International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People

On 29th November 1977 the United Nations created the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People. This day is to remind people that even though the Palestinians didn’t agree to the creation of the state of Israel in 1948 they still have human rights; the right to decide where they live, where they travel and who their government is.  Both Israelis and Palestinians have the right to live in peace. The hope of the United Nations is to build a future of peace.

In 1948 when Israel was created around 750,000 Palestinians were forced to leave their homes and become refugees (Source: United Nations). This number has grown since then and there are now more than 13 million Palestinian people in the world (Source: IMEMC). Palestinian people speak Arabic, Hebrew, English, and other varieties of Arabic. You may know Palestinian people who live in Wellington or greater New Zealand who arrived here as former refugees.

If you want to read more about Palestine, Palestinians and Israel you could look up these interactive resources:

Many famous writers and poets come from Palestine. Some of these writers are; Mahmoud Darwish, Naomi Shihab Nye and Ghassan Kanafani.

Check out the books about Palestine or by Palestinian authors in our collection. (Remember joining the library is free and if there are some books you would like us to buy you can suggest them to us: Suggestions to Buy Library Items (wcl.govt.nz)

The turtle of Oman : a novel / Nye, Naomi Shihab
“When Aref, a third-grader who lives in Muscat, Oman, refuses to pack his suitcase and prepare to move to Michigan, his mother asks for help from his grandfather, his Sidi, who takes Aref around the country, storing up memories he can carry with him to a new home.” (Catalogue)

Three wishes : Palestinian and Israeli children speak / Ellis, Deborah
“Interviews with Palestinian and Israeli children examine how the war in the Middle East has affected their lives.” (Catalogue) This book is for older children 10+

Tasting the sky : a Palestinian childhood / Barakat, Ibtisam
“When a war ends it does not go away, my mother says. It hides inside us . . . Just forget. But I do not want to do what Mother says . . . I want to remember. In this groundbreaking memoir set in Ramallah during the aftermath of the 1967 Six-Day War, Ibtisam Barakat captures what it is like to be a child whose world is shattered by war.” (Adapted from Catalogue) This book is for older children 10+

A little piece of ground / Laird, Elizabeth
“Twelve-year-old Karim Aboudi and his family are trapped in their Ramallah home by a strict curfew. Israeli tanks control the city in response to a Palestinian suicide bombing. Karim longs to play football outside with his friends. But in this city there’s constant danger. Ages 10+” (Catalogue)

Milet mini picture dictionary : English-Arabic / Turhan, Sedat
“Introduces key English and Arabic words for plants, animals, shapes, food, and other common items.” (Catalogue)

My first book of Arabic words / Kudela, Katy R
“Simple text paired with themed photos invite the reader to learn to speak Arabic.” (Catalogue)

Israel and Palestine / Gallagher, Michael
“This series is a fascinating and informative look at the historical background to world trouble spots. Each title is packed with details, photographs and maps. Ages 10-16.” (Catalogue)

Israel and Palestine / Mason, Paul
“An informed, unbiased review of some of the world’s major conflict zones Global Hot Spots aims to fill in the facts behind the headlines, developing students’ understanding of the historical context of the events they see on TV. It provides accounts of real-life experiences and looks at ‘how history was made’ in these conflict zones.” (Catalogue)

Go The Ferns! Aotearoa Women’s Sports Teams in the Spotlight


With the Black Ferns currently playing in the Rugby World Cup, and the Football Ferns soon to kick off in the 2023 Fifa Women’s Football World Cup, we thought we’d train the spotlight onto our amazing NZ female sports teams that are shining bright and creating sporting history! You’ll also notice a trend with the naming of our national women’s teams – most names incorporate a variation of the silver fern – an emblem that has become synonymous with New Zealand athletes and sports teams.

The Black Ferns – New Zealand women’s rugby team

New Zealand women's national rugby union team - Wikipedia

New Zealand women’s national rugby union team logo

The Black Ferns are New Zealand’s senior women’s rugby team and have a world ranking of #2 with World Cup titles in 1998, 2002 2006, 2010 and 2017; and they will be playing in the Finals of World Cup as I type! The Black Ferns became the first women’s team to ever be named the World Rugby Team of the Year in 2019.

[NOTE: The Black Ferns and All Blacks play Rugby Union, which is a slightly different game to Rugby League.The NZ women’s Rugby League team is called the Kiwi Ferns]

Rugby World Cup 2021 – There’s a heap of firsts at this tournament.

This is the first time the women’s version of the Rugby World Cup will be played in New Zealand, and in the Southern Hemisphere. And it’s the first World Cup tournament to go ahead since the Covid-19 pandemic began (this event was delayed a year, and why it’s still called RWC2021).

It’s also the first time it won’t be called the Women’s Rugby World Cup. Just the Rugby World Cup – the same name as the men’s tournament.

It’s also the first time poi are handed out free to everyone attending the games – part of the Wā Poi (It’s Poi Time) movement to get the crowd twirling poi to support the teams.

The Football Ferns – New Zealand women’s football team

NZ Football - HOME

NZ Football logo

The New Zealand women’s national football team,  the Football Ferns, is governed by New Zealand Football (NZF). The New Zealand national team qualified for the 2007 FIFA Women’s World Cup, held in China in September 2007. This was their first World Cup in 16 years, and the second since their 1975 debut in international competition. Because  New Zealand is co-host the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup alongside Australia, the Football Ferns automatically qualify as co-host.

