Whales, Wildfire, Worries and Wasabi: New Kids Books in the Collection

Another month of fantastic new books in the kid’s collection!  So many great titles it was hard to choose which ones to share with you here.  You could read about whales, sharks or a two headed chicken!  Maybe you’re keen for adventure, and can follow the magnificent voyagers of the pacific, or survivors of a wildfire, or some impossible creatures?  Take a look at these titles below and maybe try something new!

Picture Books

The great storm whale / Davies, Benji

“Return to the world of The Storm Whale in this dramatic new adventure from globally successful and award‑winning picture book creator, Benji Davies. One stormy night, Noi’s grandma tells him a story. It is a story of a girl, a whale and a friendship that will echo down the generations.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

I’m fabulous crab / Greenberg, Nicki

“Henry the crab grows tired of his dull life, vowing to reinvent himself as blingy, bedazzled, and fabulous.” (Catalogue)

Victor : the wolf with worries / Rayner, Catherine
“Victor the wolf has lots of worries. He worries that he isn’t brave enough, that he isn’t big enough and that he isn’t fierce enough. In fact, Victor feels anxious about almost everything. But when Victor shares his concerns with his best friend Pablo, he starts to feel a bit better. And with Pablo’s help, Victor learns even more ways to deal with those pesky worrying thoughts. And as the worries grow smaller, Victor feels a bit bigger, a bit braver, and bit fiercer inside!” (Catalogue)

Comic Books

Wildfire / Bard, Breena
“Julianna loved her life in rural Oregon. She loved taking care of her farm animals and being part of her local 4H club. But then the unthinkable happened… a wildfire destroyed her family’s home. In the aftermath, her family relocated to Portland, Oregon, where Julianna hopes to put everything behind her. Believing the fire to be the result of kids playing with fireworks, she certainly isn’t interested when her parents and younger sister start getting involved in the growing climate change protests. Emotional and inspiring, Wildfire shows readers that healing from tragedy can take many forms and demonstrates what it means to take action in the face of climate change – and how that action can be different for each of us.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Kariba / Clarke, Daniel
“Siku has always called the Zambezi River her home. She understands the water – and strangely enough, it seems to understand her, too, bending to her will and coming to her aid in times of need. But things are changing on the river – a great dam is being built, displacing thousands of Shonga people – and things are changing in Siku, too, as her ability to manipulate water grows out of control, and visions of a great serpent pull her further from reality and her loving father, Tongai. When Tongai ventures to the Kariba Dam to find a cure for Siku and never returns, she sets off to find him with the help of Amedeo, the young son of Kariba’s chief engineer. But Siku soon discovers that her father has been shielding a terrible secret: Siku is actually the daughter of the Great River Spirit, Nyaminyami, and the only way to bring about the necessary rumuko – a ritual which has brought balance to the Zambezi for centuries – is for Siku to give up the only life she’s ever known.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Beak to the future / Angleberger, Tom
“The two-headed chicken is back, with twice the adventure, twice the jokes, and a lot more heads (wait, did they just accidentally turn into a double-headed space snake?). Having lost the Astrocap somewhere in the multiverse, our intrepid hero dons the Timecap to scour the timestream, which looks a lot like broccoli, in search of it. But danger and drama await with every time-hopping POOZB! of the Timecap, including hungry dinosaurs, fierce werewolves, poet Emily Dickinson, a fish with a mustache who wants to talk about feelings, and even the return of the chicken’s archenemy, Kernel Antlers, the shape-shifting moose!” (Catalogue)

Chapter Books

Calling the whales / Bilan, Jasbinder
“After rowing out to an island near their seaside home, Tulsi and Satchen discover a whale that has been trapped in a fishing net. Determined to try to free the poor creature, they repeatedly dive down into the freezing sea to cut the netting, but eventually, exhausted and with a storm rolling in, they have to admit defeat. As they head for home to seek help, their boat capsizes in the storm and they’re left clinging to it, dangerously adrift. Just as they think all is lost, help arrives from an unexpected source …” (Catalogue)

This is how I roll / Florence, Debbi Michiko
“Susannah Mikami dreams of becoming a famous sushi chef like her dad. And this summer, she plans to learn everything about his traditional kitchen. Only he refuses to teach her, and won’t tell her why. Is it because he doesn’t want her to embarrass him in front of the documentary crew filming at his restaurant? Or worse, because she’s a girl? Either way, Sana decides he’s not the only one who can keep secrets. So when she meets Koji, a cute boy who wants to help her cook up some trouble in the kitchen — and film online tutorials to show the world her mad skills — Sana is all in. But sneaking around means lying to her parents, something Sana’s never done before. Can she take the heat, or will she get out of the kitchen for good?” (Catalogue)

Impossible creatures / Rundell, Katherine
“A boy called Christopher is visiting his reclusive grandfather when he witnesses an avalanche of mythical creatures come tearing down the hill. This is how Christopher learns that his grandfather is the guardian of one of the ways between the non-magical world and a place called the Archipelago, a cluster of magical islands where all the creatures we tell of in myth live and breed and thrive alongside humans. Then a girl, Mal, appears in Christopher’s world. She is in possession of a flying coat, is being pursued by a killer and is herself in pursuit of a baby griffin. Mal, Christopher and the griffin embark on an urgent quest across the wild splendour of the Archipelago, where sphinxes hold secrets and centaurs do murder, to find the truth – with unimaginable consequences for both their worlds.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Non-fiction

Mangō : sharks and rays of Aotearoa / Barraud, Ned
“The oceans surrounding Aotearoa New Zealand are home to over one hundred astonishing and strange species of sharks and rays. This fact-filled book takes you down into the fascinating underwater lives of these expert hunters, illustrates their evolution and explores their place in our culture. And it explains why these ancient fish and their environments need our kaitiakitanga more than ever.” (Catalogue)

The observologist / Clarkson, Giselle
“Observology is the study of looking. An observologist makes scientific expeditions, albeit very small ones, every day. They notice interesting details in the world around them. They are expert at finding tiny creatures, plants, and fungi. They know that water snails glide upside down on the undersurface of the water; not all flies have wings; earthworms have bristles; butterflies taste with their feet. An observologist knows that there are extraordinary things to be found in even the most ordinary places. Facts combine with comics, detailed illustrations, science, and funny stories in this unique, warm, and fascinating account of the small things all around us. Graphic and comic illustrations with funny talking insects make this a playful and informative book one to be treasured in the classroom.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Those magnificent voyagers of the Pacific / Crowe, Andrew
“This epic story begins 5000 years ago, when the ancestors of Polynesians discovered ways to ‘see’ over the horizon to find and settle new islands. As their landfinding skills grew, these people took ever bigger strides across the vast Pacific until they reached South America. It was not until almost every habitable island scattered across the world’s largest ocean was discovered and settled, that others would gain the skills and courage to head far from shore, allowing two great voyaging traditions to meet.” (Catalogue)

For more new books from the collection, go to: What’s new / December 2023 (wcl.govt.nz)

Dragons, Dust Storms, Delicious Food and more: New Kid’s Books in the Collection

What a delightful combination of books we have new in the collection this month!  Should you wish to read about witches and dragons, wonder what it might like to be the boss, have curiosity about food around the world or just need a bit of a giggle, we’ve got something in the new books that will satisfy your wish!  Take a look at these we’ve selected from those arriving this month…

