Go The Ferns! Aotearoa Women’s Sports Teams in the Spotlight


With the Black Ferns currently playing in the Rugby World Cup, and the Football Ferns soon to kick off in the 2023 Fifa Women’s Football World Cup, we thought we’d train the spotlight onto our amazing NZ female sports teams that are shining bright and creating sporting history! You’ll also notice a trend with the naming of our national women’s teams – most names incorporate a variation of the silver fern – an emblem that has become synonymous with New Zealand athletes and sports teams.

The Black Ferns – New Zealand women’s rugby team

New Zealand women's national rugby union team - Wikipedia

New Zealand women’s national rugby union team logo

The Black Ferns are New Zealand’s senior women’s rugby team and have a world ranking of #2 with World Cup titles in 1998, 2002 2006, 2010 and 2017; and they will be playing in the Finals of World Cup as I type! The Black Ferns became the first women’s team to ever be named the World Rugby Team of the Year in 2019.

[NOTE: The Black Ferns and All Blacks play Rugby Union, which is a slightly different game to Rugby League.The NZ women’s Rugby League team is called the Kiwi Ferns]

Rugby World Cup 2021 – There’s a heap of firsts at this tournament.

This is the first time the women’s version of the Rugby World Cup will be played in New Zealand, and in the Southern Hemisphere. And it’s the first World Cup tournament to go ahead since the Covid-19 pandemic began (this event was delayed a year, and why it’s still called RWC2021).

It’s also the first time it won’t be called the Women’s Rugby World Cup. Just the Rugby World Cup – the same name as the men’s tournament.

It’s also the first time poi are handed out free to everyone attending the games – part of the Wā Poi (It’s Poi Time) movement to get the crowd twirling poi to support the teams.

The Football Ferns – New Zealand women’s football team

NZ Football - HOME

NZ Football logo

The New Zealand women’s national football team,  the Football Ferns, is governed by New Zealand Football (NZF). The New Zealand national team qualified for the 2007 FIFA Women’s World Cup, held in China in September 2007. This was their first World Cup in 16 years, and the second since their 1975 debut in international competition. Because  New Zealand is co-host the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup alongside Australia, the Football Ferns automatically qualify as co-host.

The Silver Ferns – New Zealand women’s netball team

New Zealand national netball team - Wikipedia

New Zealand national netball team logo

The Silver Ferns have won the Netball World Cup five times (in 1967, 1979, 1987, 2003 and 2019), and have won the netball gold medal at the Commonwealth Games twice (in 2006 and 2010).

Netball has been played in New Zealand since 1906. It is the most popular female sport in New Zealand. It was originally called women’s basketball and was played outside on grass courts. Players wore full-length skirts, hats, blouses and shoes. The net was a basket, closed at one end, so the referee had to clamber up and retrieve the ball after each goal! It was not until 1970 that the sport became officially known as netball in New Zealand. Today’s netball is fast-paced, physical and usually played on asphalt or indoor courts.

Even now, it is changing fast, with Fast5 Netball World Series taking place in Christchurch in November 2022. Fast5 is a variation of netball using only five players (regular netball has seven players a side) and features shortened games and goals worth multiple points.

The White Ferns – New Zealand women’s cricket team

New Zealand women's national cricket team - Wikipedia

New Zealand women’s national cricket team logo

The NZ women’s cricket team make its test cricket debut in 1935 against England.  In 1973 the first Women’s Cricket World Cup took place. The White Ferns are one of only three teams (NZ, England and Australia) to have participated in all ten editions of this tournament, winning in 2000 and making it to the finals on four occasions.

In 1992 The national women’s team was named the White Ferns at the same time as the men became the Blackcaps.

The Tall Ferns – New Zealand women’s basketball team

See the source image

New Zealand women’s national basketball team logo

Both national sides (the Tall Ferns – women, and the Tall Blacks – men) made their Olympic debuts in 2000 at Sydney. And both teams won silver medals in the 2006 Commonwealth Games. The Tall Ferns then qualified for their third successive Olympics in 2008 at Beijing, but didn’t qualify for the 2016 and 2020 Olympics (which were held in Tokyo in 2021).

The Black Sticks – New Zealand women’s hockey team

See the source image

New Zealand Black Sticks Hockey team logo

Modern hockey emerged in England in the second half of the 19th century. Women played hockey from the 1880s, with a women’s inter-provincial match held in 1899. Hockey was the first team sport played at international level by New Zealand women, who competed against a touring English women’s team in 1914. From the 2000s both the national men’s and women’s teams are known as the Black Sticks.


Get your game-face on and check out these books about some of the world’s amazing women athletes and the sport they play:

Stacey Waaka : world champion rugby player / Riley, David
“Follows Stacey’s journey from Ruatoki to the rugby stadiums of the world. Read about some of the many challenges she’s been through, including a terrifying bus crash, and how she overcame them. Find out how her faith, family, friends, coaches, teachers and culture have guided and powered her to aim high in life”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Netball / Gifford, Clive
“Build your netball skills with the Sports Academy series. Looking to take up a new sport? Or just thinking about ways to keep fit and healthy? This book is a great introduction to all the important netball skills you’ll need. Full of skills tips and illustrations showing key techniques, you’ll discover everything- from offence to defence. The series Sports Academy covers rules, equipment and major competitions through specially commissioned, step-by-step illustrations that clearly shows skills and techniques needed for a sport.” (Catalogue)

The ultimate guide to women’s football / Thorpe, Yvonne
“Dip into this fun, fact-packed book to discover the best of women’s football, from the world’s top leagues, players and competitions to awe-inspiring goals, dazzling skills and memorable celebrations. Football is fast becoming the top participation sport for women in the UK, with almost three million active players. With the next Women’s World Cup just around the corner in June 2019, The Ultimate Guide to Women’s Football offers young readers a great way into the game and provides practical advice on how they can start playing the beautiful game themselves. A perfect read for football fans aged 8 and up.” (Catalogue)

She shoots, she scores / Clarke, Catriona
“She Shoots, She Scores! tells the empowering story of how women’s football has become one of the fastest-growing sports in the world.  Young football fans will discover how the early female players overcame prejudice to set up their own teams, and read the compelling stories of players who beat the odds to become famous around the world” (Catalogue, abridged)

Hockey / Dufresne, Emilie
“From running to rugby, it’s time to get sporty. Pick a side, lace up your trainers and jump in! these informative titles will tell you everything you need to know to get into sports. Know the rules, learn the lingo and get kitted up. Check out your sporting girl heroes in the player profile, and learn what favourite sport is doing to your body. Tackle rugby, swing into tennis or make a splash in swimming — whether you’re a fierce footballer, speedy sprinter or a brilliant basketball player, we want to be on your team! Go girls!” (Catalogue)