The Silver Ferns – New Zealand women’s netball team

New Zealand national netball team - Wikipedia

New Zealand national netball team logo

The Silver Ferns have won the Netball World Cup five times (in 1967, 1979, 1987, 2003 and 2019), and have won the netball gold medal at the Commonwealth Games twice (in 2006 and 2010).

Netball has been played in New Zealand since 1906. It is the most popular female sport in New Zealand. It was originally called women’s basketball and was played outside on grass courts. Players wore full-length skirts, hats, blouses and shoes. The net was a basket, closed at one end, so the referee had to clamber up and retrieve the ball after each goal! It was not until 1970 that the sport became officially known as netball in New Zealand. Today’s netball is fast-paced, physical and usually played on asphalt or indoor courts.

Even now, it is changing fast, with Fast5 Netball World Series taking place in Christchurch in November 2022. Fast5 is a variation of netball using only five players (regular netball has seven players a side) and features shortened games and goals worth multiple points.

The White Ferns – New Zealand women’s cricket team

New Zealand women's national cricket team - Wikipedia

New Zealand women’s national cricket team logo

The NZ women’s cricket team make its test cricket debut in 1935 against England.  In 1973 the first Women’s Cricket World Cup took place. The White Ferns are one of only three teams (NZ, England and Australia) to have participated in all ten editions of this tournament, winning in 2000 and making it to the finals on four occasions.

In 1992 The national women’s team was named the White Ferns at the same time as the men became the Blackcaps.

The Tall Ferns – New Zealand women’s basketball team

See the source image

New Zealand women’s national basketball team logo

Both national sides (the Tall Ferns – women, and the Tall Blacks – men) made their Olympic debuts in 2000 at Sydney. And both teams won silver medals in the 2006 Commonwealth Games. The Tall Ferns then qualified for their third successive Olympics in 2008 at Beijing, but didn’t qualify for the 2016 and 2020 Olympics (which were held in Tokyo in 2021).

The Black Sticks – New Zealand women’s hockey team

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New Zealand Black Sticks Hockey team logo

Modern hockey emerged in England in the second half of the 19th century. Women played hockey from the 1880s, with a women’s inter-provincial match held in 1899. Hockey was the first team sport played at international level by New Zealand women, who competed against a touring English women’s team in 1914. From the 2000s both the national men’s and women’s teams are known as the Black Sticks.


Get your game-face on and check out these books about some of the world’s amazing women athletes and the sport they play:

Stacey Waaka : world champion rugby player / Riley, David
“Follows Stacey’s journey from Ruatoki to the rugby stadiums of the world. Read about some of the many challenges she’s been through, including a terrifying bus crash, and how she overcame them. Find out how her faith, family, friends, coaches, teachers and culture have guided and powered her to aim high in life”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Netball / Gifford, Clive
“Build your netball skills with the Sports Academy series. Looking to take up a new sport? Or just thinking about ways to keep fit and healthy? This book is a great introduction to all the important netball skills you’ll need. Full of skills tips and illustrations showing key techniques, you’ll discover everything- from offence to defence. The series Sports Academy covers rules, equipment and major competitions through specially commissioned, step-by-step illustrations that clearly shows skills and techniques needed for a sport.” (Catalogue)

The ultimate guide to women’s football / Thorpe, Yvonne
“Dip into this fun, fact-packed book to discover the best of women’s football, from the world’s top leagues, players and competitions to awe-inspiring goals, dazzling skills and memorable celebrations. Football is fast becoming the top participation sport for women in the UK, with almost three million active players. With the next Women’s World Cup just around the corner in June 2019, The Ultimate Guide to Women’s Football offers young readers a great way into the game and provides practical advice on how they can start playing the beautiful game themselves. A perfect read for football fans aged 8 and up.” (Catalogue)

She shoots, she scores / Clarke, Catriona
“She Shoots, She Scores! tells the empowering story of how women’s football has become one of the fastest-growing sports in the world.  Young football fans will discover how the early female players overcame prejudice to set up their own teams, and read the compelling stories of players who beat the odds to become famous around the world” (Catalogue, abridged)

Hockey / Dufresne, Emilie
“From running to rugby, it’s time to get sporty. Pick a side, lace up your trainers and jump in! these informative titles will tell you everything you need to know to get into sports. Know the rules, learn the lingo and get kitted up. Check out your sporting girl heroes in the player profile, and learn what favourite sport is doing to your body. Tackle rugby, swing into tennis or make a splash in swimming — whether you’re a fierce footballer, speedy sprinter or a brilliant basketball player, we want to be on your team! Go girls!” (Catalogue)

The warm sun on my face : the story of women’s cricket in New Zealand / Auger, Trevor
“It is the story of a game played for the sheer love of it, and of the hard work of the dedicated souls who built and sustained women’s cricket, often in the face of challenge and adversity. ” (Catalogue, abridged)

Top basketball tips / Rissman, Rebecca
“Swish! Every basketball player dreams of the perfect shot. Look inside to learn mechanics and tips to take your game to the next level.” (Catalogue)

Rising above. Inspiring women in sports / Zuckerman, Gregory
“Behold the power of women! These are the inspirational real-life stories of female superstar athletes Serena and Venus Williams, Simone Biles, Carli Lloyd, and more — role models all. For sports fans, aspiring athletes and readers of sports biographies. The athletes featured in this book met earth-shaking challenges head on, and through hard work and perseverance, went on to conquer the sports world. This collection of mini biographies, complete with first-hand content drawn from interviews, is a source of inspiration and self-empowerment for kids and sports fans of all ages. ” (Catalogue, abridged)

