World Refugee Day & Contributing to Our Inclusive Community

A journey to a new home is called migration. Much of human history is the story of migrations. Some people migrate voluntarily, but sometimes, they are forced to move for reasons such as war, violence, or persecution. When people are forced to move, they are refugees. 

Refugees can come from various places, especially from countries that have been affected by conflicts for decades. In the last few years, the number of refugees has increased dramatically, with the highest level of forced displacement since the end of World War II. More than ever is urgent to talk about this matter.  

Refugees not only experience the difficulty of leaving their homeland, but also encounter cultural differences, and often the need to learn a new language. These are significant challenges for people integrating into a new place.

What can we do to contribute?

  • It is important to be aware of the circumstances of the other families surrounding us.
  • Find out more about refugee families in our community, school, neighbourhood or work.
  • Commemorate the contributions and courage of refugees through the times.
  • Read refugees’ stories to understand their journey.
  • When we can, clarify incorrect or inaccurate information to contribute to a better understanding of refugees and our communities.

Where can you find information about refugees around the world? Please visit the website AnyQuestions where you can find a list of useful resources. 

We invite you to read different and beautiful stories that talk about migration and the journey that many refugees must make to find a safe place. Check out the reading list below! World Refugee Day
To celebrate the World Refugee Day come to join us to read some of these books in a special storytime session in Karori. Everyone is welcome to come along on Monday 20th June at 3.30 pm at Karori Library!  

This weekend on Saturday 18th June, Wellington City Libraries is taking part in the World Refugee Day event at South Wellington Intermediate School, 30 Te Wharepouri Street, Berhampore from 11:30-3:30pm. We will be running storytimes, and a VR classroom with virtual reality games!

The suitcase / Naylor-Ballesteros, Chris
“When a weary stranger arrives one day, with only a suitcase, everyone is full of questions. Why is he here? Where has he come from? And just what is in the suitcase? A story full of heart, hope and kindness about how we treat those in need.” (Catalogue)


Story boat / Maclear, Kyo
“When a little girl and her younger brother are forced along with their family to flee the home they’ve always known, they must learn to make a new home for themselves–wherever they are. And sometimes the smallest things– a cup, a blanket, a lamp, a flower, a story–can become a port of hope in a terrible storm. As the refugees travel onward toward an uncertain future, they are buoyed up by their hopes, dreams and the stories they tell–a story that will carry them perpetually forward.”–Amazon.com” (Catalogue
The day the war came / Davies, Nicola
When the government refused to allow 3000 child refugees to enter this country in 2016, Nicola Davies was so angry she wrote a poem. It started a campaign for which artists contributed drawings of chairs, symbolising a seat in a classroom, education, kindness, the hope of a future. The poem has become this book, movingly illustrated by Rebecca Cobb, which should prove a powerful aid for explaining the ongoing refugee crisis to younger readers.” ( abridged from Catalogue)
My name is not refugee / Milner, Kate
“A young boy discusses the journey he is about to make with his mother. They will leave their town, she explains, and it will be sad but also a little bit exciting. They will have to say goodbye to friends and loved ones, and that will be difficult. They will have to walk and walk and walk, and although they will see many new and interesting things, it will be difficult at times too. A powerful and moving exploration that draws the young reader into each stage of the journey, inviting the chance to imagine the decisions he or she would make.” (Catalogue)
Out / George, Angela May

I’m called an asylum seeker, but that’s not my name. A little girl and her mother have fled their homeland, making the long and treacherous journey by boat to seek asylum. Timely, powerful and moving, Out celebrates the triumph of the human spirit in the darkest times, and the many paths people take to build a new life.” (Abridged for catalogue)
Marwan’s journey / Arias, Patricia de