Picture Books

Stickler loves the world / Smith, Lane
And just think of the wonders we must pass every day without even noticing!  Stickler, an original character covered in sticks and with multiple ever-changing eyes, loves its little world. With best friend Crow, it shares the wonders of all the amazing things the world has to offer. Stickler is astonished by the ordinary, such as the sun and the stars, as well as fascinated by those things in nature that are often overlooked, such as swirling seed pods falling from the sky. The two pals wander about the world, stopping to appreciate the many marvels along the way, especially its beloved sticks, each one unique.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The book that wouldn’t read / Tipene, Tim
“The boy at the centre of Tim Tipene’s striking new story doesn’t like reading, until one day in the school library he picks up The Book that Wouldn’t Read.  Suddenly the book takes on a life of its own — with sentences moving up and down, words changing colour and disappearing, and strange fonts and characters that get the reader jumping around, even burping. His appeals to the teacher and friends get hushed because ‘it’s reading time,’ and before he knows it, he’s finished the book. ‘What should I read next?'” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Doris / Jacoby, Sarah
“Doris has always reveled in the warmth of a spotlight. Her whole life, she’s danced the nights away, with friends from the only home she’s ever known. But one day, Doris twirls … out of step … until she stumbles across a whole new kind of spotlight.” (Catalogue)

Comics

School trip / Craft, Jerry
“Jordan, Drew, Liam, Maury, and their friends from Riverdale Academy Day School are heading out on a school trip to Paris. As an aspiring artist himself, Jordan can’t wait to see all the amazing art in the famous City of Lights. But when their trusted faculty guides are replaced at the last minute, the school trip takes an unexpected – and hilarious – turn. […] Will Jordan and his friends embrace being exposed to a new language, unfamiliar food, and a different culture? Or will they all end up feeling like the ‘new kid’?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Bigfoot and Nessie : the haunting of Loch Ness Castle / Campbell, Chelsea M.
“Bigfoot and Nessie return for another adventure, and things are getting particularly eerie. This time around, the dynamic duo is visiting Nessie’s home, the underwater Loch Ness Castle, and Bigfoot couldn’t be more excited! […] Only things are not exactly what they seem: Nessie can’t get away from her overbearing momager and endless celebrity duties, and to make matters worse, there’s a ghost roaming around in the house! Can Bigfoot and Nessie confront the ghost, stand up to Nessie’s mom, and uncover the castle’s haunting secrets?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Chapter Books

The house with a dragon in it / Lake, Nick
“When Summer and her foster family are having lunch one day, a hole appears in the middle of the living room. That hole leads to a dragon and the promise of three wishes, granted by a very unusual witch. Summer wishes for popularity and plenty of money, and things are looking up . . . until she realizes that the hole in the floor is getting bigger and the witch is getting more sinister. As things begin to unravel, will Summer get her dearest most secret wish?” (Catalogue)

The boss of everyone / Wallace, Danny
“Ten-year-old Joss’s greatest ambition is to be Class Monitor at school. But she’s about to go one step further. It’s Take Your Kid to Work Day, and Joss’s dad takes her to the games company he works for. When the boss calls a meeting and tells them he’s giving his job away to the person with the best idea for a company game-changer… Joss sticks her hand up. And the next thing she knows, Joss is the boss. Joss is thrilled. Dad is horrified: he’s going to have to be on his best behaviour all the time! As Joss whips everyone into shape, maybe they can all learn a lesson or two… even Joss herself.” (Catalogue)

Dust : a novel / Bowling, Dusti
“After Avalyn nearly died from an asthma attack, her parents moved her to the clear, dry air of Clear Canyon City, Arizona. And for the last ten years, she’s been able to breathe. That is, until Adam showed up. Quiet and unkempt, Adam is an instant target for the bullies who have plagued Avalyn and her friends. As Avalyn gets to know him, she begins to suspect that the sudden, strange increase in dust storms around town are somehow connected to his emotions. She thinks his problems may be even worse at home, especially when massive black walls of dust start rolling in after the school day. Will she find a way to stand up for her new friend? Her life may just depend on it.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

No one leaves the castle / Healy, Christopher
“The Lilac. The bard songs say that she’s the world’s most fearsome bounty hunter. That there’s no criminal she can’t catch, no mystery she can’t solve. None of that is true. Yet. In reality, the Lilac is just a kid, and the bard who wrote all that is her best friend, Dulcinetta. But the Lilac has set her goals on becoming the best bounty hunter in the Thirteen Kingdoms–and when a priceless artifact goes missing from the home of famed monster hunter Baron Angbar, the Lilac and Netta are eager to apprehend the thief and make a name for themselves. But when their investigation brings them to a dinner party at Castle Angbar, and they meet the Angbar family and their servants and guests–an unsavory group of nobles, mages, and assorted creatures, each more shady than the last–the Lilac begins to wonder if the reward is worth the trouble. And that’s before the dead body is discovered…” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Non-Fiction

Beasts of the ancient world : a kids’ guide to mythical creatures, from the sphinx to the minotaur, dragons to baku / Ward, Marchella
“Uncover tales of ancient beasts, in this beautiful anthology of mythologies. This book introduces children to the thrilling mythological beasts from ancient civilizations. Discover 23 stories accompanied by beautiful, colorful illustrations. Through the incredible storytelling you can learn about fantastic creatures such as the Japanese baku, which had the power to devour nightmares, the wise Egyptian Sphynx, and the fearsome Minotaur who went head-to-head with Theseus in Greek mythology. Featured pages highlight amazing real-life photos of objects, showing how each beast was represented in art. A perfect, global introduction to the most fascinating stories about legendary creatures from ancient history…” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Chews your own tasty adventure : a cooking journey where YOU get to choose the ingredients! : vegetarian recipes from around the world / Pathmanathan, Sai
“A fun interactive cookbook which empowers children to choose and experiment with cooking – each simple recipe only has six ingredients! Join in the fun as you experiment with recipes from around the world! From cupcakes to churros and paratha to pide, chews each ingredient in an interactive game and then see which recipes you can create. Perfect for beginner cooks to start their cooking adventure, with a maximum of six key ingredients for each recipe and clear and simple instructions, but also challenges young cooks to experiment with new techniques and ingredients. Includes fun facts for each recipe and lots of top tips!” (Catalogue)

Inside the world’s wonders : see what lies within some of the greatest buildings on Earth / Gifford, Clive
“Take a tour around the world to uncover some of the planet’s most incredible landmarks and monuments – inside and out. From the Great Pyramid of Giza to the Statue of Liberty, the Taj Mahal to Sydney Opera House, you’ll discover these iconic structures’ secrets, learn about their history and find out why they have become ‘wonders’ of the world.” (Catalogue)

For more new kids books in the collection, go to: What’s new / November 2023 (wcl.govt.nz)

Author Spotlight: Katherine Rundell

“It was a very fine day, until something tried to eat him…”

Katherine Rundell‘s books blend magical delight with tales of adventure and courageous young protagonists. They’re great for reading aloud for different aged family members, or for tamariki to read to themselves (under the duvet with a torch, we won’t tell!)

With the release of Katherine Rundell’s latest book, Impossible Creatures, we have compiled a list of some of her other wonderful reads.

