Daylight Saving: What Is It?

time - hickory dickory dock clock | Evies hickory dickory do… | Flickr“Spring forward
“Fall backwards” 

On Sunday 4 April at 3am all the clocks in New Zealand will “fall backwards” ONE HOUR to 2am as Daylight Saving time finishes. But why do we do this strange practice? Well… to explain Daylight Saving, we first really need to understand modern time:

A brief history of time

Today we tell the time by cell phones, computers and radios, as well highly accurate clocks and watches. Time rules our lives much more than in the past. Before Europeans arrived, Māori told the time by the rising and setting of the sun, the seasons, and the phases of the moon. When settlers began arriving from Britain in the 1840s, not many could afford clocks or watches, so they used bells to ring the times for school, work and church. But each town would often have a slightly different time, which was confusing for everyone. So in 1868 the New Zealand government decided it was time to have a nationwide time for everyone to follow. We were the first country in the world to do this. We made our time 11½ hours ahead of the time set at the Royal Observatory at Greenwich in England (known as Greenwich Mean Time). Towns and cities built public clocks, and by the 1880’s people were using clocks at home, and wearing watches.

In 1941 the clocks were set 12 hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time. And since 1974 Kiwis have enjoyed daylight saving during summer, when the clocks are put forward one hour.

What Are Time Zones?

World Time Zones | FOTOGRAFIA.Nelo.Esteves | FlickrWithout time zones, it would be impossible for all countries on Earth to have the sun at the highest point in the sky at noon. Why? Because Earth rotates by 15 degrees every hour. This is exactly why time zones were created. Basically, the planet was split into 24 slices of 15 degrees each. Each slice is a time zone.

So…What is Daylight Saving Time (DST)?

Daylight Saving Time (DST) is the practice of adjusting clocks so that we humans can enjoy more daylight hours during the summer to pursue our activities . Typically clocks are adjusted forward one hour near the start of spring and are adjusted backward in autumn. So, in New Zealand we put our clocks FORWARD 1 HOUR at the end of September (beginning of our Spring), and on Sunday 4 April 2021, at 3am we will all be putting our clocks BACK 1 HOUR (beginning of our Autumn / Fall). And you’ll be pleased to know that your cell phones will do all this automatically for you – Smartphones!

Here’s a quick tutorial on Daylight Saving – a practice first suggested by New Zealand entomologist, George Hudson, so that he’d have more daylight hours available to study bugs!


If you’ve got time to kill, why not check out some of these great reads all about time:

The Time Wreccas / Tyler, Val
“The Guardians look after time for all people. Humans always rush around claiming that they do not have enough time, but no one thinks of guarding it. The Guardians do this and in every region of the world there is one who protects time for us all. In Greenwich, it is Old Father Tim. When the Wreccas, who populate the Underneath (below ground), send Snot to steal the Tick, their only intention is to wreak havoc on the Guardians who live Topside (above ground). They don’t expect Snot to find out that she feels more at home Topside and that she really rather likes Tid (Old Father Tim’s grandson) who she has to trick. And little do they know that without the Tick, time will stop forever…” (Catalogue)

The terrible truth about time / Arnold, Nick
“Find out what happens if you go too close to a black hole and how flies tell the time! With a fantastic new cover look and extra horrible bits at the back of the book, this best-selling title is sure to be a huge hit with a new generation of Horrible Science readers. If you think you can stomach the sick side of science, then read on as we clock up some terrible time secrets. Find out who was killed for changing the calendar, make your own crazy clock, meet the tortured time geniuses and check out your chances of a time-travel trip.” (Catalogue)

One minute / Ahn, Somin
“In one minute, you can blink your eyes twenty times, hug your dog, plant seeds, say good-bye, watch the rain, or even save a life. So much can occur in this sliver of time one minute can feel like a singular experience. This poignant picture book is at once an introduction to time for young readers, an ode to living each moment with purpose, and a thoughtful exploration of how children experience one minute (may it seem short or long) playfully, profoundly, and with a boundless sense of possibility.” (Catalogue)

Time, tides and revolutions / Brasch, Nicolas
“This fascinating series poses and answers intriguing science questions that students are often curious about. Each book takes one theme or topic and explores it via thirteen engaging questions. The highly visual content assists students’ understanding of the sometimes quite complex concepts and processes. Focusing on time related issues it presents information via 13 engaging question-and-answer spreads.” (Catalogue)