This is the journey of one boy who longs for a home, and we follow his path, walking hand in hand with him as he looks forward with uncertainty and hopes for a peaceful future. This beautiful, heartfelt story gives a human face to the plight of refugees all over the world. Marwan’s journey is everyone’s journey”–Jacket.” (Abridged from catalogue)
Welcome / Barroux
“A powerful story about the plight of migrants from the award-winning creator of Where’s the Elephant?–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

 


Three balls of wool (can change the world) / Cristina, Henriqueta
“Exiled from their homeland, a young girl and her entire family are unhappy about the monochrome sweaters all children wear until Mom decides to make a change. Includes facts about Portugal’s history and government, about Amnesty International, and the text of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” (Catalogue)
Spectacularly beautiful / Lucas, Lisa
“A teacher helps one of her students who is scarred from violence see that she is spectacularly beautiful.” (Catalogue)

 


Migrants / Watanabe, Issa
“The migrants must leave the forest. Borders are crossed, sacrifices made, loved ones are lost. It takes such courage to reach the end. At last the journey is over and the migrants arrive. This is the new place. With forceful simplicity, Migrants narrates the journey of a group of animals leaving a leafless forest.”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Ali’s story … : a real life account of his journey from Afghanistan / Maldonado, Salvador
“This is the real-life story of 10-year-old refugee Ali who, accompanied by his grandmother, flees his home country of Afghanistan to avoid the conflict caused by the war. Told in Ali’s own words, it documents his feelings of alienation, separation and suffering that war can place on immigrant children and their families, and the thread of hope that can help them to overcome their ordeal”- (Blurb).
Feathers / Cummings, Phil

    1. “The sandpiper stretched its wings in the chilling breeze. It knew it was time to leave…so it took flight. Follow the feathers as they fall along this exquisite journey of heartache, hope and home.” (Catalogue)


Four feet, two sandals / Williams, Karen Lynn
“Two young Afghani girls living in a refugee camp in Pakistan share a precious pair of sandals while they go about their routines and wait for their names to appear on a list for a new home. Suggested level: primary, intermediate.”(Catalogue)
The journey / Sanna, Francesca
“I look up to the birds that seem to be following us. They are migrating just like us. And their journey, like ours, is very long, but they don’t have to cross any borders.” (Abridged from catalogue)
Stepping stones : a refugee family’s journey / Ruurs, Margriet
“In this picture book, a young girl and her family are forced to flee their village to escape the civil war that has engulfed Syria and make their way toward freedom in Europe”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)
Two white rabbits / Buitrago, Jairo
“A young girl describes what it is like to be a migrant as she and her father travel north toward the U.S. border. They travel mostly on the roof of a train known as The Beast, but the little girl doesn’t know where they are going. She sleeps, dreaming that she is always on the move…” (Abridged from catalogue)
From far away / Munsch, Robert N.
“When Saoussan immigrated with her family from war-torn Lebanon, she was only seven years old. This picture book tells the story of how she had to adjust to her new home in Canada. This is the perfect book to help kids empathize with immigrant children whose experiences are very similar to Saoussan’s.”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

 

View Finders Photo Competition Results

Over the school holidays, we asked young people to tell us a story by taking a photo!

We took submissions in three categories: Nature, Whānau, and Objects/Books, and in two age groups, 5-12 and 13-18.

Thanks to all our competition entrants who wowed us with your creativity, eye for detail, and wonderful visual storytelling.

We are grateful for the insightful judging provided by the team at Splendid Photo. Thanks Splendid for helping us pick these winners!

Check the winners out here! Underneath each photograph is the story behind them.

5-12 – Nature: Mala

Mala - Nature Winner

“I wanted to take a photo of a natural beauty. I want people to feel like they are in the photo, surrounded by towering blades of grass.”


5-12 – Objects/Books: Lucas

Lucas - Objects-Books Winner

“This cat was at the playground. I really wanted a photo of the cats paw because it looked interesting . I spent a long time getting the paw in the photo.”


