Aotearoa Spanish Language Week 2024

Kia ora and ¡Hola!

Here at Wellington City Libraries we are celebrating Aotearoa Spanish Language Week.

Hablas espanol? Do you speak Spanish?

Hablo un poco de Español (Eh-span-yole). I speak a little Spanish 

¿Dónde estás? Where are you?

Estoy en le biblioteca. I am at the library.

¿Sabías? Did you know?

  • There are over 500 million speakers of Spanish worldwide.

This is mainly because the Spanish colonised many different parts of the world. Countries with Spanish as an official language are called Hispanic. Most of them are in the Americas, which make up Latin America.

Hispanophone Global World Map from Wikimedia Commons licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

  • The first Spanish-speaking immigrants to New Zealand.

a family with 3 children sit facing the camera. Black and White image.

Image: “Chileans become New Zealanders” by John Wilson in Story: Latin Americans, Te Ara Encyclopaedia of New Zealand.

The first Spanish-speaking immigrants to New Zealand arrived in the late 19th century so they could work in the gold mines. Most of them were men from the Spanish-speaking countries of South America.

  • First Chileans arrived in New Zealand in 1977

When the military took over the government in Chile, families like the Guerreros, pictured opposite, were forced to leave their country as refugees. If you would like to learn more about our first Chilean immigrants, click on the photo or visit the link below to read about them and other immigrants from Latin America on Te Ara Encylopaedia of New Zealand.

Cool and interesting words in Spanish Español

One really interesting thing about learning another language is that there are lots of words that don’t have an exact translation into English. Here are some words in Spanish we think are extra cool.

  • empalagar: When you dislike something because the flavour is too sweet.
  • sobremesaWhen you finish a meal and stay at the table sharing a conversation, after everyone has eaten.
  • pena ajena: To feel embarrassed on behalf of someone else.

Here are some English words that come from Spanish Español:

  • overol: overalls
  • suéter: sweater
  • bulevar: boulevard
  • fútbol: football

Storytime Tiempo de cuentos at Karori Library

Join Karori Library in celebrating Aotearoa Spanish Language week with fun and interactive bilingual stories, games and language resources for pre schoolers. Nau mai rā tātou katoa. Everybody is welcome.

Tuesday 21 May, 10:30am – 11:30am

Te Māhanga Karori Library

Karori Library also have a new programme called Cuentacuentos – story time sessions entirely in Spanish! Every first Saturday of the month at 11 AM.

Toitoi Magazine App Toitoi Revista aplicación


Check out the Toitoi Magazine Latin America Special Issue app — it has stories, poems and art by kids about the vibrant cultures of Latin America. You can read in English, Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese, thanks to the Latin America Centre of Asia-Pacific Excellence.

Readers can listen to the stories and poems in translation, tap to hear individual words and spellings and even record their own narration.

A fun quiz Una prueba divertida


Visit the Aotearoa Spanish Language Week website for the answers, and for more fun activities for the whole whānau!

Spanish Books Libros de Español

Mi perro solo habla español / Cáceres, Andrea
“Cuando Aurora llegó a los Estados Unidos, aprendió a hablar inglés, pero Nena, su spaniel, no. Por eso, cuando pasea a Nena, Aurora les explica a sus nuevos amigos que su mascota solo habla español. Ella les dice: Nena no entiende la palabra “sit” pero sí entiende “siéntate”. […] ¡Pero ella sí que puede oler un “postre”! Con dulzura y encanto, la autora e ilustradora Andrea Cáceres cuenta una tierna e incomparable historia sobre una niña, su mascota y un amor que transciende cualquier idioma.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Leo Messi / Sánchez Vegara, Ma Isabel
“In this book from the highly acclaimed Little People, BIG DREAMS series, discover the incredible life of Leo Messi, one of the worlds most skilled and celebrated footballers. Leo Messi tells the inspiring story of a young boy from Argentina who became one of the worlds greatest footballers.” (Catalogue)

Cucú-tras by Francesca Ferri
This book invites you to play a fun game: the “Cucú-tras”. This book has great illustrations with cheerful colours and you will have fun lifting the flaps to find different farm animals.

Los tipos malos en el peor día del mundo / Blabey, Aaron
“¡Salve al príncipe heredero Mermelada! ¡Pliégate a su malvada magnificencia! ¡Arrodíllate ante su gloria de manos de traseros! O…si quieres…¡NO! Puede que los Tipos Malos y las Chicas Aún Peores hayan sido derribados, pero ¿significa eso que se quedarán en el suelo? ¡De ninguna manera, muchachos! Ponte los pantalones de fiesta: ¡se acerca la batalla definitiva entre malo y MAAAAAALO!” (Catalogue)

La lección de August by R. J. Palacio

Ten-year-old Auggie Pullman, who was born with extreme facial abnormalities and was not expected to survive, goes from being home-schooled to entering fifth grade at a private middle school in Manhattan, which entails enduring the taunting and fear of his classmates as he struggles to be seen as just another student.

If you’d like to read more books in Spanish, check out some of our favourites on this blog post, or view the full list on our catalogue.

