2022 Round-Up: Children’s Non-Fiction

Following up our twin blogs rounding up some of the best picture books of 2022 and some of the best children’s fiction of 2022, now it is time for non-fiction to shine!

This isn’t an exhaustive list, but we are taking the opportunity to highlight some of our favourite books published in 2022!

If you’d rather browse through the newest books we have added to our shelves, head on over to the New Material page on our website.

 

Tāwhaki : the deeds of a demigod / Mead, Sidney M

We might be cheating with this one, as it is a republication of a classic work by Hirini Moko Mead, first published in 1996. But this edition has beautiful illustrations by Scott Pearson.

Like Māui, Tāwhaki was a powerful demigod. This wonderful book shares three of the adventures of Tāwhaki.

Squawk! : Donovan Bixley’s forest birds of Aotearoa / Bixley, Donovan

After his 2021 book, Donovan Bixley’s draw some awesome : drawing tips & ideas for budding artists, was shortlisted in New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults, Bixley is right back at it with another amazing pukapuka!

If you are interested in knowing more about the top New Zealand children’s books of this year, have a read of our previous post about the 2022 NZCYA Book Award winners. If you haven’t already, these books are definitely worth checking out!

You don’t know what war is : the diary of a young girl from Ukraine / Skalietska, Yeva

At the front of our minds this year, has been the international conflict between Russia and Ukraine. Wellington is home to thousands of people of Ukrainian and Russian descent, some of whom have moved here this year to escape the conflict.

You might still have a lot of questions about what is happening and why. Earlier this year, we prepared a blog called understanding Ukraine and Russia: a guide for kids and their adults. We hope this will be useful for your whānau.

Another way that you can learn more is through this pukapuka, a diary by a 12-year-old girl who is experiencing the conflict directly.

Roar squeak purr : a New Zealand treasury of animal poems

Here’s a fun compendium of over 200 animal themed poems from Aotearoa New Zealand! If you’re in the mood for more local poetry, don’t forget to check out Tūhono. a journal of poetry by Wellington children / 2021 (wcl.govt.nz), the 2021 edition that Wellington City Libraries published this year!
LGBTQ+ icons : a celebration of historical LGBTQ+ icons in the arts / Keehnen, Owen
“From music to movies, literature to dance – the arts have always been influenced by the work of LGBTQ people. LGBTQ+ Icons spotlights the history and contributions of 50 pioneering artists who lived and worked around the world….” (Abridged from Amazon catalogue)

Before music : where instruments come from / Pimentel, Annette Bay
“Music doesn’t come out of nothing. It always starts somewhere… with something… with someone. Discover how music is made in this survey of musical instruments from around the world. Organized by material-from wood to gourds to found objects and more-Before Music marries a lyrical core text with tons of informational material for curious readers. In the narrative text, readers will encounter makers as they source their materials and craft instruments by hand, drawing the line from the natural world to the finished product and its sound. The sidebars offer much more to discover, including extensive instrument lists, short bios of musical innovators, and more”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)
Egg carton crafts / Rathburn, Betsy
“How can you reuse a leftover egg carton? This colorful title offers eight fun ideas! An introduction explains the importance of reusing items, and a materials and tools list puts everything you need in one place. Step-by-step instructions combine with bright, easy-to-understand photos to guide readers through the process of making each craft. Along the way, tips provide hints to make crafting easier or remix crafts into new creations!” (Catalogue)
breath with me coverBreathe with me : using breath to look after my tinana, hinengaro and wairua / Tutagalevao, Abel Junior
“Your breath is a taonga that you can use anytime to calm you. Breathing is easy to do and can help relax your tinana,hinengaro, and wairua. We can be on our way to a happy day!” (Catalogue)
The very hungry caterpillar’s very first encyclopedia
“This first encyclopedia covers all the big topics for little learners, including science, history, space, and the natural world. Explore deep underground and high in the sky, travel the globe on ships and trains, and find out about dinosaurs, plants and animals, the human body, and much, muche more. The Very Hungry Caterpillar’s Very First Encyclopedia features vibrant photography alongside more than 250 timeless illustrations from the World of Eric Carle, giving young children a charming overview of everything they need to know”– Page 4 of cover.” (Catalogue)

playing with fire book cover imagePlaying with fire = Ta’alo i le afi / Riley, David

David Riley is a gem, writing some more phenomenal retellings of Pasifika stories in 2022! You might have seen some of his wonderful books in our Pacific Language Week posts during 2022!

