Happy Lunar New Year!

Read this post in Mandarin

This year on Sunday, 22 January many countries and communities celebrate Lunar New Year, which is the calendar based on the monthly cycles of the Moon’s phases! There are Lunar New Year festivals and celebrations in China, North Korea, South Korea, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, in Chinatowns all around the world, and there are plenty of local events to celebrate in Aoteaora New Zealand too!

Chinese New Year Display and books inChinese languages at Johnsonville Library

Chinese New Year Display and books in Chinese languages at Johnsonville Library.


Library Events

Lunar New Year Mandarin Storytime 10.30-11.00am, Tuesday 24 January

Te Awe Library, 29B Brandon Street, Wellington

To celebrate the 2023 Chinese New Year, Te Awe is going to have a Mandarin storytime on the Tuesday 24 January!

为了庆祝农历新年,提亚威图书馆将于年初三,1月24日(星期二)早上10.30至11时举办中文普通话故事时间

Lunar New Year Storytime Tuesday, 31 January 10:30am

Johnsonville Library, 34 Moorefield Road, Johnsonville 

Celebrate the Lunar New Year with stories, songs, and rhymes in Mandarin, Hokkien, and English.​

欢迎参加Johnsonville图书馆组织的迎中国新年活动. 我们将用普通话, 福建话和英语讲述有趣的故事, 和以歌曲等形式开展与孩子们的互动活动


About the Lunar New Year

2023 is the Year of the Rabbit, in the Chinese zodiac. The rabbit is the fourth zodiac animal. He was a bit arrogant about how fast he was!  He used to tease his neighbour, the Ox for being slow. But one day, the Jade Emperor organised a party to determine the order of the zodiac, in order of who arrived first. The Rabbit arrived early, so he decided to go away and take a nap. When he woke up three other animals had beat him to the party, including the Ox! The rabbit is associated with kindness, quiet confidence and earnestness, which means rabbit might appear quite serious, but always moves forward with feeling and purpose. You can learn more by visiting Year of the Rabbit – Chinese Zodiac on chinesenewyear.net

LNY

Artist impression of Bánh chưng and bánh tét wrapped up for cooking.

In Vietnam, Lunar New Year is marked by the Tết Nguyên Đán festival, which is associated with lots of important customs and wonderful foods! Bánh chưng and bánh tét are some of the tasty festival cuisines, made from glutinous rice, mung beans, pork. Bánh chưng is cooked in squares wrapped in lá dong leaves, and bánh tét is cooked in cylinders wrapped in banana leaves, which is then cut into wheel-shaped slices.

Illustration of hanbok

Artist impression of hanbok.

In South Korea and North Korea, Lunar New Year is known as Seollal and is celebrated through important traditions, games, food and often by wearing the beautiful colourful hanbok, which are usually worn on special occasions.

In Malaysia, Chinese people and other ethnic groups like Malay and Indian also celebrate Lunar New Year together. You can say “Selamat Tahun Baru Cina” to a Malaysian which means “Happy Chinese New Year” in Malay. Chinese people will have a reunion dinner on the Lunar New Year’s Eve. the children will receive “ang pao”, red envelopes with money inside, on the first day of the Lunar New Year from the elderly people, represent a kind of blessing and good luck. In return, children need to say some good words back to the elderly people, like stay healthy, stay happy, and “wishing you safety all the time

You can learn more about Lunar New Year is celebrated in other countries by reading some great articles from the list of lunar new year articles from ThoughtCo.com, and by checking out some of the wonderful books listed below.

Books

The 12 days of Lunar New Year / Lettice, Jenna
“Count out twelve ways to celebrate Lunar New Year!… This cheery addition to the 12 Days series celebrates tradition, culture, and family in the lead-up to Lunar New Year! Young readers and their caregivers will enjoy counting all the different ways they can engage with their communities and honour their ancestors…” (Abridged from catalogue)
Lunar New Year / Eliot, Hannah
“Introduces Lunar New Year, describing the food, decorations, and activities of the holiday.” (Catalogue)

Happy Chinese New Year! : A Festive Counting Story / Ho, Jannie
“Count to twelve with the zodiac animals as they get ready to celebrate Chinese New Year! Sweet, colorful illustrations introduce each of the zodiac animals as they bring special items to the celebration. Xīn Nián Kuài Lè! Happy Chinese New Year! The zodiac animals are ready to celebrate Chinese New Year with traditions and a big feast! Little ones can count to twelve as each animal prepares for the holiday…” (Abridged from catalogue)

