Author Spotlight: Katherine Rundell

“It was a very fine day, until something tried to eat him…”

Katherine Rundell‘s books blend magical delight with tales of adventure and courageous young protagonists. They’re great for reading aloud for different aged family members, or for tamariki to read to themselves (under the duvet with a torch, we won’t tell!)

With the release of Katherine Rundell’s latest book, Impossible Creatures, we have compiled a list of some of her other wonderful reads.

Impossible creatures / Rundell, Katherine
“A boy called Christopher is visiting his reclusive grandfather when he witnesses an avalanche of mythical creatures come tearing down the hill. This is how Christopher learns that his grandfather is the guardian of one of the ways between the non-magical world and a place called the Archipelago, a cluster of magical islands where all the creatures we tell of in myth live and breed and thrive alongside humans. […] Then a girl, Mal, appears in Christopher’s world. She is in possession of a flying coat, is being pursued by a killer and is herself in pursuit of a baby griffin. Mal, Christopher and the griffin embark on an urgent quest across the wild splendour of the Archipelago, where sphinxes hold secrets and centaurs do murder, to find the truth – with unimaginable consequences for both their worlds.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Rooftoppers / Rundell, Katherine
“Everyone thinks that Sophie is an orphan. True, there were no other recorded female survivors from the shipwreck which left baby Sophie floating in the English Channel in a cello case, but Sophie remembers seeing her mother wave for help. […] So when the Welfare Agency writes to her guardian threatening to send Sophie to an orphanage, she takes matters into her own hands and flees to Paris to look for her mother, starting with the only clue she has – the address of the cello maker. Evading the French authorities, she meets Matteo and his network of rooftoppers – urchins who live in the sky. Together they scour the city for Sophie’s mother before she is caught and sent back to London, and most importantly before she loses hope.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The wolf wilder / Rundell, Katherine
“In the days before the Russian Revolution, twelve-year-old Feodora sets out to rescue her mother when the Tsar’s Imperial Army imprisons her for teaching tamed wolves to fend for themselves.” (Catalogue)

The explorer / Rundell, Katherine
“Fred, Con, Lila, and Max are on their way back to England when the plane they’re on crashes in the Amazon jungle and the pilot dies upon landing. For days they survive alone, until Fred finds a map that leads them to a ruined city, and to a secret.” (Catalogue)

The good thieves / Rundell, Katherine
“Vita’s grandfather, Jack, has been cheated out of everything he owns by a conman. Vita is determined to set things right with a lawless, death-defying plan. –Adapted from cover.” (Catalogue)

Cartwheeling in thunderstorms / Rundell, Katherine
“Will must find her way after she’s plucked out of a wonderful life in Zimbabwe and forced to go to boarding school in England”–Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

The book of hopes
“In difficult times, what children really need is hope. And in that spirit, Katherine Rundell emailed some of the children’s writers and artists whose work she loved most. ‘I asked them to write something very short, fiction or non-fiction, or draw something that would make the children reading it feel like possibility-ists: something that would make them laugh or wonder or snort or smile… I hope that the imagination can be a place of shelter for children and that this book might be useful in that, even if only a little. This collection, packed with short stories, poems and pictures from the very best children’s authors and illustrators, aims to provide just that.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

For younger readers:

The zebra’s great escape / Rundell, Katherine
“”A girl, a zebra, a dog and a squirrel set forth on a great adventure. Mr. Spit is out to get them – but bravery and brilliant friends are a match for anyone”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

For the adult in your life:

Why you should read children’s books, even though you are so old and wise / Rundell, Katherine
“Katherine Rundell – Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and prize-winning author of five novels for children – explores how children’s books ignite, and can re-ignite, the imagination; how children’s fiction, with its unabashed emotion and playfulness, can awaken old hungers and create new perspectives on the world. This delightful and persuasive essay is for adult readers.” (Catalogue)

Graveyard Shakes: Kids’ Comics for Halloween!

Spooky season is upon us, and we just so happen to have you covered for some great reads from our comic and graphic novel collections.

If you like the idea of a witch who uses her cauldron to make pizza, an avenging-warrior-ghost-hog, or a girl who meets her new best friend by summoning a spirit at a seance tea party, then these are for you!

Junior Comics

Witches of Brooklyn [1] / Escabasse, Sophie
“Effie moves to Brooklyn to live with her strange aunt and soon discovers that she might be a witch.” (Catalogue)

Graveyard shakes / Terry, Laura
“When Katia runs away from her private boarding school her sister Victoria goes looking for her, accidentally stumbling into the underworld of a nearby graveyard inhabited by ghosts and a man named Nikola, who is preparing a sinister spell.” (Catalogue)
Séance tea party / Yee, Reimena
“After watching her circle of friends seemingly fade away, Lora is determined to still have fun on her own, so when a tea party leads Lora to discovering Alexa, the ghost that haunts her house, they soon become best friends.” (Catalogue)

Ghost hog / Weiser, Joey
“Truff is the ghost of a young boar, fueled by fury towards the hunter who shot her down. She has a lot to learn about her new afterlife, and thankfully the forest spirits Claude and Stanley are there to guide her! However, they soon find that her parents, along with their fellow animal villagers, have been kidnapped by the malicious mountain demon Mava! Truff wants to help, but… the hunter is finally within her grasp, and if she lets him go, she may never get her revenge! Is vengeance all that being a ghost is good for? Or is there something stronger keeping this little pig tethered to the living world?” (Catalogue)

Skull Cat. Book 1, Skull Cat and the curious castle / Shurtliff, Norman
“It’s Scully the Cat’s first day as the new garden-keeper at a spooky castle… but when everyone goes missing, is he brave enough to become a hero? Draw your sword and let’s find out! Even though the castle is an eerie place, full of dark secrets, Scully is excited to start his new job and prove himself to be a great gardener. But wait a minute… what happened to all his co-workers? Were they devoured by bloodthirsty vampires? Spooked by a love-struck ghost? Pranked by a comic-reading goblin? Enchanted by a sleepy sorcerer? Will Scully have to become the hero and uncover the truth behind Le Dark Chateau? He never signed up for this!!”– Publisher’s website.” (Catalogue)

Sorceline / Douyé, Sylvia
“For as long as she can remember, Sorceline has had a knack for the study of mythical creatures. Now a student at Professor Archibald Balzar’s prestigious school of cryptozoology, she’s eager to test her skills and earn a spot as one of Balzar’s apprentices. But for all her knowledge of gorgons, vampires, and griffins, Sorceline is mystified by her fellow humans. While she excels in her studies, she quickly clashes with her classmates, revealing her fiery temper. When one of her rivals suddenly disappears, Sorceline must set aside her anger and join the quest to find her. But the mystery only deepens, leading Sorceline on a journey far darker and more personal than she expected.” (Catalogue)

YA Comics

Unfamiliar. 1 / Newsome, Haley
“Young kitchen witch Planchette gets an incredible deal on a new house in a magical town. Turns out, there’s a reason: it’s haunted! After unsuccessfully attempting to get these unwanted ghosts to leave, she realizes the only thing to do is to help them with their problems. Along the way, she befriends a shy siren who hates being popular, a girl battling a curse, and a magically-challenged witch from a powerful coven.” (Catalogue)

Summer spirit / Holleville, Élizabeth
“Summer for Louise means sand, surf, and… the supernatural. Louise spends every summer at her grandma’s house with her older sister, cousins, and Rodin the dog. But, this year, her plans to relax and read comics on the beach are about to be turned upside down by a mischievous ghost, bored with being forced to haunt the same house. While the other girls are wrapped up in romance and teenage problems, Louise takes refuge with her new paranormal BFF, determined to escape the drama and just enjoy her summer break, something that is proving to be a lot harder than she anticipated.” (Catalogue)

The Okay Witch / Steinkellner, Emma
“Thirteen-year-old Moth Hush loves all things witchy. But she’s about to discover that witches aren’t just the stuff of movies, books, and spooky stories. When some eighth-grade bullies try to ruin her Halloween, something really strange happens. It turns out that Founder’s Bluff, Massachusetts, has a centuries-old history of witch drama. And, surprise: Moth’s family is at the center of it all! When Moth’s new powers show up, things get totally out-of-control. She meets a talking cat, falls into an enchanted diary, and unlocks a hidden witch world. Secrets surface from generations past as Moth unravels the complicated legacy at the heart of her town, her family, and herself.” (Catalogue)

Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niue | Niue Language Week 2023

Fakaalofa lahi atu!