“Fire is one of the most precious elements we know. You can cook with it. You can dry things with it. You can even sit around it and tell stories like this one. But how did fire get to Samoa?”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

 

 

2022 NZCYA Book Awards: Winners Announced!

August is always an extremely exciting time of year for us, as it heralds the announcement of the winners of the New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults! This year, the Supreme Winner was accomplished author and illustrator Gavin Bishop, for his book Atua: Māori Gods and HeroesAtua, which not only won the Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award, but also the Elsie Locke Award for Non-Fiction as well as the Russell Clark Award for Illustration, is a special taonga that deserves a place on the shelf of every whānau in the land.

Find Atua, and the books that won the other categories on the night, on our catalogue below:


Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award; Elsie Locke Award for Non-Fiction; Russell Clark Award for Illustration

Atua : Māori gods and heroes / Bishop, Gavin

Judges’ comments: Atua is an instant classic, a ‘must have’ for every Kiwi household and library, that is packaged in stunning production values. Every element of this generously-sized masterpiece is carefully considered. With impeccable illustrations in Gavin Bishop’s unmistakeable style, it captures the personalities of the many gods and heroes. Each section has a fresh look, from the dense matte blackness of the first pages reflecting Te Kore, nothingness, to the startling blue backgrounds of the migration, with the glorious Te Rā — the sun, between… [Read more on the New Zealand Book Awards Trust website]

Our thoughts: We are extremely excited to see this book take the top prize. The detail in each meticulously-presented illustration will keep you hunting for more, while the masterful simplicity of the text is the work of a storeteller at the top of his game. Reading Atua is like sitting down at a campfire with a favourite uncle, eyes closed, listening to the stories of the past and being transported into them yourself by the skill of the orator. Ka rawe, Gavin — you have given us a taonga to be treasured always.


Picture Book Award

Lion guards the cake / Paul, Ruth

Judges’ comments: If a good picture book is a symbiosis of story and illustration, a stand-out picture book is one which includes that all-important third symbiotic element — the reader. Lion Guards the Cake is a sweetly irresistible story that invites readers to be both witness and accomplice to Lion’s furtive adventures and faux heroism as he upends the notion of duty. Its faultless, inventive rhyme, complemented by rich, silhouetted illustrations, engages the reader with effortless ease and a twinkle in its eye. This is confident storytelling of the highest calibre — a joyful read-out-loud which also rewards a more intimate and leisurely reading.

Our thoughts: We’re big fans of Ruth Paul here at Wellington City Libraries (she is a local author, after all!) and are really thrilled that this book has been recognised by the Awards. We predict this book will be a favourite bed-time read for ages to come, as it’s already a favourite for storytime in our libraries — it’s impossible not to feel some kinship with this cheeky lion as he fabricates more and more reasons why perhaps just a little bit more of the cake needs to be nibbled away… it’s a sacrifice, but someone’s got to do it!


Wright Family Foundation Esther Glen Award for Junior Fiction

The memory thief / Agnew, Leonie

Judges’ comments: From its eye-catching cover to the final conclusion, The Memory Thief is a stunning story that captures the reader early and holds them in an embrace of wonder, intrigue and imagination […] Unique but perfectly believable at the same time, The Memory Thief steps into another world whilst still inside our own. Memories themselves are both villains and heroes as they are taken or returned. The handling of a common illness, with its thought-provoking and original twist, is deftly handled and beautifully written.

Our thoughts: Junior Fiction is always a packed field — there are so many authors writing amazing chapter books for tamariki that it can be hard to choose a winner! The Memory Thief was a standout for us right away, however. The writing at times felt like Margaret Mahy — there’s an obvious love for the magic and mystery of language that resides at the heart of this book that encourages the reader to linger, just for the joy of feeling how the words all mesh and meld together. And it’s a rollicking good story to boot! An excellent book well-deserving of this award.