Te Ara Pukapuka Children’s Walk at Central Park

Te Ara Pukapuka has now landed at Central Park, Brooklyn, with a brand new pukapuka carefully selected for this location! We previously let you know that Central Park was the location for the next installation of Te Ara Pukapuka, but we didn’t tell you which pukapuka you’d be reading as you follow the path through the park!

Now that it’s there and ready to read, we can make the announcement!

The first board with the title "you have found Te Ara Pukapuka" written on it and the cover of Pakupaku Pīwakawaka

Our Te Ara Pukapuka welcome page

Wellington City Libraries and the Wellington City Parks, Sport & Recreation team have partnered with author Marion Day and the Upstream: Friends of Central Park environmental group to bring Pakupaku Pīwakawaka by author Marion Day and illustrator Anna Evans to Central Park. This wonderful pukapuka is available to borrow from our libraries, to buy from all good bookstores and Marion Day’s website, and of course, to read as you wander along the trails at Central Park! Each page you find will direct you towards the next as you stroll through the park.

Te Ara Pukapuka Central Park begins (and ends!) at the main entrance to Central Park on Brooklyn Road – right by the bus stop. You can find the entrance here on Google Maps. Following the story through the park will take you into the bush, near the stream, and up past the playground and excellent flying fox. The trail is nice and wide and is suitable if you have a stroller or are a confident wheelchair user – there is a steep-ish downhill section!

A Te Ara Pukapuka board with the playground behind it

Pause at the playground halfway through your Central Park Te Ara Pukapuka journey!

Pakupaku Pīwakawaka tells the story of a fantail who is tasked with keeping harmful creatures out of Tane’s forest. This pukapuka also briefly introduces us to a pīwakawaka who looks a little different to the grey, black, and brown fantails that we usually see around Wellington. When we asked Upstream if there were any creatures or critters they’d like to see featured in a book at Central Park, they let us know that there are many fantails who live in the park, and they’ve also started seeing black fantails around too.

A black fantail perching on a branch side-on

A black morph fantail. Will you spot one at Central Park?
Image: 341885505by Alan Bell on iNaturalist, licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0 DEED

There are two colourations (or morphs) of Pīwakawaka, the pied morph (grey, black, and brown), and the black morph. It’s very rare to find a North Island fantail that isn’t the pied morph, and only around 5% of South Island Fantails are black morphs. This makes it pretty exciting to find black Pīwakawaka in Central Park right here in Wellington!

Ngā mihi to everyone who helped bring Pakupaku Pīwakawaka to Central Park, and we hope you enjoy reading it as you wander the trails.

Hairy Maclary from a Donaldson’s Dairy

“Out of the gate and off for a walk went Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy…”

Sound familiar? That’s because the Hairy Maclary series, written and illustrated by Lynley Dodd, is one of New Zealand’s (and the world’s) best-loved picture books. Who can’t love that cheeky wee dog, Hairy Maclary, and all his furry mates – from Bottomley Potts (covered in spots), to the villain of many books, Scarface Claw!

But did you know that Scotland has claimed these books as their own?  “WHAT?? How can that be?” we hear you cry!

Although the Hairy Maclary series are peppered with loads of New Zealand references such as the word “dairy” (this would be called a “corner shop” in Scottish lingo), and illustrations with cabbage trees, Pōhutukawa, ponga trees and flax, the name “Maclary” is a decidedly Scottish-sounding name!

What’s in a name?

Scottish and Irish  surnames frequently have the prefix Mac or Mc. When these surnames were originally developed, they were formed by adding the Gaelic word mac, which means son of, to the name of the original bearer’s father. For example, the surname MacDougall literally means son of Dougall.

File:United Kingdom labelled map7.png

Image: Matt Lewis, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Where is Scotland anyway?

Scotland is a part of the United Kingdom (UK) and occupies the northern third of Great Britain. Scotland’s mainland shares a border with England to the south. Scotland also has almost 800 islands, including some famous ones like Shetland (known for its sheep and complicated knitting patterns), Orkney (known for its prehistoric sites), and Skye (known for its history and beautiful scenery).

See if you can find Scotland on a world map HERE

Who is Lynley Dodd?

Lynley Dodd is an internationally celebrated writer for children. She wavs born in Rotorua and now lives in Tauranga. Lynley graduated from the Elam School of Art in Auckland with a diploma in Fine Arts, majoring in sculpture. She went on to teach art before taking a break to start a family. She began to work as a freelance illustrator and illustrated another popular picture book My Cat Likes To Hide in Boxes by Eve Sutton. There was no looking back as Lynley went on to write and illustrate her own books for children. These include the Hairy Maclary series (of course!), The Nickle Nackle Tree, The Smallest Turtle

Who is Hairy Maclary?

File:Hairy Maclary and Friends Sculpture.jpg

Image: Hairy Maclary and Friends Sculpture in Tauranga (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Hairy Maclary (or ‘HM’ for short) is a small hairy dog created by  Lynley Dodd. HM can be described as a ‘bitser’, which means he’s of mixed breed. “Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy” was first published in 1983 and the series has gone on to sell over 5 million copies worldwide. HM’s adventures are usually in the company of his other animal friends and he’s depicted as a friendly, but lively little dog that gets into a lot of mischief. There is now a series of 12 books and a further nine books about his friends, all with catchy rhyming stories and realistic, colourful and fun illustrations.

