Happy Lunar New Year!

Read this post in Mandarin

This year on Sunday, 22 January many countries and communities celebrate Lunar New Year, which is the calendar based on the monthly cycles of the Moon’s phases! There are Lunar New Year festivals and celebrations in China, North Korea, South Korea, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, in Chinatowns all around the world, and there are plenty of local events to celebrate in Aoteaora New Zealand too!

Chinese New Year Display and books inChinese languages at Johnsonville Library

Chinese New Year Display and books in Chinese languages at Johnsonville Library.


Library Events

Lunar New Year Mandarin Storytime 10.30-11.00am, Tuesday 24 January

Te Awe Library, 29B Brandon Street, Wellington

To celebrate the 2023 Chinese New Year, Te Awe is going to have a Mandarin storytime on the Tuesday 24 January!

为了庆祝农历新年,提亚威图书馆将于年初三,1月24日(星期二)早上10.30至11时举办中文普通话故事时间

Lunar New Year Storytime Tuesday, 31 January 10:30am

Johnsonville Library, 34 Moorefield Road, Johnsonville 

Celebrate the Lunar New Year with stories, songs, and rhymes in Mandarin, Hokkien, and English.​

欢迎参加Johnsonville图书馆组织的迎中国新年活动. 我们将用普通话, 福建话和英语讲述有趣的故事, 和以歌曲等形式开展与孩子们的互动活动


About the Lunar New Year

2023 is the Year of the Rabbit, in the Chinese zodiac. The rabbit is the fourth zodiac animal. He was a bit arrogant about how fast he was!  He used to tease his neighbour, the Ox for being slow. But one day, the Jade Emperor organised a party to determine the order of the zodiac, in order of who arrived first. The Rabbit arrived early, so he decided to go away and take a nap. When he woke up three other animals had beat him to the party, including the Ox! The rabbit is associated with kindness, quiet confidence and earnestness, which means rabbit might appear quite serious, but always moves forward with feeling and purpose. You can learn more by visiting Year of the Rabbit – Chinese Zodiac on chinesenewyear.net

LNY

Artist impression of Bánh chưng and bánh tét wrapped up for cooking.

In Vietnam, Lunar New Year is marked by the Tết Nguyên Đán festival, which is associated with lots of important customs and wonderful foods! Bánh chưng and bánh tét are some of the tasty festival cuisines, made from glutinous rice, mung beans, pork. Bánh chưng is cooked in squares wrapped in lá dong leaves, and bánh tét is cooked in cylinders wrapped in banana leaves, which is then cut into wheel-shaped slices.

Illustration of hanbok

Artist impression of hanbok.

In South Korea and North Korea, Lunar New Year is known as Seollal and is celebrated through important traditions, games, food and often by wearing the beautiful colourful hanbok, which are usually worn on special occasions.

In Malaysia, Chinese people and other ethnic groups like Malay and Indian also celebrate Lunar New Year together. You can say “Selamat Tahun Baru Cina” to a Malaysian which means “Happy Chinese New Year” in Malay. Chinese people will have a reunion dinner on the Lunar New Year’s Eve. the children will receive “ang pao”, red envelopes with money inside, on the first day of the Lunar New Year from the elderly people, represent a kind of blessing and good luck. In return, children need to say some good words back to the elderly people, like stay healthy, stay happy, and “wishing you safety all the time

You can learn more about Lunar New Year is celebrated in other countries by reading some great articles from the list of lunar new year articles from ThoughtCo.com, and by checking out some of the wonderful books listed below.