Korean celebrations : festivals, holidays and traditions / Cho, Tina
“Korean Celebrations takes young readers on an exciting exploration of Korea’s colorful festivals and family celebrations–wonderful days that are filled with exciting activities and delicious foods.” (Abridged from catalogue)
Vietnamese children’s favorite stories / Tran, Phuoc Thi Minh

One of the special stories in this book explains why you shouldn’t sweep the house on Tết Nguyên Đán! Along with this story of Lunar New Year, there is a collection of wonderful stories connected to five great virtues of Vietnam: Nhan (Compassion), Le (Rituals), Nghia (Righteousness), Tri (Wisdom), and Tin (Trust).

Lunar New Year Around The World: Celebrate The Most Colourful Time Of The Year / Li, Amanda
“Find out all about Lunar New Year and how it is celebrated in different communities across the world!” (Catalogue)

Home for Chinese New Year : a story told in English and Chinese / Wei, Jie
“The Chinese New Year is a time for family reunions. This Chinese children’s story tells a delightful trip with lots of cultural details along the way! Jia Jun’s Dad worked out of town all year around. Now it’s time for him to come home…” (Abridged from catalogue)

Wellington City Libraries has children’s books and bilingual editions available in community languages from many different cultures!

Maylasia NY photo

Photograph by our blog author’s family of celebrations in Malaysia!

Gong Xi Fa Cai” 恭喜发财 — May you be happy and prosperous! 

– Blog by Wei Jing & Joseph

World Arabic Language Day 2022!


السلام عليكم

The 18th of December marks the United Nations Arabic Language Day. Did you know that there are over 300 million native Arabic speakers worldwide? This makes the Arabic language one of the most widely spoken languages in the word.

Arabic is spoken by a diverse range of people across the African continent and the Middle East, including Sudan, Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, and many more. There are also people who live in New Zealand who come from these countries, or whose parents or grandparents come from these countries.

Continue reading

Parihaka Day 2022

On the coast of Aotearoa, near Mount Taranaki, there is a very important place called Parihaka which has a lot to teach us about the history of injustice in New Zealand, and the importance of hope and peace.

In the years following the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in 1840, colonial greed and racism enabled the government to unlawfully confiscate land and wage war against groups of Māori who sought to defend their territory.

During the 1860s, the community at Parihaka became a haven for different groups of Māori, and a place of resistance to land confiscation and encroaching settlement. The people of Parihaka had a peaceful campaign, led by Te Whiti and Tohu, that consisted of ploughing up confiscated land, removing surveying pegs, and placing fencing.

In response, the government arrested these peaceful people and sent them far away, to Wellington, and to the South Island where they were forced to build roads. On 5 November 1881, Parihaka was invaded by a military force of 1600 armed constabulary. Māori people who were not originally from the Parihaka area were forced to leave. Violence was inflicted against the people. Their leaders were arrested. Buildings were damaged. Te Whiti and Tohu were held without trial for two years, before returning home in 1883.

Despite all of this harm, Parihaka was rebuilt by its people, and still thrives today. Parihaka reminds us of what hope and working together can achieve, especially in the face of injustice.

The memorial at Pukeahu War Memorial Park

A Place to Remember

At Pukeahu War Memorial Park, on the north-west corner of the old Dominion Museum building, there is a memorial dedicated to the people of Taranaki and Parihaka who were imprisoned in the Mount Cook barracks. The memorial represents a prisoner wrapped up in a blanket. The base of the monument is made of stones from Taranaki. As you wander through Wellington, this is the perfect spot to take a moment to reflect on the Parihaka legacy of peace.

Online resources for tamariki to learn more about Parihaka

Image: Parihaka by Josiah Martin on DigitalNZ.

Parihaka | AnyQuestions

AnyQuestions offers free online homework help to New Zealand school students. AnyQuestions provides a librarian chat service, from 1pm to 6pm Monday to Friday during the school year. The website also has great ManyAnswers articles on important topics and places. This Parihaka article will help show you more great places to find information!

One of the other great sources is the National Library topic explorer page for Parihaka, which has links to photographs, articles, and videos.