In recognition of the success of these books, a sculpture of Hairy Maclary and other characters from the books was officially unveiled on the waterfront in Tauranga in 2015, the city where Lynley Dodd lives.


If you haven’t discovered the wonders of Hairy Maclary and his equally hairy mates, why not add these to you Summer Reading Adventure lists and enjoy some good ole Kiwi reading fun:

Hairy Maclary treasury : the complete adventures of Hairy Maclary / Dodd, Lynley
“A collection of ten stories featuring the mischief and mayhem of Hairy Maclary.” (Catalogue)
Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy / Dodd, Lynley
“A small black dog and his canine friends are terrorized by the local tomcat.” (Catalogue)


The nickle nackle tree / Dodd, Lynley
“In the Manglemunching Forest there’s a Nickle Nackle tree, Growing Nickle Nackle berries that are red as red can be. And that’s not all that’s nestling on the twisty branches of this laden tree. Count up some fabulous Lynley Dodd creations, such as one Ballyhoo bird, kicking up a din and two squawking Scritchet birds with legs so twiggy thin, to nine friendly Natter birds, building nice new nests to ten fussy Fissick birds in yellow feathered vests”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)


Hairy Maclary’s caterwaul caper / Dodd, Lynley
“Hairy Maclary leads all the other dogs in the neighbourhood to investigate the terrible caterwauling created when the tough cat Scarface Claw is caught up in a tree.” (Catalogue)
The life and art of Lynley Dodd / Macdonald, Finlay
“Dame Lynley Dodd is New Zealand’s best known author and illustrator of children’s books. Her career was launched in 1973 with the publication of My Cat Likes to Hide in Boxes, which she collaborated on with cousin Eve Sutton. Other picture books soon followed and in 1983 the world famous Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy was launched. Hairy Maclary’s success placed Dodd in the international spotlight and the Hairy Maclary and Friends series is today one of the world’s most successful series of picture books. The Life and Art of Lynley Dodd is a beautiful full-colour hardback telling the story of Lynley’s early years, time at art school, teaching career, marriage and success as a children’s author. The book is a pictorial history as much as a written one, and as such includes photos of the author’s early years as well as the artwork she produced as she moved towards her world-renowned style – art school pieces, early political cartoons and illustrations for the correspondence school among others.” (Catalogue, abridged)

My cat likes to hide in boxes / Sutton, Eve
“Cats from many different countries may like to do all kinds of strange things, but my cat, an ordinary round-the-house cat, likes to hide in boxes.” (Catalogue)
Scotland / Harman, Alice
“This series provides an introduction to the study of the United Kingdom for young children as the illustrated ‘Fact Cat’ character leads the reader on a trail through the book, helping them to discover answers to key questions.” (Catalogue)
Encyclopedia of surnames / Ayto, John
“The Encyclopedia of Surnames is not just another dictionary! With entertaining coverage of more than 7,000 surnames listed alphabetically, it provides a complete and accessible companion to tracing the history of names.” (Catalogue, abridged)

 

 

Arabic Language Day and New Books in Arabic!

ٱلسَّلَامُ عَلَيْكُمْ!

The 18th of December marks the United Nations Arabic Language Day. Did you know that there are over 300 million native Arabic speakers worldwide?

This makes the Arabic language one of the most widely spoken languages in the word.

It is spoken by a diverse range of people across the African continent and the Middle East, including Sudan, Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, and many more. At Wellington City Libraries we’re lucky enough to offer our community a wide selection of books in Arabic for everyone to enjoy!

Here is our librarian, Khadro, showing us two more brand new Arabic books in the Newtown Library collection:

A smiling librarian, wearing a colourful facemask and hijab, is holding two beautiful picture books in Arabic. Behind her, you can see the children's world languages collection at Newtown Library, with lots of books in colourful shelving and comfortable seats nearby.

Our friendly librarians love helping you find good books to read!

Here are some of our favourite books for children in Arabic. Click on the title to find out more. If the book you want is in a library that is too far away, you can click ‘Place Reserve‘ to have it sent to a library which is closer, where you can pick it up.

Mā arwaʻ al-ṭaʻām = Food, food, fabulous food / Clynes, Kate
A fun story about the diversity of food and all the ways it enriches our lives. Food brings people together from all walks of life and is a great way to connect with each other.

Ikhtalafat fa-tamayyazatu / Nājim, Alāʼ Saʻd

Our Differences are Distinguished: This story is a dive into everything that makes us different and unique. Through music the characters of this book learn that there are different ways to express themselves.

Time to pray = Awqāt al-ṣalāh / Addasi, Maha

This story follows young Yasmin as she learns about one of the core tenants of her religion: prayer. It also teaches Yasmin the importance of family and community.

Samakat qaws qazah = The rainbow fish. / Pfister, Marcus

Leaning to share your beauty with others makes everyone shine. This classic tale is now available in English and Arabic for new and native Arabic speakers to enjoy.

Ayyuhā al-dub al-asmar, ayyuhā al-dub al-asmar mādhā tará? / Martin, Bill

I see a bear, what about you? A fun rhyming book that covers all the bases, from magical blue horses to cute purple cats. This book has it all.