Books

The 12 days of Lunar New Year / Lettice, Jenna
“Count out twelve ways to celebrate Lunar New Year!… This cheery addition to the 12 Days series celebrates tradition, culture, and family in the lead-up to Lunar New Year! Young readers and their caregivers will enjoy counting all the different ways they can engage with their communities and honour their ancestors…” (Abridged from catalogue)
Lunar New Year / Eliot, Hannah
“Introduces Lunar New Year, describing the food, decorations, and activities of the holiday.” (Catalogue)

Happy Chinese New Year! : A Festive Counting Story / Ho, Jannie
“Count to twelve with the zodiac animals as they get ready to celebrate Chinese New Year! Sweet, colorful illustrations introduce each of the zodiac animals as they bring special items to the celebration. Xīn Nián Kuài Lè! Happy Chinese New Year! The zodiac animals are ready to celebrate Chinese New Year with traditions and a big feast! Little ones can count to twelve as each animal prepares for the holiday…” (Abridged from catalogue)

Korean celebrations : festivals, holidays and traditions / Cho, Tina
“Korean Celebrations takes young readers on an exciting exploration of Korea’s colorful festivals and family celebrations–wonderful days that are filled with exciting activities and delicious foods.” (Abridged from catalogue)
Vietnamese children’s favorite stories / Tran, Phuoc Thi Minh

One of the special stories in this book explains why you shouldn’t sweep the house on Tết Nguyên Đán! Along with this story of Lunar New Year, there is a collection of wonderful stories connected to five great virtues of Vietnam: Nhan (Compassion), Le (Rituals), Nghia (Righteousness), Tri (Wisdom), and Tin (Trust).

Lunar New Year Around The World: Celebrate The Most Colourful Time Of The Year / Li, Amanda
“Find out all about Lunar New Year and how it is celebrated in different communities across the world!” (Catalogue)

Home for Chinese New Year : a story told in English and Chinese / Wei, Jie
“The Chinese New Year is a time for family reunions. This Chinese children’s story tells a delightful trip with lots of cultural details along the way! Jia Jun’s Dad worked out of town all year around. Now it’s time for him to come home…” (Abridged from catalogue)

Wellington City Libraries has children’s books and bilingual editions available in community languages from many different cultures!

Maylasia NY photo

Photograph by our blog author’s family of celebrations in Malaysia!

Gong Xi Fa Cai” 恭喜发财 — May you be happy and prosperous! 

– Blog by Wei Jing & Joseph

Te Ara Pukapuka Children’s Walk

If you’re like us, you are having a great time reading and getting out and about during Summer (maybe you’re signed up for our Summer Reading Adventure too)!

Why not get into nature and read a lovely pukapuka at the same time!? This Summer, our friends in the Wellington City Council Parks, Sport & Recreation team have partnered with author Moira Wairama to present Te Ara Pukapuka in Seatoun. Te Ara Pukapuka is a children’s walk, where you can read along the way as you wander along the beautiful coastline!

Te Ara Pukapuka img1


This walk begins at the end of the Churchill Park Play area in Seatoun (map of Hector Street entrance), where a trip to the playground or beach can extend to a walk inspired by a very special pūrākau/myth about the creation of Te Whanganui-a-Tara.

Enjoy Te Ara Pukapuka (book pathway) and feel the wairua (spirit) of the ancient taniwha as you and your whānau (family) wind your way around the rugged Wellington coastline towards Oruaiti Pā, at Fort Dorset.

 


Te Ara Pukapuka is in place now until Friday 17 February, be sure to head on down and immerse yourself in the story!

You can read more over on the Wellington City Council website!

This Saturday, 14th January from 10-11am there will be a guided walk through Te Ara Pukapuka.

On Saturday, there will also be a secret code released via the Wellington City Council instagram and facebook that will give you an opportunity to get your very own copy of a pukapuka from a secret box at the trail!

 

The Summer Reading Adventure for Kids: Grand Prizes Announcement!

Read books, explore the city, win prizes!

The Summer Reading Adventure for Kids runs from 1 December 2022 – 31 January 2023 for children aged 5-13. Read books; write, draw or film reviews; and complete quests to earn all kinds of awesome goodies — and you’ll still be home in time for tea! Adults and teens can also take part in their own Summer Reading Adventures — read our News blog for all the info.

Today, we’re stoked to introduce our grand prizes for kids in the 22/23 adventure!