Impossible creatures / Rundell, Katherine
“A boy called Christopher is visiting his reclusive grandfather when he witnesses an avalanche of mythical creatures come tearing down the hill. This is how Christopher learns that his grandfather is the guardian of one of the ways between the non-magical world and a place called the Archipelago, a cluster of magical islands where all the creatures we tell of in myth live and breed and thrive alongside humans. […] Then a girl, Mal, appears in Christopher’s world. She is in possession of a flying coat, is being pursued by a killer and is herself in pursuit of a baby griffin. Mal, Christopher and the griffin embark on an urgent quest across the wild splendour of the Archipelago, where sphinxes hold secrets and centaurs do murder, to find the truth – with unimaginable consequences for both their worlds.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Rooftoppers / Rundell, Katherine
“Everyone thinks that Sophie is an orphan. True, there were no other recorded female survivors from the shipwreck which left baby Sophie floating in the English Channel in a cello case, but Sophie remembers seeing her mother wave for help. […] So when the Welfare Agency writes to her guardian threatening to send Sophie to an orphanage, she takes matters into her own hands and flees to Paris to look for her mother, starting with the only clue she has – the address of the cello maker. Evading the French authorities, she meets Matteo and his network of rooftoppers – urchins who live in the sky. Together they scour the city for Sophie’s mother before she is caught and sent back to London, and most importantly before she loses hope.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The wolf wilder / Rundell, Katherine
“In the days before the Russian Revolution, twelve-year-old Feodora sets out to rescue her mother when the Tsar’s Imperial Army imprisons her for teaching tamed wolves to fend for themselves.” (Catalogue)

The explorer / Rundell, Katherine
“Fred, Con, Lila, and Max are on their way back to England when the plane they’re on crashes in the Amazon jungle and the pilot dies upon landing. For days they survive alone, until Fred finds a map that leads them to a ruined city, and to a secret.” (Catalogue)

The good thieves / Rundell, Katherine
“Vita’s grandfather, Jack, has been cheated out of everything he owns by a conman. Vita is determined to set things right with a lawless, death-defying plan. –Adapted from cover.” (Catalogue)

Cartwheeling in thunderstorms / Rundell, Katherine
“Will must find her way after she’s plucked out of a wonderful life in Zimbabwe and forced to go to boarding school in England”–Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

The book of hopes
“In difficult times, what children really need is hope. And in that spirit, Katherine Rundell emailed some of the children’s writers and artists whose work she loved most. ‘I asked them to write something very short, fiction or non-fiction, or draw something that would make the children reading it feel like possibility-ists: something that would make them laugh or wonder or snort or smile… I hope that the imagination can be a place of shelter for children and that this book might be useful in that, even if only a little. This collection, packed with short stories, poems and pictures from the very best children’s authors and illustrators, aims to provide just that.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

For younger readers:

The zebra’s great escape / Rundell, Katherine
“”A girl, a zebra, a dog and a squirrel set forth on a great adventure. Mr. Spit is out to get them – but bravery and brilliant friends are a match for anyone”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

For the adult in your life:

Why you should read children’s books, even though you are so old and wise / Rundell, Katherine
“Katherine Rundell – Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and prize-winning author of five novels for children – explores how children’s books ignite, and can re-ignite, the imagination; how children’s fiction, with its unabashed emotion and playfulness, can awaken old hungers and create new perspectives on the world. This delightful and persuasive essay is for adult readers.” (Catalogue)

Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau | Tokelau language week!

Mālo ni!

It’s time for Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau | Tokelau language week 2023! Our theme this year is:

Ke Olatia ko ia Tokelau i tana Fakavae | Tokelau to Prosper Within its Foundation.

Tokelau Language and Culture

The nation is made up of the three atolls (ring-shaped coral islands) Nukunonu, Atafu, and Fakaofo, known as the Union Islands, until 1946 when Tokelau (north-wind) became the official name.

Tokelauans are New Zealand citizens. There are more than 8500 Tokelauan people in New Zealand today – five times the population of the islands themselves (about 1600)! We’re very lucky to have more Tokelauans in Wellington than anywhere else in the world, living and contributing a lot to our shared culture!

Events

Join us at Te Whare Pukapuka o Te Takapū o Patukawenga| Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library for a special Tokelauan Storytime and Fatele Dance on Tuesday, 24 October 2023, 3:30 – 4:30pm

Celebrate Tokelau language and culture with some special guests who will share some stories and some fatele dance. Bring your elders and children and join in the fun!

Listen to a beautiful Tokelau pehe – a song – from Tokelauan-Kiwi singer Olivia Foa’i


Alafapeta | Alphabet

The Tokelau alafapeta is made up of fifteen mataituhi (letters).

There are five vaueli (vowels): A – E – I – O – U

And ten konehane (consonants): F – G – K – L – M – N – P – H – T – V

3 of these consonants are pronounced a bit differently to English though:

F – sounds more like a breathy W, like when you blow out a candle.

G – is pronounced Ng. The Tuvaluan word for “language” – Gagana – is pronounced Nga-nga-na.

H – makes a “Hyuh” sound when placed before the letters A, O or U. The word hau sounds like “hyau”.

Helpful words

Mālō ni  — Hello

E ā mai koe? — How are you?

Ko au e mālohi, Fakafetai — I am well, thank you.

Ko koe te mata mālohi — You look well

Te mānaia o te aho — It’s a beautiful day

Ōmamai tātou hihiva fakataki — Come, let us dance!

Io! — Yes!

Te lelei ō koe — Well done!

Tōfā nī — Goodbye!

Kaokao — Armpit

Learn even more phrases using the Tokelau Language Cards from the Ministry for Pacific Peoples!

Tuhi | Books

We have two NEW 2023 books in Gagana Tokelau by David Riley!

Three of the stories below are bilingual, so you can read them in either English or Tokelau.

librarian holds 4 tokelau books

Here is Ethan a librarian at Newtown holding the new books from David Riley and two other classics.


Lightning boy /Ko te tama ko Uila by David Riley (2023)

Sometimes the least likely person is the one who solves a problem. That’s what happened to Uila the day that danger came to his family. Find out how in Lightning Boy, a bilingual legend from Tokelau.

The pearl shell necklace /Ko te kahoa pā by David Riley (2023)

How much would you do for someone you love? Kalokalo-o-te-la loved Hina so much he gave everything he had for her. Find out how in The Pearl Shell Necklace, a bilingual legend from Tokelau–Back cover.

Havali fakaua ki te fale/ Walking home in the Rain by Feauaʼi Amosa Burgess

Four Tokelauan kids have fun and play pretend in the rain on their way home from school.
Tokelau heroes / Riley, David

Part of David Riley’s beloved Pasifika Heroes series – Tokelau Heroes tells the inspirational stories of achievers who have Tokelauan ancestry. It includes legends like Hina; historical figures such as Ihaia Puka; and contemporary heroes like Opetaia Foa’i (Father of Olivia Foa’i mentioned above).

For more information about Tokelau, you may visit:

Lo & Behold! New Kids Items in the Collection

If you’re looking for something new to read, we’ve got you covered!  From exciting adventures to books to give you something to think about, we’ve got new titles across all of our kid’s collections.  Check out these to start with!