The warm sun on my face : the story of women’s cricket in New Zealand / Auger, Trevor
“It is the story of a game played for the sheer love of it, and of the hard work of the dedicated souls who built and sustained women’s cricket, often in the face of challenge and adversity. ” (Catalogue, abridged)

Top basketball tips / Rissman, Rebecca
“Swish! Every basketball player dreams of the perfect shot. Look inside to learn mechanics and tips to take your game to the next level.” (Catalogue)

Rising above. Inspiring women in sports / Zuckerman, Gregory
“Behold the power of women! These are the inspirational real-life stories of female superstar athletes Serena and Venus Williams, Simone Biles, Carli Lloyd, and more — role models all. For sports fans, aspiring athletes and readers of sports biographies. The athletes featured in this book met earth-shaking challenges head on, and through hard work and perseverance, went on to conquer the sports world. This collection of mini biographies, complete with first-hand content drawn from interviews, is a source of inspiration and self-empowerment for kids and sports fans of all ages. ” (Catalogue, abridged)

Women in sports : 50 fearless athletes who played to win / Ignotofsky, Rachel
“Illustrated profiles of fifty pioneering female athletes, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Women in Science. A charmingly illustrated and inspiring book, Women in Sports highlights the achievements and stories of fifty notable women athletes–from well-known figures like tennis player Billie Jean King and gymnast Simone Biles, to lesser-known athletes like skateboarding pioneer Patti McGee and Toni Stone, the first woman to play baseball in a men’s professional league. Covering more than forty sports, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about notable women’s teams throughout history, pay and media statistics for female athletes, and muscle anatomy. Women in Sports celebrates the success of the tough, bold, and fearless women who paved the way for the next generation of athletes” (Catalogue)

The Universe from Beginning to End

With our Wellington City Library holiday focus and activities on Our Place in Space, we thought it’d be fun to explore some amazing facts and figures about our wonderful universe. Be prepared for some mind-blowing ideas as we take a big picture look at what’s out there.

What is the Universe?

The universe is…well…everything. Every star, galaxy, planet, and all of space down to the smallest cell and atom. We don’t know how big the universe is – it may go on forever, but we don’t know if it does! The farthest we can see is around 13 billion light years away. Everything within this distance is called the observable universe. As far as scientists can tell,  space spreads out infinitely in all directions. By observing the known universe, scientists conclude that galaxies fill all of the space throughout the entire universe, and our little corner where the Milky Way Galaxy sits, appears to be no different from any other corner!

The Big Bang – the start (and end) of it all

Most scientists today believe that the universe was created about 13.8 billion years ago by a massive explosion. Matter, space and time all began at this moment. This is called the Big Bang Theory. Straight after the Big Bang, the universe expanded incredibly quickly, doubling in size about 100 times a second! The universe continues to expand even today, but what will happen billions of years into the future? There are three main ideas about how the universe will end:

The Big Crunch theory: According to this theory, the universe will at some time reach its maximum size. It will then start to get smaller and smaller, eventually collapsing into the biggest-ever black hole.

The Big Freeze theory: This theory suggests that the universe will keep expanding forever. This theory has its problems though – as everything is s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d further apart, all of its heat will be spread out thinly across space. In the end nothing will remain warm in a dark and very cold universe! Brrrrr!

The Big Rip theory: According to this theory, everything in the universe will keep expanding until it is eventually ripped apart with all matter destroyed.

Want to blow your mind with more space facts?

To look up space books in the library, go to the children’s non-fiction section and look under the Dewey number 520

Space number crunch! : the figures, facts and space stats you need to know / Pettman, Kevin
“Space Number Crunch! is a snappily written, fact-packed overview of the world of space, bursting with colourful, punchy data graphics and high-impact artworks. It’s guaranteed to contain all the essential info that space fans aged 8 and up need to know. Each piece of data is based around a number, creating an entire book of easy-to-digest information that will hook the most reluctant of readers. Includes features on the Big Bang, Mission to Mars, the Hubble Telescope and each of the extraordinary planets in our solar system.” (Catalogue)

Space record breakers / Rooney, Anne
“Space is mind-boggling. Time is measured in billions of years, and distances in trillions of kilometres. Space Record Breakers takes all this wonder and packages it in digestible, factual form, focusing half on the natural wonders of space and half on the history (and future) of humankind’s exploration. Which is the biggest known planet? What’s the hottest star? Who’s the most intrepid astronaut?Presents information on outer space and human space exploration, including the planet with the most moons, the first woman in space, and the closest star to the solar system.” (Catalogue)

Super cool space facts : a fun, fact-filled space book for kids / Betts, Bruce
“Take an exciting, fact-filled journey that goes where all great space books for kids should – to our solar system and beyond! Super Cool Space Facts is bursting with info about stormy planets, exploding stars, weird black holes, amazing landers, and more. Launch into learning with awesome and easy-to-digest facts about everything from asteroids hurtling through space to astronauts on the International Space Station.  Fill your outer space adventure with the jokes, big word alerts, and fascinating mysteries of the universe all space books for kids should have. See how cool space is with incredible pictures of stars, galaxies, planets, constellations, and more.” (Catalogue, abridged)

Super space encyclopedia / Gifford, Clive
“Bursting with fascinating facts and the latest breathtaking images, this space book for children brings the wonders of the Solar System to life. Find out about the never-ending storms on Jupiter. Learn about the towering volcanoes of Venus — all 1,600 of them, and see the Valles Marineris on Mars — a canyon that is ten times longer than Earth’s Grand Canyon. Find out many more fascinating “super” facts about the cosmos with Super Space Encyclopedia. Based on recent research and discoveries, Super Space Encyclopedia showcases everything you need to know about the Universe — from the Big Bang to the formation of galaxies and planets as well as the technology used to explore it unimaginable depths. Fabulous cutaway artworks help to reveal the inner workings of the Sun, planets, and spacecraft.” (Catalogue)

50 things you should know about space / Prinja, Raman
“What exactly goes on at the International Space Station and why does the Earth spin? Just how big is our galaxy and how did the Moon form? From constellations to space shuttles, Space is as endlessly fascinating as the Universe itself. Discover everything you ever wanted to know about space missions, colliding galaxies, light years, solar eclipses, the surface of the Sun and much, much more in this exciting title. Packed with facts and figures, you’ll also find out about astronomers, astronauts and scientists and how their incredible jobs have enabled us to learn so much about our Universe.” (Catalogue)

Your place in the universe / Chin, Jason
“A non-fiction introduction to the massive scale of the known universe” (Catalogue)

Exoplanets / Simon, Seymour
“Introduces exoplanets, examining the planets outside of our solar system, discussing what makes them habitable, and exploring the efforts to discover new life.” (Catalogue)

Germs: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Microscope | Free SVGA germ is a common term for a tiny organism (so tiny that you can only see it through a microscope) that causes a disease in a plant or animal. The term ‘germ’ is a catch-all word for several different kinds of organisms including bacteria, viruses, protozoans and fungi. Check out Encyclopaedia Britannica online for loads more info on these amazing (and sometimes deadly) little beings: Encyclopaedia Britannica | Germs

Covid-19 is a germ called a virus.