Click here to see more Arabic children’s books at Wellington City Libraries

Joining the Library is free! You can take these books home for three weeks and then get some new ones! If you would like to learn more, here is some information about how to join the library, written in Arabic.

New Books in Spanish!

Read this post in Spanish!

New children’s books in Spanish have arrived! We are excited to announce the arrival of a flood of new Spanish books for all our Spanish-speaking families. All branches have some, but you will find larger collections at Karori, Johnsonville, Kilbirnie, and Newtown Libraries.

Don’t forget that you can also order these Spanish books through the online catalogue by searching for “Spanish language readers,” clicking on the book you would like, and having it sent to your local library branch to pick up.

Here are a few must-haves to whet your appetite:

La oruga muy hambrienta / Carle, Eric

In this funny story you will discover how a very hungry caterpillar becomes a beautiful butterfly.

Los días raros / Ycaza, Roger

The young character in this story wakes up one morning feeling a bit sad. Then he realises that his own smile has disappeared from his face! Discover what happens on this very strange day.

Un avestruz con mucha luz / Andrés, José Carlos

A funny encounter between three ostriches, three lions, and one ostrich egg. You won’t believe the surprise that awaits after the egg hatches!

¡No quiero ir al cole! / Blake, Stephanie

Simon does not want to go to school. He is too scared! His mum insists, but he says no, until, finally, he gives in. But when his mum picks him up from school and asks him to come back home, Simon says something that will surprise you!

Voy a portarme muy bien / Haughton, Chris

Simon is a very curious dog. When Alfonso, his owner, goes out to deliver a message, Simon promises to behave. However, he faces a lot of temptations: a cake, a cat, and more. Do you think Simon will keep his promise?

Necesito un abrazo = I need a hug / Blabey, Aaron

A little porcupine, with prickly spikes, is looking for a hug. He asks a bear, a rabbit, a reindeer, but they are all a bit reluctant because of his prickles. Do you think he will get a hug?

Gustavo : el fantasmita timido / Drago, Flavia Z

Gustavo does not have any friends, so he decides to perform a concert with his violin and invites all the people in the neighbourhood. It will be a magic night. Gustavo will play marvellously for them. But, do you think they will show up? Will they become his friends?

Dragones y tacos / Rubin, Adam

Did you know that dragons love tacos? Did you know that they love parties with tacos, and they like all kinds of tacos? However, there is one thing they do not like about tacos that causes their ears to smoke in anger. Discover what that is in this funny story!

¡Me rompí la trompa! / Willems, Mo

Elephant lets his friends climb up on his trunk. First his friend the hippopotamus climbs on, then his friend the rhinoceros does too; he even puts a piano on his trunk! All of them dance and his trunk breaks, but not for the reason you might think. This is a crazy story that will make you laugh out loud!

So, what are you waiting for? Visit your local library to pick up new books in Spanish today!

¡Nuevos libros en español!

Read this post in English!

Hemos recibido nuevos libros en español! Estamos muy contentos de anunciar la llegada de una número considera de libros en español para nuestros lectores en español. Todos nuestras sucursales tiene libros en español, pero donde más pueden encontrar es en Karori, Johnsonville, Kilbirnie, y Newtown. No olvides que también puedes ordenarlos en nuestro catálogo en línea buscando en “Spanish language readers.”

Aquí algunos libros que no te puedes perder:

La oruga muy hambrienta / Carle, Eric

En esta divertida historia descubre cómo una hambrienta oruga se convertirá en una hermosa mariposa.

Los días raros / Ycaza, Roger

El pequeño personaje de esta historia despierta una mañana y la encuentra triste, incluso se da cuenta de que su propia sonrisa ha desaparecido de su rostro. Descubre en qué terminará este raro día.

Un avestruz con mucha luz / Andrés, José Carlos

Un divertido encuentro entre tres avestruces, tres leones y un huevo de avestruz. No te pierdas lo que sucederá cuando se rompa el cascarón de este huevo.

¡No quiero ir al cole! / Blake, Stephanie

Simon no quiere ir al colegio. Le da un poco de miedo. Su mamá le insiste y él se niega. Por fin, acepta. Sin embargo, cuando su mamá lo recoge del colegio y le pide que vuelvan a casa, Simon le responde algo que te dejará sorprendido.

Voy a portarme muy bien / Haughton, Chris

El perro Simon se queda a cuidar la casa de su dueño Alfonso, quien saldrá a llevar un recado. Simon promote portarse bien pero se encuentra con muchas tentaciones que lo invitan a romper su promesa (un pastel, un gato, mucha tierra en una maceta con flores). ¿Crees que cumpla su promesa?


Necesito un abrazo = I need a hug / Blabey, Aaron

Un pequeño puercoespin, con sus grandes púas, pide abrazos a un conejo, un reno, un oso, pese a sus espina, pero la pregunta es si estarán dispuestos a darselo. ¿Tú que crees?


Gustavo : el fantasmita timido / Drago, Flavia Z

Gustavo no tiene amigos, y para remediarlo decide un día hacer un concierto con su violín. Invita a todos los habitantes del barrio. Será una noche mágica en donde Gustavo tocará maravillosamente su violín. ¿Pero vendrán sus invitados a su concierto? ¿Se convertiran en sus amigos?