Telling time / Adler, David A
“Readers follow along as a loveable crew of kid astronauts and their Martain friends go about their daily routine, exploring the differences between seconds, minutes, and hours; what A.M. and P.M. mean; and how to tell time on both digital and analog clocks. Ten seconds to lift-off Are you ready? Veteran children’s nonfiction author David Adler incorporates math concepts, such as addition and subtraction, into this fun narrative with problem-solving exercises for readers to tackle at their own pace. Edward Miller’s vibrant cartoon art depicts the happy group of friends embarking on space walks, working together on projects, and settling in for bed.  A glossary explains time zones, daylight savings time, and more. An out-of-this-world STEM book.” (Catalogue)

Telling time : how to tell time on digital and analog clocks! / Older, Jules
“Time isn’t an easy concept for kids to grasp, but young readers will delight in learning all about it with the fun and lively lessons in TELLING TIME. Exploring what time is and discovering why we need to tell time, young readers certainly learn more than ‘the big hand is on the one and the little hand is on the two’. With the help of a whole lot of clocks, a dash of humor, and a few familiar circumstances, learning to tell time is a lot of fun. It’s about time.” (Catalogue)

All about time / Hope, Charles
“Time is a key component of mathematics. It helps us make sense of an enormous amount of information, and it can have many practical applications in our everyday lives. Join our maths mutts as they learn all about the wonderful world of Time!” (Catalogue)

One day : around the world in 24 hours / Din, Suma
” ‘One Day’ follows fifteen different children from around the world through a 24 hour period. Not only will readers learn about their different lives and cultures, but they will also discover how time zones work, and what’s happening on one side of the world while the other sleeps. This is a fantastic and accessible introduction to the concept of time and time zones for a younger audience.” (Catalogue)

How DO Things Work?

Kia ora!  Have you ever looked at a machine and wondered how it works?  Or wondered how things in space work?  What about inside your body?  There are so many questions about the world!

Well, the good news is we have lots of kids books that explain and describe the inner workings of all sorts of interesting topics.  You name it, we’ve got a book to tell you how it works.  To get you started, we’ve selected a few interesting books for you to choose from.  But there are plenty more available to satisfy your curiosity.

Motorbikes / Oxlade, Chris

Find out all of the workings of some of the most amazing motorcycles.  This easy to read book breaks down many of the parts and what they do, with bright, clear illustrations.

What’s inside a black hole? : deep space objects and mysteries / Solway, Andrew

“This astronomy series looks at different aspects of the universe we live in.” (Catalogue)

Inside the bees’ hive / Ang, Karen

“Hundreds of buzzing worker honeybees build a yellow structure called a comb inside a tree trunk. The comb is made up of many small, six-sided rooms that the bees make out of wax. These rooms, called cells, will be used to hold baby bees and sweet, gooey honey. Welcome to the bees’ hive! ” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Spacecraft / West, David

“Learn all about spacecraft, from the first space capsules to space planes and space shuttles.  Find out something amazing about each vehicle and then turn the page to see it sliced in two where its innermost secrets will be revealed.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What’s eating you? : parasites – the inside story / Davies, Nicola

“There is one group of creatures who live on or in the bodies of other animals – in skin, hair, fur, feathers, blood, guts, livers, hearts and lungs. They are parasites. Uncover the secrets of their amazing life-cycles and dare yourself not to scratch or groan as you read.” (Catalogue)

Aircraft / Graham, Ian

Find out how all kinds of aircraft work and how they are laid out inside.  Lots of clear illustrations and information on different types of aircraft.

See inside weather and climate / Daynes, Katie

Filled with facts from how hurricanes and floods happen to how global warming is affecting the Earth’s climates. This is a lift-the-flap book that introduces readers to the science of weather. The work is filled with facts from how hurricanes and floods happen to how global warming is affecting the Earth’s climates.” (Catalogue)

How cities work : explore the city inside, outside and underground / Hancock, James Gulliver

“From the sewers to the skyscrapers, this book takes young readers to the heart of the city.  Get ready to explore the city in a whole new way. This innovative book for younger readers is packed with city facts, loads of flaps to lift, and unfolding pages to see inside buildings and under the streets.  Discover where people live and peek behind closed doors to see what’s going on in houses and apartments, or why not find out about what goes on underneath the streets you walk on every day? (Adapted from Catalogue)