Young Adult Fiction Award

Learning to love blue / Koirala, Saradha

Judges’ comments: Learning to Love Blue is a celebration of finding independence in a new city. As Paige moves from Wellington and the comfort of friends and family to Melbourne, she must navigate new friendships and romantic relationships, all while navigating her complicated feelings about her absent Mum. Saradha Koirala conveys all the mixed emotions of this setting in a way that is realistic, compassionate, and firmly placed in the journey into adulthood. […]

Our thoughts: Something in this book feels very relatable and familiar — even though Melbourne serves as the main setting, there’s something inexorably ‘Wellingtonian’ about the way certain things appear or are expressed. And of course we love the Joni Mitchell homages that run through the story. Saradha Koirala’s characters leave strong impressions; their predicaments feel real and their triumphs well-earned. Awesome stuff.


Wright Family Foundation Te Kura Pounamu Award for Te Reo Māori

I waho, i te moana / Morrison, Yvonne

Judges’ comments: In I Waho, i te Moana, the many sea creatures of the moana of Aotearoa are brought to life, with beautiful illustrations that highlight the interactions between sea creatures and their world. The story allows children to relate to these creatures, and to understand their roles as kaitiaki within the realm of Tangaroa. There is a beautiful flow to the reo, which reflects the expertise of the translator. Te reo Māori will transcend the imagination and encourage interactions between tamariki and parents who read this wonderful story. This will support growth in the te reo Māori capacity of both tamariki and parents who are at the conversational level.

Our thoughts: In the realm of te reo Māori translation, there are few people more accomplished than the legendary Pānia Papa. Her translation of Yvonne Morrison’s delightful Out in the Moana brims with life, character, and wit. If your whānau is just starting their journey in te reo Māori, we recommend borrowing I Waho, i te Moana alongside its English version, so you can enjoy the beautiful sounds of the reo while also keeping up with the story, which is masterfully supported by Jenny Cooper’s characterful illustrations. For whānau who are a little more advanced, this pukapuka provides a rich opportunity to dive deep with every sentence.


New Zealand Society of Authors Best First Book Award

Spark hunter / Wilson, Sonya

Judges’ comments: Perfectly pitched for middle fiction readers, Spark Hunter weaves history, culture, conservation, humour, tension and adventure into her story of Nissa Marshall, who has always known there is more to the Fiordland bush than meets the eye. While leaning into the fantastic just enough to encourage the imagination, the inclusion of archival excerpts will spark keen readers to hunt out their own discoveries within the mysterious history of this corner of Aotearoa. Making this story’s light shine bright is te reo Māori blended throughout, and a cast of supporting characters that are easily recognisable as classmates, teachers, and friends.

Our thoughts: Every year, the category of Best First Book seems to get more and more contested. It’s exciting for us as librarians when new authors come out with works this confident, assured, and skilful — but all is for nought if the story won’t capture the imaginations of tamariki. Thankfully, Spark Hunter is the kind of book that our young readers will continue to return to for years to come. We love the concept of a survival-fantasy-adventure story set in Fiordland (seriously, why hasn’t this been done more often?), and the best word we can think of to describe the plot is ‘moreish.’ A unique read that’s a lot of fun to boot!

Wellington On a Plate 2021

Calling all foodies, brace yourself for the most epic food event of the year where you can eat, drink and be Welly! Wellington on a Plate (WOAP) has arrived once again full of culinary goodness of all things food and beverage all throughout the month of August!

 

https://www.facebook.com/WellyOnaPlate/

What is Wellington on a Plate?

Wellington on a Plate is an event in August where you can Eat, Drink and Be Welly with hundreds of Festival Events, Festival Dishes that showcase the best of Wellington region’s ingredients, suppliers and producers, Creative Cocktails and all the Burgers you could munch your way through. This year’s theme is Out Of Place: “one for the improvisers, the fresh thinkers, the misfits, the rebellious, those who dance to their own tune and go against the grain. It’s surprising, challenging, different, new, adventurous, exotic, momentous, delicious and curious.” Sounds like the makings of some pretty awesome (and delicious) experiences!

How can you celebrate?

  • Eat your way around Wellington. Click here for more information about WOAP eateries.
  • Craft your visit by choosing from over 140 events, with everything from hands-on masterclasses to multi-course degustations and everything in between. Click here for more information about the events.
  • Create your own burgers, drinks and culinary goodness in the comfort of your own home, with the help of the following books:


image courtesy of syndeticsEasy peasy! : real cooking for kids.