Women in sports : 50 fearless athletes who played to win / Ignotofsky, Rachel
“Illustrated profiles of fifty pioneering female athletes, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Women in Science. A charmingly illustrated and inspiring book, Women in Sports highlights the achievements and stories of fifty notable women athletes–from well-known figures like tennis player Billie Jean King and gymnast Simone Biles, to lesser-known athletes like skateboarding pioneer Patti McGee and Toni Stone, the first woman to play baseball in a men’s professional league. Covering more than forty sports, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about notable women’s teams throughout history, pay and media statistics for female athletes, and muscle anatomy. Women in Sports celebrates the success of the tough, bold, and fearless women who paved the way for the next generation of athletes” (Catalogue)

Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti: Fijian Language Week 2022

Bula!

Fiji is a southwestern Pacific island nation located about 800 kilometres southwest of Samoa and 1,800 kilometres North of New Zealand. It is an archipelago (a group of islands) made up of several hundred islands.  There are around 20,000 Fijian people living in Aotearoa!

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Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti – Fijian Language Week is Sunday 2 October – Saturday 8 October 2022

This is a chance to celebrate the Fijian language and culture in New Zealand and around the world!  This year the theme is:

Me vakabulabulataki, vakamareqeti, ka vakaqaqacotaki na vosa vakaviti. | Nurture, preserve and sustain the Fijian language.

Celebrate Fijian Language week with workshops at Newlands Community Centre!

Wellington Fijian Language class invite children of primary and intermediate age to celebrate Fijian language with a free workshop of language, games, food and art! Learn some simple Fijian phrases, play some traditional games, learn how to do some Fijian weaving. There will be a lunch at 1pm, you are welcome to bring a plate to contribute. Parents and carers welcome. Please contact the centre to register – ph 04 4773724 or email newlandscc@wcc.govt.nz

Click the image to find out about more events here in Te Upoko-o-te-ika-a-Māui Wellington Region! PLW-Email-Signature-Fijian

Here are some simple phrases to get you started speaking Fijian:

Ni sa bula vinaka – Greetings/Hello
Ni sa moce – vei kemuni na gole – Goodbye – to those who are leaving
Ni sa moce – vei kemuni na tiko – Goodbye – to those who are staying
Kerekere – Please
Vinaka vakalevu  – Thank you

Special phrases to use in the library:

Au tiko ena vale ni vola
I am at the library

Au wili vola tiko
I am reading a book

You can learn some more simple Fijian phrases on the Ministry of Pacific Peoples Website here

Continue reading

Puzzle Paradise: The Fun and Science of Problem Solving

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Do you like any/all of the following:

  • Problem solving
  • Maths
  • Reading
  • Art
  • Patterns
  • Shapes

Then it sounds like you like doing puzzles! Puzzles can come in a variety of shapes and sizes and they are often toys that we’ve played with since we were babies. If you think of blocks, Lego, Rubik’s cubes, picture puzzles, jigsaws, card games, Jenga, tangrams, sudoku – they’re all puzzles that need to be solved, and in doing so your brain is getting loads of exercise!


What happens to your brain when you do a puzzle?

Mental health icon vector clip art | Free SVGYour brain thinks you’re hunting! Puzzles play with words, numbers, shapes, and logic which makes us want to uncover the solutions that they hide. It’s like reading a Whodunnit – our brain is constantly trying to work out why. It is the ‘hunt’ itself that stimulates the areas of your brain that involves discovery.

You’ll get a whole brain workout: Puzzles activate both the left and right hemispheres of the brain which includes imagination, reasoning and memory.

You get a rush of pleasure when you solve the puzzle! That feel-good moment when you finally figure out that last clue or place the missing piece? That comes thanks to a rush of dopamine in your nucleus accumbens, the area of the brain responsible for rewards.


Who invented…?

Jigsaw puzzle in different colors | Public domain vectorsJigsaw Puzzles: The first jigsaw puzzle was created by a map engraver called John Spilsbury, in 1762. He mounted one of his master maps onto wood and then cut around the countries. He gave it to children in the local school to help them with their geography education. Learn more about the history of jigsaw puzzles on Britannica Online: Encyclopaedia Britannica | Jigsaw Puzzles

File:Rubik's cube scrambled.svg - Wikimedia CommonsRubik’s Cubes: In 1974, a young Hungarian architect named Ernő Rubik became obsessed with finding a way to model three-dimensional movement to his students. After spending months experimenting with blocks made from wood and paper, held by rubber bands, glue, and paper clips, he finally created something he called the “Bűvös kocka,” or Magic Cube. Learn more about the Rubik’s Cube on Britannica Online: Encyclopaedia Britannica | Rubik’s Cube

tangram | Free SVGTangrams: Invented in China approximately 200 years ago, a tangram is a re-arrangement puzzle created by cutting a square into seven geometric shapes called “tans”.