This week, from Sunday 15 October to Saturday 21 October, we are celebrating Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niue | Niue Language Week 2023.

Our theme this year is:

Fakatūleva e Vagahau Niue mo e Tau Aga Fakamotu ma e Tau Atuhau | Sustain Niue Language and Culture for Future Generations.

Niue Language and Culture

According to the Ministry for Pacific Peoples, “Vagahau Niue has been registered with UNESCO as an endangered language, so one of the challenges is the preservation of Vagahau Niue and Niue culture.”

Niue leaders and community groups are working hard to keep Vagahau Niue / Niue Language and Culture going so that the next generation (your children and your childrens’ children) can learn the unique knowledge of the island, its history, its people and their values.

This is tricky becasue there are only about 1,900 people who live in Niue. Most Niuean people live outside the country, over 30,000 in Aotearoa/New Zealand and about 6,000 in Australia!

Young New Zealand-born Niueans have said that Vagahau Niue and Niue Culture are avenues to stay connected with their parents and grandparents; it is their sense of identity.

For people who aren’t Niuean, you can support by learning about Niue culture and people who have  made some amazing contributions to Aotearoa/ New Zealand.

Events

Join us at Newtown Library for a special Niue Language Week Storytime! We have special guest elder Mailigi Hetutu visiting Newtown Library this year to share some special stories from Niue and some childrens games. This session is most suitable for 4-6 year olds. Fakaalofa lahi atu ku a mutolu oti — everyone is welcome!

To get you excited for more stories in Niuean, head on over to our YouTube channel where you can watch and listen to our librarian Lewis (now the Pasifika Librarian at Porirua Libraries!) read a special bilingual story — Fifine pulotu mo e tofuā | The artist and the whale by David Riley — in English and Vagahau Niue.

This video was recorded as part of our celebrations for Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niue back in 2021. We would like to thank Lewis and David for allowing us to share this beautiful story with you throughout Niue Language Week — fakaaue lahi, David! Make sure to check out the Reading Warrior website to find more stories of the Pacific from David and his collaborators.


You can find even more events on the official NZ Niue Language Week Facebook page and on the Ministry for Pacific Peoples website.

10 Fun Fast Facts about Niue

  1. Niue is the world’s largest raised coral atoll
  2. It was created 2-3 million years ago
  3. Niue is just one island
  4. It takes around two hours to drive around the entire island
  5. It has some of the clearest waters in the world because no rivers or streams run off into the ocean
  6. There is a prison on the island’s golf course
  7. Niue is one of the last countries in the world to see the sunset
  8. Niue has no traffic lights

Te Kupu Fakafeleveia | Useful Words

Vagahau Niue                      English
Fakaalofa lahi atu               Greetings/Hello
Fakaalofa atu                       Greetings/Hello
Fakaalofa lahi atu ki a mutolu oti              Greetings Everyone
Mutolu kia                            Goodbye – to those who are leaving
Nonofo ā mutolu kia          Goodbye – to those who are staying
Fakamolemole                     Please
Fakaaue Lahi oue tulou     Thank you

Language is a wonderful way to connect with others and celebrate diversity. You can learn even more phrases by using the Niue Language Cards from the Ministry for Pacific Peoples!

Tau tohi | Books

We have many Niue language books in our library collection, and you are most welcome to borrow them today! Here are some of our favourites, but you can also visit this link to find even more children’s books in Vagahau Niuē at your local library.

We are the rock / Riley, David
“In We are the Rock contemporary Niueans, historical and legendary figures tell their stories of focus, expression and achievement.” (Catalogue)

Tau kukukuku ha AkoTau kukukuku ha Ako = Ako’s hugs / Fuemana-Foaʿi, Lisa 

“Ako shows his affection towards his family by giving them hugs, including the family cat and his cuddly toy, Kuku, the fruit bat.” (Catalogue)

Of course you can! = E maeke he taute e koe / Hinge, Karen

“Jeremy is starting at a new school. He’s not too sure about how he will fit in. But the other students make him welcome and every time he thinks he can’t do something they say … “Of course you can!” That is until the day they go to the swimming pool.” (Catalogue)

Tau Matatohi faka-Niue Niue Alphabet with English TranslationTau matatohi Faka-Niue : Niue alphabet with English translation / Ikenasio-Thorpe, Bettina  

A short introduction to the alphabet! In the same series, we also have an introduction to colours and counting numbers!

The woman who was swallowed by a whale : a tale from Niue / Wilton, Briar
“The woman who was swallowed by a whale is a folktale ; Niue : rock of Polynesia is a short factual introduction to the country and culture.” (Catalogue)

Kuaka visits Niue / Peterson,Vanessa
“Uses a story format and the concept of bird migration to introduce places in Niue, food and customs.” (Catalogue)

Tales of Niue nukututaha : in Niuean and English / Feilo, Zora
“A collection of twelve stories in both English and Niuean set on the island if Niue, this is the author’s reinterpretation of myth, legend and storytelling from her native land. Each story is lavishly illustrated by Niuean artist Lange Taufelila.” (Catalogue)

The artist and the whale = Fifine pulotu mo e tafuā : a Niue legend / Riley, David
“Mataginifale is a Niue superhero with a difference. She isn’t known for her super powers, but for her super creativity. One day she had an argument with a whale that tested her thinking skills too.” (Catalogue)

Niuean for kids / Jahri Jah Jah
“Learn to speak words and phrases in Niuean. This book packs in many common words and phrases., including greetings, colours, numbers, body parts, animals and farewells. It is a great resource for anybody wanting to learn some basic words in Niuean. Suitable for ages 1+.” (Catalogue)

Niue stands alone / Tu tokotaha a Niue / tau tala tuai ne talahau e David Riley ; fakaliliu e Mele Nemaia ; tau fakatino mai ia Chad Robertson / Riley, David
“Have you ever done something so embarrassing you just wanted to hide? Fao and Huanaki know how that feels. They once did something embarrassing too. But they found a way to turn it into something good.” (Catalogue)

Coconut delight = Fakafetuiaga fiafia ha ko e Niu / Riley, David
“Some of the sweetest fruits in the world grow in Niue. There’s fua futi (bananas), fua mago (mangoes) and fua loku (pawpaw). But niu (coconut) might be the most important of them all. How did the niu get to Niue? Find out how in Coconut Delight, a bilingual legend from the Rock!” (Catalogue)

That’s it from us today! We hope you enjoy Niue Language Week 2023! Fakaaue lahi oue tulou.

Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti | Fijian Language Week 2023

Bula…

… and welcome to Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti | Fijian Language Week 2023! Fiji is a tropical paradise located in the South Pacific Ocean, known for its stunning beaches, crystal-clear waters, and lush rainforests. The friendly people of Fiji welcome visitors with open arms, and their culture is rich and vibrant.