“Mary Contini and Pru Irvine provide over 60 recipes guaranteed to tickle the tastebuds, featuring a huge range of recipes, including a selection from other countries, not just Britain.

Including clear instructions and information about the basics of cooking and utensils, as well as safety in the kitchen, these recipes are designed for children to cook with an adult. But once they have gained confidence and experience, kids will be able to cook many of them confidently on their own. From Cheesy Easy Peasy Pasta, Tooty Fruity Chicken Curry and Moorish Carrot Salad to Portobello Burgers, Scrumptious Slappleberry and Spanish Omelette, this is a fun and informative approach to cooking.” (Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsKids cook! : 100+ super-easy, delicious recipes.

“With aspiring young chefs showing off their skills on Chopped Junior and Food Network Star Kids, it’s clear that kids CAN cook and LOVE to cook! Now, Good Housekeeping has created the perfect cookbook for kids of all ages eager to step in the kitchen. It features more than 100 delicious, fail-safe recipes–from burgers and pizzas to salads and cookies–accompanied by tempting photographs and basic kitchen and cooking how-tos.” (Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsMy first cookbook : 35 easy and fun recipes for children aged 7 year +.

“Learn how to cook while making fantastic snacks, desserts, and meals. With 35 recipes that you’ll love to make and a helpful techniques section, this book will teach you all about cooking, from how to make sandwiches and party snacks, to making simple dishes for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as a range of lip-smacking desserts. Try new foods and make up your own exciting variations on the recipes – with such simple ideas, you can really get creative in the kitchen! Every recipe has step-by-step artworks to guide you, plus a skill level so you can start with quick and easy dishes and move on to more challenging things as you become more confident.” (Adapted from Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Star Wars cookbook : Han sandwiches and other galactic snacks.

“Take your sandwich game to the next level with Star Wars-shaped sandwich cutters From sandwiches to sides and desserts, these easy-to-make, irresistible recipes feature iconic scenes from across the saga. Photographs featuring Star Wars figurines re-creating epic moments from the films provide an extra helping of humour.” (Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Minecrafter’s cookbook : more than 40 game-themed dinners, desserts, snacks, and drinks to craft together.

The Minecrafter’s Cookbook brings the Overworld to life with over 40 fantastic, Minecraft-themed recipes that kids and parents can make together. From main courses that will fill your hunger bar; to enchanted snacks that Alex and Steve couldn’t survive without; to party-friendly, game-themed desserts and potion drinks, there is plenty in this book to enchant young gamers and their families. Kids will love the accompanying illustrations of their favourite characters and scenes, while parents will appreciate the simple, step-by-step directions to guide them as they craft. The delicious recipes in this book are sure to make spending time together a whole lot more fun!” (Adapted from Catalogue).

Search our catalogue for more cookbooks.

While you’re at it, why not rent some food themed DVDs to compliment your WOAP meal at home, such as:

image courtesy of amazon.comRatatouille.

“A rat named Remy dreams of becoming a great chef despite his family’s wishes and the obvious problem of being a rat in a decidedly rodent-phobic profession. When fate places Remy in Paris, he finds himself ideally situated beneath a restaurant made famous by his culinary hero. Despite the apparent dangers of being an unwanted visitor in the kitchen of one of Paris’ most exclusive restaurants, Remy forms an unlikely partnership with Linguini, the garbage boy, who inadvertently discovers Remy’s amazing talents. They strike a deal, ultimately setting into motion a chain of extraordinary events that turns the culinary world of Paris upside down.” (Catalogue).

Check out the trailer!





image courtesy of amazon.comCloudy with a chance of meatballs.

“When Flint Lockwood’s latest contraption accidentially destroys the town square and rockets up into the clouds, he thinks his inventing career is over. Then, something amazing happens aa delicious cheeseburgers start raining from the sky. His machine actually works! But when the machine starts to run amok, it’s up to Flint, with the help of weather girl Sam Sparks to find some way to shut down the machine and save the day.” (Catalogue)

Check out the trailer!




image courtesy of amazon.com

Cloudy with a chance of meatballs 2.