Picture Books

A bed of stars / Love, Jessica
Going to bed each night can be dark and scary. The night sky stretches out endlessly, making one sensitive child feel small in comparison. So Dad comes up with a plan: a night of camping out in the desert. After sunset, when the young thinker feels tiny against the vast sky, Dad knows just what to ask-and just what to say-to soothe away fears. From acclaimed author-illustrator Jessica Love comes a story of small moments between father and child that affirms the comfort of finding one’s place in the world.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The blue-footed booby / Biddulph, Rob
“Let’s follow the footprints! Let’s hunt for some clues! Left footprint! Right footprint! No time to lose! As everybody knows, Red-Footed Boobies are fabulous bakers. But when Desmond’s frangipane tart goes missing amidst a flurry of footprints, the Blue-Footed Booby becomes the chief suspect. But all is not as it seems…” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Nooo! Not the dentist / Blake, Stephanie
“Simon gets a sore tooth so needs to take his first trip to the dentist. The night before the appointment, Simon’s friend Ferdinand makes the most of the chance to show he knows more. Ferdinand uses his full imagination to describe the graphic horrors of the dentist’s chair. “I will NEVER go to the dentist!” yells Simon. But his mother takes no notice. When Simon is eventually persuaded onto the dentist chair, insisting his name is “Poo Bum”, he finds a remarkably patient dentist and an experience he wasn’t expecting… ” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Comic Books

Lo & behold / Mass, Wendy
“Can a virtual reality headset help change the way twelve-year-old Addie looks at things? With her life recently turned upside down, 12-year-old Addie is uncomfortable in her own skin until the world of virtual reality sparks her imagination and leads to an exciting new project, a new friend, and to reconnecting with who she’s always been.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

 

Adventuregame comics. 1, Leviathan / Shiga, Jason
“A “choose your own story” graphic novel. Leviathan is set in a medieval coastal village, where residents live in fear of a giant sea creature. Your goal as a reader is simple: defeat the Leviathan! As you wander through the open world, the town’s backstory is revealed. You can attempt to visit the library to try and learn why the Leviathan destroyed it years ago. You can stop by the castle to discover the town was once riddled with crime and theft–and how that’s stopped as the Leviathan will wreak havoc on the town for the smallest misdeeds. If you’re lucky, you may find your way to the old wizard who may possess the one thing that could keep the Leviathan at bay. But not everything is as it appears in this village. Can you discover the secrets and stop the Leviathan before it’s too late?” (Catalogue)

Four eyes / Ogle, Rex
“When Rex finds out he needs glasses, he’s beyond miserable. Dealing with the bullies at school, his family being broke, and an embarrassing lack of friends, he has way too much on his plate already.  A humorous and heartwarming middle-grade graphic memoir about fitting in, facing bullies and finding the right pair of glasses.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Chapter Books

The sideways orbit of Evie Hart / Kamaleddine, Samera
“Evie Hart likes rules. A lot. But as she embarks on her very last year of primary school, it feels like all the rules around her are being broken. When Evie’s class starts learning about the Earth’s place in the universe, it makes Evie think about her own place in the world and where she belongs. Which has her more worried than ever. When your mum writes a horoscope page for a living, it’s hard not to think about what the future holds. Especially when she and the only dad Evie has ever known are acting like they’re on different planets. But the more Evie learns about the sky and the stars, the more she learns that changes in the world can’t always be controlled. And maybe that’s not a bad thing.” (Catalogue)

A child like you / Robert, Na’íma bint
“Somewhere, out there, In the wide, wide world, a child like you is Watching…” Four brave children watch, listen, search, and feel, as they experience the inequalities, dangers and injustices of life in our world. Inspired by real-life activists and campaigners Greta Thunberg, Yusra Mardini, Marley Dias and Iqbal Masih, each of these children is filled with courage, determination and hope. They campaign to help save the planet, show that refugees can contribute and show leadership in sport in their new land, they build a library of 1000 books depicting black girls, they speak out against the outrage of child slavery. Lyrical and powerful, this book is a passionate call to children everywhere to speak their truth and stand up for a better world.” (Catalogue)

The circle breakers / Agbabi, Patience
“Elle and her friends are back! This time, they’ll be leaping to the past, the present and the future to safeguard the secret of The Gift and destroy The Vicious Circle. Fourteen-year-old Elle and her friends are going to a not-to-be-missed funfair. But a ride on the Ghost Train takes them further than they ever imagined. They end up in 1880, face-to-face with criminal mastermind, The Grandfather! To Elle’s surprise, he needs her help. Someone has threatened to reveal The Gift to the media. If that happens, everyone will know that Leaplings can leap through time; no Leapling will be safe. Meanwhile, Millennia’s power at the head of The Vicious Circle grows. Will Elle work for a villain to save her secret community? Can she and The Infinites crush The Vicious Circle for good?” (Catalogue)

Junior Non Fiction

Timelines of everything : from woolly mammoths to world wars
“From dinosaurs and Vikings to the history of robots and espionage, discover incredible world history in this lavish collection of timelines. Jam-packed with surprising facts and amazing details, such as the most bloodthirsty pirate of all time and the first crime to be solved by studying fingerprints, Timelines of Everything will take you on a whirlwind journey through an illustrated history of time, from the Big Bang to the modern world. More than 120 timelines give you all the general knowledge you need – and even some surprising trivia you don’t!” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What machines do / Allan, John
“Digging, ploughing, baking, flying. Explore the exciting World of Machines! Learn what different machines do and how they work. Discover which machines build houses, and which ones are blasted into space. Bright illustrations and informative text show a wide variety of machines. Perfect for little engineers who like to see what machines do and how they work. A colourful children’s book depicting various types of everyday machinery and what they do.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Any body : a comic compendium of important facts & feelings about our bodies / Gathen, Katharine von der
“We live in our bodies for life, so it’s a good idea to understand them. Any Body looks from the outside and the inside, answering questions about our bodies and how we feel about them. It looks at how our bodies change and how we can change our bodies. It includes interesting facts about skin, hair, and body functions alongside the questions that may affect us from puberty and beyond – gender identity, beauty, self-confidence, how other people react and relate to us, and how they make us feel. This compendium allows us to get to know and feel at home in our bodies – and have a giggle about them too.” (Catalogue)

Wonderfully wired brains / Gooding, Louise
“We all have a brain. It carries our opinions, personalities, likes and dislikes, and tells us what to do, and what not to. There isn’t one brain in the world that is exactly the same as another! The differences in our brains should be understood and celebrated. This inclusive book will introduce children to the world of neurodiversity and encourages them to embrace their differences. (Adapted from Catalogue)

For more new books in the collection, go to:

What’s new & Popular / July 2023 (wcl.govt.nz)

New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults 2023: Children’s Finalists!

It’s been another bumper crop year for children’s books in Aotearoa New Zealand — and all you need to do for confirmation is check out the shortlist for the New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults, officially announced last week. This is always a super exciting time of year for us at the library — picture librarians huddled anxiously around computer screens awaiting the announcement, exclaiming with joy and anticipation upon seeing the list go up, scrolling to see if our favourites made the cut.

The good news is many of our favourites did make the cut this year! The books on the list are by turns funny, quirky, beautiful, profound, and so distinctly Aotearoa in quality that they only could have come from here. To help you make your mind up about which books you think should win their categories, we thought we’d share the full list here, with links to all the books in our catalogue. Just click on the title and you’ll be able to reserve the next available copy to read. But get in quick — we don’t think they’ll stay on the shelf for very long!