Online brain teasers to get you started

Stuff Kids’ General Knowledge Quizzes

CBC Kids Games and Puzzles

Jigsaw Puzzles for Kids

Safe Kids’ Games


Puzzle Books for everyone

Usborne Young Puzzle Book series: This is a great series of puzzle books aimed at ages 4+. There are many different stories and scenarios to choose from. For example:

Puzzle mountain / Leigh, Susannah
“A fantastic new padded hardback edition of this exciting, fun adventure, which challenges young children to answer a puzzle on every double page. Brightly coloured, detailed illustrations in a cartoon style, along with plenty of maps, guides and things to spot, help children become engrossed in the absorbing adventure story.” (Catalogue)

More picture puzzle books:

I spy A to Z : a book of picture riddles / Wick, Walter
“Easy-to-read riddles by Jean Marzollo are paired with 46 object-filled photographs by Walter Wick to create the most engaging alphabet book ever! Young readers can use the simple picture clues to recognize the letter and letter sound featured on each page. There are more than 30 million I Spy books in print!” (Catalogue)

Around the world in 80 puzzles / Artymowska, Aleksandra
“We are going around the world! Take yourself on a fantastical journey packed with puzzles to unpick and meandering mazes to wander through. There are 80 challenges to complete. Can you solve them all?” (Catalogue)

The looky book / Bixley, Donovan
“Presents a series of picture puzzles with a New Zealand theme in which the reader is invited to find a variety of objects.” (Catalogue)

Where’s Wally series: Fun fact: “Where’s Wally” is called “Where’s Waldo” in North America!

Where’s Wally / Handford, Martin
“Detailed pictures for the readers to find Wally in, plus other tasks to do on each page, under the flaps. Open the flaps and frantically find extra things that have never been seen or searched for before.” (Catalogue)

Master-mind : over 100 games, tests, and puzzles to unleash your inner genuis / Drimmer, Stephanie Warren
“An introduction to the human brain uses quizzes, trivia, and puzzles to explore the different functions of the brain, how to improve brain power, and why each brain is unique.” (Catalogue)

The everything kids’ dinosaurs book stomp, crash, and thrash through hours of puzzles, games and activities / Wagner, Kathi
“A collection of puzzles, games, and activities about dinosaurs that describes how to become a palaeontologist, what the earth looked like during the time of dinosaurs, and other reptiles and birds that coexisted with dinosaurs.” (Catalogue)

Math games lab for kids : 24 fun, hands-on activities for learning with shapes, puzzles, and games / Rapoport, Rebecca
“Math is the foundation of all sciences and key to understanding the world around us. Math Games Lab for Kids shares more than 50 hands-on activities that make learning about math fun by drawing and building shapes, solving puzzles, and playing games.” (Catalogue, abridged)

The 5 minute brain workout for kids : 365 amazing, fabulous, and fun word puzzles / Chamberlain, Kim
“With ten levels of puzzles–ranging from easiest to most challenging–and an answer key at the end to check your work, this book is sure to help keep your brain active and will help increase your understanding of and love for all kinds of words!” (Catalogue)

Gadgets away : 100 great games to play / Jennison, Fiona
“Technology has become the too-easy way to entertain ourselves and our children. This easy-to-use, imaginative book has everything. There’s plenty of fun here to keep your family laughing: Sporty games and playground classics Activities for indoors, gardens, parks and beaches Memory and travel games, brain teasers and magic tricks.” (Catalogue)

How to solve the Rubik’s Cube
“The Rubik’s Cube is the world’s best-known puzzle, a magical object that has baffled and fascinated the world for more than forty years. This clearly-illustrated step-by-step guide teaches you a foolproof beginners’ method for solving the Cube, plus advanced techniques if you want to learn to solve it in seconds.” (Catalogue)

Te ‘Epetoma ō Te Reo Māori Kūki ‘Āirani: Cook Islands Language Week 2022

Kia Orāna! It’s Te ʻEpetoma ō Te Reo Māori Kūki ʻĀirani | Cook Islands Language Week 2022!

Pacific Language Weeks are about all New Zealanders learning more about Pacific people that make up a big part of our population and are some of our closest neighbours!

The overarching theme for the 2022 Pacific Language Weeks is sustainability. Cook Islands Language Week has been celebrated every year in Aotearoa since 2012, with events running this year from Sunday 31st July to Saturday 6th August.

This year’s theme is:

‘Ātuitui’ia au ki te Oneone o tōku ‘Ui Tupuna | Connect me to the soil of my ancestors.

Help us celebrate this special time for the community by learning more about the unique culture, language and history of the Cook Islands through the information, books, and other resources below!

Where are the Cook Islands?

They are located in the South Pacific neighbouring Sāmoa, Niuē and French Polynesia. There are 15 islands altogether with a total land area of 240 square kilometres.

How many people speak Cook Islands Māori, and where do they live?

Te Reo Māori Kūki ʻĀirani (Cook Islands Māori) refers to several dialects (slightly different versions of the same language) spoken in the Cook Islands, with the most common language dialect being spoken in Rarotonga. In New Zealand, about 80,500 people are Cook Islanders, or of Cook Islands descent. Peoples of Cook Islands descent make up a significant portion of Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington) and Aotearoa’s Pasifika population, with significant numbers living in our Northern suburbs and nearby Porirua. (Source: 2018 Census)

Why are they called the Cook Islands?

The area was first settled around 1000CE by Polynesian people who probably came from Tahiti, which is where the famous navigator Tupaia would come from over 700 years later. You can learn more about Tupaia here: Tupaia | Te Ara Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. They gave the islands names like Rarotonga, Aitutaki, and Rakahanga.