“Inventor Flint Lockwood thought he saved the world when he destroyed his machine that turned water into food causing cheeseburger rain and spaghetti tornadoes. But Flint soon learns that his invention survived and is now creating food-animals. Flint and his friends embark on a dangerously delicious mission to battle hungry tacodiles, shrimpanzees, hippotatomuses, cheespiders and other foodimals to save the world again!” (Catalogue).

Check out the trailer!




image courtesy of amazon.comWilly Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.

“The one-and-only Willy Wonka makes the world taste good for a whole new generation in this magical family classic sparkling with brilliantly restored picture and sound! Also included is the all-new documentary Pure Imagination, featuring interviews with Gene Wilder and the Wonka kids and revealing production secrets from the movie!nWhen they find prized Golden Tickets inside their Wonka candy bars, five lucky children win a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the legendary candy factory run by the mysterious Willy Wonka. Now, on a whirlwind tour of Willys incredible, edible realm of milk chocolate waterfalls, elfish Ooompa-Loompas and industrial-sized sugar-coated creations, one very special boy will discover the sweetest secret of all: a generous, loving heart.” (Catalogue).

 

Daylight Saving: What Is It?

time - hickory dickory dock clock | Evies hickory dickory do… | Flickr“Spring forward
“Fall backwards” 

On Sunday 4 April at 3am all the clocks in New Zealand will “fall backwards” ONE HOUR to 2am as Daylight Saving time finishes. But why do we do this strange practice? Well… to explain Daylight Saving, we first really need to understand modern time:

A brief history of time

Today we tell the time by cell phones, computers and radios, as well highly accurate clocks and watches. Time rules our lives much more than in the past. Before Europeans arrived, Māori told the time by the rising and setting of the sun, the seasons, and the phases of the moon. When settlers began arriving from Britain in the 1840s, not many could afford clocks or watches, so they used bells to ring the times for school, work and church. But each town would often have a slightly different time, which was confusing for everyone. So in 1868 the New Zealand government decided it was time to have a nationwide time for everyone to follow. We were the first country in the world to do this. We made our time 11½ hours ahead of the time set at the Royal Observatory at Greenwich in England (known as Greenwich Mean Time). Towns and cities built public clocks, and by the 1880’s people were using clocks at home, and wearing watches.

In 1941 the clocks were set 12 hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time. And since 1974 Kiwis have enjoyed daylight saving during summer, when the clocks are put forward one hour.

What Are Time Zones?

World Time Zones | FOTOGRAFIA.Nelo.Esteves | FlickrWithout time zones, it would be impossible for all countries on Earth to have the sun at the highest point in the sky at noon. Why? Because Earth rotates by 15 degrees every hour. This is exactly why time zones were created. Basically, the planet was split into 24 slices of 15 degrees each. Each slice is a time zone.

So…What is Daylight Saving Time (DST)?

Daylight Saving Time (DST) is the practice of adjusting clocks so that we humans can enjoy more daylight hours during the summer to pursue our activities . Typically clocks are adjusted forward one hour near the start of spring and are adjusted backward in autumn. So, in New Zealand we put our clocks FORWARD 1 HOUR at the end of September (beginning of our Spring), and on Sunday 4 April 2021, at 3am we will all be putting our clocks BACK 1 HOUR (beginning of our Autumn / Fall). And you’ll be pleased to know that your cell phones will do all this automatically for you – Smartphones!

Here’s a quick tutorial on Daylight Saving – a practice first suggested by New Zealand entomologist, George Hudson, so that he’d have more daylight hours available to study bugs!


If you’ve got time to kill, why not check out some of these great reads all about time:

The Time Wreccas / Tyler, Val
“The Guardians look after time for all people. Humans always rush around claiming that they do not have enough time, but no one thinks of guarding it. The Guardians do this and in every region of the world there is one who protects time for us all. In Greenwich, it is Old Father Tim. When the Wreccas, who populate the Underneath (below ground), send Snot to steal the Tick, their only intention is to wreak havoc on the Guardians who live Topside (above ground). They don’t expect Snot to find out that she feels more at home Topside and that she really rather likes Tid (Old Father Tim’s grandson) who she has to trick. And little do they know that without the Tick, time will stop forever…” (Catalogue)