Pukapuka for tamariki to learn more about Parihaka

Syndetics book coverMaumahara ki tērā Nōema / nā Jennifer Beck rāua ko Lindy Fisher ; nā Kawata Teepa i whakamāori.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)
Syndetics book coverRemember that November / written by Jennifer Beck ; illustrated by Lindy Fisher.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPeace warriors / Raymond Huber (2015)

This book tells the heroic stories of brave New Zealander’s and people around the world who used non-violent resistance to pursue paths of peace. One of the stories is of Archibald Baxter, who refused to fight in World War 1 because he did not believe in killing. He faced brutal punishment and rejection for his courageous choice.

Keenan Book Cover
Amorangi and Millie’s trip through time / Keenan, Lauren
“Amorangi and Millie lost their mum. Their only clue to her whereabouts is a carving on a tree that says, I’m in the past! Rescue me! To do this, Amorangi and Millie must travel up every branch of their family tree and collect an object from each ancestor they meet. They must then be back in the modern day before the sun sets, or they’ll all be trapped forever in the past. In their travels, the children experience aspects of events in New Zealand history, such as the invasion of Parihaka, the Great Depression, World War Two, the Musket Wars and the eruption of Mount Taranaki. They also experience changes in the town and landscape, the attitudes of people and the way people live their lives”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Author Interview: Bill Nagelkerke

Header - Kids Blog - The Ghost House

Click this banner to go straight to the interview!

What better way to celebrate Halloween than checking out an interview with author Bill Nagelkerke about his spooky new children’s novel The Ghost House!

The Ghost House revolves around 13-year-old David, whose family has moved to a house on the edge of the Red Zone in Christchurch. When David ventures into the forbidden Red Zone he stumbles upon an old villa that survived the earthquakes! The house speaks to him and begs him to help.

Bill Nagelkerke has written short stories, poems, plays and books for all ages, as well as translating other people’s books from Dutch into English.

He has won the Storylines Margaret Mahy Medal and Lecture Award. His children’s book, The Ghosts on the Hill was a Storylines Notable Book and joint winner of the 2021 Storylines What Now Kids’ Pick Award.

The Ghost House is a poignant and eerie supernatural tale aimed at readers 8 – 13 years that carefully navigates the line between being deliciously spine tingling without ever crossing the line into becoming full out frightening. It is beautifully and evocatively written using very carefully chosen words and language to describe the settings and characters.

Click the above banner to go to the interview, or click here: https://www.mixcloud.com/wellingtoncitylibraries/bill-n/

This interview was done in conjunction with The Cuba Press, and Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM. This interview was conducted by Neil Johnstone.

Find out more about Radioactive FM on their website!

You can reserve a library copy on our catalogue or buy your own copy through The Cuba Press! Check out the full range of titles by Cuba Press here!


Here’s some of Bill’s other books available at your library!

Stop the tour : the diary of Martin Daly, Christchurch, 1981 / Nagelkerke, Bill
“It is 1981 and Martin senses big trouble brewing at home. The South African rugby team has been invited to tour New Zealand. Martin’s sister, Sarah, is out to stop the tour in protest against South Africa’s apartheid system. His rugby-mad dad is equally determined that the tour should go ahead. Martin wishes the whole thing would simply go away … Then a new school leads to a new friendship, and Martin is faced with a choice. He can walk away or he can become involved in something that will end up being bigger than anybody could have predicted”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Ghosts-on-the-Hill-cover-webThe ghosts on the hill / Nagelkerke, Bill
“The year is 1884. The place is Lyttelton, a small and bustling harbour town. Elsie is waiting for the fish to bite. She has her reasons for coming down to the waterfront so often, the main one being the memory of the lost boys. She was one of the last to see them alive, and now she is haunted by what happened to them. When the opportunity comes for Elsie to follow in their footsteps over the Bridle Path, and put their ghosts to rest, she doesn’t hesitate. ‘I’ll be careful,’ she says. But no one knows that the weather is about to change for the worse.”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Emily the Dreadfuls and the Dead Skin Gang / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Emily, the hero of ‘Emily’s Penny Dreadful’, is back. She has an idea for a new ‘dreadful’ story, this time all about a group of burglars who call themselves the Dead Skin Gang. At the same time, Emily starts her own gang, the Dreadfuls. Her best friend Robin, isn’t too keen on joining, while Uncle Raymond doesn’t like all the noise the Dreadfuls make. But then the next door neighbour’s dog goes missing, and the Dreadfuls (and Uncle Raymond) have a job to do”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Old bones / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Jamie and his dad have lost the farm in the floods. But Dad’s new partner, Sue, doesn’t seem that upset by the destruction of the farm. The trio move into a large old house in the city, right beside the Avon. While the adults seem content to put their energies into the new house and circumstances, Jamie has a bad feeling about the house and is terrified of the closeness of the river. Something bad happened in this house, he just knows it. Suggested level: intermediate, junior secondary.” (Catalogue)