Into the wild prizeGrand Prize Option 1: Into the Wild

This prize pack contains:
– A family pass to Zealandia
– 4x individual passes to Wellington Zoo
– A NeoBear AR Globe
– A selection of locally-made goodies, including chocolate! 

Wellington City Libraries is grateful to Zealandia, Wellington Zoo and OfficeMax for their generous sponsorship of this prize. 

Science and Wonder

Grand Prize Option 2: Science and Wonder 

This prize pack contains:
– A family pass to the Space Place
– A NeoBear AR Globe
– A Merge Cube holographic cube
– A selection of locally-made goodies, including chocolate! 

Wellington City Libraries is grateful to Experience Wellington, The Space Place, and OfficeMax for their generous sponsorship of this prize. 


Art Through Technology

Grand Prize Option 3: Art through Technology 

This prize pack contains:
– A selection of high-quality artistic stationery
– A Merge Cube holographic cube
– A selection of locally-made goodies, including chocolate! 

Wellington City Libraries is grateful to OfficeMax for their generous sponsorship of this prize. 


Movies and More

Grand Prize Option 4: Books, Movies and More 

This prize pack contains:
– Free movie vouchers for Light House Cinemas in Wellington – enough for the whole family
– A Unity Books voucher to the value of $50
– A selection of locally-made goodies, including chocolate! 

Wellington City Libraries is grateful to Light House Cuba for their generous sponsorship of this prize. 


Pick up the Adventurer’s Guide from your local library and visit our Summer Reading Adventure website to pre-register and start logging your reading and adventures today.

Read on to find out more!

Continue reading

Festive Family Fun at Your Library!

Meri Kirihimete, Pōneke!

It’s that time of year again! The festive season for many is just around the corner, which means our libraries (and librarians!) are getting ready to celebrate with stories, songs, teddy bear sleepovers, and of course a whole bunch of books. So why not grab the family, jump in your fuzziest pyjamas (or cheeriest Christmas costume) and head on down to your local library to join in on the fun?

All of our Festive Family Fun events have a slightly different flavour depending on where they’re happening, but in general you can expect to enjoy stories, songs, crafts, and maybe even a visit from a certain portly gentleman at some locations! Stories from all over the world and in different languages also feature at our special trilingual event at Newtown Library. Visit each event link below to find out more.

In addition to the events below, all of our libraries will have beautiful displays of special holiday books from our Celebration Collection. These books will be on the shelf for a limited time only, so make sure to grab your copies today!

What’s on for the December holidays?


Monday 12 December

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library, 3.30 – 4.30pm — Teddy Bears’ Christmas CRAFTerschool and Sleepover


Tuesday 13 December

Johnsonville Library, 3.30 – 4.30pm — Teddy Bears’ Christmas CRAFTerschool and Sleepover


Thursday 15 December

Wadestown Library, 6.00 – 6.30pm — Family Christmas Storytime


Friday 16 December

Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library, 5.30 – 6.00pm — Teddy Bears’ Christmas Sleepover


Saturday 17 December

Karori Library, 11.00am – 12.00pm — Family Christmas Storytime


Monday 19 December

Te Awe Library, 2.00 – 2.30pm — Festive Family Fun: Baby Rock and Rhyme


Tuesday 20 December

Newtown Library, 10.30 – 11.30am — Trilingual Storytime and Christmas Crafts!


Wednesday 21 December

Te Awe Library, 10.30 – 11.00am — Family Christmas Storytime


Thursday 22 December

Te Awe Library, 10.30 – 11.00am — Festive Family Fun: Baby Rock and Rhyme


Children’s Event Schedule over the Summer

Kia ora koutou! The summer holidays are a great time for you to relax, spend some time with whānau, and bask in the sunshine with a good book. Our librarians sometimes like to do this as well, so there will be some changes to our regularly-scheduled events and programmes during Christmas, New Year’s, and January. You can find out where and when everything is happening at the Event Calendar, or the children’s What’s On webpage, but here are the basics for you:

Baby Rock and Rhyme:

Our rockers and rhymers will be taking a break at most sites from the 11th of December, and making a glorious return from the 24th of January. However, if you’re itching for that musical fix in your life, the wonderful team at Te Awe Library on Brandon Street will keep running Baby Rock and Rhyme until the 23rd of December, and return on the 9th of January. Karori and Cummings Park Libraries will resume from the 7th of February.

