Te Wiki Kaumātua – Across Generations

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Image: Piqsels public domain photography

Seniors Week 2021 (Te Wiki Kaumātua) is from 1 – 8 October. This year’s theme is “Across Generations” which is focusing on ways to connect people from all generations and backgrounds around Wellington. the start date for Seniors’ Week is significant too as 1 October is International Day of Older Persons.

Do you have elderly grandparents or great-grandparents, or even an elderly neighbour you can connect with? Maybe you could record their stories to help keep their traditions alive. Our Kaumātua are a rich treasure house of lifetime experiences that are hugely significant. They are our history. This week is a great opportunity to listen to their stories, learn something about their experiences, and reconnect with them.

In Māori culture, Kaumātua are held in very high esteem.  They have a variety of roles in their whānau (wider family), hapū (sub-tribe) and iwi (tribe):

  • Being the storehouses of tribal knowledge and traditions
  • Acting as guardians of tikanga (Māori customs)
  • Nurturing children – traditionally kaumātua looked after children while their parents worked or went away to fight, and often brought up the first grandchild
  • Providing leadership
  • Helping resolve disputes.

If you want to explore your family history further, Wellington City Libraries have some great databases that can be accessed using your library card. Just jump onto the Hītori / History page HERE


Why not immerse yourself in some books featuring elders:

What’s happening to grandpa? / Shriver, Maria
“Kate has always adored her grandpa’s storytelling – but lately he’s been repeating the same stories again and again. One day he even forgets Kate’s name. Her mother’s patient explanations open Kate’s eyes to what so many of the elderly must confront: Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of memory loss. With special insight derived from her own father’s struggle with Alzheimer’s, Maria Shriver offers a touching and optimistic story that encourages awareness, acceptance, and dialogue among family and friends.” (Catalogue)
Wrinkles / JR
“This first-ever picture book by internationally acclaimed artist-photographer JR allows young readers to consider the lives and stories of the older people around them. Memories, experiences, and emotions are touched on in a welcoming way, creating the perfect conversation-starter between children and their elders. Evocative black-and-white photographs of faces and simple, poignant read-aloud text consider the literal and lyrical meaning of wrinkles, leaving readers of all ages with a well-justified appreciation of aging and natural beauty.” (Catalogue)

A plan for Pops / Smith, Heather
“In this illustrated picture book, a child helps their grandparents deal with a difficult change in abilities.” (Catalogue)
The lines on Nana’s face / Ciraolo, Simona
“It’s granny’s birthday, but her little granddaughter wonders why, because of the lines on her face, she looks so worried! But they are simply wrinkles, and grandma is very fond of her lines because they are where she keeps her memories.” (Catalogue)
My nanna is a ninja / Young, Damon
“All nannas are different. But what if your nanna was really different? What if your nanna was a ninja?”(Catalogue)
A hat for Mrs. Goldman : a story about knitting and love / Edwards, Michelle
“Sophia knits a special hat for her elderly neighbour and knitting teacher, Mrs. Goldman. When Sophia was a baby, Mrs. Goldman knitted a tiny baby hat to keep her warm. Last year, she taught Sophia how to knit. Now Sophia wants to knit a special hat for Mrs. Goldman. And she wants to do it all by herself!” (Catalogue)
Birdsong / Flett, Julie
“When a young girl moves from the country to a small town, she feels lonely and out of place. But soon she meets an elderly woman next door, who shares her love of nature and art. As the seasons change, can the girl navigate the failing health of her new friend? Acclaimed author and artist Julie Flett’s textured images of birds, flowers, art, and landscapes bring vibrancy and warmth to this powerful story, which highlights the fulfilment of intergenerational relationships and shared passions.” (Catalogue)

Love you forever / Munsch, Robert N.
“Robert Munsch’s beloved tale is gentle affirmation of the love a parent feels for her child — forever. Nurtured by the unconditional love of his parent, a boy grows happily through the stages of childhood to become, in turn, a loving adult.” (Catalogue)
Whakarongo ki o Tupuna = Listen to your ancestors / Darryn, Joseph
“As a wise teacher grows older, she encourages her students to learn from the example of famous ancestors. She gives the next generation simple messages of days gone by: getting out into nature, letting go of anger, anxiety and stress, and standing strong and tall” (Catalogue)

Kids’ Club Review by Hazel: Gangsta Granny

Gangsta Granny, by David Walliams

I thought this story was adventurous and sad. This story is about a boy called Ben and his boring Granny that smells like cabbage . Ben figured out that his Granny is a gangsta and they plan to steal the crown jewels. There is a sad twist at the end so if you want to know the rest of the story READ THIS BOOK!!!!!!!! =)=)=)=)

5 stars

Reviewed by Hazel from Tawa, 9 years old

Some great new kids fiction for Term 2!

Term 2 is well under way, so take some time to sit back, relax and enjoy some of these fantastic new kids fiction books available through your local library!

 

 

Stanley will probably be fine by Sally J Pla

After fainting during a school assembly, Stanley uses his time in a safe room to begin drawing a comic book superhero and then enters a treasure hunt so that he can win passes to Comic Fest.