Probably the most well-known and infamous germ of modern times is the germ that causes Covid-19! For the past two years, the world has been living with a global pandemic because of Covid-19.

The Covid-19 germ is a virus called a coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that affect animals. Occasionally, coronaviruses have been known to move from animals to humans. The coronavirus we’re talking about today is a new virus, which has caused COVID-19.

On its own, a virus, like coronavirus, is lifeless. However, it becomes active when it infects, or enters, a cell of an animal or a plant. Once inside a cell, a virus can reproduce itself, like living things can.

How can we stop ourselves getting sick?

There will always be times in your life when you get sick – you can’t avoid it! But there are some simple things you can do every day to help you stay healthy and prepare you body to fight the germs:

  1. Eat healthily, with loads of fruit and vegetables, so that you build and maintain a healthy immune system. Your immune system will help you fight off the germs that want to get into your body.
  2. Wash your hands regularly, using soap and water – especially after using the bathroom and before you eat.
  3. Don’t spread the germs amongst your friends by going out when you’re sick, and cough and sneeze into your elbow so that the germs stay off your hands.
  4. If you feel really sick, you should go to your doctor and follow their advice.

Good germs vs. bad germs

Not all germs are bad. Some types of bacteria actually help people’s bodies stay healthy. There are good bacteria that live inside your intestines that help you digest your food so that all the nutrients get to the places they need to get to. Other good bacteria are used to make medicines that fight sicknesses.

Sir Alexander Fleming, Frs, the Discoverer of Penicillin Art.IWMARTLD4217 - PICRYL Public Domain Image

Sir Alexander Fleming working in his lab. Image: Public domain

Did you know? The first anti-bacterial medicine, or antibiotic, was discovered by mistake by a Scottish bacteriologist called Alexander Fleming in 1928. Penicillin was named after the green mould called Pennicilium notatum which had contaminated dishes in Dr Fleming’s lab while he was on holiday. When he got back he found that the penicillin was killing the bacteria he’d been growing! Find out more about Dr. Fleming by borrowing his biography from the library.

Want to do more germ research online?

Any Questions | Epidemics

20 Interesting Activities to Teach Kids about Germs

Awesome 8 Things Living On, In, and With You

Fun Science and Tech for Kids | Biology

Biology for Kids


Want to do more germ research in the library?

The giant book of germs / Hendry, Lorna
“How many germs live on your hand? How do germs make you sick? Do the germs in your gut really keep you healthy? Discover many more surprising facts in The Giant Book of Germs!” (Catalogue)

It’s catching : the infectious world of germs and microbes / Gardy, Jennifer
“Presents general information about different types of germs, as well as the diseases they cause, and how people work to prevent them from spreading.” (Catalogue)

Dirty Bertie : germs / MacDonald, Alan
“Join Bertie as he attempts to catch sister Suzy’s horrible illness, finds himself partnering Gran at a dancing competition and meets his match in the new babysitter who’s even grubbier than he is!” (Catalogue)

Little bunny, big germs / Wells, Rosemary
“Saying nope to soap, little bunny soon learns the importance of protecting himself and others from germs when he catches a cold and is sent home from school.” (Catalogue)

Dr. Dog / Cole, Babette
“Common sense advice with some good rude fun. Both pet and personal physician to the Gumboyle family, Doctor Dog is always on hand with the perfect diagnosis and remedy for every complaint.” (Catalogue)

Wash your hands / McNamara, Margaret
“When everyone in Ms. Connor’s first grade class has a cold, she shows her students how to wash their hands to get rid of germs.” (Catalogue)

Alexander Fleming / Tames, Richard
“Describes the life of Alexander Fleming, his bacteriological research and the importance of the discovery of penicillin.” (Catalogue)

Keep it clean: germ free / Minden, Cecilia
“Level 1 guided reader that teaches students how to prevent the spread of germs by washing hands and the importance of cleanup.” (Catalogue)

What are germs? / Daynes, Katie
“What are germs? How do they spread? And how do medicines help? Curious young children can take a closer look at those mischievous, microscopic bacteria and viruses in this fascinating introduction to germs and hygiene, with 30 flaps to lift and tips on hand-washing and staying healthy.” (Catalogue)

Uike Kātoanga’i ‘o e lea faka-Tonga: Tonga Language week 2022

Tonga Language Week Poster. Tongan girl in traditional dress

Mālō e lelei!

We are excited to tell you this week is Uike Kātoanga’i ‘o e lea faka-Tonga, Tonga Language Week, from Sunday 4th September to Saturday 10th September.

This year, the theme is Ke Tu’uloa ‘a e lea faka-Tönga ‘i Aotearoa, Sustaining the Tonga Language in Aotearoa.

A series of activities and events will be running for the whole week. To find out more click the button below:

https://www.mpp.govt.nz/programmes/pacific-language-weeks/tonga-language-week/

About Tonga

The Kingdom of Tonga has more than 170 islands! Some of the islands are the peaks of undersea volcanoes! Other Tongan islands are atolls, or islands in which coral reefs surround a shallow pool of water. Only 36 of the islands have people living on them.

The population in Tonga is around 100,000 people, 70% of whom reside on the main island, Tongatapu.

The islands are divided into three main groups: Tongatapu in the south, Ha‘apai in the center, and Vava‘u in the north. There are also isolated islands in the far north (the Niuas island group) and in the far south (‘Ata).

There are two official languages, Tonga and English.

The distance between New Zealand and Tonga is around 2,382km and it takes about three and a half hours to fly there.

At the 2018 census, 82,389 people living in Aotearoa NZ identified themselves as being part of the Tongan ethnic group.  Head over to Te Ara Encyclopedia to learn more about Tonga identities and cultural contributions in Aotearoa!

Basic Tonga Greetings

Mālō e lelei – Greetings / Hello

Mālō e lelei – Greetings Everyone

‘Okú ke fēfē hake? – How are you (singular)?

‘Oku ou sai pē, mālō – I am fine, thank you


New FREE Tonga Language Learning App 

Check out this new app ‘MA’AU: Learn through Bathtime’. You can learn Tonga, Gāgāna Sāmoa and Fijian languages. There are songs, quizzes and colouring!

Picture of tongan boy with soap bubbles and the word bathtime above

Learning Tongan Language through bathtime

If you want to learn more about them you can visit their website. https://maau.co.nz/

You can also read the book; Learning Tongan through bathtime.