The terrible truth about time / Arnold, Nick
“Find out what happens if you go too close to a black hole and how flies tell the time! With a fantastic new cover look and extra horrible bits at the back of the book, this best-selling title is sure to be a huge hit with a new generation of Horrible Science readers. If you think you can stomach the sick side of science, then read on as we clock up some terrible time secrets. Find out who was killed for changing the calendar, make your own crazy clock, meet the tortured time geniuses and check out your chances of a time-travel trip.” (Catalogue)

One minute / Ahn, Somin
“In one minute, you can blink your eyes twenty times, hug your dog, plant seeds, say good-bye, watch the rain, or even save a life. So much can occur in this sliver of time one minute can feel like a singular experience. This poignant picture book is at once an introduction to time for young readers, an ode to living each moment with purpose, and a thoughtful exploration of how children experience one minute (may it seem short or long) playfully, profoundly, and with a boundless sense of possibility.” (Catalogue)

Time, tides and revolutions / Brasch, Nicolas
“This fascinating series poses and answers intriguing science questions that students are often curious about. Each book takes one theme or topic and explores it via thirteen engaging questions. The highly visual content assists students’ understanding of the sometimes quite complex concepts and processes. Focusing on time related issues it presents information via 13 engaging question-and-answer spreads.” (Catalogue)

Telling time / Adler, David A
“Readers follow along as a loveable crew of kid astronauts and their Martain friends go about their daily routine, exploring the differences between seconds, minutes, and hours; what A.M. and P.M. mean; and how to tell time on both digital and analog clocks. Ten seconds to lift-off Are you ready? Veteran children’s nonfiction author David Adler incorporates math concepts, such as addition and subtraction, into this fun narrative with problem-solving exercises for readers to tackle at their own pace. Edward Miller’s vibrant cartoon art depicts the happy group of friends embarking on space walks, working together on projects, and settling in for bed.  A glossary explains time zones, daylight savings time, and more. An out-of-this-world STEM book.” (Catalogue)

Telling time : how to tell time on digital and analog clocks! / Older, Jules
“Time isn’t an easy concept for kids to grasp, but young readers will delight in learning all about it with the fun and lively lessons in TELLING TIME. Exploring what time is and discovering why we need to tell time, young readers certainly learn more than ‘the big hand is on the one and the little hand is on the two’. With the help of a whole lot of clocks, a dash of humor, and a few familiar circumstances, learning to tell time is a lot of fun. It’s about time.” (Catalogue)

All about time / Hope, Charles
“Time is a key component of mathematics. It helps us make sense of an enormous amount of information, and it can have many practical applications in our everyday lives. Join our maths mutts as they learn all about the wonderful world of Time!” (Catalogue)

One day : around the world in 24 hours / Din, Suma
” ‘One Day’ follows fifteen different children from around the world through a 24 hour period. Not only will readers learn about their different lives and cultures, but they will also discover how time zones work, and what’s happening on one side of the world while the other sleeps. This is a fantastic and accessible introduction to the concept of time and time zones for a younger audience.” (Catalogue)

How DO Things Work?

Kia ora!  Have you ever looked at a machine and wondered how it works?  Or wondered how things in space work?  What about inside your body?  There are so many questions about the world!

Well, the good news is we have lots of kids books that explain and describe the inner workings of all sorts of interesting topics.  You name it, we’ve got a book to tell you how it works.  To get you started, we’ve selected a few interesting books for you to choose from.  But there are plenty more available to satisfy your curiosity.

Motorbikes / Oxlade, Chris

Find out all of the workings of some of the most amazing motorcycles.  This easy to read book breaks down many of the parts and what they do, with bright, clear illustrations.

What’s inside a black hole? : deep space objects and mysteries / Solway, Andrew

“This astronomy series looks at different aspects of the universe we live in.” (Catalogue)

Inside the bees’ hive / Ang, Karen

“Hundreds of buzzing worker honeybees build a yellow structure called a comb inside a tree trunk. The comb is made up of many small, six-sided rooms that the bees make out of wax. These rooms, called cells, will be used to hold baby bees and sweet, gooey honey. Welcome to the bees’ hive! ” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Spacecraft / West, David

“Learn all about spacecraft, from the first space capsules to space planes and space shuttles.  Find out something amazing about each vehicle and then turn the page to see it sliced in two where its innermost secrets will be revealed.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What’s eating you? : parasites – the inside story / Davies, Nicola

“There is one group of creatures who live on or in the bodies of other animals – in skin, hair, fur, feathers, blood, guts, livers, hearts and lungs. They are parasites. Uncover the secrets of their amazing life-cycles and dare yourself not to scratch or groan as you read.” (Catalogue)

Aircraft / Graham, Ian

Find out how all kinds of aircraft work and how they are laid out inside.  Lots of clear illustrations and information on different types of aircraft.