Dragones y tacos / Rubin, Adam

Sabías que a los dragones les encantan los tacos? Sabías que les fascinan las fiestas con tacos y que les gustan de todo tipo? Pero hay algo que no les gusta de los tacos y los hace echar incluso humo por las orejas. En esta divertida historia descubrirás de qué se trata.


¡Me rompí la trompa! / Willems, Mo

Un elefante empieza a subir a su trompa a todos sus amigos. Empieza por su amigo el hipopotamo, luego sube a su trompa a su amigo el rinoceronte, incluso sube a su trompa un piano! Todos bailan y se divierten sobre su trompa. Sin embargo, su trompa se le quiebra y no es precisamente por la razón que piensas! Es una loca historia que seguro te hará reír.

Mga bagong libro sa Filipino!

Read this post in English!

Magandang balita! May mga bagong pambatang libro sa wikang Filipino, bilingguwal, at multilingguwal ang matatagpuan ngayun sa Wellington City Libraries. Mula sa kwento ng Pambansang Alagad ng Sining para sa Panitikan na si Virgilio Almario at iba pang premyadong manunulat gaya nina Jomike Tejido, Patricia Celina Ngo, Liana Romulo, Corazon Dandan Albano, tiyak na masisiyahan hindi lamang ang mga bata kung hindi ang buong pamilyang Pilipino at mga ibang mambabasa ng wikang Filipino.

Ilan sa mga kwento na inyong matatagpuan ay ang mga sumusunod:

Gustong Mag-aral ni Sula / Almario, Virgilio

Tunghayan ang kwento ni Sula, isang batang T’boli, kung paano napukaw sa kanyang murang edad ang kagustuhang matutong magbasa at magsulat.

Mga hayop na bibilangin / Wildsmith, Brian

Isang nakakatuwa at nakaka-engganyo na board book na may makukulay na hayop sa bawat pahina. Masayang mag-aral ng pagbilang at pagbigkas ng mga uri ng mga hayop sa Filipino.
“1 unggoy, 2 usa, 3 daga, 4 na paru-paru, 5 ibon….”


Nasaan po sila? : sa mga pista / Tejido, Jomike

Maaliw sa panibagong Search and Find na serye kung saan maaari nating hanapin ang mga bagay na matatagpuan sa nakakatuwa at makukulay na mga tanawin. Hanapin ang mga ito na nakatago sa iba’t ibang lugar na pangturista, mga pagdiriwang, o kaya ay sa iba’t ibang lugar sa Pilipinas at sa Asya. Ang Nasaan Po Sila serye ay isang libro na bago at nakakaengganyong basahin para sa mga mag-aaral ng Ingles at Filipino.

Sari-Sari Mga Salitang Paulit-Ulit (A Book of Double Words) / Yambao, Auri Asuncion

“Bahay-bahayan… sabay-sabay… paruparo… waling-waling… liko-liko… yakap-yakap… “
Isang kaaya-aya at nakakaengganyong libro na puno ng paulit-ulit na mga salita. Sa Filipino, inuulit ang mga salita o bagahi ng isang salita upang gayahin ang tunog, diin, paigtingin, tipunin at pagsamahin ang mga ideya, at ipagdiwang ang pluralidad!


Sayaw ng mga Kamay / Que, Joanna

Tunghayan ang kwento tungkol sa magkaibigan na nalampasan ang mga hadlang para makapag-usap gamit ang Filipino Sign Language. Natutuhan nina Sam at Mai na mag-usap sa pamamagitan ng sayaw ng mga kamay. Inilarawan nila sa isa’t-isa kung ano ang mga nakikita at naririnig nila sa kanilang paligid. Ang resulta nito ay isang magandang pagkakaibigan kung saan hindi hadlang ang uri ng komunikasyon upang magkaintindihan.

That’s it, Pancit! / Ngo, Patricia Celina

“Masaya ang magkaroon ng dalawa sa maraming bagay pero minsan ay nakalilito.”
“Paano ako pipili sa dalawang kultura?”
“Dahil isa lang ako, paano ko malalaman kung sino talaga ako?”


Ako ba ay maliit? = Am I small? / Winterberg, Philipp

Ang librong ito ay isinalin sa higit na 200 wika at diyalekto mula nang ito’y mailathala. “Maliit ba ako?” Sundan si Tamia sa kaniyang paglalakbay at kaniyang pagtatanong sa mga hayop na kaniyang nakakasalubong. Tiyak na ikatutuwa ng mga mambabasa sa mga naging tugon ng mga hayop sa kaniya.


Tara, Itok! / Dandan-Albano, Corazon

Si Itok ay laging nag-iisa at napag-iiwanan dahil kalahati lamang ang kaniyang buntot. Mula sa makukulay na guhit ng ilustrador na si Ara Vilena, tuklasin natin ang kuwento ni Itok at kung paano niyang napagtagumpayan ang kaniyang kapansanan upang makahanap ng kaibigan.