Running the country : a look inside New Zealand’s government / Gill, Maria

“What does the government do to keep New Zealand running smoothly? How does parliament work and what is the job of the MPs? From the Bill of Rights to the way we vote, from parliamentary headquarters to the local council — and everything in between — Maria Gill explains our system of government. You will discover facts about laws, our currency, voting at the elections and the role of the media. There are fascinating profiles of New Zealand leaders, illustrated by cartoonist Malcolm Evans, along with photographs, amazing statistics and useful ‘google this’ Internet links to find out more.” (Catalogue)

The fantastic body : what makes you tick & how you get sick / Bennett, Howard J

“Jam-packed with fun facts, cool diagrams, and gross stories, and written by a successful, practicing pediatrician, this fun and comprehensive reference book with DIY projects is ideal for kids who want to know more about the mysterious stuff going on inside their bodies.” (Catalogue)

How computers work / Hubbard, Ben

“Ever wonder what goes on inside your computer? Take a look into how processors, networks and more are all connected.” (Catalogue)

Inside of a dog : what dogs see, smell, and know / Horowitz, Alexandra

“From an animal behaviorist and dog enthusiast comes an adorable guide to understanding how our canine friends see the world. Want to know what dogs are thinking? What they feel, and what they can spell with that great big nose of theirs? Here’s your chance to experience the world nose first, from two feet off the ground. What do dogs know, and how do they think? The answers will surprise and delight you as dog owner and scientist Alexandra Horowitz explains how our four-legged friends perceive their daily worlds, each other, and us. This book is as close as you can get to knowing about dogs without being a dog yourself.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What do we do with all that poo?

All living creatures poo! Big ones like elephants do big poos, and little ones like ants do tiny poos, and human beings are somewhere in the middle! There a lots of more scientific terms for poo: ‘faeces’, ‘stool’ or ‘bowel movement’, and ‘scat’ is the term for the poo of a wild animal.

But why do we have to poo, what is it, and where does it all go when you flush the toilet?

Flush Toilet Illustrations And Hand Hygiene clipart drawing free imageThe purpose of poo is to remove waste from your body – especially the leftover bits of food that your body can’t use, such as fruit pips and vegetable skins. About 75% (three quarters) of a typical poo is water. The water helps to make the poo soft so it can get out of the body easily. The rest of the poo consists of broken-down body cells, fat and minerals and leftover food waste (those fruit pips and vege skins mentioned above). But did you know that your poos are alive?? Your intestines contain billions of bacteria that help digest food. When the bacteria come out in poo, about half of them are still alive. The live bacteria can make you ill if they get into your stomach. This is why poo can be harmful, and you have to flush it away and wash your hands.

The sewage / wastewater journey

Treatment plant at Moa Point.

Image: Treatment plant at Moa Point. Courtesy Wellington.govt.nz

Once you’ve flushed the toilet, this then becomes sewage. Sewage (or wastewater) is from all our sinks, toilets, laundries, kitchens and bathrooms. This waste flows through a network of underground pipes and pumping stations to one of the treatment plants in Wellington. There are two sewage treatment plants in Wellington – Moa Point and the Western Treatment Plant (Karori) – and a sludge treatment plant at the Southern Landfill.

At the Moa Point Treatment Plant, sewage travels through a series of screens, and tanks before being discharged as liquid into Cook Strait.

  • Non-organic – large materials such as toilet paper are first removed using screens. This rubbish is washed and compressed and sent to the Southern Landfill for disposal.
  • Solid sewage (sludge) – as sewage travels through the tanks, the majority of solids are removed. This sludge is taken to the Southern Landfill Sludge Treatment Plant where it is de-watered (water removed from solids).
  • Effluent – a series of tanks  use a combination of sedimentation and bacteria to decompose almost 70% of  material. Remaining liquid effluent is exposed to ultraviolet light (such as the sun) to destroy any harmful bacteria. The treated liquid is finally discharged, through a long outfall pipe, 1.8km into Cook Strait.

Here’s a really good flow chart that explains the process in more detail:

The Treatment Process


FAQs

Stinky Face Cliparts - Bad Smell Png , Free Transparent Clipart - ClipartKeyQ: Why is poo brown?
A: The brown colour comes from bilirubin, a chemical made from dead red blood cells.