Books

Visit your local library and have a look at our amazing books to learn more about Tonga cultures and practice the language in the  Tonga collection for kids. All our branch libraries have children’s collections in Tonga language.

If you don’t have a library card, you can sign up for free!

Rise of the To’a / Tatafu, ‘Alisi
“Describes the culture behind the Tongan national rugby league team, Kau To’a, Mate Ma’a Tonga, MMT, and features profiles on each of the players. Also tells the fictional story of Toko, who overcomes his fears and grows in self confidence.” (Catalogue)

 


How Tonga got its name = Ko e founga hono ma’u ‘e Tonga ‘a hono hingoa / Riley, David
“Maui threw his line and hook into the ocean. He felt the hook catch onto something huge and heavy. “Wow, it’s beautiful!” Maui said. What amazing sight did Maui see in the ocean that day?” (Catalogue)

 


Fish for mufti day : a story from the Islands of Tonga / MacGregor, Jill
“To raise money for the Mufti Day donation Siokatame and his friends collect seafood and sell it to people in their village.” (Catalogue)
The Secret Cave by David RileyThe secret cave = Koe ‘ana fakapulipulí / Riley, David
“Naua was an expert fisherman who found an underwater cave. Naua had a feeling his cave would be helpful one day. And so it did. Find out what happened in The Secret Cave – Koe ‘Ana Fakapulupuli, a Tongan legend retold by David Riley”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

Of Course You Can! Io Te' Ke Lava

Of course you can! = ‘Io te′ ke lava / Hinge, Karen
“Jeremy is starting at a new school. He’s not too sure about how he will fit in. But the other students make him welcome and every time he thinks he can’t do something they say … “Of course you can!” That is until the day they go to the swimming pool.”–Back cover” (Catalogue)

That’s a wrap! Let’s enjoy the Tonga Language Week 2022 together! Mālō ‘aupito.

Puzzle Paradise: The Fun and Science of Problem Solving

via GIPHY

Do you like any/all of the following:

  • Problem solving
  • Maths
  • Reading
  • Art
  • Patterns
  • Shapes

Then it sounds like you like doing puzzles! Puzzles can come in a variety of shapes and sizes and they are often toys that we’ve played with since we were babies. If you think of blocks, Lego, Rubik’s cubes, picture puzzles, jigsaws, card games, Jenga, tangrams, sudoku – they’re all puzzles that need to be solved, and in doing so your brain is getting loads of exercise!


What happens to your brain when you do a puzzle?

Mental health icon vector clip art | Free SVGYour brain thinks you’re hunting! Puzzles play with words, numbers, shapes, and logic which makes us want to uncover the solutions that they hide. It’s like reading a Whodunnit – our brain is constantly trying to work out why. It is the ‘hunt’ itself that stimulates the areas of your brain that involves discovery.

You’ll get a whole brain workout: Puzzles activate both the left and right hemispheres of the brain which includes imagination, reasoning and memory.

You get a rush of pleasure when you solve the puzzle! That feel-good moment when you finally figure out that last clue or place the missing piece? That comes thanks to a rush of dopamine in your nucleus accumbens, the area of the brain responsible for rewards.


Who invented…?

Jigsaw puzzle in different colors | Public domain vectorsJigsaw Puzzles: The first jigsaw puzzle was created by a map engraver called John Spilsbury, in 1762. He mounted one of his master maps onto wood and then cut around the countries. He gave it to children in the local school to help them with their geography education. Learn more about the history of jigsaw puzzles on Britannica Online: Encyclopaedia Britannica | Jigsaw Puzzles

File:Rubik's cube scrambled.svg - Wikimedia CommonsRubik’s Cubes: In 1974, a young Hungarian architect named Ernő Rubik became obsessed with finding a way to model three-dimensional movement to his students. After spending months experimenting with blocks made from wood and paper, held by rubber bands, glue, and paper clips, he finally created something he called the “Bűvös kocka,” or Magic Cube. Learn more about the Rubik’s Cube on Britannica Online: Encyclopaedia Britannica | Rubik’s Cube

tangram | Free SVGTangrams: Invented in China approximately 200 years ago, a tangram is a re-arrangement puzzle created by cutting a square into seven geometric shapes called “tans”.


Online brain teasers to get you started

Stuff Kids’ General Knowledge Quizzes

CBC Kids Games and Puzzles

Jigsaw Puzzles for Kids

Safe Kids’ Games


Puzzle Books for everyone

Usborne Young Puzzle Book series: This is a great series of puzzle books aimed at ages 4+. There are many different stories and scenarios to choose from. For example:

Puzzle mountain / Leigh, Susannah
“A fantastic new padded hardback edition of this exciting, fun adventure, which challenges young children to answer a puzzle on every double page. Brightly coloured, detailed illustrations in a cartoon style, along with plenty of maps, guides and things to spot, help children become engrossed in the absorbing adventure story.” (Catalogue)

More picture puzzle books:

I spy A to Z : a book of picture riddles / Wick, Walter
“Easy-to-read riddles by Jean Marzollo are paired with 46 object-filled photographs by Walter Wick to create the most engaging alphabet book ever! Young readers can use the simple picture clues to recognize the letter and letter sound featured on each page. There are more than 30 million I Spy books in print!” (Catalogue)

Around the world in 80 puzzles / Artymowska, Aleksandra
“We are going around the world! Take yourself on a fantastical journey packed with puzzles to unpick and meandering mazes to wander through. There are 80 challenges to complete. Can you solve them all?” (Catalogue)

The looky book / Bixley, Donovan
“Presents a series of picture puzzles with a New Zealand theme in which the reader is invited to find a variety of objects.” (Catalogue)

Where’s Wally series: Fun fact: “Where’s Wally” is called “Where’s Waldo” in North America!

Where’s Wally / Handford, Martin
“Detailed pictures for the readers to find Wally in, plus other tasks to do on each page, under the flaps. Open the flaps and frantically find extra things that have never been seen or searched for before.” (Catalogue)

Master-mind : over 100 games, tests, and puzzles to unleash your inner genuis / Drimmer, Stephanie Warren
“An introduction to the human brain uses quizzes, trivia, and puzzles to explore the different functions of the brain, how to improve brain power, and why each brain is unique.” (Catalogue)

The everything kids’ dinosaurs book stomp, crash, and thrash through hours of puzzles, games and activities / Wagner, Kathi
“A collection of puzzles, games, and activities about dinosaurs that describes how to become a palaeontologist, what the earth looked like during the time of dinosaurs, and other reptiles and birds that coexisted with dinosaurs.” (Catalogue)

Math games lab for kids : 24 fun, hands-on activities for learning with shapes, puzzles, and games / Rapoport, Rebecca
“Math is the foundation of all sciences and key to understanding the world around us. Math Games Lab for Kids shares more than 50 hands-on activities that make learning about math fun by drawing and building shapes, solving puzzles, and playing games.” (Catalogue, abridged)