My first book of Tagalog words : an ABC rhyming book of Filipino language and culture / Romulo, Liana

“Ang C ay para sa champorado, tsokolate at kanin, maniwala kayo o hindi. Ito ang almusal ko. Masarap habang mainit.” Kilalanin ang isang kasiya-siyang pamilyang Pilipino na magpapakilala sa atin sa tunog ng mga salitang Filipino na may kalakip na paliwanag tungkol sa lingguwistika at kultura na madaling mauunawaan ng mga bata. Matututunan sa bawat pahina ang mga pang-araw-araw na salitang mahalaga sa kulturang Pilipino na nakalahad gamit ang kaaya-ayang ABC-approach.

Bisitahin lamang ang website ng Wellington City Libraries at i-type ang mga salitang “Filipino Language Readers” o “Tagalog Language Readers” upang mahanap at mapareserba ng alin man sa inyong napiling libro. Maaari ding ipadala ang napiling ninyong libro sa pinakamalapit na sangay ng aklatan sa inyong lugar. Kaya ano pa ang hinihintay n’yo? Tayo nang magbasa sa wikang Filipino!

Get into the spirit of Halloween ’21 at the library — Part One!

image courtesy of stuff.co.nz

Halloween has arrived at the library! In addition to dressing up and eating treats, now is the time to get your scare on reading up about the history of Halloween, and getting some cool ideas for Halloween costumes and crafts. Soon to come is Part Two, where we’ll share with you some extra-spooky fiction, picture books, eBooks and movies for a quiet (scare) night in. Let the scare fest begin! AHHHWWOOOOOO!

About Halloween:

Halloween, or All Hallows Eve, is celebrated on October 31st. The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain, which was held on November 1 in contemporary calendars. It was believed that on that day, the souls of the dead returned to their homes, so people dressed in costumes and lit bonfires to ward off spirits. Today Halloween is considered a holiday (especially in the United States) for dress-up, (traditionally witches, ghosts and zombies), treats and fun, especially for children. For more information about the history of Halloween, read our previous post.

Some ways that people around the world celebrate Halloween include:

  • Dressing up in costume,
  • Handing out treats to trick or treaters,
  • Decorating the house with Halloween party favours,
  • Reading or sharing ghost stories (we have heaps of those!),
  • Watching scary movies (we have heaps of those as well!)

Immediately following Halloween, on November 1st, Día de Muertos is a traditional Central American holiday that reunites the living and dead. It is a holiday for celebrating life and death, a holiday where mourning is exchanged for celebration. Below are a couple of books from our collection where you can read up more about this festival:

image courtesy of syndeticsThe day of the dead = El dia de los muertos.

@This book tells the story of two children as they celebrate their ancestors on the vibrant holiday: The day of the dead. With sugar skulls, sweet-smelling marigold petals and joyful songs, Hispanic families welcome back ancestors on this holiday. Complete with lush college and lyrical text in both English and Spanish, this wonderful picture book creates the perfect introduction to this festival (and perhaps also to the Spanish language).” (Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsDía de los muertos.

“It’s Día de Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) and children throughout the pueblo, or town, are getting ready to celebrate! They decorate with colored streamers, calaveras, or sugar skulls, and pan de muertos, or bread of the dead. There are altars draped in cloth and covered in marigolds and twinkling candles. Music fills the streets. Join the fun and festivities, learn about a different cultural tradition, and brush up on your Spanish vocabulary, as the town honors their dearly departed in a traditional, time-honored style.” (Catalogue)


Where can I find more information about Halloween:


image courtesy of syndeticsCelebrate Halloween.

“Vivid images and lively, inviting text illuminate the spookiest night of the year. This book spirits readers on a tour of Halloween celebrations around the globe as it explores the rich history of this holiday and the origins of its folklore, food, games, costumes, and traditions.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsHow to make frightening Halloween decorations.

“Do you like to scare and gross out your friends? Create frightening Halloween decorations with just a few simple supplies. Surprise your friends with glowing alien heads and sicken them with bloody intestines. Whether you’re decorating for a party or just for fun, these projects will turn an ordinary Halloween into a howling good time.”(Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsHow to create spectacular Halloween costumes.

“Are you searching for a Halloween costume that will get you noticed? Then How to Create Spectacular Halloween Costumes is the book for you! From a guitar-playing vampire to the floor of a movie theater, these easy-to-make costumes are sure to impress your friends. They might even cause a few screams!” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndetics10 minute Halloween crafts.

“In 10 Minute Crafts: Halloween, children can learn how to make Halloween decorations such as bat hangings and black cat lanterns and create spookily brilliant zombie finger puppets and witches on broomsticks, plus lots more amazing Halloween ideas.” (Catalogue)

New to the collection is…

image courtesy of syndeticsHalloween : 300 spooky facts to scare you silly.

“The wildly popular Weird But True line is all dressed up for Halloween with 300 all-new spooky facts about candy, costumes, pumpkin carving, and more Calling all boys and ghouls: You’re in for a treat of freaky facts, stats, tidbits, and trivia about one of the most popular holidays Did you know that there is an underwater pumpkin carving contest? Or that the U.S. Defense Department has a zombie apocalypse plan? Maybe you’d be amazed to discover that there are more Halloween emojis than there are U.S. states? It’s all weird–and it’s all true–in this latest and greatest edition, packed with hilarious and terrifying tidbits on Halloween.” (Catalogue)


Have a safe and happy Halloween!