The first European contact with the islands took place in 1595, but the Cook Islands name comes from the British navigator Captain James Cook, who arrived first in 1773 and again in 1777. Strangely enough, the name ‘Cook Islands’ first appeared on a Russian map in the 1820s.

There is still a lot of debate today about whether the Cook Islands should take a new name that reflects the Polynesian history and heritage of the area. Visit Britannica Online to learn more about the history and people of the Cook Islands: Cook Islands | Encyclopaedia Britannica


Books

Visit your local library and have a look at our amazing books to learn more about Cook Islands cultures and practice the language. At Newtown Library we also stock the Cook Islands News.
If you don’t have a library card, you can sign up for free!

Te ‘anga’anga ‘ōu ‘ā māmā = Mum’s new job / Tainui, Bronwyn
“Tiāki finds it difficult when his mother goes back to work, but discovers it is fun to help out at home by making lunch.” (Catalogue)

Kua kitea ‘a māmā = Finding mum / Long, Don
“In the supermarket, a little boy retraces his footsteps in order to find his mum.” (Catalogue)

Cook Islands heroes / Riley, David
“Cook Islands Heroes tells the inspirational stories of achievers who have Cook Islands ancestry. It includes legends like Ina, Maui, Ngaru and Ru; historical figures such as […] Alistair Te Ariki Campbell; and contemporary heroes Kevin Iro […] The book is written to inspire young Cook Islanders, to encourage reading and promote literacy.” (Publisher description)

‘Ei for the day / MacGregor, Jill
“Yvette and Kiikii wear an ‘ei and an ‘ei katu when their dance group performs at the Saturday Morning Market in Rarotonga​​.” (Catalogue)

Also, visit this link to find even more children’s books in Te Reo Māori Kūki ‘Āirani at your local library.


More Resources

This is a good time to learn some Te Reo Māori Kūki ʻĀirani. Here are some useful phrases to help get started. Pronunciation is mostly similar to Te Reo Māori – so don’t be shy, give it a go!

Kia orāna – Greetings/Hello
ʻAere rā / ʻĒ noʻo rā – Goodbye (to those going/to those staying)
ʻInē? – Please
Meitaki maʻata – Thank you very much
Tatarāʻara – Sorry
Inā ake ana – Excuse me
Pēʻea koe/kōrua/kōtou? – How are you?
Meitaki maʻata au/māua/mātou – I am/We are well

There are lots of cool things happening across the country to celebrate this time. For more information on events and ideas on how to celebrate, visit these websites:

Puppets & Puppeteers

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With puppets and puppetry featuring in our Beyond the Page Festival July holiday activities, we thought we’d explore all things PUPPET!

A puppet is a ‘moving doll’. They are often used in theatre performances, kids’ TV shows and films and often use strings or other devices to make the puppet move and look alive. Some puppets are very simple (like sock puppets), but others are more complicated and need lots of practise to use. The person who works the puppet and makes it move is called a puppeteer.

Simple Puppets that you can make at home

FPin on Paper Dollsinger Puppet: As the name suggests, you simply pop the puppet over your finger/s and get wiggling! Another form of finger puppet is the two-finger puppet that has holes for two fingers which act as the puppet legs.

Sock puppet: Find an old sock and glue funny eyes and noses onto the foot of the sock. Then wear it like a glove with the thump acting like a jaw.

Glove Puppet: Similar to a finger puppet, but larger. The puppeteer uses his or her fingers and hand to work the puppet.

Paddle Puppet: The puppet is on the end of a cardboard or wooden paddle, or is even the paddle itself. When the puppeteer wiggles the paddle back and forth, it seem that the puppet moves by itself.

Complicated Puppets

Jumping Jack: A puppet where the arms and legs of the puppet are joined to a string. When the string is pulled down, the arms and legs go up.

Rod Puppet and Bunraku: The puppet is worked with rods joined to the puppets arms and legs, while another puppeteer moves the head and sometimes the mouth. Bunraku is a special type of Japanese rod puppetry.

Make a Shadow Puppet Theatre Book – Stories In Paper | Shadow puppets, Shadow theatre, Puppets

Shadow Puppet Theatre. Image: Pinterest.com

Shadow Puppet:  A cut out figure on a rod is held in front of a light. Its shadow is projected onto a screen. The puppeteer moves the puppet around, giving it some life.

Marionette: This puppet is moved around with strings that hang from above the theatre. This is one of the more complex types of puppetry and is hard to master as some marionettes can have up to thirty strings.

Ventriloquist Figure or Dummy: This puppet is one of the few where the audience sees the puppeteer. The puppeteer moves the puppets head arms and mouth with his hands as well as with levers. The performance usually takes the shape of a conversation between the dummy and the puppeteer. The puppeteer speaks normally, then puts on a different voice when the puppet is supposed to be talking. His voice seems to be coming from his stomach (from the old Latin word: “venter”). His lips are not moving, but the puppet’s lips may move, so it seems as if the puppet is talking.


Jim Henson and the Muppets

Jim Henson's Legacy: A "Rainbow Connection" with UMD | Flickr

Jim Henson with the Muppets. Image: Flickr

Jim Henson (1936 – 1990) ) was one of the most well-known and innovative modern puppeteers. He is the creator of the Muppets – think Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, Cookie Monster, and Elmo.  He made up the word Muppets as a blend of “marionette” (see above) and “puppet” and created the Muppets while still a student at university. The Jim Henson Museum is in his hometown of Leland, Mississippi and has an assortment of original Muppet characters on display. One of the bridges in Leland is also named “The Rainbow Connection” after the popular song from the 1979 film The Muppet Movie.