The 5 minute brain workout for kids : 365 amazing, fabulous, and fun word puzzles / Chamberlain, Kim
“With ten levels of puzzles–ranging from easiest to most challenging–and an answer key at the end to check your work, this book is sure to help keep your brain active and will help increase your understanding of and love for all kinds of words!” (Catalogue)

Gadgets away : 100 great games to play / Jennison, Fiona
“Technology has become the too-easy way to entertain ourselves and our children. This easy-to-use, imaginative book has everything. There’s plenty of fun here to keep your family laughing: Sporty games and playground classics Activities for indoors, gardens, parks and beaches Memory and travel games, brain teasers and magic tricks.” (Catalogue)

How to solve the Rubik’s Cube
“The Rubik’s Cube is the world’s best-known puzzle, a magical object that has baffled and fascinated the world for more than forty years. This clearly-illustrated step-by-step guide teaches you a foolproof beginners’ method for solving the Cube, plus advanced techniques if you want to learn to solve it in seconds.” (Catalogue)

Railways, Trains and Destinations

This week is National Rail Safety week in both New Zealand and Australia (8 – 14 August 2022).

TrackSAFE Foundation NZ is promoting a superstition that might help keep pedestrians safe at railway crossings:

A superstition we're on board with | KiwiRail

We hope that by “Blowing to the left and right” near railway tracks will be the magic you need to keep you and your friends safe!


James, the red engine, from the Thomas the Tank Engine stories by Rev. W Awdry. Image: Jamie Boorman

Trains, and going on train journeys, have always had a magical quality to them. So many books have been written about trains or with a train journey as a central part of the book – think “Thomas the Tank Engine”,  “The Railway Children”, or the Hogwarts Train in the Harry Potter series. Trains can clatter over high bridges, run underground through long tunnels and can even go at lightning speeds on high-tech electromagnetic tracks.

Train FAQ

What is a Train Spotter?

A Train Spotter is a rail enthusiast that really likes watching trains! They will often write down the numbers of passing trains as a hobby and compare their notes with other enthusiasts. A Train Spotter can also be called A railfan, rail buff or train buff, railway enthusiast or railway buff… or ferroequinologist!

What’s the largest model railway in New Zealand?

The Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT) has a Main Trunk Line model railway that’s a must see if you’re visiting Auckland. The model showcases the history and engineering feats of the North Island Main Trunk Line; including the Hapuawhenua Viaduct and the twisting Raurimu Spiral. Watch this You Tube clip to see this amazing model in action and learn about the NZ’s incredible railway history.


What is the fastest train in the world?

File:Shanghai maglev train.jpg - Wikimedia CommonsThe fastest train in the world is  Shanghai Maglev. It is a magnetic levitation train (maglev) that operates in the city of Shanghai, China. This 504-foot-long train can fit 574 passengers and roars to life over the tracks at a top speed of 431 km/h – wow!

Can trains crash?

undefinedYes! But they are still considered to be one of the safer forms of transport, ahead of car and motorbike travel. New Zealand’s worst train disaster was the Tangiwai Disaster. At 10.21 p.m. on Christmas Eve 1953 the Wellington–Auckland night express plunged into the flooded Whangaehu River at Tangiwai, in the central North Island, after a lahar from Mt Ruapehua washed away Tangiwai Bridge. Of the 285 passengers and crew on board, 151 died.

New Zealand author David Hill has written a historical novel exploring the environmental tragedy from the perspective of a young person, check it out here.



Let’s take a train journey through the Wellington City Libraries Catalogue:

Trains / Jenner, Elizabeth
“Explore the wonder of the railway and see how train travel has developed through time. Trains are used across the world to transport goods and passengers. They can ride rails underground, move at high-speeds and travel between countries. In this book, you will discover the wonder of the railway and see how train travel has developed through history- from simple mining wagons to high-speed machines and beyond.” (Catalogue)

Thomas the Tank Engine : the complete collection / Awdry, W
“This volume brings together all 26 books from the classic Railway series in one volume, with a foreword by the author. The stories are brought to life with the original illustrations, beautifully restored and reproduced.” (Catalogue)
The railway children / Nesbit, E.
“Family! Friendship! Adventure! Mystery! Roberta, Peter, and Phyllis have their lives turned upside down when their father mysteriously has to go away. The railway becomes the centre of their new life, but little do they know what wonders and changes it will bring to them – maybe even the answer to Father’s disappearance …Oxford Children’s Classics present not only the original and unabridged story of The Railway Children in a beautiful new edition, but also help you to discover a whole world of new adventures with a vast assortment of recommendations and activities. Ages 7+” (Catalogue)


Two little trains / Brown, Margaret Wise
“Two little trains head west, travelling through hills and mountains and over rivers and plains.” (Catalogue)
How trains work / Gifford, Clive
“From the fastest to the longest, the oldest to the newest, through tunnels and up mountains, take a fascinating ride through the world of trains in this brilliant new book from illustrator James Gulliver Hancock.” (Catalogue)

Skimbleshanks / Eliot, T. S.
“We must find him or the train can’t start! All aboard as Skimbleshanks, the Railway Cat, stars in the third picture-book pairing from Arthur Robins and T.S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s cats, set on the Night Mail train where Skimble won’t let anything go wrong.” (Catalogue)
Train / Demarest, Chris L
“The amazing sights of a train ride through the countryside whiz by in this deceptively simple rhyming book. Little listeners will be mesmerized by this rhythmic, rhyming ride-perfect reading for kids on a roll!” (Catalogue)
Night train, night train / Burleigh, Robert
“Told in rhyming text, a train speeds through the night, revealing the sights and colors along the way to its young and sleepy riders.” (Catalogue)
The space train / Powell-Tuck, Maudie
“Jakob has found the long-lost SPACE TRAIN! But it’s old, battered and broken. With the help of Granny and Derek the robot chicken, can Jakob fix the train? A stunning intergalactic adventure, packed with fun flaps and out-of-this world illustrations.” (Catalogue, abridged)
Where’s Thomas? : a Sodor search-and-find adventure
“Sodor is a busy, bustling place with plenty of things for a team of Very Useful Engines to do. Join Thomas and all of his friends as they travel all across the Island and see how many hidden things you can find on each colourful page!” (Catalogue)

Puppets & Puppeteers

via GIPHY

With puppets and puppetry featuring in our Beyond the Page Festival July holiday activities, we thought we’d explore all things PUPPET!

A puppet is a ‘moving doll’. They are often used in theatre performances, kids’ TV shows and films and often use strings or other devices to make the puppet move and look alive. Some puppets are very simple (like sock puppets), but others are more complicated and need lots of practise to use. The person who works the puppet and makes it move is called a puppeteer.