Te Wiki Kaumātua – Across Generations

toddler, hand, holding, elder, person, hand holding, hold, care, help, elderly, old, senior, aged, aging, people, hope, respect, women, young, concepts, giving, friendship, support, generation, love, skin, closeup, patient, touching, up, color, two, adult, isolated, human, thumb, unity, symbol, finger, grandparent, living, caucasian, female, family, togetherness, nursing, hospital, mature, grandmother, conceptual, wrinkled, human Hand, close-up, child, teamwork, females, assistance, part Of, caucasian Ethnicity, human body part, bonding, body part, parent, positive emotion, family with one child, mother, focus on foreground, daughter, 2K

Image: Piqsels public domain photography

Seniors Week 2021 (Te Wiki Kaumātua) is from 1 – 8 October. This year’s theme is “Across Generations” which is focusing on ways to connect people from all generations and backgrounds around Wellington. the start date for Seniors’ Week is significant too as 1 October is International Day of Older Persons.

Do you have elderly grandparents or great-grandparents, or even an elderly neighbour you can connect with? Maybe you could record their stories to help keep their traditions alive. Our Kaumātua are a rich treasure house of lifetime experiences that are hugely significant. They are our history. This week is a great opportunity to listen to their stories, learn something about their experiences, and reconnect with them.

In Māori culture, Kaumātua are held in very high esteem.  They have a variety of roles in their whānau (wider family), hapū (sub-tribe) and iwi (tribe):

  • Being the storehouses of tribal knowledge and traditions
  • Acting as guardians of tikanga (Māori customs)
  • Nurturing children – traditionally kaumātua looked after children while their parents worked or went away to fight, and often brought up the first grandchild
  • Providing leadership
  • Helping resolve disputes.

If you want to explore your family history further, Wellington City Libraries have some great databases that can be accessed using your library card. Just jump onto the Hītori / History page HERE


Why not immerse yourself in some books featuring elders:

What’s happening to grandpa? / Shriver, Maria
“Kate has always adored her grandpa’s storytelling – but lately he’s been repeating the same stories again and again. One day he even forgets Kate’s name. Her mother’s patient explanations open Kate’s eyes to what so many of the elderly must confront: Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of memory loss. With special insight derived from her own father’s struggle with Alzheimer’s, Maria Shriver offers a touching and optimistic story that encourages awareness, acceptance, and dialogue among family and friends.” (Catalogue)
Wrinkles / JR
“This first-ever picture book by internationally acclaimed artist-photographer JR allows young readers to consider the lives and stories of the older people around them. Memories, experiences, and emotions are touched on in a welcoming way, creating the perfect conversation-starter between children and their elders. Evocative black-and-white photographs of faces and simple, poignant read-aloud text consider the literal and lyrical meaning of wrinkles, leaving readers of all ages with a well-justified appreciation of aging and natural beauty.” (Catalogue)

A plan for Pops / Smith, Heather
“In this illustrated picture book, a child helps their grandparents deal with a difficult change in abilities.” (Catalogue)
The lines on Nana’s face / Ciraolo, Simona
“It’s granny’s birthday, but her little granddaughter wonders why, because of the lines on her face, she looks so worried! But they are simply wrinkles, and grandma is very fond of her lines because they are where she keeps her memories.” (Catalogue)
My nanna is a ninja / Young, Damon
“All nannas are different. But what if your nanna was really different? What if your nanna was a ninja?”(Catalogue)
A hat for Mrs. Goldman : a story about knitting and love / Edwards, Michelle
“Sophia knits a special hat for her elderly neighbour and knitting teacher, Mrs. Goldman. When Sophia was a baby, Mrs. Goldman knitted a tiny baby hat to keep her warm. Last year, she taught Sophia how to knit. Now Sophia wants to knit a special hat for Mrs. Goldman. And she wants to do it all by herself!” (Catalogue)
Birdsong / Flett, Julie
“When a young girl moves from the country to a small town, she feels lonely and out of place. But soon she meets an elderly woman next door, who shares her love of nature and art. As the seasons change, can the girl navigate the failing health of her new friend? Acclaimed author and artist Julie Flett’s textured images of birds, flowers, art, and landscapes bring vibrancy and warmth to this powerful story, which highlights the fulfilment of intergenerational relationships and shared passions.” (Catalogue)

Love you forever / Munsch, Robert N.
“Robert Munsch’s beloved tale is gentle affirmation of the love a parent feels for her child — forever. Nurtured by the unconditional love of his parent, a boy grows happily through the stages of childhood to become, in turn, a loving adult.” (Catalogue)
Whakarongo ki o Tupuna = Listen to your ancestors / Darryn, Joseph
“As a wise teacher grows older, she encourages her students to learn from the example of famous ancestors. She gives the next generation simple messages of days gone by: getting out into nature, letting go of anger, anxiety and stress, and standing strong and tall” (Catalogue)

Our Favourite Picture Books

It should be no surprise to you that librarians like books. We work here for a reason! We are surrounded by books at work and a good number of them often manage to find their way home with us at the end of the day. We choose books for book clubs, displays, and storytimes, and a very important part of what we do is helping people like you find a book that you’re going to love.