Preschool Storytime and Kōhunga Kōrero

These will run until the 11th of December at most sites for all your storytelling needs, and our storytellers will be returning from the 24th of January. At Te Awe Library, Preschool Storytime will be running right up until Christmas, and will be back from the 9th of January. At Karori, Cummings Park and Khandallah Libraries, storytime will return from the 7th of February.

LEGO® programmes:

Some Let’s Go LEGO® and LEGO® Time programmes will be cancelled over December and January, and some will keep running. It’s best to check the event calendar to see what’s on where.

Term-time programmes:

Our term-time programmes including Code Club, Tech Time, and CRAFTerschool will mostly be starting up again after Waitangi Day 2023, to give you all time to adjust to being back at school before diving back in to library events. Check the event calendar to be sure!


Don’t forget that our Summer Reading Adventure is running until the 31st of January 2023! Visit this page to learn more and sign up now. There are also plenty of special holiday events happening for children and families during the festive season — visit our blog post to find out more!

If you have any questions, feel free to contact your local library, or you can email the Children’s Librarian to find out more.

Tūhono: Poets Among Us

Kia ora aspiring poets, and up-and-coming sonneteers! Tūhono, Wellington City Libraries’ poetry journal for children and teens, is now open for submissions until 14 December!

This gives you a little more time to write a poem, and send us your creations! We have loved reading all the wonderful poems sent into us so far!

This year, the theme is “Whakangā | Breath.” Whakangā refers to the taking in of breath, or to the process of breathing. It also calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; taking a breath to create calm; taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be.

Enter here!

Click this button to enter!

Unlike some other poetry journals, having your work accepted in Tūhono is not a competition — as long as you follow the rules of submission, every piece of work that gets sent to us will be published. Tūhono itself — the collection of poetry from young people all over Wellington — will be published as an eBook on OverDrive, and in a limited print run for our libraries, so that everyone with a library card can borrow it and bask in your talent and glory! Check out previous editions of Tūhono on our catalogue here.

Last blog, we shared some of the awesome poems from 2020, so for this one, we’ll turn to some of the incredible works from 2021! Here’s a few of our favourites!

  1. Alone Tiana

Alone poem image

Alone

Alone can taste like a sour lolly

Alone can feel like a bee stinging

Alone can sound like a roar of laughter

Alone looks like nothing

Alone can smell like the only clean sock 

in a wash basket of smelly socks.

Tiana 

 

2.  The Run — Vanessa 

The Run poem image

The run

Goosebumps fled, screaming up my arms

Promptly refusing to hold 

The inevitable droopy puddles

Belonging to my raw feet.

 

Muttering silent cries of regret 

Our class crept up up the road 

As silent as a spider hunting its prey

Shadows flickered in the shallow light

Of the nervous moon 

 

Gravel crunched beneath my shaking feet

Like snapping sticks

We started, clinging tightly together 

As we descended

Down the winding wave of shadows

 

Tall trees loomed threateningly

Over our scrawny group.

A splash was followed closely 

By angry curses up ahead

 

Head torches snapped on

Bobbing up and down like giddy fireflies

While the rain started drizzling down leisurely

 

Centuries later

Soaked, sweaty, and thoroughly mud splattered

We turned around and headed home.

Half way done.