See inside weather and climate / Daynes, Katie

Filled with facts from how hurricanes and floods happen to how global warming is affecting the Earth’s climates. This is a lift-the-flap book that introduces readers to the science of weather. The work is filled with facts from how hurricanes and floods happen to how global warming is affecting the Earth’s climates.” (Catalogue)

How cities work : explore the city inside, outside and underground / Hancock, James Gulliver

“From the sewers to the skyscrapers, this book takes young readers to the heart of the city.  Get ready to explore the city in a whole new way. This innovative book for younger readers is packed with city facts, loads of flaps to lift, and unfolding pages to see inside buildings and under the streets.  Discover where people live and peek behind closed doors to see what’s going on in houses and apartments, or why not find out about what goes on underneath the streets you walk on every day? (Adapted from Catalogue)

Running the country : a look inside New Zealand’s government / Gill, Maria

“What does the government do to keep New Zealand running smoothly? How does parliament work and what is the job of the MPs? From the Bill of Rights to the way we vote, from parliamentary headquarters to the local council — and everything in between — Maria Gill explains our system of government. You will discover facts about laws, our currency, voting at the elections and the role of the media. There are fascinating profiles of New Zealand leaders, illustrated by cartoonist Malcolm Evans, along with photographs, amazing statistics and useful ‘google this’ Internet links to find out more.” (Catalogue)

The fantastic body : what makes you tick & how you get sick / Bennett, Howard J

“Jam-packed with fun facts, cool diagrams, and gross stories, and written by a successful, practicing pediatrician, this fun and comprehensive reference book with DIY projects is ideal for kids who want to know more about the mysterious stuff going on inside their bodies.” (Catalogue)

How computers work / Hubbard, Ben

“Ever wonder what goes on inside your computer? Take a look into how processors, networks and more are all connected.” (Catalogue)

Inside of a dog : what dogs see, smell, and know / Horowitz, Alexandra

“From an animal behaviorist and dog enthusiast comes an adorable guide to understanding how our canine friends see the world. Want to know what dogs are thinking? What they feel, and what they can spell with that great big nose of theirs? Here’s your chance to experience the world nose first, from two feet off the ground. What do dogs know, and how do they think? The answers will surprise and delight you as dog owner and scientist Alexandra Horowitz explains how our four-legged friends perceive their daily worlds, each other, and us. This book is as close as you can get to knowing about dogs without being a dog yourself.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The Wonderful World of Roblox!

Welcome to the wonderful world of Roblox! Move over, Minecraft! Roblox has been taking the world by storm as a multiplayer online and game creation system platform that allows users to design their own games and play a wide variety of different types of games created by other users. As of August 2019, Roblox has over 100 million monthly active users.

So if you’re looking to improve your robloxing skills or new to the game, come on down to your local library and check out the latest release of Roblox books, such as:

image courtesy of syndeticsInside the world of Roblox.

Presents an inside look at the Roblox world, introducing talented members of the community and providing insider information on the games.
image couresty of syndetics

Roblox character encyclopedia.

Offers an official character reference to Roblox, including biographical information and listings of avatar items.
image courtesy of syndeticsRoblox top adventure games.

From the Bloxy Award-winning Jailbreak and Lumber Tycoon 2 to the massively popular Heroes of Robloxia and Apocalypse Rising, this action-packed book gives you the official scoop on some of the most popular and critically-acclaimed adventure games on Roblox. Each profile tells you everything you need to know, including a guide to gameplay, interviews with the creators, and tips and tricks to take your skills to the next level.
image courtesy of syndeticsRoblox top role-playing games.

Offers an introduction to the many role-playing games in the Roblox universe and includes tips, tricks, and interviews with the creators.
image courtesy of syndeticsReady, set, play! : all the funnest, coolest games for kids.