Simple Puppets that you can make at home

FPin on Paper Dollsinger Puppet: As the name suggests, you simply pop the puppet over your finger/s and get wiggling! Another form of finger puppet is the two-finger puppet that has holes for two fingers which act as the puppet legs.

Sock puppet: Find an old sock and glue funny eyes and noses onto the foot of the sock. Then wear it like a glove with the thump acting like a jaw.

Glove Puppet: Similar to a finger puppet, but larger. The puppeteer uses his or her fingers and hand to work the puppet.

Paddle Puppet: The puppet is on the end of a cardboard or wooden paddle, or is even the paddle itself. When the puppeteer wiggles the paddle back and forth, it seem that the puppet moves by itself.

Complicated Puppets

Jumping Jack: A puppet where the arms and legs of the puppet are joined to a string. When the string is pulled down, the arms and legs go up.

Rod Puppet and Bunraku: The puppet is worked with rods joined to the puppets arms and legs, while another puppeteer moves the head and sometimes the mouth. Bunraku is a special type of Japanese rod puppetry.

Make a Shadow Puppet Theatre Book – Stories In Paper | Shadow puppets, Shadow theatre, Puppets

Shadow Puppet Theatre. Image: Pinterest.com

Shadow Puppet:  A cut out figure on a rod is held in front of a light. Its shadow is projected onto a screen. The puppeteer moves the puppet around, giving it some life.

Marionette: This puppet is moved around with strings that hang from above the theatre. This is one of the more complex types of puppetry and is hard to master as some marionettes can have up to thirty strings.

Ventriloquist Figure or Dummy: This puppet is one of the few where the audience sees the puppeteer. The puppeteer moves the puppets head arms and mouth with his hands as well as with levers. The performance usually takes the shape of a conversation between the dummy and the puppeteer. The puppeteer speaks normally, then puts on a different voice when the puppet is supposed to be talking. His voice seems to be coming from his stomach (from the old Latin word: “venter”). His lips are not moving, but the puppet’s lips may move, so it seems as if the puppet is talking.


Jim Henson and the Muppets

Jim Henson's Legacy: A "Rainbow Connection" with UMD | Flickr

Jim Henson with the Muppets. Image: Flickr

Jim Henson (1936 – 1990) ) was one of the most well-known and innovative modern puppeteers. He is the creator of the Muppets – think Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, Cookie Monster, and Elmo.  He made up the word Muppets as a blend of “marionette” (see above) and “puppet” and created the Muppets while still a student at university. The Jim Henson Museum is in his hometown of Leland, Mississippi and has an assortment of original Muppet characters on display. One of the bridges in Leland is also named “The Rainbow Connection” after the popular song from the 1979 film The Muppet Movie.




Check out the catalogue and get making and performing with puppets these holidays!

Puppets / D’Cruz, Anna-Marie
“An exciting collection of step-by-projects that readers can do at home on their own or in the classroom.” (Catalogue)

Sock Puppet Theater presents The three little pigs : a make and play production / Harbo, Christopher L
“Hear ye! Hear ye! Sock Puppet Theater Presents The Three Little Pigs! Now it’s a snap to make simple, adorable puppets, key props, and the perfect stage for bringing this classic fairy tale to life. But that’s not all! As an added bonus, this book also includes a fun starter script, helpful acting and performance tips, and clever suggestions for making your play truly unique. With Sock Puppet Theatre, you hold in your hands everything needed to get your puppeteer career started on the right foot!” (Catalogue)

Making shadow puppets / Bryant, Jill
“In this book in the Kids Can Do It series, kids can create traditional shadow puppets from around the world.” (Catalogue)

The most excellent book of how to be a puppeteer / Lade, Roger
“Tap students hidden talents with these clever books filled with step-by-step instructions for entertaining friends and family at home or at school.” (Catalogue)

Recycling things to make and do / Bone, Emily
“Provides step-by-step instructions for a range of craft activities using recycled materials. Suggested level: primary, intermediate.” (Catalogue)

I am Jim Henson / Meltzer, Brad
“Presents the creator of the Muppets and describes the creative spirit, performance talents and beliefs in the goodness of people that inspired his career and how he helped create the iconic programs Sesame Street and The Muppet Show.” (Catalogue)

The Muppets character encyclopedia / Shemin, Craig
“The most sensational, inspirational, muppetational character encyclopaedia ever! Play the music, light the lights, and meet all your favourite characters from the Muppets in The Muppets Character Encyclopaedia. From Animal to Zoot, meet over 200 of the most memorable and best-loved Muppet characters from the 1970s to the present day. […] The Muppets Character Encyclopaedia is a must-have for new fans eager for background on their new favourite Muppets as well as older fans wanting to relive the original TV series.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Mānawatia a Matariki!

“Mānawa maiea te putanga o Matariki
Mānawa maiea te ariki o te Rangi
Mānawa maiea te mātahi o te tau

Celebrate the rising of Matariki
Celebrate the rising of the lord of the sky
Celebrate the rising of the New Year

For the first time in Aotearoa, Matariki will officially be celebrated as a rā whakatā ā-ture (public holiday) on Friday 24 June 2022.

It is an opportunity for all people of Aotearoa to come together and reflect on the year that has passed, celebrate the present, and plan for the future.”(Mānawatia a Matariki)

In Aotearoa, the Matariki star cluster can be seen for most of the year, but in May the stars set below the horizon and during June or July each year, they rise again. The rising of Matariki marks the start of the Māori new year and is a time of remembrance, peace, and celebration. Traditionally nine stars were visible. These are named individually with each star signifying an important aspect of Te Ao Māori. Tohunga (skilled experts) would observe how the stars looked in the sky and make predictions on the coming year according to their appearance.

Celebrating Puanga

Many Māori in the west of New Zealand observe the rise of Puanga about two weeks earlier than Matariki. Puanga can be seen in the eastern sky and it signals the approach of dawn as if “the sun itself is pushing it from behind”. Puanga is celebrated by our Wellington mana whenua, Te Āti Awa as well as other Taranaki Iwi, Whanganui Iwi, Ngāpuhi, Rēkohu/Wharekauri and Moriori from the Chatham Islands. “Puanga kai rau” means Puanga of abundant food and gives credit to the fruits which Puanga brings.

The Matariki cluster is known throughout the world by many names including the Pleiades star cluster. In Greek ancient mythology, the Pleiades were seven sisters. The sisters’ names were Alcyone, Celaeno, Electra, Maia, Merope, Sterope (or Asterope), and Taygete. Puanga is known by some other cultures as Rigel.