Q: Why does poo smell?
A: The smell mainly comes from bacteria, and the gases and chemicals they release.

Q: Why does everyone think that poo is gross?
A:  We have evolved to find the look and smell of poo disgusting. this makes us avoid it, helping to keep us safe from infection and germs.


So if you’re not too grossed out by now, Wellington City Libraries have loads of books for all ages about this rather stinky subject! Here’s just a few…

You wouldn’t want to live without poo! / Woolf, Alex
“Learn the surprising truth about just how important poo really is: it keeps our bodies healthy, and can also be used to power our cars, heat our homes and help grow our crops.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Poo in the zoo / Smallman, Steve
“Zoo Keeper Bob is exhausted. There’s too much poo in the zoo – and he’s the one who has to scoop it up. Then one day, a mysterious glowing poo appears! Could it be alien poop from outer space? And what on EARTH will Bob do with it?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

My amazing poo plant / Simons, Moya
“Emma can’t have a pet as she lives in an apartment. Her mum loves pot plants and encourages Emma to think of having a plant as a pet. Emma isn’t interested until one day, when a low-flying bird drops a poo in an empty plant pot and her mum tells her if she waters it a poo plant might grow from the seeds in the bird’s dropping. Emma enters her poo plant into the most unusual pet category of her class pet show.” (Catalogue)

What do they do with all that poo? / Kurtz, Jane
“There are so many different kinds of animals at the zoo, and they each make lots of poo. So what do zoos do with all of that poo? This zany, fact-filled romp explores zoo poo and all of the places it ends up, including in science labs and elephant-poo paper–even backyard gardens!” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The clue is in the poo and other stuff too / Seed, Andy
“A funny and fascinating natural history of animal droppings, tracks and other traces, exploring what we can learn about animals from what they leave behind. Fully-illustrated and in a large format, this will be a visually appealing book for any child with an interest in animals and nature.” (Catalogue)

Loos save lives : how sanitation and clean water help prevent poverty, disease and death / Boyd, Seren
“Who knew toilets were so interesting – and so important? You probably use a toilet several times every day. Flush, turn on the tap, wash your hands – then forget all about it. But did you know that 2.4 billion people across the world don’t have somewhere they can go to the toilet safely, and over 1 billion people don’t have access to any kind of sanitation or clean water at all? Poor sanitation and restricted access to a toilet is more serious than you might think. It prevents children (and especially girls) from going to school, it means communities may have to walk miles to access safe drinking water and it kills. Poor sanitation means poor hygiene, which means illnesses and viruses are more easily spread. Going to the toilet out in the open makes people vulnerable and puts them in danger.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Everybody poos / Gomi, Tarō
“All living things do different sorts of poo. Some are different colours, others have different smells or sizes. Some do it on land, some poo in water. This children’s book has a no-nonsense approach to the bodily function to encourage children not to be ashamed about potty training.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Code Clubs at Wellington City Libraries

Coding is everywhere, even behind the scenes of this very blog! Here’s a snippet of HTML from one of our most popular Kids’ Blog posts from last year — can you work out which one?

Did you know that you can learn how to code at your local library? That’s right! In collaboration with our friends at Code Club Aotearoa, we have been running Code Clubs across Wellington City Libraries since early 2018 — and this year, there is a new library joining the Code Club family — our He Matapihi branch, on the ground floor of the National Library in Thorndon!

Here is the full list of Code Clubs across Wellington City Libraries — click the relevant link to register (please note some of our Clubs are full already! You can still click the link to be waitlisted for the next intake of students):

  • He Matapihi Library Code Club — Wednesdays at 3.45pm (register here)
  • Johnsonville Library Code Club Level 1 — Thursdays at 3.30pm (this club is FULL; click here to join the waitlist)
  • Johnsonville Library Code Club Level 2 — Wednesdays at 5.00pm (this club is FULL; click here to join the waitlist)
  • Karori Library Code Club — Tuesdays at 3.30pm (register here)
  • Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library Code Club — Saturdays at 2.00pm (this club is FULL; click here to join the waitlist)
  • Newtown Library Code Club — Mondays at 4.00pm (register here)

At Code Club, you will complete progressive coding challenges under the guidance of librarians and other coding experts! Most of our Code Clubs start off by covering projects in Scratch 3.0 (and it’s useful if you already have an account, but we can help you make one if you don’t!), with some groups moving on to cover other coding practices like Python and HTML/CSS (using popular multi-purpose coding platform trinket.io). Contact your local club if you want to find out more about what they offer, or you can check out some of the projects yourself here!