Picture Book Award

Judges’ comments: “The shortlisted picture books vary greatly in theme and illustration style, and contemporary issues are dealt with subtly and in tandem with the pictures.”

Duck Goes Meow / MacIver, Juliette
“Woof! says Dog. Moo! says Cow. Cluck! says Hen, and Duck Goes … Meow. A little yellow duckling is amongst animal friends who are all sure of the sounds they make: hiss, neigh, moo, cheep, cluck and oink. But when Duck goes ‘meow’, the other animals say no, that is wrong, try again … then Duck’s mama arrives, and boy, do they get a surprise!” (Catalogue)

Farewell, Anahera / Hatley-Owen, Vanessa“This is a beautiful, comforting and uplifiting story for anyone who has lost someone that they love. From far away, Hawaiki called to her. Turning her face to the sun, she was ready for her next adventure. In the disance, across the shining sea, smiling faces of her ancestors were ready for her, their hands reaching out to welcome her home. Welcome precious one! Welcome! Follows Anahera as her loved ones bid her farewell and her ancestors welcome her home.” (Catalogue)

How my koro became a star / Te Paa, Brianne
“A young boy learns about the customs around celebrating Matariki from his grandfather. They watch the stars from the top of a mountain, prepare their offering of food for the gods, and the boy learns about Te Waka o Rangi and the tradition of calling out the names of loved ones who have passed away so that they can become stars.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Read this book in te reo Māori

Roo and Vladimir : an unlikely friendship / Stapleton, Minky
“This is the heart-warming tale of a small Pekingese and a very large dog called Roo. Roo is big. He is goofy. He is clumsy. And all he wants is a friend. But the other dogs are afraid of him, which makes Roo sad. Then he is befriended by Vladimir the Pekingese – the best friend in the whole world. It takes a big storm and a washed out bridge for Roo to prove his worth and become a much-loved town hero.” (Catalogue)

The Lighthouse Princess / Wardell, Susan
“Do you need rescuing from this tower?” he asked her. “No,” she said, “I like it here.” The Lighthouse Princess is almost perfectly happy. She takes care of the light that keeps ships at sea safe, catches fish off the balcony and swims with penguins and seals. But one day, a little fishing boat with green sails sets out just as a storm blows up.” (Catalogue)


Junior Fiction Award

Judges’ comments: “Whether contemporary or historical, serious or playful, rooted in te ao Māori or te ao Pākehā, these satisfying stories having something to teach readers about life in Aotearoa New Zealand and the power rangatahi have to effect change in a complicated world.”

Below / Hill, David
“Caught in a tunnel collapse, Liam and Imogen have to use all their wits to survive in this gripping novel for readers eight years and up. […] When Liam dares his classmate Imogen to come on a forbidden tour of the railway tunnel being drilled through a nearby mountain, he hopes she’ll quit protesting about it damaging the environment – his dad is an engineer working on the tunnel, after all. Just as they reach the huge tunnelling machine everything goes horribly wrong. […] Can they stop arguing and start working together to escape before time runs out?” (Catalogue)

Children of the rush. Book one / Russell, James
“It’s 1861, and gold fever is sweeping the world. Otherwise sensible adults have gone mad and will do anything to get their hands on the precious metal. But two children have been caught up in the rush. Michael and Atarangi couldn’t be more different, but they share one thing: each has a remarkable and magical talent. Circumstances conspire to bring the children together in the remote and inhospitable goldfields, and they’re thrust into a world where lawlessness, greed, and cruelty reign. When the children find out that a cut-throat gang stalks the goldfields, preying upon the innocent, they have a choice to make: turn a blind eye, or fight back?” (Catalogue)

Jason Mason and the world’s most powerful itching powder / Gunn, Jason
“Jason Mason is a pretty average kid. The kind of kid who doesn’t get chosen for the rugby team. The kind of kid who gets his lunchbox picked over by the school bully every day. The kind of kid who finds it hard to concentrate in class. The kind of kid who is, actually, a SECRET AGENT. WAIT . . . WHAT? You won’t believe the crazy, laugh-out-loud, risky, save-the-world type stuff this pretty average kid gets up to. This book is destined to leave you itching for more Jason Mason adventures!” (Catalogue)

Masher / Colston, Fifi
“Twelve-year-old Freddie Foxworthy just wants to do arts and crafts. He finds them a lot easier to deal with than his peers, and far more rewarding. His latest project is to create the perfect glove puppet from papier-mache. But when ashes from his metalhead neighbour’s deceased bull terrier get into the mix, he finds he has accidentally made a growling puppet with an unpredictable mouth! Freddie has an overload of mysteries to solve – who is to blame for the late Masher’s death? Was Masher responsible for the disappearance a neighbourhood cat? And, most of all, is Masher actually for real? Surely Freddie couldn’t be causing all this chaos himself?” (Catalogue)

Pipi and Pou and the raging mountain / Tipene, Tim
“Pipi and Pou are looking forward to a weekend of screen time but Nana has other ideas. The earth is shaking down south and Nana wants to find out why. Can Pipi and Pou stop the raging mountain carving a destructive path through the forest? And what if success means sharing their secret powers with strangers? Join Pipi, Pou, and Nana – katiaki with a superhero difference – as they journey through the forest, meet amazing friends, and try to calm a mountain before it’s too late.” (Catalogue)


Non-Fiction Award

Judges’ comments“From biography and pūrākau to understanding more about climate and weather, the finalist titles in this year’s Elsie Locke Award for Non-Fiction introduce readers to a range of new ideas and experiences, both inspirational and educational.”

A new dawn / Sione, Emeli
“Emeli Stone shares her Dawn Raid story to help us understand the real impact of this dark time in our history.” (Catalogue)

Freestyle: The Israel Adesanya Story / Riley, David

“Freestyle: The Israel Adesanya Story tells the story of UFC champion Israel Adesanya. It details his family’s move from Nigeria to New Zealand for a better future and how Israel fulfilled his parents’ dreams in the most unexpected way! The book is Illustrated by Ant Sang, one of New Zealand’s most well-known and respected graphic novelists.” (Catalogue)

Sylvia and the birds : how the bird lady saved thousands of birds, and how you can too / Emeney, Jo
“Part graphic biography, part practical guide to protecting our bird wildlife, this remarkable book for young readers and their families is fully committed to detailing the wonders of our native birds, the threats they face, and how we can help them. Based on the life of ‘The Bird Lady, ‘ Sylvia Durrant, who helped over 140,000 sick, injured, and lost birds during her lifetime, it inspires a reverence for the natural world and is a call to action for all young ecologists and environmentalists.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Te Wehenga : the separation of Ranginui and Papatūānuku / Tait, Mat
“Te Wehenga is the separation of Ranginui, Sky-Father, and Papatūānuku, Earth-Mother … the reo Māori and English are woven together in a seamless bilingual approach to the text, with visceral illustrations underlining the mana of the story.” (Catalogue)

Also available as an eBook

Weather and climate New Zealand / Carrod, Sandra
“Understanding our weather is key to understanding our changing climate and its impact on our lives.” (Catalogue)


Illustration Award

Judges’ comments: “Frightening to cute, places of dark to beacons of light, and Aotearoa to Italy and the Himalayas, the books up for the Russell Clark Award for Illustration cover a broad range of topics, perfectly showcasing the diverse talents of their illustrators. The shortlisted titles demonstrate the illustrators’ cohesiveness, originality, skill, confidence and energy.”