5-12 – Whānau: Mia

Mia Whānau Winner

“It was sooooo cool! I didn’t know that sunrises in New Zealand could look like this. We were lucky to go to an old fashioned Bach. It was old and had holes in the floor. But the front bedroom had glass for one wall. So me, mum and my sister all slept in there, so that we could see the sunrise from our beds. I got up so early, so that I could go down and take photos. It was so beautiful I couldn’t believe it. Like art in the sky. Only us there on the beach together.”


13-18 – Nature: Brunella 

Brunella image

“For me, beauty is also in nature, and it’s not always exposed on the outside; easy to see, touch, feel, and smell… but it also is sometimes in unexpected places where if you look carefully, you can find light and beauty somewhere dark, small and
mysterious.”


13-18 – Objects/Books: Kaitlyn

Kaitlyn - Objects

“This is my netball hoop. Dad bought a new one because the other was tipping over. I have spent a lot of time this holiday practicing shooting for the netball season ahead.”


13-18 – Whānau: Tilly

Tilly Whānau Category Winner

“The whānau photo took place when my family and I were flying a kite on the beach. People stopped to watch as my family and I laughed willing it to fly higher and higher. The moment captured the familiar essence of whānau.”


Each of our winners won their own reusable film camera, a roll of film, and a voucher to get it developed! We hope they will all enjoy exploring a classic photography medium, that might be what their parents (or grandparents!) grew up with.

Thanks to Ben & Jerry’s Wellington and Light House Cinema who kindly provided some bonus spot prizes for a few other entrants!

Keep an eye-out for the travelling View Finders photography exhibition, including all our young people’s work. Coming soon to a library near you!

View Finders Beanstack Challenge!

This April School Holidays, take part in our View Finders Photography Challenge! 

We have a holiday challenge for you on our Beanstack platform!

This Beanstack challenge will guide you down the path of learning about photography so that you can get your submissions in before the deadline of the 1st of May — and there are some cool spot prizes for people who complete book reviews and take part in activities. We’re choosing a random book reviewer or challenge completer EVERY DAY to win a spot prize, so don’t miss out!

To jump right into Beanstack, click here! 🎞

Our Beanstack challenge is full of tips and activities to help you take great portraits of people, find flora and fauna in our wonderful city, and get inspired by excellent object photography!

Beanstack challenges

Some of the digital badges you can earn on our Beanstack!


For our photo competition, we’re taking submissions in three categories: Nature, Whānau, and Objects/Books, and in two age groups, 5-12 and 13-18.

The first prize for each category is a reusable Kodak film camera, some black-and-white film roll, and free development with Splendid Photo!

The Beanstack activities lead to a link to enter your own photos.

We look forward to seeing your photos and hearing the story behind them! You may want to display your photo at your local branch library at the end of the competition.

View Finders 1st Place Category Prizes

Our 1st place category prizes! You could win your very own film camera!


Special thanks to our friends at Splendid Photo, who are helping us to judge the competition, and Ben & Jerry’s Wellington, Light House Cinema, and Unity Books, who are kindly providing us with spot prizes to give away. Ka rawe!

The Great Teddy Bear Sleepover at Johnsonville Library

Yes, you heard right! The Great Teddy Bear Sleepover is coming back to Johnsonville Library on Friday the 30th of August at 6.30pm! Come along in your PJs with your favourite teddy or stuffed toy for an evening of fun stories, songs and activities, then leave your teddies behind to have a big sleepover with all their new friends. Who knows what mischief they might get up to unsupervised in the library overnight? Pick them up on Saturday morning to find out!

This event is suitable for children of all ages. Keep an eye out for the Great Teddy Bear Sleepover popping up at other libraries around the city as well!

Three teddy bears reading a book in the sun

Teddy bears read!

For more information, contact Johnsonville Library on 477 6151.

ComicFest 2019 is nearly here!

Do you like free comics? Do you like winning prizes just for wearing a cool costume? Or for drawing a super nerdy picture? Would you like to meet some of the awesome people behind some of your favourite comics, including the Tea Dragon Society, Snarked, and even Batman?