Kua tā te taimi? : ko he tala Hamoa mai Niu Hila / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Tua and his class are preparing for special visitors. While everyone is getting ready, Tua can’t stop asking, “Is it time yet?” Suggested level: junior, primary. Also available in Cook Islands Māori, Niue language, Sāmoan, and Tongan.” (Catalogue)

Diwali Festival of Lights 2022

Remya Baby Rock and Rhyme

Our librarian Remya entertains at a Diwali Baby Rock and Rhyme at Newtown Library

According to the Hindu lunar calendar, around the month of either October or November the most celebrated festival around the world is Diwali – the festival of lights (also known as Deepavali, or दिवाली in the Hindi script).

It is said that the beginning of Diwali celebration started with the epic story of Ramayana. Prince Ram defeated the ten headed demon Ravana, who had kidnapped Ram’s wife Sita.

He then returned to the kingdom of Ayodhya on a night of the new moon, after fourteen years of exile with Sita. The people of Ayodhya welcomed Ram and Sita by lighting rows of oil lamps, celebrating the joyous occasion of having Ram as their future King.

Diwali displays

Some of our Diwali displays at Miramar, Tawa, and Newtown Libraries!

The festival is celebrated as victory of light over darkness, good over evil, and knowledge over ignorance. On Diwali day lamps called rangoli are lit – decorative patterns created with colour sand or flowers – and people young and old wear new clothes, share sweets, and light fireworks. It is a festival of bringing people together, sharing, and caring for one another.

This year Diwali falls on Monday 24th October 2022! Celebrate with Wellington City Libraries and our special Diwali Celebration Collections!

Here are some books for you to check out!

Rama and Sita : the story of Diwali / Doyle, Malachy
“Rama and Sita live happily in the forest until Sita is abducted by the demon king Ravana. Can Rama rescue her – and who is the little white monkey who offers to help?” (Catalogue)

All about Diwali : things to make and do / Haddow, Swapna
“Diwali is one of India’s most significant holidays. This beautiful activity book book is filled with crafts and recipes, fun activities and facts about the Diwali celebrations observed by over one billion people across faiths. Read all about why Diwali is named the festival of lights and discover the stories behind it.” (Catalogue)

Shubh Diwali / Soundar, Chitra
“One family celebrates the Hindu festival of lights”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

The best Diwali ever / Shah, Sonali
“This year, Ariana has plans to make Diwali an extra special celebration, with yummy sweets, divas around the house, pretty clothes, fireworks and… the rangoli competition, of course. Everything would go perfectly to plan if it weren’t for Rafi, her annoying little brother, always up to mischief…and always being clumsy! Will he ruin Diwali too?”–Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

Some Diwali books in Hindi or Tamil languages:

Dīpaka kī dibālī = Deepak’s Diwali / Karwal, Divya (Hindi)
“It’s the worst Diwali ever! Dad has forgotten the sparklers, the fairy lights are broken, and after hearing the story of Rama and Sita, Deepak is sure that the demon king, Ravana, is after him … Part of Mantra Lingua’s Celebration series, this warm contemporary story is interwoven with beautifully illustrated images from Hindu mythology. The book is packed with recipes and activities.” (Catalogue)

Amma kahe kahani Diwali / Mathur, Bhakti (Hindi)
“This is the Hindi version of ‘Amma tell me about Diwali!’ — www.Amazon.com” (Catalogue)

Tipakkin ti pavali = Deepak’s Diwali / Karwal, Divya (Tamil)
“It’s not shaping up to be a good Diwali so far: Dad has forgotten the sparklers, the fairy lights are broken, and, after hearing the story of Rama and Sita, Deepak is sure that Ravana the demon king is after him. Will Deepak’s Diwali be a washout or will the family’s celebration be rescued?” (Catalogue)