A portrait of Leonardo : the life and times of Leonardo da Vinci : a literary picture book / Bixley, Donovan
“Strip back the layers of varnish and discover the man behind the masterpieces, the personality that drove one of the greatest minds in history. The life and times of Leonardo da Vinci are vividly imagined by Donovan Bixley.” (Catalogue)

4 yaks and a yeti / Hillary, Peter
“High in the foothills of the Himalayas, a young Nepalese boy, Lhakpa, and his four loyal yaks – Yak, Nak, Zopchok and Zum – embark on a perilous journey to find the mythical castle, Shangri-La. On this daring adventure Lhakpa and his yaks battle the perils of the misty mountains – freezing snowstorms and danger prowling in the shadows. And watching from the snow-covered peaks above is their greatest challenge of all – the legendary Yeti… Written by mountaineer Peter Hillary and illustrated by award-winning artist Ant Sang, this fable of perseverance and the realisation that not everything in life is as it seems is a wonderful read for adventurers of all ages.” (Catalogue)

Roar squeak purr : a New Zealand treasury of animal poems
“In between the covers of this book you will meet creatures large and small. They might pad, or skitter, swoosh or soar. They could be fuzzy, feathery, suckery, scaly or spiky. These animals might ROAR or squeak or Purrrrrrrrrr. Just like the animals they are about, these poems come in all shapes and sizes! … This … treasury brings together over 200 animal poems.” (Catalogue)

Te Wehenga : the separation of Ranginui and Papatūānuku / Tait, Mat
“Te Wehenga is the separation of Ranginui, Sky-Father, and Papatūānuku, Earth-Mother … the reo Māori and English are woven together in a seamless bilingual approach to the text, with visceral illustrations underlining the mana of the story.” (Catalogue)

Also available as an eBook

The Lighthouse Princess / Wardell, Susan
“Do you need rescuing from this tower?” he asked her. “No,” she said, “I like it here.” The Lighthouse Princess is almost perfectly happy. She takes care of the light that keeps ships at sea safe, catches fish off the balcony and swims with penguins and seals. But one day, a little fishing boat with green sails sets out just as a storm blows up.” (Catalogue)


Te Kura Pounamu Award for Te Reo Māori

Judges’ comments: “The judges of the Wright Family Foundation Te Kura Pounamu Award, which is for books written entirely in te reo Māori, found this year’s crop of shortlisted books showed excellent use of reo and displayed strong themes of mātauranga Māori and mātāpono Māori.”

He raru ki tai / Cooper, Jane
“An adventure story set in seventeenth-century Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland when the hapū of Ngā Oho/Ngā Iwi predominated. […] Cousins, Te Kawenga and Kakati learn of a plan being hatched against a neighbouring iwi and strange activity occurring at a seasonal fishing camp. A huge trap is being built to snare and kill Ureia, the taniwha of Hauraki iwi. The cousins fear the retribution that will be taken on their people if Ureia is killed. So they take a dangerous journey to defy the decision of their people and try and save the taniwha.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Also available as an eBook

Kua whetūrangitia tōku koro / Te Paa, Brianne
“A young boy learns about the customs around celebrating Matariki from his grandfather. They watch the stars from the top of a mountain, prepare their offering of food for the gods, and the boy learns about Te Waka o Rangi and the tradition of calling out the names of loved ones who have passed away so that they can become stars.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Read this book in te reo Ingarihi

Te kokorangi : te aranga o Matariki / Ihimaera, Witi
“E kimi ana a Te Kokorangi i etahi pia hou tokowha hei ako i nga korero o Matariki me te maramataka. Kowhiria ana etahi tama tokotoru, me tetahi kotiro, he pani, ko Aria te ingoa. Tohe ana a Aria kia haere ano ko tana kuri haunga i tona taha. Ka ahua hoha a Aria i nga akoranga, kaore hoki ia e pai kia tohutohungia ia. Engari kua noho morearea te iwi. Taihoa pea ratou ka tino raru i a Ruatapu Te Pukurua. Ae ranei ma Aria ano te iwi e whakaora?” (Catalogue)

Read this book in te reo Ingarihi


Best First Book

Judges’ comments: “The judges recognise the ‘guts and talent’ it takes to have your first book published, and the 2023 NZSA Best First Book Award finalists impressed with the range of characters, topics and settings — all presented with skill and much promise for the future.”

Echo / Kelly, Arlo
“Being visually impaired, Eric loves his quiet life living on a remote beach on the east coast of New Zealand. But his life is about to change in unexpected ways and a chance encounter means this summer will be like no other.” (Catalogue)

Holding the horse / Williams, J. L
“It tells the story of Sid, a boy who really wants to be a jockey when he leaves school in a few years, and the struggle with his father who is completely against the idea.” (Catalogue)

He raru ki tai / Cooper, Jane
“An adventure story set in seventeenth-century Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland when the hapū of Ngā Oho/Ngā Iwi predominated. […] Cousins, Te Kawenga and Kakati learn of a plan being hatched against a neighbouring iwi and strange activity occurring at a seasonal fishing camp. A huge trap is being built to snare and kill Ureia, the taniwha of Hauraki iwi. The cousins fear the retribution that will be taken on their people if Ureia is killed. So they take a dangerous journey to defy the decision of their people and try and save the taniwha.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Also available as an eBook

Kidnap at Mystery island / Garden, Carol
“Set in a time after the great global Environment Revolution of 2072, readers enter a high-tech world of eco criminals, artificial islands, global warming, rising seas and patrolling coastal rangers. Like other kids of his generation, Dom has a special talent, chosen by his parents at conception. He is a human chameleon – he can blend into any surroundings and become almost invisible. Unfortunately his Anti-Ec dad, Dezi Krate, a mining billionaire set on ignoring the new planet-saving laws, kidnaps the young niece of some coastal rangers, Zoe: special talent mind-reading. Together with her sisters, who also have remarkable talents, can Zoe and Dom and other key players in this dangerous, futuristic world outwit the ruthless Dezi? A gripping futuristic, kidnap adventure story.” (Catalogue)

The Lighthouse Princess / Wardell, Susan
“Do you need rescuing from this tower?” he asked her. “No,” she said, “I like it here.” The Lighthouse Princess is almost perfectly happy. She takes care of the light that keeps ships at sea safe, catches fish off the balcony and swims with penguins and seals. But one day, a little fishing boat with green sails sets out just as a storm blows up.” (Catalogue)

Exciting New Books in the Kid’s Collection

We have piles of new books for kids of all ages in our collection this month, everything from the next chapter of your favourite series, to beautiful picture books to read together, or exciting non-fiction titles to learn about the world.  We’ve selected a handful here to share with you, with titles for kids of all ages.

Sleepy Sheepy / Cummins, Lucy Ruth
Sleepy Sheepy was not sleepy
But it was time for bed
(At least, that’s what the clock said.)
But Sleepy Sheepy would not sleepy.
He was wired. And absolutely not tired!
In fact, he was WIDE-AWAKE.