Check out the catalogue and get making and performing with puppets these holidays!

Puppets / D’Cruz, Anna-Marie
“An exciting collection of step-by-projects that readers can do at home on their own or in the classroom.” (Catalogue)

Sock Puppet Theater presents The three little pigs : a make and play production / Harbo, Christopher L
“Hear ye! Hear ye! Sock Puppet Theater Presents The Three Little Pigs! Now it’s a snap to make simple, adorable puppets, key props, and the perfect stage for bringing this classic fairy tale to life. But that’s not all! As an added bonus, this book also includes a fun starter script, helpful acting and performance tips, and clever suggestions for making your play truly unique. With Sock Puppet Theatre, you hold in your hands everything needed to get your puppeteer career started on the right foot!” (Catalogue)

Making shadow puppets / Bryant, Jill
“In this book in the Kids Can Do It series, kids can create traditional shadow puppets from around the world.” (Catalogue)

The most excellent book of how to be a puppeteer / Lade, Roger
“Tap students hidden talents with these clever books filled with step-by-step instructions for entertaining friends and family at home or at school.” (Catalogue)

Recycling things to make and do / Bone, Emily
“Provides step-by-step instructions for a range of craft activities using recycled materials. Suggested level: primary, intermediate.” (Catalogue)

I am Jim Henson / Meltzer, Brad
“Presents the creator of the Muppets and describes the creative spirit, performance talents and beliefs in the goodness of people that inspired his career and how he helped create the iconic programs Sesame Street and The Muppet Show.” (Catalogue)

The Muppets character encyclopedia / Shemin, Craig
“The most sensational, inspirational, muppetational character encyclopaedia ever! Play the music, light the lights, and meet all your favourite characters from the Muppets in The Muppets Character Encyclopaedia. From Animal to Zoot, meet over 200 of the most memorable and best-loved Muppet characters from the 1970s to the present day. […] The Muppets Character Encyclopaedia is a must-have for new fans eager for background on their new favourite Muppets as well as older fans wanting to relive the original TV series.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa 2022

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Tālofa Lava! 

Sāmoa Language Week | Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa will be celebrated this year from Sunday, 29 May 2021 until Saturday, 4th June 2022. This is a chance for all New Zealanders to celebrate Sāmoan language, Sāmoan culture in New Zealand and around the world, and promote the use of Sāmoan language in schools, at work and at home.

Did you know that nearly 4% of New Zealanders are Sāmoan? That’s almost 200,000 people! Gagana Sāmoa is the 3rd most spoken language in Aotearoa, New Zealand!

Sāmoa has a unique historical relationship with New Zealand. It is the only country that New Zealand has a Treaty of Friendship. The Treaty of Friendship between Sāmoa and New Zealand is like a mutual project to support Tagata Sāmoa (Sāmoan people) to have better opportunities. Being proud of your language is such an important part of feeling proud of your culture.

This year’s theme for Vaiaso o le Gagana Samoa is:

Fa’aāuāu le Folauga i le Va’a o Tautai – Continue the Voyage with Competent Wayfinders of the Ocean.

2022 is also a significant year for the Samoan community, being the 60th anniversary of Samoa Independence. Communities are organising activities to commemorate this milestone, which coincides with Samoa Language Week.

Events for Samoa Language Week

As part of Samoa Language Week, there will be a Pasifika Pool Party! Find out more about the council events here.

Our friend the wonderful librarian Lewis from Johnsonville Library presents a special story in English and Gagana Sāmoa, How Do You Say ‘Thank You’? by Karamia Müller. Many thanks to the publisher Beatnik Publishing for allowing us to share this story!

Find Out More:

You can also visit your local library and borrow some amazing books to learn more about Samoan culture, and practice the language. All our libraries have Samoan books and Newtown Library has the biggest collection! If you don’t have a library card- you can sign up for free. If you are worried about fines- just talk to the staff, they can help.

Awesome Samoan books in our collection:

Losi the Giant fisherman : Samoan myths and legends pick a path collection / Malaeulu, Dahlia
Losi the Giant was the greatest fisherman across all the moana. A mischievous and loyal friend to sea creatures and all humans, Losi will always be remembered as the hero who brought taro, the food of the Gods’, to Earth.

Author and Publisher Dahlia Malaeulu lives in Wellington and has written and published lots of Samoan books. You can read her blog about how Losi the Giant fisherman was shaped by her son Mase who has Autism.

Available from Mila’s Books!

Also, read this really interesting article on the Spinoff!

Samoan heroes / Riley, David
“A collection of inspirational stories of achievers who have Samoan ancestry. It includes: contemporary heroes like Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, Troy Polamalu, Judge Ida Mālosi, Savage and Associate Professor Donna Adis; historical figures like Emma Coe, Tamasese, Salamāsina and Lauaki; legends like Sina, Tiʻitiʻi and Tigilau”–Back cover.” (Catalogue). Also available as an eBook.

Fanene Peter Maivia : son of Samoa / Riley, David
“Fanene Peter Maivia – Son of Samoa is the remarkable story of the first Polynesian to become a star of professional wrestling. Fanene’s life began in Samoa and he took Samoa to the world. He was a pioneer who inspired some of the greatest wrestlers the world has known, including his own grandson, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.”–Publisher’s description.” (Catalogue). Also available as an eBook.