Online eBooks on Overdrive/Libby:

Babys First Diwali (cover)Baby’s first Diwali

“Clear pictures and simple read-aloud text introduce baby to Diwali, the festival of light.” (Catalogue)

It’s Diwali / Sehgal, Kabir
“Count along in celebration of Diwali, the Indian Festival of Lights, in this luminous picture book from bestselling mother-son duo Surishtha and Kabir Sehgal. Count up to ten and back down again to the tune of “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe” while learning about the traditions that make Diwali a fun-filled festival!” (Catalogue)

Rama and Sita : the story of Diwali / Doyle, Malachy
“Whether you’re looking for a Diwali gift or a simple introduction to the Diwali story to share with your children, this beautiful book, now reissued in a larger picture book format, is ideal.” (Abridged from catalogue)

Some short phrases in the Hindi language:

Namaste (नमस्ते) – Hello
Dhanyavad (धन्यवाद) – Thank you
Kaise ho aap? (कैसे हो आप?) – How are you?
Badia ho (बडिया हो) – I am well.

Learn more here!

Diwali — Encyclopaedia Britannica (oclc.org)

Mānawatia a Matariki!

“Mānawa maiea te putanga o Matariki
Mānawa maiea te ariki o te Rangi
Mānawa maiea te mātahi o te tau

Celebrate the rising of Matariki
Celebrate the rising of the lord of the sky
Celebrate the rising of the New Year

For the first time in Aotearoa, Matariki will officially be celebrated as a rā whakatā ā-ture (public holiday) on Friday 24 June 2022.

It is an opportunity for all people of Aotearoa to come together and reflect on the year that has passed, celebrate the present, and plan for the future.”(Mānawatia a Matariki)

In Aotearoa, the Matariki star cluster can be seen for most of the year, but in May the stars set below the horizon and during June or July each year, they rise again. The rising of Matariki marks the start of the Māori new year and is a time of remembrance, peace, and celebration. Traditionally nine stars were visible. These are named individually with each star signifying an important aspect of Te Ao Māori. Tohunga (skilled experts) would observe how the stars looked in the sky and make predictions on the coming year according to their appearance.

Celebrating Puanga

Many Māori in the west of New Zealand observe the rise of Puanga about two weeks earlier than Matariki. Puanga can be seen in the eastern sky and it signals the approach of dawn as if “the sun itself is pushing it from behind”. Puanga is celebrated by our Wellington mana whenua, Te Āti Awa as well as other Taranaki Iwi, Whanganui Iwi, Ngāpuhi, Rēkohu/Wharekauri and Moriori from the Chatham Islands. “Puanga kai rau” means Puanga of abundant food and gives credit to the fruits which Puanga brings.

The Matariki cluster is known throughout the world by many names including the Pleiades star cluster. In Greek ancient mythology, the Pleiades were seven sisters. The sisters’ names were Alcyone, Celaeno, Electra, Maia, Merope, Sterope (or Asterope), and Taygete. Puanga is known by some other cultures as Rigel.


Te Iwa o Matariki (The Nine Stars of Matariki)

Matariki – signifies reflection, hope and our connection to the environment

Pōhutukawa – connects with those who have passed on

Waitī – ties to bodies of fresh water and the food within it

Waitā – ties to the ocean and the food within it

Waipuna-ā-rangi – associated with the rain

Tupuānuku – is for food that grows within the soil

Tupuārangi – is for food that grows up in the trees

Ururangi – is the star associated with the winds

Hiwa-i-te-rangi – the youngest, is the wishing star that also ties into our aspirations for the coming year


Matariki Connections

Competition for Ages 512

Matariki is a good time to reflect on our lives and the world around us, celebrate the present, and think about the future.

In this competition, discover and draw what one star connection means to you! Use the above descriptions to choose an aspect of life associated with a star, and then illsutrate what it means to you!

The competition runs from 21–30 June.

Find out about the star connections here, or on the entry form at libraries and community centres. You can enter online at wcl.govt.nz/matarikiconnections

Win some lovely pukapuka!




Hot off the press!