Provides guidance, tips, and tricks for such video games as Minecraft, Angry Birds, Animal Crossing, Crossy Road, Roblox, and Super Mario Run. These games will improve reaction speed, build problem-solving skills, develop imagination and creativity, and encourage teamwork. Many of them are even educational, too!

4 Science Non Fiction: The Magic School Bus Collection

Check out The Magic School Bus collection, written by Joanne Cole and published by Scholastic.  This series is rated “the bestselling science series ever”, and “the freshest, most approach to science for children”, by the New York Times.  Join Ms Fizzle and her students on gripping and unorthodox adventures where kids will be introduced through storytelling to the basic concepts of science in all areas such as biology, astronomy, and  paleontology.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsIn the time of the dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs, adventure, science  and time travel all rolled into one in this book. The magic school bus turns into a time machine and transports Ms Fizzle and her class back into the prehistoric times, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Highly recommended!

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsLost in the Solar System.

Take a special field trip in the magic school bus with Ms. Frizzle and her class, where they go into outer space and visits each planet in the solar system. Includes narrated version on audio disc.

 

Also check out the nonfiction companion to the original Magic School Bus series.

 

The Magic School Bus presents…

images courtesy of syndeticsThe Human Body.

This is a book about the human body (combined with facts and a story) that makes learning and science more fun, interactive and innovative.This book is packed with incredible photographs, amazing facts and everything you have ever wanted to know about your brain, bones, lungs, muscles and much, much more!

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsSea Creatures.

Join Ms Fizzle and her class on another special field trip on the magic school bus where they take a journey to the ocean where they learn about the different creatures that live there. This week is Sea Week – Dive into some fishy books! Glub glub!

 

 

 

Top 10 Children’s non-fiction August 2015

The Minecraft boffins are at it again! Two of the top 10 are Minecraft books that have been updated with tips for the latest game versions and additional information. You’ll be joining over 20 million users of the game!

World building with Lego has spawned some amazing imagery check out the photography of Vesa Lehtmäki a.k.a. Avanaut on Flickr and Instagram. This guy got himself a Y-wing studio scale model! Inspired? Show us what you’ve got in the comments =)

 

1.   Minecraft by Stephanie Milton
2.   The LEGO ideas book by Daniel Lipkowitz
3.   Minecraft hacks master builder by Megan Miller
4.   Star Wars character encyclopedia by Simon Beecroft
5.   Minecraft by Nick Farwell
6.   Star Wars by David West Reynolds
7.   Dog by Juliet Clutton-Brock
8.   Lego Star Wars in 100 scenes by Daniel Lipkowitz
9.   Minecraft blockopedia by Alex Wiltshire
10. Star Wars rebels by Adam Bray

 

Top 10 children’s non-fiction June 2015

Create and build. Online or IRL (in real life) children are loving blocks made of lego/bedrock/sandstone. Excellent resources to find and share at the library!

1. The LEGO ideas book by Daniel Lipkowitz

2. Minecraft hacks master builder by Megan Miller

3. Star Wars character encyclopedia by Simon Beecroft

4. Star Wars by David West Reynolds

5. The LEGO movie by Hannah Dolan

6. Lego Star Wars by Simon Beecroft

7. Maps by Aleksandra Mizielinska

8. Minecraft by Nick Farwell

9. Minecraft by Stephanie Milton

10. Lego official annual 2015

 

 

Top 10 children’s non-fiction for May

There’s a varied set of popular facts whisking out the library door for autumn time reading. World War One fascination has continued from the ANZAC centenary with some great books.  Philippa Werry, a NZ Post book awards Children’s finalist has created a great store of facts and stories surrounding ANZAC day in her book and her blog.  Star wars and minecraft still have a special place in the Top 10 – of course they do

1.  Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton

2.  Star Wars, by David West Reynolds

3.  Minecraft hacks master builder, by Megan Miller

4.  The LEGO ideas book, by Daniel Lipkowitz

5.   Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

6.  Minecraft,  by Nick Farwell

7.  Anzac Day, by Philippa Werry

8.  World War I, by Simon Adams

9.  Marvel super hero character encyclopedia, by Scott Peterson

10. See inside the First World War, by Rob Lloyd Jones