Vanessa

 

3. The Forgotten Lake — Quinn 

The Forgotten Lake

The forgotten lake

My shaking  reflection in the mucky water 

This water used to be clear and beautiful now you can barely see the bottom

The smell of all the trash smells like slaughter

The lake is so rotten and filthy it has become forgotten

Quinn

4. Guen 

Guen poem

Guen 

My name is Guen 

My hair is yellow and blue, wet like rain 

My eyes are orange and big like an elephant 

My smile is funny and tall like a flower garden 

My laugh is white like a keyboard 

My shirt is purple like Shirley 

The sky is purple like tissues 

And I am soft like a puppy 

Guen

 

 

 

 

 

The Summer Reading Adventure for Kids: A Sneak Preview

Read books, explore the city, win prizes!

The Summer Reading Adventure for Kids runs from 1 December 2022 – 31 January 2023 for children aged 5-13. Read books; write, draw or film reviews; and complete quests to earn all kinds of awesome goodies — and you’ll still be home in time for tea! Adults and teens can also take part in their own Summer Reading Adventures — read our News blog for all the info.

Pick up the Adventurer’s Guide from your local library and visit our Summer Reading Adventure website to pre-register and start logging your reading and adventures today.

Read on to find out more!

Continue reading

Tūhono – Dazzling Poems by You!

Tūhono display photo

A beautiful Tūhono display at Cummings Park Library

Exciting times — until December 14th, you can submit your poem for Tūhono 2022, our poetry journal for children and teens in Wellington, Te Whanganui-a-Tara. We’ve already seen some amazing poems come through!

This year, the theme is “Whakangā | Breath.” Whakangā refers to the taking in of breath, or to the process of breathing. It also calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; taking a breath to create calm; taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be.

To help give you some inspiration, we thought we would share again with you some of our favourite poems from Tūhono 2020. Read on, and prepare to be blown away!

1. My Butterfly Journey — Ronan, age 5

Full text of poem written below.
My Butterfly Journey

I can’t move
I’m in a chrysalis
I will have butterfly powers when I come out

I will go where the butterflies go
I will lay eggs
Then I will die

The caterpillar will do the journey back home

— Ronan, age 5

2. The Verselet Tree — Amelia, age 9

Full text of poem is written below.
The Verselet Tree

Wise, knowing and smart,
When I sit beneath you I feel safe,
warm and comforted this feeling makes
me want to drift off in a slow and
steady sleep,
but before I do, a thought comes to my
mind,
the thought grows as I sleep,
When I wake the thought has formed
into a poem.
As I wander home,
I think of the poem and decide to write
it down,
And then I will go back and get
another poem from you.

— Amelia, age 9

3. Connection — Jericho, age 11

Full text of poem is written below.
Connection

I have a connection to music,
as if it’s part of my life,
as it follows the beat of my heart,
over and over again.
It lives deep inside me,
it burns inside my heart,
as an eternal flame,
raging on inside of me.
It shocks my soul,
It runs thru my body,
It harmonises my life,
As if when I listen to it
all fear and pain go away.
Music electrifies my very existence.

— Jericho, age 11

4. Connected — Pemma, age 12

Full text of poem is written below.
Connected

A thread, a rope,
The invisible link between us all,
Connected by soul,
The whispering call.

Shining stars twinkle above,
Our ancestors watching,
With the eye of the crescent moon.

Nature’s melody,
The sweet birds,
Our link with Papatūānuku
Has always been heard.

A thread, a rope,
A quiet trail,
Linked together, connected.

— Pemma, age 12

5. Little One — Rajvi, age 5

Full text of the poem is written below
Little One

Go to sleep little one
no need to cry
we will be there for you forever ……
oh my baby
go to sleep little one ….
O ho ho ……
Just go to sleep little one

— Rajvi, age 5 (written on 15/10/20 for her younger brother, born on 11/10/20)


Tūhono on the shelves & the web!

Be sure to check out our poetry collections at your local library branch! You can find Tūhono 2020 & 2021 on the catalogue as physcial books, and as ebooks on Overdrive/Libby.