Fijian Language Week runs from Sunday 8 – Saturday 14 October. Our theme this year is:

Me vakabulabulataki, vakamareqeti, ka vakaqaqacotaki na vosa vakaviti | Nurture, preserve, and sustain the Fijian language

If you’re just starting to learn about Fiji, here are some quick iwiliwili vakasakiti — some fascinating numbers — to get you started:

  • Humans have been living in Fiji for over 3,000 years!
  • There are more than 330 Fijian islands, but you’ll only find people living on about 110 of them.
  • Fiji started forming around 150 million years ago, caused by volcanic activity under the sea!
  • The largest island — Viti Levu — makes up 57% of Fiji’s total land area, and holds three quarters of the whole population.

Let’s celebrate Fijian Language Week by exploring the culture of Fiji, visiting your local library for fantastic resources, and embracing the theme of nurturing, preserving and sustaining the Fijian language.

Kai | Kakana

A plant with green, heart-shaped leaves.

Yaqona, also known as the kava plant. Image: Piper methysticum (leaves) by Forest & Kim Starr on Wikimedia Commons. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 DEED.

As in many Pasifika nations, traditional Fijian foods leans on local resources like fish, coconut, kumara, and taro.

Yaqona — a pepper plant found across many Pacific islands — can be made into a beverage called kava, which adults in Fiji drink at celebrations and ceremonies.

Lovo is a meal cooked underground, much like our hāngī in Aotearoa. It requires a lot of preparation and a variety of ingredients, so it’s usually only made for big events like weddings or festivals. Here’s a rough idea of how it’s laid out:

Image: supplied by author.


Useful Words | Vosa Veivukei

Let’s encourage everyone to learn the Fijian language by using simple words and phrases in your everyday conversations. Here are some examples of everyday words you might use:

Ni sa bula vinaka | Greetings/Hello
Ni sa bula vinaka kece sara | Greetings Everyone
Ni sa moce | Goodbye
Kerekere | Please
Vinaka vakalevu | Thank you
Drau sa vakacava tiko? | How are you?
Au daumaka tiko, vinaka | I am fine, thank you
O cei na yacamu? | What is your name?
Na yacaqu ko | My name is ______
Lutu na niu, lutu ki vuna | The coconut falls close to its roots

Language is a wonderful way to connect with others and celebrate diversity. You can learn even more phrases by using the Fijian Language Cards from the Ministry for Pacific Peoples!

Discover Fiji through books!

Look for books about Fiji’s culture, history, and of course, the Fijian language. You can find some more books in the Fijian language on our catalogue here.

Vunimaqo and me : mango tree collections / Kamali, Daren

“A collection of poems, coupled with images that deepen the words, channelling the many voices and the stories of those who found connections and shelter by the mango tree. The author was born and raised in Suva, Fiji, but is now based in New Zealand. In English with some Fijian words, includes a glossary.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Fijian reference grammar / Schütz, Albert J.
“This book is based on over fifty years of research on the Fijian language–both the standard language and its many dialects. It does not attempt to follow any particular linguistic theory, but in contrast, focuses heavily on describing the language in context. The data that it is based on include material written and spoken by Fijians–ranging from the advice offered by the author’s colleagues in the Fijian (monolingual) Dictionary Project to Fijian-language newspapers and textbooks, to recordings of loanwords and casual conversations, and–most recently–the text and DVD of a recent Fijian play, Lakovi. ” (adapted from Catalogue)

My ocean home Fiji / Casey, Penelope
“My Ocean Home Fiji is a beautiful children’s book that tells the story of Tui and his Fijian friends, who explore the magical world under the sea.” (Catalogue)

Fijian for kids / Jahri Jah Jah
“Learn to speak words and phrases in Fijian. This book packs in many common words and phrases., including greetings, colours, numbers, body parts, animals and farewells. It is a great resource for anybody wanting to learn some basic words in Fijian. Suitable for ages 1+” (Catalogue)

Counting in Fijian / Jahri Jah Jah
“Simple illustrations and text introduce the numbers from 1 to 15 in the Fijian language. Suggested level: junior.” (Catalogue)

Fiji / Sorovi-Vunidilo, Tarisi
“The islands of Fiji are full of rich history and culture. Describes the history, customs, geography, and culture of the people who live there, and provides authentic vocabulary words for an immersive experience. Includes a glossary, index, and bibliography for further reading.” (Catalogue)

Let’s come together to make a difference, one word at a time. Vinaka vakalevu (thank you very much) for joining us in this exciting celebration of Fijian Language Week!

Vaiaso o te Gana Tuvalu | Tuvalu Language Week 2023

Tālofa…

…and welcome to Vaiaso o te Gana Tuvalu | Tuvalu Language Week 2023! Fakafetai — thank you for joining us in celebrating this beautiful Pasifika nation.

Tuvalu Language Week runs from Sunday 1st to Saturday 7th of October 2023. The theme for Tuvalu Language Week this year is:

Fakatumau kae fakaakoi tau gana ke mautu a iloga o ‘ta tuā. | Preserve and embrace your language to safeguard our heritage identities.

It’s important that we support and protect Tuvaluan people and culture, now more than ever, as their homeland faces a very serious threat.

Due to global warming, the 9 islands that make up Tuvalu are being swallowed by the sea, and it’s predicted that they’ll be impossible to live on within 50-100 years. Without a homeland to anchor their way of life, Tuvaluan traditions and culture are at terrible risk of extinction.

But we can all help to keep Tuvalu alive if we take some time to learn and share Tuvaluan language and culture; spread knowledge and raise awareness throughout Aotearoa and beyond.

Food | Kai

An image of pulaka plants growing in a muddy pit.

Image: Pulaka Pit by Luigi Guarino on Flickr, licensed under CC BY 2.0 Deed.

Like all Pasifika nations, Tuvaluan kai draws heavily on their island resources, like coconuts and seafood. The majority of the working population are farmers, and can happily feed themselves with food produced in their own backyards. The most common crop is pulaka — swamp taro — which grows underground, making it less likely to be damaged by strong weather or rising tides.

Fekei is a popular dessert in Tuvalu, made by wrapping a mixture of coconut cream and grated pulaka in the leaves of the pulaka plant.

Helpful Words | Pati Aoga

Hello! — Tālofa!

My name is ___ — Toku igoa ko ___

Good luck! Cheers! Be well! — Manuia!

Have a good day! — Manuia te aso!

Have a good night! — Manuia te pō!

Have a good journey! — Manuia te malaga!

This lady will pay for everything! — A mea katoa e ‘togi nē te fafine tēnei!

My hovercraft is full of eels — Taku hovercraft kō fonu i pusi

Learn even more phrases using the Tuvalu Language Cards from the Ministry for Pacific Peoples!

Books | Tusi

Au e foliki? = Am I small / Winterberg, Phillip
“‘Am I small?’ – Tamia is not sure and keeps asking various animals that she meets on her journey. Eventually she finds the surprising answer…” This book has been translated into Tuvaluan, and is a bilingual story, meaning it has English and Tuvaluan side-by-side. (Adapted from Catalogue)

A librarian is holding three bilingual books in Tuvaluan in front of the Pasifika language display at Newtown Library

Librarian Ethan shows off some of these beautiful bilingual books at Newtown Library!

Bilingual Tuvaluan Stories / Sioni, Alamai Manuella
Alamai Manuella Sioni and illustrator Chad Robertson have put out a fantastic series of 8 bilingual Tuvaluan picture books — a mixture of legends and stories about life in Tuvalu.