Brush up on your geography and history with…

Samoa / Aiono-Iosefa, Sarona
“Did you know that the English word ‘tattoo’ is supposedly derived from the Samoan word ‘tatau’? Find out about the traditional methods still used by Samoans to apply the amazing tattoos worn by many of the islands’ people today. In this book you will discover that an ‘ie toga is a beautiful and intricate fine mat, woven by Samoan women and used as highly prized gifts, which are made and given to celebrate important occasions. You can also study the climate, population, social structure and political history of the thirteen islands that make up the beautiful countries of American Samoa and independent Samoa (formerly Western Samoa).” (Catalogue).

Samoa & Tuvalu / Guile, Melanie
This book contains information about the history, culture and people of Samoa and nearby Tuvalu. A great book to have just in time for Samoan Language week.
Learn some simple words and phrases

  • Tālofa lava: Hello (formal)
  • Mālō le soifua: Hello/Good health
  • ‘O ā mai ‘oe? How are you? (to one person only)
  • Manuia fa‘afetai: Good, thank you
  • Manuia le aso: Have a great day
  • Tōfā soifua: Good bye (formal)

Faʻafetai lava ma ʻia manuia tele le Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa!

Thank you and have a very blessed Sāmoan Language Week

Get your tech on with Techweek 2022!

Techweek is back! It runs from 16th to 22nd May 2022 nationwide!
image courtesy of techweek


What is Techweek?

Techweek is a nationwide series of events, showcasing and celebrating New Zealand innovation. Techweek has a mixture of live, virtual and hybrid events, both physical and virtual, that can be attended and enjoyed from anywhere in the world!

The theme for Techweek 2022 is “connect for a better tomorrow.”

For more information about Techweek and what events are on, visit the website.

Some highlights you might like to explore include a talk with Dr Michelle Dickinson, the Founder of Nanogirl Labs, about STEM in Schools, and an introductory Scratch coding virtual project with Code Club Aotearoa.

In the mean time, if you want information on the latest technology and innovations, why not check out the following books in the library collection?!

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsSTEAM jobs for gamers.

Do you love playing video games? Did you know you can get a job helping to create one? There are more jobs for those who love gaming than you probably ever realized. From animators to script writers, readers will learn about various STEM and STEAM gaming jobs and what it takes to get one– Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe zoom, fly, bolt, blast steam handbook : build 18 innovative projects with brain power.

Rockport’s creative engineering extraordinaire, Lance Akiyama, returns again with Zoom, Fly Bolt, Blast STEAM Engineer and 18 STEAM approved projects to get kids doing, thinking, and building!– Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsSelf-driving cars : the new way forward.

“Author Fallon presents a history of how the technology used in self-driving cars has developed, identifies recent technological gains, and surveys recent controversies surrounding the potential mass adoption of self-driving cars.”–Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsSTEAM lab for kids : 52 creative hands-on projects using science, technology, engineering, art, and math.

“The creative projects in STEAM Lab for Kids are designed to demonstrate that there’s math and science to be found in great art! From rubber bands to edible stained glass, young engineers and artists alike will find inspiration in these 52 art-forward labs.” — Back cover. Also available as an eBook.


image courtesy of syndeticsVirtual reality.

“Engaging images accompany information about virtual reality. The combination of high-interest subject matter and light text is intended for students in grades 2 through 7” — Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe science of medical technology : from humble syringes to life-saving robots.

“This fascinating guide to the ever-growing potential of medical technologies combines fact-packed, easy-to-read text with colourful and quirky illustrations. From an exploration of how new devices are helping to spot early signs of illness to a discussion of how vaccinations have helped to eradicate devastating diseases, it is an eye-opening introduction to the miraculous power of preventative and curative medicine.Each spread has multiple entry points, including an introductory paragraph, illustrations and side panels such as Fascinating Fact, Can You Believe It?, and Try It Yourself, which provide additional information and handy advice.” (Catalogue).

Please search our catalogue for more information about technology here:

Understanding Ukraine and Russia: A Guide for Kids and their Adults

Wellington is home to thousands of people of Ukrainian and Russian descent, as well as people from Polish, Belarusian, and other Eastern or Central-Eastern European backgrounds. The current conflict between Ukraine and Russia means that people who have moved here from those countries, or who have family there, are probably feeling pretty anxious, scared, or upset right now. And of course, whenever there is conflict happening somewhere in the world, it tends to find its way into our everyday lives — through the news, through TV or internet content, or through our friends or teachers at school talking about it — and it’s completely normal for that to make us feel a bit scared or anxious as well.

A man in Ukrainian cultural dress, including a tall fur cap and an elaborately-knotted brocade, is holding a small child in front of a festival stall which is decorated with sunflowers.

The Ukrainian stall at the Palmerston North Festival of Cultures in 2018. Note the Ukrainian flag in the background, as well as all the sunflowers — the sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine. Image courtesy of Palmerston North City Library, licensed under CC BY 4.0.

One way that we can help ourselves, and others, is by learning as much as we can about the history and culture of those places, and how news gets created and reported. If we learn about that, we can understand more about what’s going on at the moment in Ukraine and Russia — which means we’ll be more aware of, and better able to process, what’s being reported in the media and what our friends, whānau, and the wider community are talking about.