Despite his name, Sleepy Sheepy is NOT sleepy. He’d much rather build with blocks or knit socks than go to sleep. Will Ma and Pa Sheepy ever get their sheepy to go to sleepy?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The fantastic Bureau of Imagination / Montague, Brad
“Every day, special figment agent Sparky delivers all the mail the FBI receives to the proper department, like the Office of the Unexplainable or the Department of Dreams. It’s a big job, but Sparky keeps everything running smoothly . . . until disaster strikes when the Cave of Untold Stories overflows and threatens to topple the whole bureau. And now, dear reader, will you join the effort and become a special agent before it’s too late? The FBI is counting on you!” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Fish and Crab / Coppo, Marianna
“Fish and Crab are best friends, always there for each other. When it’s time for bed, Crab is ready to go to sleep, but Fish is still wide awake, wondering: What is that noise–that ooh, ooh? What if aliens abduct us as we sleep? What if it rains frogs? What if . . . so many things?!

At once relatable and reassuring, Fish and Crab shows the youngest of readers that it is okay to embrace the full spectrum of our feelings–not just at bedtime, but anytime. And that even the biggest worries and “what ifs” are easier to cope with–and move on from–when someone you love and trust is there to listen.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Sir Ladybug and the Queen Bee / Tabor, Corey R.
“Sir Ladybug–the duke of the dandelion patch, champion of truth and justice–is on a new quest! He and his herald, Pell, and his trusty squire, Sterling, will have to be extra-clever to outwit the mean Queen Bee.

Woven seamlessly into this funny and surprising story are the themes of friendship, bravery, teamwork, creative thinking, and helping others. With warmth and heart, surprising and delightful asides, and a memorable cast of characters, this series will appeal to avid and reluctant readers alike.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Isla to island / Castellanos, Alexis
“Marisol loves her colorful island home. Cuba is vibrant with flowers and food and people…but things are changing. The home Marisol loves is no longer safe–and then it’s no longer her home at all. Her parents are sending her to the United States. Alone.

Nothing about Marisol’s new life in cold, gray Brooklyn feels like home–not the language, school, or even her foster parents. But Marisol starts to realize that home isn’t always a place. And finding her way can be as simple as staying true to herself.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Glitter boy / Eagleton, Ian
“Eleven-year-old James loves dancing, poetry, and Mariah Carey. But he’s being bullied by a boy at school, and as the secrets build up, James begins to lose his spark. Can he find the strength to let the truths out?” (Catalogue)

Where the black flowers bloom / Smith, Ronald L.
“When ghoulish creatures kill twelve-year-old Asha’s guardian, her dying words launch Asha on a quest to stop an ancient evil, and along the way, she uncovers shocking secrets about the family she never knew and begins to find her place in the world as she discovers her own untapped powers.” (Catalogue)

The monkey who fell from the future / Welford, Ross
“Centuries after a catastrophic meteor collision, nature has retaken the earth. In a small town in what was once England, young Ocean Mooney and the monkey-owning Duke Smiff have just dug up a 400 year-old tablet computer. Meanwhile, in the present day, Thomas Reeve and his genius cousin Kylie create the Time Tablet – a device which they hope will allow them to communicate with the future. But when the Time Tablet malfunctions live on television, Thomas and Kylie are sucked into the year 2425 – and have only 24 hours to return home, and save the future of humanity.” (Catalogue)

Around the world in 80 musical instruments / Dickmann, Nancy
“A visual celebration of the huge variety of instruments played across the world, from those you know to those you almost certainly don’t. Grouped into percussion instruments, wind, and string, as well as the weird and wonderful that defy categorization, readers will discover how they are all related to each other in ‘families’, and enjoy exploring the musical family tree as a fold-out poster.” (Catalogue)

The most exciting book of science, inventions, & space ever / Watts, Claire
“Meet the Brainwaves, hilarious little mischief-makers who will be your guides to a marvellous range of mindblowing science topics – from the wisest and wackiest inventions the world has ever seen to the adventures of pioneering astronauts, plus all the core information you need to know, such as the periodic table, energy, forces, and matter. These pint-sized pals will jump aboard the invention of the car, take you on a madcap holiday to Mars and outer space, and will even shrink down to atomic level to explore the most basic building blocks of science.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Girls who slay monsters : daring tales of Ireland’s forgotten goddesses / Ryan, Ellen
“There was a time when tales of Ireland’s mythical goddesses – their astonishing powers, bravery, and unbreakable bonds with nature – were famous, in Ireland and beyond. But over time, these stories were lost, often replaced or rewritten to make room for male warriors and kings. Until Now. Girls Who Slay Monsters brings these heroes of Irish mythology back to vibrant, magical life. From Éire, Ireland’s fierce namesake, and BÉ Binn, a giant who overcame her bullies, to Badb, a gleefully gruesome death prophet, and BÉ Mannair, a gender-fluid spy who challenged an entire army. These are goddesses of many shapes, skin shades and sizes, from every corner of ancient Ireland, whose daring still inspires today. Stand by their sides as they wield magic, fight monsters, and protect the powerless – and you might just discover that you, too, are a force of nature.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

For more new items in the catalogue, go to:  What’s new & Popular / May 2023 (wcl.govt.nz)

Tūhono 2022 is Live!

At long last we’re here — Tūhono 2022, the latest volume in our poetry journal for (and by) young Wellingtonians, has officially been released into the world as. Just like last year, we had over 200 young Wellington poets between the ages of 5 and 18 contribute, so we have again split the journal into two volumes — one containing the poems written by kids, and the other containing those written by teens. Head on over to OverDrive or Libby to check out the kids’ version — you can find the teens’ one here.

We are having physical copies printed as well, so soon you’ll be able to find Tūhono 2022 on the shelf at your local public or school library. Visit this link to reserve your copy. We’re also giving two copies to the National Library of New Zealand, where they will be preserved for the rest of time (the legal term is ‘in perpetuity’) as part of the cultural heritage of this country. We think that’s an awesome achievement for all of you who wrote poems for the book. Congratulations on being published!

Go forth and read! You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and maybe — just maybe — you’ll feel a connection, a sense of tūhono, with everyone else who put a little something of themselves into this incredible book.


Tūhono. a journal of poetry by Wellington children / 2022
“Whakangā : breath. This theme links all of the poems in this third edition of Tūhono, which were contributed by Wellington poets aged 5-12 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout November 2022. Poems by writers aged 13-18 are collected in a separate volume.

The process of drawing in breath calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; creating calm, taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be. While the breath of the world lives in our lungs, we are energised by lives and experiences both our own and those of others, holding within us the insecurities and accomplishments of our pasts, and the anxieties and hopes of our futures. Sometimes, as we exhale this breath of the world, we get lucky and all of this potential is transmuted into words we can speak out loud or write on the page. And these exhalations, dear reader, are what you are about to breathe in.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono. a journal of poetry by Wellington teens / 2022
“Whakangā : breath. This theme links the poems in this third edition of Tūhono, submitted by Wellington poets aged 13-18 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout November 2022. Poems by writers aged 5-12 are collected in a separate volume.