The ili of Funafuti = Te ili o Funafuti / Kaveinga, Meli
“Describes the process used by the women of Funafuti (Tuvalu) to make a fan from coconut palms.” (Catalogue)

The gifts of Pai and Vau = Meaalofa a Pai mo Vau / Riley, David
“Pai and Vau are Nanumea superheroes who created beautiful things in our world. One day a stranger named Tefolaha came to their island. “This is now my island,” he declared and challenged them to a contest. What kind of contest did he dream up? What would Pai and Vau do if they lost?” (Catalogue)

Visit our catalogue to find more books in Gana Tuvalu!

Chinese Language Week 2023 (English)

Read this post in Simplified Chinese!

Read this post in Traditional Chinese!

Da Jia Hao! Neih Hou! 大家好! 你好! This year, we are going to observe Chinese Language Week, a celebration that aims to raise the profile of Chinese languages in New Zealand, from the 17th of September to 23rd of September! Chinese languages are beautiful and special languages. The Chinese characters not only tell you how to say a word, but also show you its meaning. Even more incredible, is the history of written Chinese languages can be traced back to the Shang Dynasty (1766 – 1122BC). It is one of the oldest written languages in the world.

There are 302 dialects in the Chinese language, and different places have their own mother tongue. For example, you will hear Shanghainese in Shanghai, or Sichuanese in Sichuan. Most people in Hong Kong speak Cantonese, and in Taiwan, people use Taigi. If you go to Malaysia or Singapore, you’ll find people who speak Hokkien, Cantonese and Hakka! Here in New Zealand, most Chinese speakers use Yue or Cantonese, followed by Mandarin.

Chinese characters can be divided into Simplified Chinese characters and Traditional Chinese characters. Simplified Chinese characters were developed from Traditional Chinese characters. Simplified Chinese is written from left to right, just like English script. However, Traditional Chinese is written from right to left, and it should be read from top to bottom. Today, Simplified Chinese characters are widely used in China, Malaysia, Singapore, while Traditional Chinese characters are primarily used in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau.


Library Events

Mandarin Storytime – 10.30 – 11.00am, Sunday 17 September

Te Awe Library, 29B Brandon Street, Wellington. 

To celebrate Chinese Language Week we have a special preschool storytime in Mandarin – we’d love to see you there!

Pre School-Storytime in Mandarin – 10.30 – 11.00am, Wednesday 20 September

Newtown Library, 13 Constable Street, Newtown.

Fun stories, ancient poetry, songs and rhymes for children aged 4-8 years old with their caregivers.

Children’s Storytime in English and Mandarin – 11.00 – 12.00pm, Saturday 23 September

Karori Library, 247 Karori Road, Karori.

We are happy to announce a Chinese Storytime to celebrate Chinese Language Week of 2023. The session will be in Mandarin and English!

Get ready for engaging storytelling, ancient Chinese Tang poems, exciting songs that will entertain the whole whānau.

Chinese Calligraphy Workshop – 2.00 – 3.00pm, Saturday 23 September

Newtown Library, 13 Constable Street, Newtown.

Come and experience Chinese Calligraphy. Grind your own ink and use writing brushes for the first time. Let’s learn together.

Trilingual Storytime – 10.30 – 11.00am, Monday 25 September

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library, 158 Main Road (Cnr Cambridge Street & Main Road), Tawa.

Celebrate Chinese Language Week with a special storytime in Cantonese, Mandarin, and English. Recommended for children aged 2+ years with their caregivers.

Trilingual Storytime – 10.30 – 11.00am, Tuesday 26 September

Johnsonville Library, 34 Moorefield Road, Johnsonville.

Celebrate Chinese Language Week with a special storytime in Cantonese, Mandarin, and English. Recommended for children aged 2+ years with their caregivers.

Traditional Chinese Painting ​ 国画体验 – 10.30 – 11.30am, Thursday 28 September

Johnsonville Library, 34 Moorefield Road, Johnsonville

Join us at the library to learn about and try your hand at traditional Chinese painting. Our expert will share his traditions and techniques with you, then you can try creating your own artwork! Recommended for children aged 8+ with their caregivers.

Traditional Chinese Painting ​ 国画体验 – 12.30 – 1.30pm, Thursday 28 September

Karori Library, 247 Karori Road, Karori

Join us at the library to learn about and try your hand at traditional Chinese painting. Our expert will share his traditions and techniques with you, then you can try creating your own artwork! Recommended for children aged 8+ with their caregivers.

Traditional Chinese Painting ​ 国画体验 – 3.00 – 4.00pm, Thursday 28 September

Te Awe Library, 29b Brandon Street, Wellington Central

Join us at the library to learn about and try your hand at traditional Chinese painting. Our expert will share his traditions and techniques with you, then you can try creating your own artwork! Recommended for children aged 8+ with their caregivers.


Books in English

To celebrate Chinese Language Week, do not forget to check our children’s collection. We have a wide range of books in the junior fiction and non-fiction section and picture books introducing Chinese customs and culture:

Dim sum, here we come / Lam, Maple
“Today is Sunday and that means its dim sum time with my whole family! I can’t wait to see everyone, especially Grandma. I’m going to eat lots of shrimp dumplings, rice noodle rolls, egg tarts, and my favourite–char siu buns. We will have to order enough for us all to share. So what are you waiting for? Dim sum, here we come!” (Catalogue)

Cang Jie : the inventor of Chinese characters / Li, Jian
“In ancient times under the reign of Yellow Emperor (about 2500 B.C.), people kept records by piling stones and tying knots. One day, Cang Jie, a historical official who tied knots to keep records under Yellow Emperor, unexpectedly made a big mistake. Feeling very guilty, he was determined to find out a better way for keeping records. […] In this multicultural children’s story, kids will find out that there is a story behind every Chinese character. Children will also learn about basic Chinese characters and how to make them.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The Anchor book of Chinese poetry
“Unmatched in scope and literary quality, this landmark anthology spans three thousand years, bringing together more than six hundred poems by more than one hundred thirty poets, in translations-many new and exclusive to the book-by an array of distinguished translators. Here is the grand sweep of Chinese poetry, from the Book of Songs-ancient folk songs said to have been collected by Confucius himself-and Laozi’s Dao De Jing to the vividly pictorial verse of Wang Wei, the romanticism of Li Po, the technical brilliance of Tu Fu, and all the way up to the twentieth-century poetry of Mao Zedong and the post–Cultural Revolution verse of the Misty poets. […] The Anchor Book of Chinese Poetry captures with impressive range and depth the essence of China’s illustrious poetic tradition.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

All about China : stories, songs, crafts and games for kids / Branscombe, Allison
“Take the whole family on a whirlwind tour of Chinese culture and history with this award-winning, delightfully illustrated book complete with stories, activities, and games. This Chinese children’s book is perfect for educators and parents wishing to teach kids about this fascinating Asian country. Travel from the stone age through the dynasties to the present day with songs and crafts for kids that will educate them about Chinese language and the Chinese way of life.” (Catalogue)

Let’s make dumplings! : a comic book cookbook / Amano, Hugh
“Includes dumpling history and lore, this comic book cookbook invites readers to explore the big little world of Asian dumplings and proves that intricate folding styles and flavourful fillings are achievable in the home kitchen.” (Catalogue)

Chinese / Dickmann, Nancy
“This book takes a light-hearted look at the characters and creatures from the Chinese mythological stories. These myths come from different cultural groups, and they include stories about how the world came to be, as well as folk tales and stories with a religious message. The stories are full of gods, monsters, animals, ghosts and nature spirits. The book is structured as a ‘Who’s Who’ of the culture’s myths and legends and has a gossipy, informal tone, allowing the characters’ personalities to come through.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Chinese children’s favorite stories / Yip, Mingmei
“A collection of children’s legends and tales from China. This volume of beloved Chinese stories contains a delightful selection from the rich store of Chinese folklore and legend. Discover the many delightful animal characters as well as Chang-E, the famous Eight Immortals, and Guan Yin, goddess of compassion. Retold for an international audience, the beautifully illustrated stories will give children aged six to ten in other countries a glimpse into both the tradition and culture of China.” (Catalogue)


Books in Mandarin

We also have a good amount of books in Mandarin that can let you practice your Mandarin! Check out some of our favourites below, or visit the catalogue to find more children’s books in Chinese languages!