To help you find a picture book you’ll love, we thought we’d tell you about some of the picture books we love, and why we like them. So read on for a list of your local librarians’ favourite picture books.

Amy’s favourite:

My cat likes to hide in boxes / Sutton, Eve

The illustrations are super cute and my cat also likes to hide in boxes (or any other tiny spot he can squeeze into).


Andree’s favourite:

Stack the cats / Ghahremani, Susie

Counting and Cats, what’s not to love!

Will the cats stack or tumble and fall? How is the best way to stack your cats?

A fun way to put a little bit of maths and a little bit of cute into your life.


Catherine’s favourite:

The pout-pout fish / Diesen, Deborah

I love the rhythm and rhyme and how a frown turned upside down is a smile ( I have a song that goes with it) and the value of a loving kiss to change your perspective on life. Wonderful illustrations too with just enough detail to be interesting. With the illustrations I think the book could do double duty as just an undersea looking/talk-about book if you are one to one with a child.


Claire’s favourite:

Poor Louie / Fucile, Tony

Poor Louie is very sweet – You can’t help but feel sorry for the poor puppy dealing with lots of changes, going from being the centre of attention to… not so much… The very sweet twist at the end is what makes it great though.


Debbie’s favourite:

The Lorax / Seuss

Even though it was a children’s book  it was read to a small group of peers at a college biology camp by a teacher. It has always remained a special book for me because of his wonderful rendition of the story.

Plus I love the environmental message.


El’s favourite:

The lamb who came for dinner / Smallman, Steve

This story makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside whenever I read it.


Emma’s favourite:

The bear who wasn’t there / Pham, LeUyen

I like it because it’s as funny for adults as it is for kids (probably for slightly older kids like 8+), and there’s lots of different characters which you can do all sorts of voices for, and it gets meta and it’s just great!


Jonno’s favourite:

Bark, George / Feiffer, Jules

This book is the greatest thing put to paper since the Dead Sea Scrolls. It is a delightful book with so many hilarious moments, plot twists, and animal sounds, that kids are rapt by it.


Kath’s favourite:

The legend of rock paper scissors / Daywalt, Drew

This book has the best illustrations, and made me laugh out loud when I read it. When I read it to kids, they love the battle scenes and I always have fun giving the characters voices. I wish I could have posters of the illustrations!


Mary’s favourite:

Dr. Seuss’s sleep book. / Seuss

A favourite from my childhood! I love all the illustrations, all the funny creatures, and how you can choose your favourite creature on each page. Dr. Seuss is great at rhyming so it’s easy to read aloud, and at the end of the book you’re told to turn off your light and go to sleep which is a great hint!


Sandy’s favourite:

Supermarket, zoopermarket : a fun flap book / Sharratt, Nick

I am a great fan of Nick Sharratt, both because of his delightful and quirky illustrations in collaboration with others but also his own picture books. One that gets the attention of both children and adults at story time is a lift the flap ‘Supermarket Zoopermarket’. Very funny and a delightful play with words. Snappetizing…crocolate drops. I bet you can guess what they are. Crazy Crisps …Salt and Fin-egar crisps…fangtastic flavour.


Sara’s favourite:

Winnie the witch / Thomas, Valerie

Who could fail to be charmed by Winnie and her black cat Wilbur?  The adventures they have! The fun and the scrapes and the quirky naughtiness appeal to kids and grownups alike.


Stephen’s favourite:

The book with no pictures / Novak, B. J.

We know, we know, a picture book with no pictures in it! But trust us, this is one book you will definitely want to hear read aloud!


Te Atawhai’s favourite:

Pete the cat and his magic sunglasses / Dean, James

Such a fun, groovy read! Always in a good mood after reading Pete the Cat!


Tessa’s favourite:

The great white man-eating shark : a cautionary tale / Mahy, Margaret

I love the illustrations (especially Norvin’s shifty eyes), I love when Norvin gets his comeuppance and most importantly, I love Sharks!


When you’re around books all day, every day, it can be hard to pick just one favourite. Particularly when there are so many good books out there! One librarian couldn’t narrow it down to just one picture book, so here are her top picks.

Sue’s picks:

The black book of colours / Cottin, Menena

Such expressive language. A great one to get your audience to shut their eyes to. Makes for a good segue into discussions about disability etc with smaller children.

Nicketty-nacketty, noo-noo-noo / Cowley, Joy

A great rhyming read, and I love it that the wee wishy woman sticks it to the giant. Yay!  One for the underdogs!

Along came a different / McLaughlin, Tom

Bright and colourful, and another fun read that teaches tolerance (and shapes while you’re at it!)

Love you forever / Munsch, Robert N.

I first heard this book read by a grandchild at her nana’s funeral, and it’s made me cry ever since. All about a mother’s love. It got read to my children A LOT!

We’re going on a bear hunt / Rosen, Michael

A classic! Did you know that this can successfully be acted out to Edvard Grieg’s music “In the Hall of the Mountain King”?!


Now you’ve seen our favourite picture books, what do you think? Have you read any of them, or do you want to read any of them? And what’s your favourite picture book?