You can do all that and more at ComicFest 2019, running from Thursday the 2nd to Saturday the 4th of May. Come on down to the National Library, just across the road from the Beehive, for all kinds of super-amazing stuff to do, from drawing workshops to drawing competitions, making your own comic zines to winning your own comic at Free Comic Book Day. ComicFest is one of our favourite times of the literary year, and we’d love to see you all there!

Check out some of the comic books by some of the artists and writers you might get to meet at ComicFest 2019:

Snarked!. Book one, Forks and hope / Langridge, Roger Roger Langridge is one of the insanely talented comic book creators joining us for ComicFest. He’s well known for his work on Thor: The Mighty Avenger and The Muppet Show, but the Snarked! books are probably my favourite by him! They’re set in the crazy world of Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland), which only makes them cooler!

The Tea Dragon Society / O’Neill, Katie I totally love Katie O’Neill’s Tea Dragon Society — apprentive blacksmith Greta’s amazing journey is told through the some of the most beautiful art you’ll ever see in a comic book. Don’t miss Katie’s Tea Dragon Workshop during ComicFest — join her in the National Library Programme Rooms on Saturday the 4th of May at 9.00am to see a new species of Tea Dragon take flight before your eyes. I know I can’t wait!

Helen and the Go-Go Ninjas / Sang, Anthony Ant Sang’s Helen and the Go-Go Ninjas should be a go-to comic for older kids. Set in Auckland deep in the future, Helen is enlisted by a group of time-travelling ninjas to save the world from the tyranny of the Peace Balls — will she succeed in her quest? It’s truly a read that keeps you on the edge of your seat right ’til the end. Love it!

There’s heaps more to see and do, and heaps more books to read, at ComicFest 2019. Can’t wait to see you there! Click the banner below to see the whole programme of events.

Let’s Go LEGO Schedule Update

With another new year comes another set of LEGO adventures for Wellington library-goers! We’re making some changes to the Let’s Go LEGO schedule this year, so check the days and times below to see when it’s on at your local library!

Khandallah Library: 1st Friday of the month, 3:30-4:30pm
Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: 2nd Thursday of the month, 3:30-4:30pm
Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: 2nd Thursday of the month, 3:30-4:30pm
Johnsonville Library: 2nd Friday of the month, 3:30-4:30pm
Karori Library: 3rd Saturday of the month, 2:00-3:00pm

Let’s Go LEGO is a free, interactive LEGO-based programme for children aged 5+. In Let’s Go LEGO, your creative skills will be put to the test as you use the library’s LEGO collections to design and build your masterpieces. Each session will have a different theme that will inspire you to hone your skills and become your library’s very own LEGO legend.

For more information, contact your local branch library.

中国龙制作 – Dragon Making for Chinese Language Week @ Khandallah Library

Come along and celebrate Chinese language week at Khandallah Library by making paper dragons! Supplies will be provided to help you make your own elegant, wise or fierce dragon. Join us at Khandallah Library on Thursday 27th September from 6:30 to 7:00pm.
No RSVP required. Suitable all ages!

Check out these books to learn more about Chinese language and culture: 

First words. Mandarin / Mansfield, Andy

Lonely Planet have put together this gorgeous children’s guide to 100 basic mandarin words for topics like food and weather.

All about China : stories, songs, crafts and games for kids / Branscombe, Allison

Explore Chinese history, tradition and art with this beautiful book.

Gordon & Li Li : words for everyday / McSween, Michele Wong

Meet Li Li and Gordon as they learn to communicate in simple Mandarin and English.

Super simple Chinese art : fun and easy art from around the world / Kuskowski, Alex

Learn how to create a range of Chinese crafts, adapted for kids with a step-by-step guide.

See you at Khandallah Library!

Write reviews, win prizes!

Did you know you can automatically earn prizes for sending us your book reviews?