To finish up, below is an example of one of the simple games you could find yourself making after just a couple of weeks of attending Code Club. It really is fun! How many ghosts can you capture, ghostbuster?

The wonderful world of Minecraft.

Welcome to the wonderful world of Minecraft! The game, since its release in 2011, has been entertaining and encouraging children to use their creativity, innovation and engineering skills to create variety of worlds with different blocks. The popularity of Minecraft is ever growing, as is the collection of Minecraft books and resources at Wellington City Libraries.

 

So if you’re looking to improve your minecrafting skills or new to the game, come on down to your local library and check out the latest release of Minecraft books, such as:

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMinecraft For Beginners.

Minecraft for Beginners is the perfect introduction to Survival mode for true beginners. Parents can read and use this book easily with young children aged 6+, or even on their own! Follow the simple, step-by-step instructions to help you stay alive. Learn how to start a game, which biomes you’ll want to spawn in and which you’ll want to avoid.

image courtesy of syndeticsMinecraft Master Builder: Time Machine.

Minecraft Master Builder Time Travel lets you journey through history and create your own amazing Minecraft masterpieces inspired by magnificent buildings and inventions from ancient times and through to the future with this incredible step-by-step guide! For ages 9- 11.

image courtesy of syndeticsMinecraft STEM Challenge: Build A City.

Build a bustling Minecraft metropolis – and get to grips with STEM concepts (science, technology, engineering and maths) as you play! For ages 7+

image courtesy of syndeticsTheme Park Adventure (Minecraft Let’s Build!)

Theme Park Adventure is the first title in the brand new Let’s Build! construction series for younger Minecrafters. Age: 7+

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Unofficial Guide to Minecraft Construction.

Minecraft construction is the ultimate way to get creative. Players build castles, famous structures, and even entire cities with the game’s construction materials. Filled with fun tips, readers will learn the ins and outs of construction and be inspired by other gamers’ creations. Screenshots and sidebars that highlight STEM and coding concepts round out the experience.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe unofficial guide to Minecraft mods.

Minecraft is known as a platform for creativity, and with mods, players can take their gaming experience to another creative level. Mods, short for “modifications,” are any software that change Minecraft’s original content. Mods can make minor changes or change the entire world–it’s all up to the player. Screenshots show mods in action, while STEM and coding sidebars round out the content.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe unofficial guide to Minecraft survival.

Survival mode is the ultimate test of a Minecraft player’s skills. Can you get enough to eat, gather the resources you need to build a shelter, and win battles against vicious mobs? Learn helpful tips for staying alive in the game, and gleen additional insights from screenshots and STEM and coding sidebars.

https://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781541538856/mc.gif&upc=&oclc=&client=wellingtonclThe unofficial guide to Minecraft mining and farming.

Mining and farming are at the heart of the Minecraft experience. Players use mined and farmed materials to build structures, from the simplest shelter to entire cities. Learn about mining and farming techniques and strategies within the game, and gain insights from screenshots and STEM and coding sidebars.

Wonderful world of Lego!

Lego Fanatics, brace yourself.

Lego mania has been unleashed all around Wellington City Libraries with Lets Go Lego, with the release of The Lego Movie 2; TV show Lego Masters Australia and an outstanding collection of  books that will inspire your Lego creativity… and addiction. Believe it or not, according to Inner Child Learning, Lego Bricks have been applauded by teachers and parents as one of the best toys for learning, building creativity, and strengthening fine-motor skills. Lego Bricks are an open-ended toy, meaning they can become just about anything a child or adult imagines, including an educational tool.

What are you waiting for? Its time to come on down to your local library and unleash your inner Lego master!… by…


Attending one of our Lets Go Lego sessions at the following branches:

Newtown Library: Third Monday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm

Miramar Library: Fourth Thursday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm

Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: Second Thursday of each month, 3:30-4:30pm.

Khandallah Library: First Friday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm.

Karori Library: Third Saturday of each month, 2.00-3.00pm.

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: Second Thursday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm.

For further information email WCL enquiries or check out the library event calendar for dates.