Tūhono. a journal of poetry by Wellington children / 2021
“Whakaata : reflection. This theme links all of the poems in this second edition of Tūhono, which were contributed by young Wellington poets aged 5-12 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout October and November 2021. Poems by writers aged 13-18 are collected in a separate volume. The year 2021 provided us all with plenty of opportunities to reflect. What’s really important? What falls by the wayside when times are tough? What do you see looking back at you when you gain the courage to hold the mirror up to the light? Anxious, loving, hopeful, angry, quirky, imagistic, insular, exuberant – these poems are a kaleidoscope. At one end we put in our certainties and our questions, our need to understand and to express. As for what we see at the other end? Well, you’re reading it. WCL would like to thank Kimi Ora School for generously providing beautiful artworks created by their students to accompany their poems.”–Overdrive catalogue.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono. a journal of poetry by children and teens / 2020 
“Tūhono : connection. This is the theme that binds together all 197 poems you are about to read, which were contributed by young Wellington writers aged 5-18 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout the month of November 2020. The year 2020 was challenging for many people. Some had to spend time apart from their friends and the people they love. Some had to find ways to live with uncertainty and the sense that everything might not be okay in the world. But taken together, these poems represent a constellation of thoughts, ideas, worries, anxieties, hopes, loves, and dreams about how we find ways to connect, even in the face of adversity.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono: A journal of poetry by Wellington children / 2021 (eBook via Libby/Overdrive)
“Whakaata : reflection. This theme links all of the poems in this second edition of Tūhono, which were contributed by young Wellington poets aged 5-12 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout October and November 2021. Poems by writers aged 13-18 are collected in a separate volume.

The year 2021 provided us all with plenty of opportunities to reflect. What’s really important? What falls by the wayside when times are tough? What do you see looking back at you when you gain the courage to hold the mirror up to the light? Anxious, loving, hopeful, angry, quirky, imagistic, insular, exuberant – these poems are a kaleidoscope. At one end we put in our certainties and our questions, our need to understand and to express. As for what we see at the other end? Well, you’re reading it.

WCL would like to thank Kimi Ora School for generously providing beautiful artworks created by their students to accompany their poems.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono. a journal of poetry by children and teens / 2020
“Tūhono : connection. This is the theme that binds together all 197 poems you are about to read, which were contributed by young Wellington writers aged 5-18 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout the month of November 2020. The year 2020 was challenging for many people. Some had to spend time apart from their friends and the people they love. Some had to find ways to live with uncertainty and the sense that everything might not be okay in the world. But taken together, these poems represent a constellation of thoughts, ideas, worries, anxieties, hopes, loves, and dreams about how we find ways to connect, even in the face of adversity.” (Catalogue)

What’s On for Kids in the CBD?

Warning: This blog post is intended for parents and caregivers — kids read on at your peril!

Kia ora folks! As we hurtle towards the summer, a lot more families will be heading into the city centre to visit the waterfront, go shopping, explore the city streets, and perhaps even visit one of our three CBD libraries! And if you’re coming into the city with a child in tow, what could be a nicer thing to do than join one of our wonderful city centre librarians for a lovely Preschool Storytime or Baby Rock and Rhyme session? Read on to find out more about when and where you can expect to find something to do with your preschooler in the central city.


Te Awe Library

A spooktacular Halloween display in the kids’ area at Te Awe Library.

Te Awe Library is our largest CBD library, located between Brandon Street and Panama Street, just off Lambton Quay. At Te Awe, you can find a huge children’s section, lots of cosy nooks to curl up and read in, free bookable meeting rooms, as well as a big collection of books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, and even vinyl records for adults and children alike to browse — and don’t forget the excellent Collective Coffee Shop is located conveniently within the library for a great way to start the day with your tamariki!

What’s on for tamariki at Te Awe?