Write a Kids’ Club review about a book you liked (or didn’t like!), and see it published online for the world to see! You’ll automatically earn a prize after your first 2 reviews, and after every 5th review from then on. Anything you read can count – chapter books (even school ones), non-fiction, comics, and more!

Sometimes we get reviews of really cool and useful websites – which we think is great!

Head over to the Kids’ Club page for more info, and to get started.

6 New Non Fiction to read in the new year.

Happy New Year! Welcome to the first junior non fiction blog post of 2018! Featured are books all about science experiments, a follow up of successful women who changed the world and made history, history at its most horrible and entertainment thrown in for good measure.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndetics365 Weird Wonderful Science Experiments.

Whether you’re making your own slime, rockets, crystals, and hovercrafts or performing magic (science!) tricks and using science to become a secret agent, this book has something for every type of curious kid. Each experiment features safety precautions, materials needed, step-by-step instructions with illustrations, fun facts, and further explorations.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMore girls who rocked the world.

“From the inspiring author of Girls Who Rocked the World comes another comprehensive collection of true, inspiring profiles of successful young women throughout history who made their mark on the world before turning twenty. Young women today crave strong, independent role models to look to for motivation. In the follow-up to the bestseller Girls Who Rocked the World, More Girls Who Rocked the World offers a fun and uplifting collection of influential stories with forty-five more movers and shakers who made a difference before turning twenty. From Annie Oakley and Queen Victoria to Malala Yousafzai and Adele–each with her own incredible story of how she created life-changing opportunities for herself and the world–you’ll get to know these capable queens of empires and courageous icons of entertainment. Also included are profiles of gutsy teenagers who are out there rocking the world right now and personal aspirations from today’s young women”– Provided by publisher. Also check out Girls who rocked the world.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Big Earth Book.

Planet Earth. Four elements. Once incredible story. Get ready for a roller-coaster ride through history, geography, science and more. Take an amazing journey into the planet’s past and discover how four elements — earth, fire, air and water — created the world and everything that exists today. This book combines amazing facts with stunning photography and hand-drawn illustrations to bring our planet and its past to life in an exciting and engaging way.

IMAGE COURTESY OF SYNDETICSF2 Football Academy.

Take your football skills to the next level with the world’s biggest football YouTubers, the F2.F2: Football Academy features the greatest players, the biggest teams, and most jaw-dropping moments from across the football world, and teaches the skills and the tekkers it takes to be the best!Want step-overs like Sanchez? Or a pile-driver like Ibrahimovic? Or quick-feet like Messi? Let the F2 show you how. Filled with tips and hacks, as well as the inside track on your favourite stars: Pogba, Suarez, Aguero and the rest. With a free app that brings the book to life and shows you how to turbo-charge your tekkers, there’s not a moment to lose open, read, learn, download and get out on the pitch and practice. Love, peace and tekkers.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe last Jedi : the visual dictionary.

This book presents a guide to the characters, droids, aliens, and creatures of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” with details on costumes, weapons, and accessories.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHorrible Histories: 25th Anniversary Yearbook.

This is a must-have for all Horrible Histories fans. Packed with foul facts, gory games, dreadful jokes, quick quizzes and putrid puzzles, it’s a yearbook with rat-itude! Discover all the dreadful details about your favourite eras of history from the Rotten Romans, to the Terrible Tudors and the Gorgeous Georgians to the Woeful World Wars. History has never been so horrible!

 

Flicks at Six at Tawa Library

 

Come along to our free movie night on Thursday 18th January at 6pm.

This month a young woman in ancient Polynesia discovers that a terrible curse was inflicted on her island after Maui stole the heart of a goddess. To end the curse, she sets out on an epic journey across the Pacific to find Maui and convince him to return the goddess’s heart.

This film is rated PG

Not sure what film we’re talking about? You can call the library or talk to a librarian to find out what is playing each month.

Bring your own cushion for a comfy night in. Movies will play in the Children’s section of the library