 

Borrowing Lego books from your local library, such as:

iamge courtesy of syndeticsLego City : busy word book.

Jam packed with busy and colourful scenes from LEGO City sets and more than 750 words. LEGO City is the perfect place for early readers to encounter plenty of exciting words for the first time, including vocabulary for buildings, vehicles, jobs and activities. Fun, interactive activities such as spotting recurring characters and naming favourite vehicles keep children engaged and encourage repeat reading.

image courtesy of syndeticsGenius LEGO inventions with bricks you already have : 40 new robots, vehicles, contraptions, gadgets, games and other fun STEM creations.

The world of Lego, science and engineering combines with this amazing books that gives you ideas on how to transform your bin of LEGO® bricks into amazing, movable toys, machines and gadgets. It’s easy and fun to build each of these awesome contraptions and games by following the clear step-by-step instructions and photographs. No matter what you end up creating, you’ll learn exciting new things about science, impress your family and have a blast along the way. A must have book and resource to read, especially with Techweek 2019 around the corner!

image courtesy of sydneticsAmazing brick mosaics : fantastic projects to build with the Lego blocks you already have.

“Every LEGO-loving kid has at least one huge bin of bricks the sets are built, dismantled, and typically never built again and this book gives them dozens of ways to reuse them in fun projects that range from easy to challenging. Featuring a simple yet elegant mosaic technique, step-by-step instructions, and full-color photographs for making 25 cool two-dimensional pictures, Amazing Brick Mosaics offers unique projects that will delight any LEGO enthusiast”–Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick city. New York : 20 unofficial LEGO® projects to build!

It’s New York – but not as you know it. This unofficial guide helps LEGO® fans of all ages discover Central Park, the Chrysler Building, Brooklyn Bridge and 17 more landmarks recreated in amazing detail by top brick artists from around the world. Then make your own with 20 quick-build projects that include a hot dog cart, yellow taxi cab and subway train.–Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick city. London : unofficial LEGO® projects to build!

It’s London – but not as you know it. This unofficial guide helps LEGO® fans of all ages discover the Houses of Parliament, Tower of London, Covent Garden and 17 more landmarks recreated in amazing detail by top brick artists from around the world. Then make your own with 20 quick-build projects that include an Underground train, a red bus and fish & chips. –Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick city. Paris : fascinating facts and amazing stories.

It’s Paris – but not as you know it. This unofficial guide helps LEGO (R) fans of all ages discover the Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe, Centre Pompidou and 17 more landmarks recreated in amazing detail by top brick artists from around the world. Then make your own with 20 quick-build projects that include Notre Dame, Sacre Coeur and a Tour de France cyclist.–Provided by publisher.

See previous blog posts, (one and two) for other Lego books in the collection.

Lets Go Lego and Code Club now on at Newtown Library!

Are you looking for something to do after school?

Then come along to Newtown Library for some fun filled creating and innovating with Lets go Lego and the new Code Club!
Let’s Go LEGO is a free, programme recommended for children aged 5+ with parent/guardian supervision. You will use the library’s Lego collections to design and build your masterpieces.

Each session will be held on the 3rd Monday of every month between 3.30pm – 4.30pm. 

The next session will be on Monday 20th May.


image courtesy of https://codeclub.nz/

Code Club Aotearoa is a free coding club for 9-13 year olds. Children will work their way through a range of fun coding projects, using Scratch and Python, under the guidance and support of coding experts. Please contact Newtown Library to register. Code Club at Newtown Library will be held every Friday until between 4pm -5pm.

So what are you waiting for? Head on down to Newtown Library to make, create and innovate Lets go Lego and Code Club Aotearoa!

Techweek 2019!

image courtesy of techweek.co.nzTechweek19 is back!… and will run from 20—26 May 2019 nationwide. Techweek simply provides a platform to add voices to a growing conversation on global innovation. The theme for Techweek19 is still ‘innovation that’s good for the world’.

For more information about Tech Week and what events are on, visit the website.

In the mean time, if you’re want information on the latest technology and innovations, why not check out the following books in the library collection.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsThe zoom, fly, bolt, blast steam handbook : build 18 innovative projects with brain power.

Rockport’s creative engineering extraordinaire, Lance Akiyama, returns again with Zoom, Fly Bolt, Blast STEAM Engineer and 18 STEAM approved projects to get kids doing, thinking, and building!– Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsSelf-driving cars : the new way forward.