First words. Mandarin / Mansfield, Andy
“Bring the Mandarin language to life with this beautifully illustrated children’s book from Lonely Planet Kids, an imprint of Lonely Planet, the world’s leading travel guide and phrasebook publisher. Perfect for the whole family, First Words Mandarin features 100 words to use while travelling, from food and transport, to animals and weather. Each word is accompanied with a bold illustration and a simple pronunciation guide to make the vocabulary fun and easy to learn.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The little monkey king’s journey = Xiao Wukong / Li, Jian
“Long, long ago, a little Monkey was born from an old magic stone which suddenly cracked open after lying in the sunlight and moonlight for thousands of years. Although he was an orphan, the Little Monkey was extremely talented. Fortunately, the Monkey King in the mountain adopted him. […] During his journey, with the help from the Immortal Turtle, the Phoenix, the Dragon King and the Immortal, the Little Monkey gained a powerful body. Could he eventually save the life of the Monkey King?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Xia tian de cai hong = Summertime rainbow / Yang, Belle
“In this story presented in both English and Chinese, bunnies hop through the meadow on a beautiful summer day, spotting blue sky, white clouds, yummy green grass, and other colorful sights.” (Catalogue)

Home for Chinese New Year : a story told in English and Chinese / Wei, Jie
“The Chinese New Year is a time for family reunions. This Chinese children’s story tells a delightful trip with lots of cultural details along the way! Jia Jun’s Dad worked out of town all year around. Now it’s time for him to come home. He took a train, bus, three-wheeled motorcycle, ferry-boat and even walked for many miles. He finally made it home and had a reunion dinner with his family on New Year’s Eve. […] In a few days, Dad was ready to head back to work, but it was certain that Dad would be home again next year to celebrate the Chinese New Year with his family.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Xiao lao shu yu jin zhong zi = The little rat and the golden seed : a story in English and Chinese / Li, Jian
“Age range 5+ Learn how the clever Little Rat earned his place as one of the Chinese Zodiac Animals. This adorable Chinese-English bilingual children’s book tells the story of the Little Rat and the Grandpa — unlikely allies who embark on an adventure to find a golden seed. They encounter rough seas, fierce guards and tall mountains, but — in the end — bring home a golden rice seed and save the village from going hungry.” (Catalogue)


Start your own Chinese language adventure at the library today!

– Thanks to Wei Jing, Kirk & Isabel for creating this blog post

Chinese Language Week 2023 (Traditional Chinese Script)

Read this post in English!

Read this post in Simplified Chinese!

大家好!你好!我們將在即將到來的9月17日至23日慶祝紐西蘭中文週。舉辦紐西蘭中文週的目的是為了推廣中文學習。中文是一門優美獨特語言,而中文的特別之處在於,中文文字不止傳達了其發音,同時也承載了其涵義。更酷的是,中文的起源可追溯至商朝時期,大約公元前1766至1122年,為世界上最古老的語言之一。  

中文涵蓋了共302門的方言,而不同的地區會有不同的母語。舉例來說,在上海你會聽到上海話,在四川則有四川話。在香港,大家以粵語為主,台灣人則會說台語。如果你有機會到訪馬來西亞或新加坡,你會遇到會說廣東話,福建話,或客家話的華人。在紐西蘭,大部分的華裔都說廣東話,其次則是普通話。  

此外,漢字(中文字)還可以分為簡體字和繁體字。簡體字是從繁體字演化而來,閱讀方式就和閱讀英語一樣,從左到右。而繁體字則相反,排版通常為豎排排版,閱讀方式從右到左,從上到下。如今,中國,馬來西亞和新加坡以簡體字為主;而繁體字則見於台灣,香港和澳門。 

圖書館活動  

為了慶祝中文週,威靈頓圖書館舉辦了各式各樣的活動,歡迎大家一起來參加! 

普通話故事會 – 早上10.30至11.00,9月17日,星期日  

提亞威圖書館 Te Awe Library, 29B Brandon Street, Wellington.  

為慶祝中文週,提亞威圖書館將舉辦特別的普通話故事會。我們的故事會將包括有趣和好玩的故事及詩詞韻律。建議2歲以上的兒童及其看護人參加。

普通話故事會 – 早上10.30至11.00, 9月20日,星期三  

Newtown圖書館 Newtown Library, 13 Constable Street, Newtown. 

在Newtown圖書館慶祝紐西蘭中文週。讓4-8歲的華裔兒童及家長體驗中文文化的魅力!其他中文與方言者歡迎!  

雙語故事會 – 早上11.00至下午12.00,9月23日,星期六  

Karori卡羅里圖書館 Karori Library, 247 Karori Road, Karori. 

在Karori圖書館,將有慶祝紐西蘭中文週的活動。活動內容有講故事、唐詩朗誦及展現中文流行樂與童謠,讓4-8歲的華裔兒童及家長體驗中文文化的魅力!其他中文與方言者歡迎!  

書法工坊 – 下午2.00至3.00,9月23日,星期六  

Newtown圖書館 Newtown Library, 13 Constable Street, Newtown. 

在Newtown圖書館慶祝紐西蘭中文週。一起嘗試研墨執筆,體驗中國書法。

三語故事會 – 早上10.30至11.00,9月25日,星期一  

Tawa圖書館 Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library, 158 Main Road (Cnr Cambridge Street & Main Road), Tawa. 

為慶祝中文週,我們將舉辦特別的粵語、普通話和英語的三語故事會。建議2歲以上的兒童及其看護人參加。

三語故事會 – 早上10.30至11.00,9月26日,星期二

Waitohi強生威爾遜圖書館 Johnsonville Library, 34 Moorefield Road, Johnsonville.

為慶祝中文週,我們將舉辦特別的粵語、普通話和英語的三語故事會。建議2歲以上的兒童及其看護人參加。

書籍  

同時,大家也別忘了到圖書館借閱我們的兒童讀物。在我們的藏書裡,有一系列關於中華文化的書籍:

Dim sum, here we come / Lam, Maple
“Today is Sunday and that means its dim sum time with my whole family! I can’t wait to see everyone, especially Grandma. I’m going to eat lots of shrimp dumplings, rice noodle rolls, egg tarts, and my favorite–char siu buns. We will have to order enough for us all to share. So what are you waiting for? Dim sum, here we come!” (Catalogue)

Cang Jie : the inventor of Chinese characters / Li, Jian
“In ancient times under the reign of Yellow Emperor (about 2500 B.C.), people kept records by piling stones and tying knots. One day, Cang Jie, a historical official who tied knots to keep records under Yellow Emperor, unexpectedly made a big mistake. Feeling very guilty, he was determined to find out a better way for keeping records. […] In this multicultural children’s story, kids will find out that there is a story behind every Chinese character. Children will also learn about basic Chinese characters and how to make them.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The Anchor book of Chinese poetry
“Unmatched in scope and literary quality, this landmark anthology spans three thousand years, bringing together more than six hundred poems by more than one hundred thirty poets, in translations-many new and exclusive to the book-by an array of distinguished translators. Here is the grand sweep of Chinese poetry, from the Book of Songs-ancient folk songs said to have been collected by Confucius himself-and Laozi’s Dao De Jing to the vividly pictorial verse of Wang Wei, the romanticism of Li Po, the technical brilliance of Tu Fu, and all the way up to the twentieth-century poetry of Mao Zedong and the post–Cultural Revolution verse of the Misty poets. […] The Anchor Book of Chinese Poetry captures with impressive range and depth the essence of China’s illustrious poetic tradition.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