 

 

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsStonebird  By Mike Revell

When ten-year-old Liam moves house to be closer to his dementia-suffering grandma, he’s thrown into an unfamiliar place, with a family that seems to be falling apart. Liam doesn’t remember what his grandma was like before she became ill. He only knows the witch-like old woman who snaps and snarls and eats her birthday cards. He wants to fix it, but he can’t. Walking his dog one day, Liam discovers an old stone gargoyle in a rundown church, and his life changes in impossible ways. The gargoyle is alive. It moves unseen in the night, acting out Liam’s stories. And stories can be dangerous things…Seeking revenge against the bullies at his new school, Liam tells a story about the gargoyle attacking them. When one of them ends up in hospital, a regretful Liam vows never to go near the gargoyle again. But his grandma’s illness is getting worse, his mum isn’t coping, and his sister is skipping school…What if the gargoyle is the only thing that can save Liam’s family?

 

 

The wishmakers by Tyler Whitesides

Ace unwittingly releases a genie from a peanut butter jar and gets unlimited wishes that he must learn to use with their consequences before all the world’s cats and dogs turn into zombies who will eat mankind.

 

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsThe short but brilliant career of Lucas Weed by Chrissie Walker

“Lucas Weed hasn’t really made any friends at his new school, so when the ‘cool kids’ suggest he carry out a prank in class, Lucas thinks it might be his path to being accepted. And when the pranks keep getting more and more outrageous – and with videos uploaded to YouTube – Lucas Weed’s popularity soars! But after an embarrassing stunt that doesn’t quite go according to plan – in front of a very important person – Lucas decides it’s time to call it a day. But how?”–Publisher information.

 

 

Nothings fair in fifth grade by Barthe De Clements

A fifth grade class, repelled by the overweight new student who has serious home problems, finally learns to accept her.

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsCave bear mountain by Jo Sandhu

At Cave Bear Mountain, Tarin is given tragic news about his Clan, and wants to return to them immediately. But Kaija and Luuka have discovered an astonishing truth about their mother. It seems the friends will be divided. But when the wolf cubs are kidnapped to fight in the Bear Festival. Only together will they have a chance of saving them.

 

 

Star friends: Secret spell by Linda Chapman

“Do you believe in magic? Maia and her friends do! And when they meet the Star Animals, a whole world of magical adventure unfolds. Lottie and her star animal, a squirrel called Juniper, must use their special powers to stop the forces of dark magic. Someone in the village is using dark magic and the Star Friends need to work together to figure it out who it is. But things keep going wrong! Sita is convinced a Shade is following her, Lottie is sure she’s going to fail her piano exam and Ionie thinks the others don’t want to be her friends. Only Maia seems her usual self. She needs to find out what is happening and how to stop it! Perfect for fans of My Secret Unicorn and The Rescue Princesses, and for Rainbow Magic readers looking to move on to a more challenging adventure.” –Publisher description.

 

Wings of fire; a winglets collection by Tui T Sutherland

“In Pyrrhia, every dragon has a story … Before the dragonets, beyond the war of the SandWing queens — the dragons of Pyrrhia each have their own story to tell. Like Fierceteeth, stuck in a SandWing prison, obsessed and full of thwarted ambition. Deathbringer, at the very beginning of his journey, desperate to prove himself. And Six-Claws, a loyal SandWing who will soon find out that loyalty comes with a price. Fly further into the dangerous territories of Pyrrhia than ever before to learn the secrets behind Wings of fire”.

Kids’ Club Review by Luke: Grandad’s wheelies

Grandad's wheeliesGrandad’s wheelies, by Jack Lasenby

Jack loves to visit his grandparents as they have great stories. For example, his granddad claims to have dug to China. I liked this story as it is based in NZ and is funny, easy to read, and his grandparents are very likeable. Children 6+ would really enjoy reading this book.

4 stars

Reviewed by Luke from Karori and Karori Normal School , 12 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Anna: Grandad’s wheelies

Grandad's wheeliesGrandad’s wheelies, by Jack Lasenby

This is a NZ book about a granddad and grannie who make up lots of great stories for Jack. I really enjoyed reading this book because it was funny, a bit crazy, and entertaining. I think children 6+ would like it.

5 stars

Reviewed by Anna from Karori and Karori Normal School , 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Edward: Grandad’s guitar

Grandad's guitarGrandad’s guitar, by Janine McVeagh (1946-)

I thought it was cool because they travelled all over the world with grandad’s guitar. I wondered what was going to happen when it went out to sea in a storm.

3 stars

Reviewed by Edward from Cummings Park and Ngaio School , 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by elena: Grandad’s Guitar

Grandad’s Guitar, by Janine McVeagh & Fifi Colston

I thought it was a very touching story with a deeper meaning than I thought it would have. It was very moralistic when Kahu accepted the guitar and the full story that came with it.

3 stars

Reviewed by elena from Miramar and Miramar Christian School , 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Erica: Gangsta granny

Gangsta grannyGangsta granny, by David Walliams (1971-)

This is a great book. It’s a really exciting book about a boy who doesn’t like his cabbage smelling Granny. But Granny isn’t just an ordinary Granny…she’s pretty amazing. In this book she gets to meet the Queen and tells the boy (Ben) she has been lying to him about stealing jewels all this time.
I would highly recommend this book for 8+ boy or girl who likes adventures

5 stars

Reviewed by Erica  from Miramar and Seatoun School , 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by ngaio: Gangsta granny

Gangsta grannyGangsta granny, by David Walliams (1971-)

i think gangsta granny is awesome. it is about a boy who has parents that are never paying attention to there son. every friday night he goes to stay with his granny. he thinks she is boring but she is actually a jewel theif. but she is just faking.
i would recommend this book to people who like a variety of things in books.

5 stars

Reviewed by ngaio from Newtown and Berhampore School , 9 years old