“Author Fallon presents a history of how the technology used in self-driving cars has developed, identifies recent technological gains, and surveys recent controversies surrounding the potential mass adoption of self-driving cars.”–Provided by publisher.


image courtesy of syndeticsScience lab : fantastic activities for young scientists.

From building a bridge and crafting a catapult to making a marble run and creating a crane, Science Lab is packed with activities that young readers can do at home to explore, discover, and understand the way the world works. It’s perfect for school projects, homework help, and firing up imaginations.


image courtesy of syndeticsStephen Biesty’s Incredible Cross-Sections.

This children’s book explores the innermost workings of some extraordinary buildings and machines. From helicopters to submarines, skyscrapers to coal mines, open up a fascinating world packed with unique and detailed cutaway drawings.

image courtesy of sydneticsTriumphs of technology.

From the power points in our homes to the mobile phones in our pockets, every aspect of our lives involves ingenious inventions of incredible complexity. Learn all about the inventions and advances in technologies that have helped make our lives a lot easier and discover the inventors and great minds who brought us these new machines in STEM-gineers: Triumphs of Technology.

STEAM lab for kids : 52 creative hands-on projects using science, technology, engineering, art, and math.image courtesy of syndetics

“The creative projects in STEAM Lab for Kids are designed to demonstrate that there’s math and science to be found in great art! From rubber bands to edible stained glass, young engineers and artists alike will find inspiration in these 52 art-forward labs.” — Back cover.


image courtesy of syndeticsEngineering.

Showcases engineering feats throughout history from the pyramids of Ancient Egypt to the building of the Golden Gate Bridge. The book also features famous engineers, including the Wright brothers to Gustave Eiffel. Steam engines, rocket technology, bridges, and buildings are all covered here in this exciting book.

Earthquake Encounters at Te Papa!

Te Papa has some fun filled entertainment for kids that combines learning, fun and gaming!

Te Papa and the Earthquake commission have developed a Minecraft computer game called ShakerMod, which is the world’s first Minecraft Mod that lets you experiment with realistic earthquakes in Minecraft that enables children to develop skills on how to play minecraft; stop an evil corporation from using the destructive power of earthquakes to take over the world; explore the effects of earthquakes and monsters and learn how to keep your home safe.

The game can be played at Te Papa as part of its earthquake education programme, Earthquake Encounters, or downloaded to play at home or at school (users need to have a license for the Minecraft game). 

You can read the press release for more information. In the mean time, why not go down to your local library and have check out the amazing books on earthquakes and Minecraft in the junior non fiction collection. Books in the collection include:

image courtesy of syndeticsEarthquakes! : shaking New Zealand.

“Explains everything about the natural phenomenon, providing information for what to do during an earthquake and exploring some of the earthquakes through history”–Back cover.

iamge courtesy of syndeticsExtreme earthquakes and tsunamis.

An earthquake can shift an entire city three metres, make the Earth spin faster, and send shudders right across the world. It is raw power at work – and then monster waves follow . . . These may travel thousands of kilometres across the ocean, dump ships on dry land, an ruin a million buildings in one fatal whoosh. Find out about the most fearsome earthquakes and tsunamis, their causes and devastating effects, and the latest technology used to detect these hidden terrors. And virtually nowhere on the planet is entirely safe from them.

image courtesy of sydneticsFault lines & tectonic plates : discover what happens when the earth’s crust moves, with 25 projects.

Learn about earthquakes and volcanoes and how the earth’s surface is always changing.

image courtesy of syndeticsEarth-shattering earthquakes.

In Earth-Shattering Earthquakes, readers can explore a world of fearsome faults, shaky ground and shattering shock waves. Discover what it takes to be an earthquake expert, learn how to survive when an earthquake hits, and discover how rats and snakes can predict tremors. Filled with hilarious illustrations by Mike Phillips, Horrible Geography is the perfect escapism from miserable maps, rotten rock piles and dire diagrams. Hold tight!

image courtesy of syndeticsCool builds in Minecraft.

Teaches players how to build fifty different objects in Minecraft, including houses, vehicles, farms, and castles.

IMAGE COURTESY OF SYDNETICSUnofficial Minecraft STEM lab for kids : family-friendly projects for exploring concepts in science, technology, engineering, and math.