All about China : stories, songs, crafts and games for kids / Branscombe, Allison
“Take the whole family on a whirlwind tour of Chinese culture and history with this award-winning, delightfully illustrated book complete with stories, activities, and games. This Chinese children’s book is perfect for educators and parents wishing to teach kids about this fascinating Asian country. Travel from the stone age through the dynasties to the present day with songs and crafts for kids that will educate them about Chinese language and the Chinese way of life.” (Catalogue)

Let’s make dumplings! : a comic book cookbook / Amano, Hugh
“Includes dumpling history and lore, this comic book cookbook invites readers to explore the big little world of Asian dumplings and proves that intricate folding styles and flavourful fillings are achievable in the home kitchen.” (Catalogue)

Chinese / Dickmann, Nancy
“This book takes a light-hearted look at the characters and creatures from the Chinese mythological stories. These myths come from different cultural groups, and they include stories about how the world came to be, as well as folk tales and stories with a religious message. The stories are full of gods, monsters, animals, ghosts and nature spirits. The book is structured as a ‘Who’s Who’ of the culture’s myths and legends and has a gossipy, informal tone, allowing the characters’ personalities to come through.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Chinese children’s favorite stories / Yip, Mingmei
“A collection of children’s legends and tales from China. This volume of beloved Chinese stories contains a delightful selection from the rich store of Chinese folklore and legend. Discover the many delightful animal characters as well as Chang-E, the famous Eight Immortals, and Guan Yin, goddess of compassion. Retold for an international audience, the beautifully illustrated stories will give children aged six to ten in other countries a glimpse into both the tradition and culture of China. – Publisher.” (Catalogue)

此外,我們也有不少中文書籍,能夠讓你從今天就能開始練習你的普通話哦!

First words. Mandarin / Mansfield, Andy
“Bring the Mandarin language to life with this beautifully illustrated children’s book from Lonely Planet Kids, an imprint of Lonely Planet, the world’s leading travel guide and phrasebook publisher. Perfect for the whole family, First Words Mandarin features 100 words to use while travelling, from food and transport, to animals and weather. Each word is accompanied with a bold illustration and a simple pronunciation guide to make the vocabulary fun and easy to learn.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The little monkey king’s journey = Xiao Wukong / Li, Jian
“Long long ago, a little Monkey was born from an old magic stone which suddenly cracked open after lying in the sunlight and moonlight for thousands of years. Although he was an orphan, the Little Monkey was extremely talented. Fortunately, the Monkey King in the mountain adopted him. […] During his journey, with the help from the Immortal Turtle, the Phoenix, the Dragon King and the Immortal, the Little Monkey gained a powerful body. Could he eventually save the life of the Monkey King?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Xia tian de cai hong = Summertime rainbow / Yang, Belle
“In this story presented in both English and Chinese, bunnies hop through the meadow on a beautiful summer day, spotting blue sky, white clouds, yummy green grass, and other colorful sights.” (Catalogue)

Home for Chinese New Year : a story told in English and Chinese / Wei, Jie
“The Chinese New Year is a time for family reunions. This Chinese children’s story tells a delightful trip with lots of cultural details along the way! Jia Jun’s Dad worked out of town all year around. Now it’s time for him to come home. He took a train, bus, three-wheeled motorcycle, ferry-boat and even walked for many miles. He finally made it home and had a reunion dinner with his family on New Year’s Eve. […] In a few days, Dad was ready to head back to work, but it was certain that Dad would be home again next year to celebrate the Chinese New Year with his family.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Xiao lao shu yu jin zhong zi = The little rat and the golden seed : a story in English and Chinese / Li, Jian
“Age range 5+ Learn how the clever Little Rat earned his place as one of the Chinese Zodiac Animals.This adorable Chinese-English bilingual children’s book tells the story of the Little Rat and the Grandpa — unlikely allies who embark on an adventure to find a golden seed. They encounter rough seas, fierce guards and tall mountains, but — in the end — bring home a golden rice seed and save the village from going hungry.” (Catalogue)

更多關於我們的圖書館中文書籍您可以點擊這裡 

那今天的分享就到這裡結束咯, 就從今天開始屬於你的中文學習旅程吧!

Chinese Language Week 2023 (Simplified Chinese Script)

Read this post in English!

Read this post in Traditional Chinese!

大家好!你好!我们将在即将到来的9月17日至23日庆祝新西兰中文周。举办新西兰中文周的目的是为了推广中文学习。中文是一门优美独特语言,而中文的特别之处在于,中文文字不止传达了其发音,同时也承载了其涵义。更酷的是,中文的起源可追溯至商朝时期,大约公元前1766至1122年,为世界上最古老的语言之一。 

中文涵盖了共302门的方言,而不同的地区会有不同的母语。举例来说,在上海你会听到上海话,在四川则有四川话。在香港,大家以粤语为主,台湾人则会说台语。如果你有机会到访马来西亚或新加坡,你会遇到会说广东话,福建话,或客家话的华人。在新西兰,大部分的华裔都说广东话,其次则是普通话。 

此外,汉字(中文字)还可以分为简体字和繁体字。简体字是从繁体字演化而来,阅读方式就和阅读英语一样,从左到右。而繁体字则相反,排版通常为竖排排版,阅读方式从右到左,从上到下。如今,中国,马来西亚和新加坡以简体字为主;而繁体字则见于台湾,香港和澳门。 

图书馆活动 

为了庆祝中文周,惠灵顿图书馆举办了各式各样的活动,欢迎大家一起来参加! 

普通话故事会 – 早上10.30至11.00,9月17日,星期日 

提亚威图书馆 Te Awe Library, 29B Brandon Street, Wellington. 

为庆祝中文周,提亚威图书馆将举办特别的普通话故事会。我们的故事会将包括有趣和好玩的故事及诗词韵律。建议2岁以上的儿童及其看护人参加。 

普通话故事会 – 早上10.30至11.00, 9月20日,星期三 

Newtown图书馆 Newtown Library, 13 Constable Street, Newtown.

在Newtown图书馆庆祝新西兰中文周。让4-8岁的华裔儿童及家长体验中文文化的魅力!其他中文与方言者欢迎! 

双语故事会 – 早上11.00至下午12.00,9月23日,星期六 

Karori卡罗里图书馆 Karori Library, 247 Karori Road, Karori.

在Karori图书馆,将有庆祝新西兰中文周的活动。活动内容有讲故事、唐诗朗诵及展现中文流行乐与童谣,让4-8岁的华裔儿童及家长体验中文文化的魅力!其他中文与方言者欢迎! 

书法工坊 – 下午2.00至3.00,9月23日,星期六 

Newtown图书馆 Newtown Library, 13 Constable Street, Newtown.

在Newtown图书馆庆祝新西兰中文周。一起尝试研墨执笔,体验中国书法。 

三语故事会 – 早上10.30至11.00,9月25日,星期一 

Tawa图书馆 Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library, 158 Main Road (Cnr Cambridge Street & Main Road), Tawa.

为庆祝中文周,我们将举办特别的粤语、普通话和英语的三语故事会。建议2岁以上的儿童及其看护人参加。 

三语故事会 – 早上10.30至11.00,9月26日,星期二 

Waitohi强生威尔逊图书馆 Johnsonville Library, 34 Moorefield Road, Johnsonville.