Te Iwa o Matariki (The Nine Stars of Matariki)

Matariki – signifies reflection, hope and our connection to the environment

Pōhutukawa – connects with those who have passed on

Waitī – ties to bodies of fresh water and the food within it

Waitā – ties to the ocean and the food within it

Waipuna-ā-rangi – associated with the rain

Tupuānuku – is for food that grows within the soil

Tupuārangi – is for food that grows up in the trees

Ururangi – is the star associated with the winds

Hiwa-i-te-rangi – the youngest, is the wishing star that also ties into our aspirations for the coming year


Matariki Connections

Competition for Ages 512

Matariki is a good time to reflect on our lives and the world around us, celebrate the present, and think about the future.

In this competition, discover and draw what one star connection means to you! Use the above descriptions to choose an aspect of life associated with a star, and then illsutrate what it means to you!

The competition runs from 21–30 June.

Find out about the star connections here, or on the entry form at libraries and community centres. You can enter online at wcl.govt.nz/matarikiconnections

Win some lovely pukapuka!




Hot off the press!

The Astromancer: The Rising of Matariki. / Ihimaera, Witi
“The Astromancer is looking for four new apprentices to learn about Matariki and the Maramataka calendar. She chooses three boys and an orphan girl, Aria, who will come only if she can bring her smelly dog. Aria, though, is bored by the lessons, and she doesn’t want to be told what to do. But these are dangerous times, and Ruatapu the Ravenous is about to threaten the safety of the whole tribe. Will Aria step up to save them? Also available in te reo Maori as Te Kokorangi.” (Catalogue)
Te Kokorangi: Te Aranga o Matariki. / Ihimaera, Witi
“E kimi ana a Te Kokorangi i etahi pia hou tokowha hei ako i nga korero o Matariki me te maramataka. Kowhiria ana etahi tama tokotoru, me tetahi kotiro, he pani, ko Aria te ingoa. Tohe ana a Aria kia haere ano ko tana kuri haunga i tona taha. Ka ahua hoha a Aria i nga akoranga, kaore hoki ia e pai kia tohutohungia ia. Engari kua noho morearea te iwi. Taihoa pea ratou ka tino raru i a Ruatapu Te Pukurua. Ae ranei ma Aria ano te iwi e whakaora?” (Catalogue)

Want to find out more to help you celebrate Matariki?

Mānawatia a Matariki

Matariki at Te Papa

Matariki ki Pōneke

Matariki | AnyQuestions 

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa

Matariki: Te Tau Hou Māori

Te Aka Māori Dictionary

Wellington City Libraries: Matariki

 

Ngā mihi o te tau hou Māori!

Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa 2022

Samoan Language Week Banner

Tālofa Lava! 

Sāmoa Language Week | Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa will be celebrated this year from Sunday, 29 May 2021 until Saturday, 4th June 2022. This is a chance for all New Zealanders to celebrate Sāmoan language, Sāmoan culture in New Zealand and around the world, and promote the use of Sāmoan language in schools, at work and at home.

Did you know that nearly 4% of New Zealanders are Sāmoan? That’s almost 200,000 people! Gagana Sāmoa is the 3rd most spoken language in Aotearoa, New Zealand!

Sāmoa has a unique historical relationship with New Zealand. It is the only country that New Zealand has a Treaty of Friendship. The Treaty of Friendship between Sāmoa and New Zealand is like a mutual project to support Tagata Sāmoa (Sāmoan people) to have better opportunities. Being proud of your language is such an important part of feeling proud of your culture.

This year’s theme for Vaiaso o le Gagana Samoa is:

Fa’aāuāu le Folauga i le Va’a o Tautai – Continue the Voyage with Competent Wayfinders of the Ocean.

2022 is also a significant year for the Samoan community, being the 60th anniversary of Samoa Independence. Communities are organising activities to commemorate this milestone, which coincides with Samoa Language Week.

Events for Samoa Language Week

As part of Samoa Language Week, there will be a Pasifika Pool Party! Find out more about the council events here.

Our friend the wonderful librarian Lewis from Johnsonville Library presents a special story in English and Gagana Sāmoa, How Do You Say ‘Thank You’? by Karamia Müller. Many thanks to the publisher Beatnik Publishing for allowing us to share this story!

Find Out More:

You can also visit your local library and borrow some amazing books to learn more about Samoan culture, and practice the language. All our libraries have Samoan books and Newtown Library has the biggest collection! If you don’t have a library card- you can sign up for free. If you are worried about fines- just talk to the staff, they can help.

Awesome Samoan books in our collection:

Losi the Giant fisherman : Samoan myths and legends pick a path collection / Malaeulu, Dahlia
Losi the Giant was the greatest fisherman across all the moana. A mischievous and loyal friend to sea creatures and all humans, Losi will always be remembered as the hero who brought taro, the food of the Gods’, to Earth.

Author and Publisher Dahlia Malaeulu lives in Wellington and has written and published lots of Samoan books. You can read her blog about how Losi the Giant fisherman was shaped by her son Mase who has Autism.

Available from Mila’s Books!

Also, read this really interesting article on the Spinoff!

Samoan heroes / Riley, David
“A collection of inspirational stories of achievers who have Samoan ancestry. It includes: contemporary heroes like Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, Troy Polamalu, Judge Ida Mālosi, Savage and Associate Professor Donna Adis; historical figures like Emma Coe, Tamasese, Salamāsina and Lauaki; legends like Sina, Tiʻitiʻi and Tigilau”–Back cover.” (Catalogue). Also available as an eBook.

Fanene Peter Maivia : son of Samoa / Riley, David
“Fanene Peter Maivia – Son of Samoa is the remarkable story of the first Polynesian to become a star of professional wrestling. Fanene’s life began in Samoa and he took Samoa to the world. He was a pioneer who inspired some of the greatest wrestlers the world has known, including his own grandson, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.”–Publisher’s description.” (Catalogue). Also available as an eBook.

Brush up on your geography and history with…

Samoa / Aiono-Iosefa, Sarona
“Did you know that the English word ‘tattoo’ is supposedly derived from the Samoan word ‘tatau’? Find out about the traditional methods still used by Samoans to apply the amazing tattoos worn by many of the islands’ people today. In this book you will discover that an ‘ie toga is a beautiful and intricate fine mat, woven by Samoan women and used as highly prized gifts, which are made and given to celebrate important occasions. You can also study the climate, population, social structure and political history of the thirteen islands that make up the beautiful countries of American Samoa and independent Samoa (formerly Western Samoa).” (Catalogue).

Samoa & Tuvalu / Guile, Melanie
This book contains information about the history, culture and people of Samoa and nearby Tuvalu. A great book to have just in time for Samoan Language week.
Learn some simple words and phrases

  • Tālofa lava: Hello (formal)
  • Mālō le soifua: Hello/Good health
  • ‘O ā mai ‘oe? How are you? (to one person only)
  • Manuia fa‘afetai: Good, thank you
  • Manuia le aso: Have a great day
  • Tōfā soifua: Good bye (formal)

Faʻafetai lava ma ʻia manuia tele le Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa!