  • Preschool StorytimeWednesdays at 10.30am (new time!)
    Fun and interactive stories, songs, and rhymes to inspire your preschooler and grow a love of literacy. Through stories and play, children learn how to express themselves and understand the world around them. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
  • Baby Rock and RhymeMondays at 2.00pm and Thursdays at 10.30am
    Join us for these fun and free sessions for parents and carers to interact with their babies through songs and stories. Rhyme, rhythm, repetition and music are the building blocks of language for babies. Recommended for pēpī aged 0-2 with their caregivers.
  • Monthly Mandarin StorytimesFirst Tuesday of the month at 10.30am
    Regular Mandarin storytimes are starting up again! Join us for these special bilingual events run by our talented staff and learn more about Chinese story, music, and culture. All are welcome, whether or not you speak Mandarin as your first language. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
    普通话讲故事时间。提亚威 图书馆 上午10.30—11am。 每个月的第一个周二。
    互动和有趣的故事和童谣时间,激发儿童对文学的热爱。通过故事和玩耍,儿童会学习自我表述, 并了周围的世界。
    建议2-4岁儿童和家长参加。免费。
  • LEGO® TimeSaturdays at 2.00pm and Sundays at 11.00am
    Come down to the library and get creative in these free-build sessions with our extensive LEGO® collections. Builders of all ages and experience levels are welcome to get stuck in! Recommended for tamariki, rangatahi, and pākeke aged 5+. Children under the age of 14 should be accompanied by a caregiver.

How to get to Te Awe

All CBD buses go past Te Awe Library — get off at the Lambton Central stops by David Jones for easy access to the library via Panama Street. Free bike parking is available on Grey Street, and paid street parking is available on Panama and Brandon Streets. Visit this link for directions to Te Awe Library from your current location.


Arapaki Library

A beautiful display at Arapaki Library in celebration of Diwali 2022.

Arapaki Library is located on Manners St, perfect for families who live in the city centre or who travel through for work or school. At Arapaki, you can find a great selection of kids’ books, as well as books in a variety of community languages, including Korean, Japanese, French, Russian, Persian and Spanish.

What’s on for tamariki at Arapaki?

  • Preschool Storytime — Thursdays at 10.30am
    Fun and interactive stories, songs, and rhymes to inspire your preschooler and grow a love of literacy. Through stories and play, children learn how to express themselves and understand the world around them. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
    Our storytimes at Arapaki are very popular with local preschools, but all are welcome to join in on the fun!

How to get to Arapaki

Like Te Awe, all CBD bus routes go directly past Arapaki Library — get off at the Manners Street at Willis Street stop if you’re coming from the Courtenay Place end of town, or at the Manners Street at Cuba Street stop if you’re coming from the railway station end of town. Limited paid parking is available near the library on Victoria Street or Willis Street. Visit this link for directions to Arapaki Library from your current location.


He Matapihi Library

A lovely Pride display from the team at He Matapihi Library, in the small amphitheatre used for events.

Our smallest CBD location, He Matapihi Library is located on Molesworth Street, on the ground floor of the National Library building. He Matapihi’s unique collection contains only books written by New Zealand authors, with a special focus on books of significance to Māori as well as to Wellingtonians specifically. With the wonderful Home Cafe right next door, He Matapihi is the perfect spot for families to chill out together!

What’s on for tamariki at He Matapihi?

  • Preschool StorytimeMondays at 10.30am
    Fun and interactive stories, songs, and rhymes to inspire your preschooler and grow a love of literacy. Through stories and play, children learn how to express themselves and understand the world around them. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
  • Craftivity — Saturdays at 10.30am
    Bust the indoor boredom and join us for free arts and crafts for kids at the library! Our talented staff are full of ideas, and we can’t wait to see yours! This is a guaranteed fun time for tamariki and the whole whānau to enjoy together. Recommended for tamariki aged 4+ with their caregivers.

How to get to He Matapihi

The Library is in walking distance of Wellington Railway Station — get off at Wellington Station and turn right up Molesworth Street. For bus users, the 14 and 22 are regular services that go via the library — get off at the Molesworth Street – Cathedral stop. Otherwise, paid parking is available near the library on Molesworth Street and Aitken Street. Visit this link for directions to He Matapihi Library from your current location.