为庆祝中文周,我们将举办特别的粤语、普通话和英语的三语故事会。建议2岁以上的儿童及其看护人参加。 

书籍 

同时,大家也别忘了到图书馆借阅我们的儿童读物。在我们的藏书里,有一系列关于中华文化的书籍:

Dim sum, here we come / Lam, Maple
“Today is Sunday and that means its dim sum time with my whole family! I can’t wait to see everyone, especially Grandma. I’m going to eat lots of shrimp dumplings, rice noodle rolls, egg tarts, and my favorite–char siu buns. We will have to order enough for us all to share. So what are you waiting for? Dim sum, here we come!” (Catalogue)

Cang Jie : the inventor of Chinese characters / Li, Jian
“In ancient times under the reign of Yellow Emperor (about 2500 B.C.), people kept records by piling stones and tying knots. One day, Cang Jie, a historical official who tied knots to keep records under Yellow Emperor, unexpectedly made a big mistake. Feeling very guilty, he was determined to find out a better way for keeping records. […] In this multicultural children’s story, kids will find out that there is a story behind every Chinese character. Children will also learn about basic Chinese characters and how to make them.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The Anchor book of Chinese poetry
“Unmatched in scope and literary quality, this landmark anthology spans three thousand years, bringing together more than six hundred poems by more than one hundred thirty poets, in translations-many new and exclusive to the book-by an array of distinguished translators. Here is the grand sweep of Chinese poetry, from the Book of Songs-ancient folk songs said to have been collected by Confucius himself-and Laozi’s Dao De Jing to the vividly pictorial verse of Wang Wei, the romanticism of Li Po, the technical brilliance of Tu Fu, and all the way up to the twentieth-century poetry of Mao Zedong and the post–Cultural Revolution verse of the Misty poets. […] The Anchor Book of Chinese Poetry captures with impressive range and depth the essence of China’s illustrious poetic tradition.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

All about China : stories, songs, crafts and games for kids / Branscombe, Allison
“Take the whole family on a whirlwind tour of Chinese culture and history with this award-winning, delightfully illustrated book complete with stories, activities, and games. This Chinese children’s book is perfect for educators and parents wishing to teach kids about this fascinating Asian country. Travel from the stone age through the dynasties to the present day with songs and crafts for kids that will educate them about Chinese language and the Chinese way of life.” (Catalogue)

Let’s make dumplings! : a comic book cookbook / Amano, Hugh
“Includes dumpling history and lore, this comic book cookbook invites readers to explore the big little world of Asian dumplings and proves that intricate folding styles and flavourful fillings are achievable in the home kitchen.” (Catalogue)

Chinese / Dickmann, Nancy
“This book takes a light-hearted look at the characters and creatures from the Chinese mythological stories. These myths come from different cultural groups, and they include stories about how the world came to be, as well as folk tales and stories with a religious message. The stories are full of gods, monsters, animals, ghosts and nature spirits. The book is structured as a ‘Who’s Who’ of the culture’s myths and legends and has a gossipy, informal tone, allowing the characters’ personalities to come through.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Chinese children’s favorite stories / Yip, Mingmei
“A collection of children’s legends and tales from China. This volume of beloved Chinese stories contains a delightful selection from the rich store of Chinese folklore and legend. Discover the many delightful animal characters as well as Chang-E, the famous Eight Immortals, and Guan Yin, goddess of compassion. Retold for an international audience, the beautifully illustrated stories will give children aged six to ten in other countries a glimpse into both the tradition and culture of China.” (Catalogue)

此外,我们也有不少中文书籍,能够让你从今天就能开始练习你的普通话哦!

First words. Mandarin / Mansfield, Andy
“Bring the Mandarin language to life with this beautifully illustrated children’s book from Lonely Planet Kids, an imprint of Lonely Planet, the world’s leading travel guide and phrasebook publisher. Perfect for the whole family, First Words Mandarin features 100 words to use while travelling, from food and transport, to animals and weather. Each word is accompanied with a bold illustration and a simple pronunciation guide to make the vocabulary fun and easy to learn.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The little monkey king’s journey = Xiao Wukong / Li, Jian
“Long long ago, a little Monkey was born from an old magic stone which suddenly cracked open after lying in the sunlight and moonlight for thousands of years. Although he was an orphan, the Little Monkey was extremely talented. Fortunately, the Monkey King in the mountain adopted him. […] During his journey, with the help from the Immortal Turtle, the Phoenix, the Dragon King and the Immortal, the Little Monkey gained a powerful body. Could he eventually save the life of the Monkey King?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Xia tian de cai hong = Summertime rainbow / Yang, Belle
“In this story presented in both English and Chinese, bunnies hop through the meadow on a beautiful summer day, spotting blue sky, white clouds, yummy green grass, and other colorful sights.” (Catalogue)

Home for Chinese New Year : a story told in English and Chinese / Wei, Jie
“The Chinese New Year is a time for family reunions. This Chinese children’s story tells a delightful trip with lots of cultural details along the way! Jia Jun’s Dad worked out of town all year around. Now it’s time for him to come home. He took a train, bus, three-wheeled motorcycle, ferry-boat and even walked for many miles. He finally made it home and had a reunion dinner with his family on New Year’s Eve. […] In a few days, Dad was ready to head back to work, but it was certain that Dad would be home again next year to celebrate the Chinese New Year with his family.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Xiao lao shu yu jin zhong zi = The little rat and the golden seed : a story in English and Chinese / Li, Jian
“Age range 5+ Learn how the clever Little Rat earned his place as one of the Chinese Zodiac Animals.This adorable Chinese-English bilingual children’s book tells the story of the Little Rat and the Grandpa — unlikely allies who embark on an adventure to find a golden seed. They encounter rough seas, fierce guards and tall mountains, but — in the end — bring home a golden rice seed and save the village from going hungry.” (Catalogue)

更多关于我们的图书馆中文书籍您可以点击这里

那今天的分享就到这里结束咯, 就从今天开始属于你的中文学习旅程吧!

Uike Lea Faka-Tonga 2023 | Tonga Language Week 2023

Mālō e lelei kaungāme’a, and welcome to Uike Lea Faka-Tonga 2023 | Tonga Language Week 2023! The Tongan language is spoken by nearly 190,000 people around the world — including about 100,000 across the 45 inhabited islands of Tonga, and over 35,000 here in Aotearoa! Tongan people are a very important part of our whānau in Aotearoa, with over 82,000 people of Tongan descent living here, nearly 3,300 of whom live here in Wellington. (Source: 2018 Census)

This year, the theme for Uike Lea Faka-Tonga is:

‘E tu’uloa ‘a e Lea faka-Tonga ‘o ka lea-aki ‘i ‘api, siasi (lotu), mo e nofo-‘a-kāinga | The Tongan Language will be sustainable if used at home, church and in the wider community

Help us celebrate this special time for the community by learning more about the unique culture, language and history of Tonga and the Tongan people through the books and other resources below!


Celebrating the Life of Emeli Sione

A photo of Emeli Sione wearing a floral headdress, holding the English and Tongan versions of her book 'A New Dawn.' Above is the following text: "Emeli Loulu Aholelei Sione. Sunrise 01.07.74. Sunset 22.08.23."

Image courtesy of Dahlia Malaeulu, Mila’s Books.

Before we share our wonderful pukapuka in the lea faka-Tonga with you all, we wanted to take a moment to celebrate the life of Emeli Sione, who passed away in August 2023. Emeli was the bestselling author of A New Dawn (in lea faka-Tonga, Ko e Pongipongi Fo’ou), which was shortlisted for the Elsie Locke Non-fiction Award at this year’s Children’s Book Awards, and has also been shortlisted in the Ngaio Marsh Book Awards, but she also acted as author, editor, translator, advisor, and advocate for many other books in the Tongan language and about Tongan people and culture.