The process of drawing in breath calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; creating calm, taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be. While the breath of the world lives in our lungs, we are energised by lives and experiences both our own and those of others, holding within us the insecurities and accomplishments of our pasts, and the anxieties and hopes of our futures. Sometimes, as we exhale this breath of the world, we get lucky, and all of this potential is through some mysterious process transmuted into words we can speak out loud or write on the page. And these exhalations, dear reader, are what you in turn are about to breathe in.” (Catalogue)


Acknowledgements

There are some wonderful people who work for the library who need to be thanked for their efforts in creating this year’s edition of TūhonoStephanie P (my partner-in-crime, and the amazing librarian who buy all the kids’ books for the library), Ligia (she designed the book — what an amazing talent she has!), Stephanie A (she helped collect and format your poems), Joseph (he helped with editing), Monty (he makes it possible for us to publish stuff online), Bridget (who writes the catalogue records that make it possible to find stuff at the library) and Celeste (who looks after our website). Hats off and a round of applause for these talented librarians who are helping to make our dream of publishing our very own poetry journal a reality!

Eid Mubarak! Happy Eid!

As Salaamu Alaykum & Eid Mubarak to our Muslim whānau!

What is Islam?

Ramadan and Eid are important events in the religion called Islam. People who follow Islam are called Muslims. Did you know there are about 1.9 billion Muslims worldwide? Islam is the second biggest religion in the world, after Christianity!

Why is it good to learn about Islam?

A local Muslim family celebrating Eid al-Fitr at Newtown Library

As the world comes together and people mix more and more, it’s good to learn about religions and cultures that maybe different to your own. You may be Muslim yourself, have a Muslim friend, or classmate, or you may not know any Muslims. But we can all learn more about Islam. Like many religions, Islam has lots of ancient wisdom and practices that help its followers to be peaceful and kind people.

Libraries are great places to learn the basic facts about religions, cultures, important celebrations and special days.

Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr

Ramadan is one of the most sacred times of the year for Muslims. During this month Muslims are expected to fast from dawn until sunset, pray, give charity and spend time with family. Generally, it is a time spent being quiet and reflecting on Allah (God). Ramadan ends with Eid al-Fitr, a celebration that marks the end of the fasting. In Arabic it means ‘Holiday of Breaking the Fast’. It is also a holiday where sharing food is very important. Yum!

Did you know there are two Eid celebrations? Eid al-Fitr is always the first one in the year and it is usually around May or June. The other Eid is called Eid al-Adha and happens around July or August.

Eid in Aotearoa New Zealand

In Aotearoa New Zealand 2023, Eid Day will fall on either Saturday 22nd or Sunday 23rd of April – it all depends on the sighting of the moon.  Traditionally, Eid al-Fitr begins at sunset on the night of the first sighting of the crescent moon. Everyone needs to give money to charity (meaning to people who are poor or needy) which is called Zakat-ul-Fitr. After that there is a special ‘Eid prayer’.

This year there is a big celebration happening in Wellington on the 22nd of April, organised by the Eid Day Trust. Everyone can go and join in the fun. You can find out more on their Facebook page.

Celebration Collection

In the Library we have a new Celebration Collection for Ramadan and Eid. This means we have a lot of beautiful new books about Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr that are available at this time of the year.

During Ramadan some of the books have even been staying at mosques around Wellington City!

As part of this special collection, we have over 60 books about Ramadan and Eid written by Muslim authors, as well as many books with Muslim characters. These books are for kids of all ages, from babies all the way up to intermediate-aged readers.

Please do come into our libraries and see our beautiful new books. Eid Mubarak!

Children’s books about Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr

The proudest blue : a story of hijab and family / Muhammad, Ibtihaj
“Faizah relates how she feels on the first day her sister, sixth-grader Asiya, wears a hijab to school.” (Catalogue)
In my mosque / Yuksel, M. O.
“A picture book featuring culturally rich artwork celebrates the joys, rituals, and traditions that are practiced in mosques throughout the world, and includes a glossary and information about many historical and significant mosques.” (Catalogue)
Aya and the butterfly / Salama, Maysoon
“Aya and her grandad grow swan plants in their garden. Dedicated to the children and whānau of the Aotearoa New Zealand Muslim community, whose lives were changed forever on 15 March 2019.” (Catalogue)
Once upon an Eid : stories of hope and joy by 15 Muslim voices
“Eid: The short, single-syllable word conjures up a variety of feelings and memories for Muslims. Maybe it’s waking up to the sound of frying samosas and simmering pistachio kheer, maybe it’s the pleasure of putting on a new outfit for Eid prayers, or maybe it’s the gift giving and holiday parties to come that day. Whatever it may be, for those who cherish this day of celebration, the emotional responses may be summed up in another short and sweet word: joy.” (Adapted from Catalogue)
Like the moon loves the sky / Khan, Hena
“Illustrations and prose inspired by the Quran celebrate a mother’s love and hopes for her child.” (Catalogue)
Sadiq / Nuurali, Siman (series)
“When Sadiq’s father leaves on a business trip, he worries he’ll miss his baba too much. But Baba has a story for Sadiq: the story of the Desert Star. Learning about Baba’s passion for the stars sparks Sadiq’s interest in outer space. But can Sadiq find others who are willing to help him start the space club of his dreams?” (Catalogue entry for Sadiq and the Desert Star)
Planet Omar / Mian, Zanib (series)
“Welcome, readers, to the imaginative brain of Omar! You might not know me yet, but once you open the pages of this book you’ll laugh so hard that snot will come out of your nose (plus you might meet a dragon and a zombie – what more could you want?). My parents decided it would be a good idea to move house AND move me to a new school at the same time. As if I didn’t have a hard enough time staying out of trouble at home, now I’ve also got to try and make new friends. […] The only good thing is that Eid’s just around the corner which means a feast of all my favourite food (YAY) and presents (DOUBLE YAY).” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Community languages

Please note: We also have books in different community languages about Islam, Ramadan and Eid, including Arabic, Farsi, Somali and Bahasa Malaysia.

Please do come into our libraries and see our beautiful new books. Eid Mubarak!

Kilbirnie Library Kids’ Club Kete are here!

Kia ora koutou, kids and parents! We have a super exciting announcement for you this week!

Kids Club Kete have landed at Kilbirnie Library!

Kids’ Club Kete are bags of books, specially selected by our librarians, that you can grab and borrow from Te Whare Pukapuka o Te Awa-a-Taia (Ruth Gotlieb) Kilbirnie Library!

Each kete contains a treasure trove of books around a theme, such as comics, easy to read, picture books or non-fiction.

Kete are perfect for a deep dive into your favourite topics!

 


Kids' Club Kete image of a Friendly Monster

A friendly monster decorates some of our kete!

Do you like to dance? We’ve got a kete on dancing.

Do you like to learn about Dinosaurs? We’ve got a kete all about dinosaurs!

Want to read some books about Aotearoa or books by Aotearoa authors? We’ve definitely got the kete for that!

Do you like ghost stories? We’ve got a whole kete full of spooky stories just for you!

Or, are you more into adventure stories? Don’t worry – we’ve got a kete just for that.


Image of a Kids' Club Kete

Kids’ kete bags come in several cute designs!

These awesome Kids’ Club Kete are also available at other branch libraries around Wellington!

Currently, kete are avalaible at Karori Library, Johnsonville Library, and at Tawa Library, so pop over to your favourite branch to pick up some new favourite books!