The Astromancer: The Rising of Matariki. / Ihimaera, Witi
“The Astromancer is looking for four new apprentices to learn about Matariki and the Maramataka calendar. She chooses three boys and an orphan girl, Aria, who will come only if she can bring her smelly dog. Aria, though, is bored by the lessons, and she doesn’t want to be told what to do. But these are dangerous times, and Ruatapu the Ravenous is about to threaten the safety of the whole tribe. Will Aria step up to save them? Also available in te reo Maori as Te Kokorangi.” (Catalogue)
Te Kokorangi: Te Aranga o Matariki. / Ihimaera, Witi
“E kimi ana a Te Kokorangi i etahi pia hou tokowha hei ako i nga korero o Matariki me te maramataka. Kowhiria ana etahi tama tokotoru, me tetahi kotiro, he pani, ko Aria te ingoa. Tohe ana a Aria kia haere ano ko tana kuri haunga i tona taha. Ka ahua hoha a Aria i nga akoranga, kaore hoki ia e pai kia tohutohungia ia. Engari kua noho morearea te iwi. Taihoa pea ratou ka tino raru i a Ruatapu Te Pukurua. Ae ranei ma Aria ano te iwi e whakaora?” (Catalogue)

Want to find out more to help you celebrate Matariki?

Mānawatia a Matariki

Matariki at Te Papa

Matariki ki Pōneke

Matariki | AnyQuestions 

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa

Matariki: Te Tau Hou Māori

Te Aka Māori Dictionary

Wellington City Libraries: Matariki

 

Ngā mihi o te tau hou Māori!

Winners of the Crafty Kyle Competition!

A huge ovation for the winners of the Crafty Kyle Competition!

Amelia Major, Katie Chu-Fong, Matthew Yang went to Karori, Central and Johnsonville libraries to collect their prizes. They received a library bag full of books (some were even signed by Kyle Mewburn!), library concession cards and other fun goodies…

We received over 100 entries and they were all fantastic!

Thanks to all the children who contributed to the competition, Kyle Mewburn will find some inspirational ideas from your drawings!


matthew photo2

Matthew collecting his prize from Johnsonville library
photo Katie Chu-Fong2
Katie collecting her prize from Miramar library

Crafty Kyle Competition Winners!

The Crafty Kyle Competition is now over. The participants had to come up with a new imaginary story by Kyle Mewburn and design a book cover for it. We got heaps of entries… Well done everyone!

The winners of the Crafty Kyle Competition have now been announced.

Amelia Major won the 5 to 7 years old category. Well done for such a poetic and light-hearted drawing…

Amelia Major

Katie Chu-Fong won the 8 to 10 years old category. Very colourful and dynamic scene that you created for the “Vegetable Choir”.

katie Chu-Fong

The champion of the 11 to 13 years old category is Matthew Yang. The character Andy looks so fun and real in his cardboard boxes castle!

matthew Yang

The winners will be collecting their library prizes this week. Books signed by Kyle Mewburn will be one of the treats in the prize pack! Maybe your drawings will inspire Kyle Mewburn for one of his future books…

Hallowe’en party at Kilbirnie Library

On the day before Hallowe’en, an enthusiastic group of spooky characters joined witch/librarian Sandra at Kilbirnie Library for interactive stories themed around Hallowe’en. Stories shared included Room on the Broom, What’s in the Witch’s Kitchen and Bedtime for Monsters. Afterwards, the junior ghouls took home more spooky stories to share with their families. It was great to see them relish the stories and join in the fun!

Halloween @ Kilbirnie2Halloween @ Kilbirnie1

 

Books Go Arty exhibition: Duck’s stuck!

Duck waddled. Duck quacked. Duck ate grass. Duck napped. All is well in the farmyard…until…. ”Help! I’m stuck!” quacks Duck!  None of the farmyard animals can free Duck. None that is, except for crafty Rat. But does Rat have an alterior motive….?

You can find a fabulous feathery parade of bright yellow ducks right now at Central Library and at Island Bay Community Center. And if you look very closely, you might just find a certain crafty Rat. These bright and dynamic sculptures have been created by the brilliant children at Tawa school and Clifton Tce Model School.

It is part of Wellington City Libraries Books Go Arty With Kyle Mewburn Exhibition. The exhibition is on at Island Bay, Karori and Central Libraries until the 14th of November. Don’t forget to check it out!

IMG_7335petit

duck at Central