The good news is that the library has a whole heap of resources — books and other things — to help you learn more about Ukraine, Russia, international conflict, and the media more generally. Read on to find out how the library can help you understand what’s going on in the world at the moment.


HINT: Many of the links in this blog go to the Encyclopaedia Britannica for Kids. This is accessible to all Wellington City Libraries patrons. But to access this wonderful resource, and the others mentioned in this blog, you’ll need to login using your library card number (on the back of your card) and 4 digit pin (last FOUR numbers of the phone number listed on your library account), and the link will take you straight there.


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Celebrate a Festival of lights with Hanukkah 2021!

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

חנוכה שמח! Happy Hanukkah! חג אורים שמח! Happy Festival of Lights!

Hanukkah 2021, also known as Festival of the Lights, will fall this year on the 28th November until 6th December.

What is Hannukah?

Hanukkah, or Chanukkah, is a Jewish festival that is observed for eight days and eight nights. It officially starts on the 25th day of the month of Kislev in the Hebrew calendar, which can occur anywhere from late November to mid-December.

Did you know? Hannukah can be broken down into חנו כ”ה, “[they] rested [on the] twenty-fifth”, referring to the fact that the Jews ceased fighting on the 25th day of Kislev, the day on which the holiday begins.

To learn more about Hannukah, check out this clip from Clarendon Learning on YouTube down below:


How do people celebrate Hannukah?

To commemorate this, Jewish people who celebrate Hanukkah light candles in special nine-branch candelabrum known as a Hanukkah menorah (מנורת חנוכה).  One candle is lit on the first night of Hanukkah, two on the second, and then this continues until all the candles are lit. The candles themselves are not used for any other purpose, even to light the other candles in the Menorah, so the ninth candle is used to light all the others. During Hanukkah, Jewish people make music together, share food (especially yummy fried foods like latkes and sufganiyot jam-filled doughnuts), exchange gelt, or gift money, and spend time with family and loved ones. A game is also traditionally played during Hanukkah that involves a driedel, which is a spinning top.

image courtesy of wikimedia.org

image courtesy of wikimedia.org


For more craft and gift ideas, have a read of:

image courtesy of syndeticsFestive fun.

“Presents craft projects relating to special days and festive occasions: Chinese New Year, Valentine’s Day, Passover, Easter, April Fool’s Day, May Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas and Kwanzaa. Includes step-by-step instructions. Suggested level: junior, primary.” (Catalogue)

Where can I find information about Hannukah?

Non fiction about Hannukah, Judaism and other religious festivals:

image courtesy of syndeticsCelebrate! : a book of Jewish holiday.

“This wonderful charmingly illustrated book celebrates Jewish holidays all year long. From Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, to Sukkot, the celebration of the harvest, to Hanukkah, the festival of lights, this is the perfect book for families to enjoy together.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsA Jewish life.

“A Jewish Life explores some of the cornerstones of what it means to be Jewish today, through Passover and Hanukkah celebrations, christening and wedding ceremonies, what happens in a synagogue and why many Jewish people go on pilgrimages to Israel.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsThe big book of festivals.

“Kids aged 7+ with an interest in the world around them will adore this collection of fantastic festivities, crazy celebrations and happy holy days from across the globe. The big book of festivals introduces young people to some major festivals and some lesser-known regional festivals from around the world. This gorgeously illustrated hardback features a total of 38 festivals, including: Lunar New Year, Day of the Dead, Kumbh Mela, Holi, Diwali, Gelede, Christmas, La Tomatina, Eid-ul-Fitr, Konaki Sumo, Carnaval, Hanukkah, Anastenaria, Festival of Giants, Matariki, Halloween, The Birthday of Guru Nanuk, Buddha’s Birthday, Bunya Cone Harvest Festival, Easter, Inti Raymi, Venetian Masquerade Ball, and more.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsA faith like mine : a celebration of the world’s religions– seen through the eyes of children.

“Using revealing photography and detailed personal accounts to give unique insight into the diversity of religious faith as experienced by children across the world, this is an ideal book for families to read together.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsReligious celebrations.

“This interesting book is part of a series written for young students that focuses on a wide variety of celebrations and festivals held for special occasions throughout the world. It focuses on religious celebrations. Written in simple language, this colourful book takes a global approach highlighting similarities and differences between how events are celebrated within different cultures.” (Catalogue)

Picture Books and fiction about Hannukah.

image courtesy of syndeticsNonna’s Hanukkah surprise.

“When Rachel loses the special menorah her mother gave her so she could share Hanukkah with her cousins, Rachel’s grandmother comes to the rescue with a creative and crafty solution.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsIs it Hanukkah yet?

“From snow on the ground to making applesauce and latkes to lighting the menorah, this story shows the seasonal and traditional ways we know Hanukkah is on its way.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsHana the Hanukkah fairy.

“When Hana the Hanukkah Fairy’s hanukkah is stolen by naughty Jack Frost, Hanukkah celebrations everywhere are at risk. Rachel and Kirsty must help Hani find her magical object!” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsThe latke who couldn’t stop screaming : a Christmas story.

“Latkes are potato pancakes served at Hanukah. Lemony Snicket is an alleged children’s author. For the first time in literary history, these two elements are combined in one book. People who are interested in either or both of these things will find this book so enjoyable it will feel as if Hanukah is being celebrated for several years, rather than eight nights.” (Catalogue)