“In Unofficial Minecraft STEM Lab for Kids, you’ll find a collection of creative projects that make learning science, technology, engineering, and math exciting and fun for the whole family. Learn to document your Lab activities with sketchnoting, and how to screencast and narrate videos to share with family, friends, and other Minecrafters. Enjoy Minecraft together–and harness its powerful potential for learning–with Unofficial Minecraft STEM Lab for Kids”– Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsUnofficial Minecraft lab for kids : family-friendly projects for exploring and teaching math, science, history, and culture through creative building.

“Includes a variety of creative exercises that explore the game’s aspects and use them to teach fun, educational lessons. Begin the book by brushing up on some common Minecraft language and examining each of the four game modes: survival, creative, adventure, and spectator. Then, use this knowledge to venture off onto the six different quests that encourage child and adult participation.”–Publisher’s description.

image courtesy of syndeticsBuilding a Minecraft city.

Offering young Minecraft enthusiasts the ultimate sandbox experience, Building a Minecraft City gives kids aged 7-11 an outlet to enhance their love of the game and take their creative play to new heights. Brought to you by the trusted For Dummies brand, this kid-focused book offers step-by-step instructions and simple explanations for completing projects that will teach your child invaluable new skills–all while having a ton of fun!

Get down to Earth during the April School Holidays

Explore earth science, learn about the environment, kick back and watch a movie, or let your creative side out to play, during the school holidays at Wellington City Libraries.

 

Let’s Go Lego!

At Let’s Go Lego, your creative skills will be put to the test as you use our Lego collections to design and build your masterpieces. Each session will have a different theme that will inspire you to hone your skills and become a Lego Legend. Bookings not required. Suitable for ages 5+

Monday 15th April, 3.30 – 4.30pm at Newtown Library

Tuesday 16th April 1 – 3pm at Island Bay Community Centre

Thursday 18th April 10am – 12pm at Churton Park Community Centre

Saturday 20th April 2 – 3pm at Karori Library

 

Earth Science 101

Join experts from Victoria University to learn about the amazing geology of our city – rock formations, fault lines, earthquakes and more. Come along prepared to do some hands-on science as well! Suitable for ages 5+.

Monday 15th April 2 – 3pm at Johnsonville Library

Tuesday 16th April 2 – 3pm at Karori Library

Wednesday 17th April 11am – 12pm at Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library

Wednesday 17th April 2 – 3pm at Miramar Library

 

Family Movie

Bring a blanket and pillow, and relax at our fun family movies. A different G rated movie from the library collection will be showing each time, and are suitable for the whole family. Recommended for ages 4+.

Thursday 18th April 4 – 5.30pm and 6 – 7.30pm at Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library

 

Easter Rock Painting

Paint up some special rocks to hide around the suburb for Easter. We’ve got the rocks, the paint, the brushes and more, just bring yourself and your imagination! #WGTNRocks. Suitable for ages 4+.

Thursday 18th April 1 – 3pm at Island Bay Community Centre

 

Recycled Art

Let out your inner artist as we use recyclable material to create inspiring artworks from scratch! Join in to make a huge collaborative sculpture, or make your own piece to take home. Suitable for ages 4+.

Wednesday 17th April 2 – 3.30pm at Newlands Community Centre

Thursday 18th April 11am – 12pm at Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library

Wednesday 24th April 10am – 12pm at Churton park Community Centre

Friday 26th April 11am – 12pm Wadestown Library


VR Experience

Virtual reality (VR) offers us a new and exciting way to learn about science and the world around us. Explore the wonders of our planet’s most extreme locations from the comfort of your local library. Numbers are limited, bookings required. Reserve your seats by contacting the event library. Suitable for ages 6+.

Tuesday 23rd April 2 – 3pm at Johnsonville Library

Wednesday 24th April 2 – 3pm at Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library

Friday 26th April 11am – 12pm at Khandallah Library

Friday 26th April 2 – 3pm at Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library

 

Green Storytime

Help the library celebrate the lead-up to Earth Day by coming along to this special storytime all about the environment – and how we fit in it! Magical eco-stories and crafts for the whole family to enjoy. Suitable for all ages

Tuesday 16th April 2 – 3pm at Brooklyn Library

Saturday 27th April 11am – 12pm Karori Library

 

 

All events are free. Bookings are not required, except for the VR experience. All children must be accompanied by caregivers at every event.