Author Interview: Bill Nagelkerke

Header - Kids Blog - The Ghost House

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What better way to celebrate Halloween than checking out an interview with author Bill Nagelkerke about his spooky new children’s novel The Ghost House!

The Ghost House revolves around 13-year-old David, whose family has moved to a house on the edge of the Red Zone in Christchurch. When David ventures into the forbidden Red Zone he stumbles upon an old villa that survived the earthquakes! The house speaks to him and begs him to help.

Bill Nagelkerke has written short stories, poems, plays and books for all ages, as well as translating other people’s books from Dutch into English.

He has won the Storylines Margaret Mahy Medal and Lecture Award. His children’s book, The Ghosts on the Hill was a Storylines Notable Book and joint winner of the 2021 Storylines What Now Kids’ Pick Award.

The Ghost House is a poignant and eerie supernatural tale aimed at readers 8 – 13 years that carefully navigates the line between being deliciously spine tingling without ever crossing the line into becoming full out frightening. It is beautifully and evocatively written using very carefully chosen words and language to describe the settings and characters.

Click the above banner to go to the interview, or click here: https://www.mixcloud.com/wellingtoncitylibraries/bill-n/

This interview was done in conjunction with The Cuba Press, and Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM. This interview was conducted by Neil Johnstone.

Find out more about Radioactive FM on their website!

You can reserve a library copy on our catalogue or buy your own copy through The Cuba Press! Check out the full range of titles by Cuba Press here!


Here’s some of Bill’s other books available at your library!

Stop the tour : the diary of Martin Daly, Christchurch, 1981 / Nagelkerke, Bill
“It is 1981 and Martin senses big trouble brewing at home. The South African rugby team has been invited to tour New Zealand. Martin’s sister, Sarah, is out to stop the tour in protest against South Africa’s apartheid system. His rugby-mad dad is equally determined that the tour should go ahead. Martin wishes the whole thing would simply go away … Then a new school leads to a new friendship, and Martin is faced with a choice. He can walk away or he can become involved in something that will end up being bigger than anybody could have predicted”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Ghosts-on-the-Hill-cover-webThe ghosts on the hill / Nagelkerke, Bill
“The year is 1884. The place is Lyttelton, a small and bustling harbour town. Elsie is waiting for the fish to bite. She has her reasons for coming down to the waterfront so often, the main one being the memory of the lost boys. She was one of the last to see them alive, and now she is haunted by what happened to them. When the opportunity comes for Elsie to follow in their footsteps over the Bridle Path, and put their ghosts to rest, she doesn’t hesitate. ‘I’ll be careful,’ she says. But no one knows that the weather is about to change for the worse.”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Emily the Dreadfuls and the Dead Skin Gang / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Emily, the hero of ‘Emily’s Penny Dreadful’, is back. She has an idea for a new ‘dreadful’ story, this time all about a group of burglars who call themselves the Dead Skin Gang. At the same time, Emily starts her own gang, the Dreadfuls. Her best friend Robin, isn’t too keen on joining, while Uncle Raymond doesn’t like all the noise the Dreadfuls make. But then the next door neighbour’s dog goes missing, and the Dreadfuls (and Uncle Raymond) have a job to do”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Old bones / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Jamie and his dad have lost the farm in the floods. But Dad’s new partner, Sue, doesn’t seem that upset by the destruction of the farm. The trio move into a large old house in the city, right beside the Avon. While the adults seem content to put their energies into the new house and circumstances, Jamie has a bad feeling about the house and is terrified of the closeness of the river. Something bad happened in this house, he just knows it. Suggested level: intermediate, junior secondary.” (Catalogue)

Kua tā te taimi? : ko he tala Hamoa mai Niu Hila / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Tua and his class are preparing for special visitors. While everyone is getting ready, Tua can’t stop asking, “Is it time yet?” Suggested level: junior, primary. Also available in Cook Islands Māori, Niue language, Sāmoan, and Tongan.” (Catalogue)