Emeli was a founding member of Mila’s Books based in Moera, Lower Hutt, one of the most significant publishers of children’s books in Pasifika languages in Aotearoa, and the only publishing company in New Zealand that works with an all-Pasifika team of authors, illustrators and editors. Through her work as an author and editor at Mila’s Books, and previously with the Ministry of Education, Emeli’s contribution to Pasifika literature, and Tongan children’s books in particular, can’t be overstated. This month, Mila’s Books are releasing 12 books in Tongan that Emeli worked on as part of the Tongan My Pasifika series — we can’t wait to have these books in our libraries for everyone to enjoy!

A New Dawn by Emeli Sione, published by Mila’s Books

Ko e Pongipongi Fo’ou by Emeli Sione, published by Mila’s Books



Lea Faka-Tonga at the Library

Check out some of our favourite books from the children’s section from and about Tonga, and in lea faka-Tonga:

Tonga / Toumu’a, Ruth
“The islands of Tonga are full of rich history and culture. Describes the history, customs, geography, and culture of the people who live there, and provides authentic vocabulary words for an immersive experience. Includes a glossary, index, and bibliography for further reading.”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

Tongan heroes / Riley, David
“Tongan heroes presents inspirational stories of achievers who have Tongan ancestry. It includes: Legends like Aho’eitu, Hina and Seketoa, historical figures such as Queen Salote Tupou III, Pita Vi and Professor Futa Helu, contemporary heroes like Jonah Lomu, Captain Kamelia Zarka, Filipe Tohi, The Jets, Manu Vatuvei, Dr Viliami Tangi and Valerie Adams. Readers will be inspired as they discover the challenges these figures faced and overcame, to become some of the world’s best in their chosen fields.” (Catalogue)

The worm and the whale / Halapua, Lisala
“Worms, yams and humpback whales tangle in a heart warming Tongan fable”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

How Tonga got its name = Ko e founga hono ma’u ‘e Tonga ‘a hono hingoa / Riley, David
“Maui threw his line and hook into the ocean. He felt the hook catch onto something huge and heavy. “Wow, it’s beautiful!” Maui said. What amazing sight did Maui see in the ocean that day?” (Catalogue)

Rise of the To’a / Tatafu, ‘Alisi
“Describes the culture behind the Tongan national rugby league team, Kau To’a, Mate Ma’a Tonga, MMT, and features profiles on each of the players. Also tells the fictional story of Toko, who overcomes his fears and grows in self confidence.” (Catalogue)

Learning Tongan through bathtime / Sanerivi, Deborah
“Follow along with these children as their mother names each of their amazing body parts after fun in the mud. Join them as they go through their bath and bed time routines. Sentences are written in Tongan with their English translations.” (Publisher description)

The eleventh sheep = ko e sipi hono tahataha / Mewburn, Kyle
“When the eleventh sheep falls out of Sian’s dreams and into the real world, Sian is excited to have a new friend. Every day they play together, and at night Sian falls straight asleep with her arms around her woolly friend. But she can tell the eleventh sheep is homesick”–Publisher’s description.” (Catalogue)

Ko fé ho ihu? = where is your nose / Piliu, Annabel
“An early learning primer for the Tongan language.” (Catalogue)

‘Oku ou lava ‘o tohi : I can write / Lovatt Davis, F. M.
“Photographs and text introduce a range of places where children can write.” (Catalogue)

Also, visit this link to find even more books in lea faka-Tonga at your local library.


More Resources

Check out the following websites to learn more about the islands of Tonga and this beautiful country’s culture, language and history:

What Comes Next? A Series of Unfortunate Events

Finding new pukapuka for your tamariki can be a challenge, especially when they can get through a big series in just a couple of weeks. Well, the library is here to help! In our series “What Comes Next?” we try and tackle the tricky challenge of helping you find the next book after a great series. If you haven’t seen our blog from last month on Ranger’s Apprentice, then be sure to check it out if your tamaiti loves fantasy or archery! This month we are focusing on the delightfully dreary Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket, with humorous recommendations for those who enjoyed the series.

A Series of Unfortunate Events has delighted children with the Baudelaires woeful escapades for well over two decades now and the series has only grown in popularity following the Netflix adaptation. While no one is quite like Lemony Snicket, we’ve put together our best picks for tamariki who loved this series.

Younger Kids:

Luckily for tamariki there are heaps of excellent books which lean into the darker side while remaining humorous and fun. The Spiderwick Chronicles are a great fit for tamariki who like fantasy with just a little bit of scary, and so is the hilarious Floodseries by Colin Thompson. Chris Riddell brings us a gothic mystery complete with a ghostly mouse in Goth Girl, and if you found yourself rooting for the villain, then check out The Crims by Kate Davies which features a whole family of criminals.

The field guide / DiTerlizzi, Tony
“When the Grace children go to stay at their Great Aunt Lucinda’s worn Victorian house, they discover a field guide to fairies and other creatures and begin to have some unusual experiences. Suggested level: primary, intermediate.” (Catalogue)
Neighbours / Thompson, Colin
“Nerlin and Mordonna Flood have seven children, most of whom were made in a cellar, using incredible mystical powers. Betty is a normal little girl – but she’s a useless witch. Her attempts at magic often go wrong, with unexpected yet welcome results. When the next-door neighbours rob the Floods, they find out what the Floods do to bad neighbours” (Adapted from catalogue)
Goth Girl and the ghost of a mouse / Riddell, Chris
“A deliciously dark offering from the award-winning author-illustrator of the Ottoline books” (Catalogue)
The Crims / Davies, Kate
“When her notoriously inept family of criminals is wrongly accused, Imogen, the only truly skilled criminal, uses her skills to clear their names.” (Catalogue)

Older Kids:

For the older ones who want that dark-humor vibe after reading or rereading A Series of Unfortunate Events we have got you covered. Skullduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy is another fantasy with darker vibes that older kids are sure to love, and Ms Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs is perfect for older kids who love a bit of mystery. Good Omens by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman has been on my TBR for ages, and if you ever need to laugh about doomsday then look no further than this excellent book. And if you want even more Neil Gaiman then check out The Graveyard Book which features another child in unfortunate circumstances, raised by ghosts in a graveyard after the murder of his parents.

Skulduggery Pleasant / Landy, Derek
“When twelve-year-old Stephanie inherits her weird uncle’s estate, she must join forces with Skulduggery Pleasant, a skeleton mage, to save the world from the Faceless Ones.” (Catalogue)
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children / Riggs, Ransom
“After a family tragedy, Jacob feels compelled to explore an abandoned orphanage on an island off the coast of Wales, discovering disturbing facts about the children who were kept there.” (Catalogue)

 

 


Good omens : the nice and accurate prophecies of Agnes Nutter, witch / Pratchett, Terry
“According to the Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch – the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. People have been predicting the end of the world almost from its very beginning, so it’s only natural to be sceptical when a new date is set for Judgement Day. But one fast-living demon and a somewhat fussy angel would quite like the Rapture not to happen.” (Adapted from catalogue)


The graveyard book / Gaiman, Neil
“After the grisly murder of his entire family, a toddler wanders into a graveyard where the ghosts and other supernatural residents agree to raise him as one of their own.” (Catalogue)

We hope you’ve enjoyed these recommendations, we certainly had fun diving into the dark and twisty humour that Lemony Snicket does so well! Catch you again next time for recommendations on a classic children’s series which centres cuddly creatures that you might just have at home.