Thank you and have a very blessed Sāmoan Language Week

Get in the Pink and Make Bullying a Thing of the Past!

Home - Pink Shirt Day

“On Pink Shirt Day, Friday 20 May 2022, Aotearoa will be transformed into a sea of māwhero/pink as we stand together to spread aroha, celebrate diversity and end bullying!” (Pink Shirt Day Rangitahi toolkit resource)

Pink Shirt Day began in Canada in 2007 when two students took a stand against bullying after another year 9 student was harassed on his first day at the school for wearing pink. The bullies called him names for wearing pink and threatened to beat him up.

In Aotearoa, Pink Shirt Day has been run by the Mental Health Foundation since 2012. They work to reduce the impact of bullying behaviour and the harm it causes.

“By taking part in Pink Shirt Day, you become a part of a powerful movement to celebrate diversity and end bullying.”

Bullying at school is a serious issue for New Zealand young people. We have the dubious record of having the third highest rate of school bullying out of 36 OECD countries. 

happy birthday greeting card on green and red textileWhat Can I Do?

  • Wear pink! The brighter the better. Then if someone comments on your “out there” clothing choices, you can talk to them about why you love the colour pink and what it stands for. You don’t have to limit your pink wearing to just one day of the year. Pink is a beautiful colour and stopping bullying and heightening bullying awareness is a 24/7 mission!
  • Hold a Pink Shirt Day quiz with your friends or classmates. This helps create camaraderie as well as have some fun. A Pink Quiz starter is HERE but you could make your own quiz to share.
  • Create a kindness wall or white board in your class or at your school where you and your classmates can leave positive messages of hope. Photograph them and feature in your next school newsletter.
  • Become a RAKtivist. Did you know that New Zealand also celebrates a Random Acts of Kindness day on 1 September? But you can make every day a RAK day!

Some Handy Websites

Pink Shirt Day

Mental Health Foundation

Mental Health for Kids

Bullying Free NZ


Some Wellington City Libraries Kids’ Blog Links

Wellington pride festival blog

Keep Calm and Carry on with Mindfulness blog

Become a RAKtivist blog


Some Great Reading from the WCL Catalogue

How to beat bullying at school : simple steps to put an end to bullying.
“Unfortunately, bullying is one of the biggest problems for schoolchildren, and recent technological developments have only made things worse. But there is no need to suffer in silence! The best thing you – or your child – can do is to talk about it. Although it may seem that things will never get better, there are several effective ways to deal with bullies.” (Catalogue)
Bullying / Spilsbury, Louise
“Helping children to recognise [bullying] and know what to do about it. The … series encourages children to explore their emotions and discuss topics they may find difficult to understand. There are practical tips and activities as well as advice for parents and teachers”–Publisher’s description.” (Catalogue)
Teasing isn’t funny : what to do about emotional bullying / Higgins, Melissa
“Jesse and the other animals at the bus stop make fun of Kelly’s fluffy fur and plain clothes. The constant teasing makes Kelly the cat feel sad. Young readers watch Kelly struggle with the teasing and learn safe ways to make it stop. Sensitive illustrations of gender-neutral animal characters help all children relate to the issue of emotional bullying.” (Catalogue)
You be you! : the kid’s guide to gender, sexuality, and family / Branfman, Jonathan
“You Be You! is an illustrated children’s book for ages 5 and up that makes gender identity, sexual orientation and family diversity easy to explain to children. Throughout the book kids learn that there are many kinds of people in the world and that diversity is something to be celebrated. It covers gender, romantic orientation, discrimination, intersectionality, privilege, and how to stand up for what’s right. With charming illustrations, clear explanations, and short sections that can be dipped in and out of, this book helps children think about how to create a kinder, more tolerant world.” (Catalogue)
Say something / Reynolds, Peter H.
“The world needs your voice. If you have a brilliant idea… say something! If you see an injustice… say something! In this empowering new picture book, beloved author Peter H. Reynolds explores the many ways that a single voice can make a difference. Each of us, each and every day, has the chance to say something: with our actions, our words, and our voice. Perfect for kid activists everywhere, this timely story reminds readers of the undeniable importance and power of their voice. There are so many ways to tell the world who you are… what you are thinking… and what you believe. And how you’ll make it better. The time is now: SAY SOMETHING!” (Catalogue)
Be who you are / Parr, Todd
“Picture book encouraging kids to be proud of what makes them unique, where they come from, and how they express themselves and see the world.” (Catalogue)
Be your own superhero / Meek, Laura
“A fun and practical guide of achievable micro-actions to help young readers feel more in control of their mental health, empowering them to grow their confidence and change the world for the better. Do you want someone else to help you out of a hard situation? Would you prefer another person swooped in and saved the day? I didn’t think so. You want to be a superhero. With this guide, you can. It’s full of activities to help develop your powers. It’ll teach you everything you need to know about growing your abilities, feeling happier and getting more confident. Written by child psychiatrist Dr Laura Meek, this fun and practical guide will empower young readers to become more aware of their own mental health and will help them to improve their confidence.” (Catalogue)
Wonder / Palacio, R. J
“August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school until now. He s about to enter fifth grade at Beecher Prep, and if you ve ever been the new kid, then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he s just like them, despite appearances?R. J. Palacio has crafted an uplifting novel full of wonderfully realistic family interactions, lively school scenes, and writing that shines with spare emotional power. “Wonder” is a book with such a big, wide heart it shows how we are all fragile, imperfect, and perfectly beautiful creatures. A wonderful novel by a wonder of a writer! Julia Alvarez, author of “Return to Sender,” “Before We Were Free,” “Finding Miracles,” and the Tia Lola Stories”.” (Catalogue)

Pink is for boys / Pearlman, Robb
“A celebration of how colours are for everyone depicts characters engaging in their favourite activities.” (Catalogue)
Along came a different / McLaughlin, Tom
“Reds love being red. Yellows love being yellow. And Blues love being blue. The problem is that they just don’t like each other. Maybe being different doesn’t mean you can’t be friends… But one day, along comes a different colour who likes Reds, Yellows and Blues, and suddenly everything starts to change. A very special picture book that supports the adage that there is more that unites us than divides us. Along Came a Different just goes to show how much better we can all be when we come together to find common ground as friends.” (Catalogue)
Friendships and bullying / Head, Honor
“Kids can find the world we live in daunting and a bit scary. There’s just so much going on with climate change, social media and pressures to work out what it is you want to do in life – even at this young age! This book will help young readers explore some common areas of anxiety and conflict on the topic of FRIENDSHIPS and BULLYING in a fun and gentle way.” (Catalogue)