Tūhono 2022: We Want Your Poems!

Tūhono, Wellington City Libraries’ poetry journal for children and teens, is now open for submissions! Until December 14th, we will be accepting submissions of poetry from young writers aged 5 – 18 in Wellington City. In previous years we have published more than 200 young poets in Tūhono — so this year we’ll again be splitting it into two books, one for kids and one for teens.

Enter here!

Click this button to enter!

Unlike some other poetry journals, having your work accepted in Tūhono is not a competition — as long as you follow the rules of submission, every piece of work that gets sent to us will be published. Tūhono itself — the collection of poetry from young people all over Wellington — will be published as an eBook on OverDrive, and in a limited print run for our libraries, so that everyone with a library card can borrow it and bask in your talent and glory! Check out previous editions of Tūhono on our catalogue here.

Let your poetic thoughts take wing!

Here is all the information you need in order to submit a poem for inclusion in Tūhono 2022:

When?

  • Submissions are open from 1 November – 14 December 2022.
  • The journal will be published and available to borrow from the library in early 2023.

Where?

Who?

  • Anyone between the ages of 5 and 18 who lives in the Wellington region may participate.
  • You may submit as an individual or as a group.

What?

  • Theme: We want you to write a poem on the theme of “Whakangā | Breath.” Whakangā refers to the taking in of breath, or to the process of breathing. It also calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; taking a breath to create calm; taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be.Exactly what you write about in relation to this theme is up to you. You could write a poem about times when you feel calm or things that help you to feel relaxed; or, you could write about things or feelings you experience when you might feel the need to whakangā.We recommend you look up the definitions of the words ‘whakangā‘ and ‘breath‘ in a dictionary to find out all the hidden meanings before you start writing. They don’t mean exactly the same thing — and that is intentional, to give you a wider range of stuff to write about. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!
  • Length: Your poem should not be longer than one A4 page typed, with size 12 font and 1.5 line spacing. Only one poem per person will be accepted.
  • Language: Your poem may be written in English or te reo Māori.

Why?

  • We want to give all young people in Wellington the opportunity to have their work published on an accessible platform. We think everyone deserves a platform and the chance to see something they created be part of the library’s collection, alongside all the other great authors and poets represented on our shelves. Tūhono aims to be a uniquely Wellington collection of writing, capturing the thoughts and emotions of kids and teens from all over the city and region across time. We consider ourselves lucky to be able to provide this platform for your creativity to take wing.

Throughout the month of November, we will be posting regular updates on this blog providing inspiration for your writing — so keep your eyes peeled! If you would like more information about Tūhono, you are more than welcome to contact the editors here. Happy writing, everyone!

International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People

On 29th November 1977 the United Nations created the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People. This day is to remind people that even though the Palestinians didn’t agree to the creation of the state of Israel in 1948 they still have human rights; the right to decide where they live, where they travel and who their government is.  Both Israelis and Palestinians have the right to live in peace. The hope of the United Nations is to build a future of peace.

In 1948 when Israel was created around 750,000 Palestinians were forced to leave their homes and become refugees (Source: United Nations). This number has grown since then and there are now more than 13 million Palestinian people in the world (Source: IMEMC). Palestinian people speak Arabic, Hebrew, English, and other varieties of Arabic. You may know Palestinian people who live in Wellington or greater New Zealand who arrived here as former refugees.

If you want to read more about Palestine, Palestinians and Israel you could look up these interactive resources:

Many famous writers and poets come from Palestine. Some of these writers are; Mahmoud Darwish, Naomi Shihab Nye and Ghassan Kanafani.

Check out the books about Palestine or by Palestinian authors in our collection. (Remember joining the library is free and if there are some books you would like us to buy you can suggest them to us: Suggestions to Buy Library Items (wcl.govt.nz)

The turtle of Oman : a novel / Nye, Naomi Shihab
“When Aref, a third-grader who lives in Muscat, Oman, refuses to pack his suitcase and prepare to move to Michigan, his mother asks for help from his grandfather, his Sidi, who takes Aref around the country, storing up memories he can carry with him to a new home.” (Catalogue)

Three wishes : Palestinian and Israeli children speak / Ellis, Deborah
“Interviews with Palestinian and Israeli children examine how the war in the Middle East has affected their lives.” (Catalogue) This book is for older children 10+

Tasting the sky : a Palestinian childhood / Barakat, Ibtisam
“When a war ends it does not go away, my mother says. It hides inside us . . . Just forget. But I do not want to do what Mother says . . . I want to remember. In this groundbreaking memoir set in Ramallah during the aftermath of the 1967 Six-Day War, Ibtisam Barakat captures what it is like to be a child whose world is shattered by war.” (Adapted from Catalogue) This book is for older children 10+

A little piece of ground / Laird, Elizabeth
“Twelve-year-old Karim Aboudi and his family are trapped in their Ramallah home by a strict curfew. Israeli tanks control the city in response to a Palestinian suicide bombing. Karim longs to play football outside with his friends. But in this city there’s constant danger. Ages 10+” (Catalogue)

Milet mini picture dictionary : English-Arabic / Turhan, Sedat
“Introduces key English and Arabic words for plants, animals, shapes, food, and other common items.” (Catalogue)

My first book of Arabic words / Kudela, Katy R
“Simple text paired with themed photos invite the reader to learn to speak Arabic.” (Catalogue)

Israel and Palestine / Gallagher, Michael
“This series is a fascinating and informative look at the historical background to world trouble spots. Each title is packed with details, photographs and maps. Ages 10-16.” (Catalogue)

Israel and Palestine / Mason, Paul
“An informed, unbiased review of some of the world’s major conflict zones Global Hot Spots aims to fill in the facts behind the headlines, developing students’ understanding of the historical context of the events they see on TV. It provides accounts of real-life experiences and looks at ‘how history was made’ in these conflict zones.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono: Poets Among Us

Kia ora aspiring poets, and up-and-coming sonneteers! Tūhono, Wellington City Libraries’ poetry journal for children and teens, is now open for submissions until 14 December!

This gives you a little more time to write a poem, and send us your creations! We have loved reading all the wonderful poems sent into us so far!

This year, the theme is “Whakangā | Breath.” Whakangā refers to the taking in of breath, or to the process of breathing. It also calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; taking a breath to create calm; taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be.

Enter here!

Click this button to enter!

Unlike some other poetry journals, having your work accepted in Tūhono is not a competition — as long as you follow the rules of submission, every piece of work that gets sent to us will be published. Tūhono itself — the collection of poetry from young people all over Wellington — will be published as an eBook on OverDrive, and in a limited print run for our libraries, so that everyone with a library card can borrow it and bask in your talent and glory! Check out previous editions of Tūhono on our catalogue here.

Last blog, we shared some of the awesome poems from 2020, so for this one, we’ll turn to some of the incredible works from 2021! Here’s a few of our favourites!

  1. Alone Tiana

Alone poem image

Alone

Alone can taste like a sour lolly

Alone can feel like a bee stinging

Alone can sound like a roar of laughter

Alone looks like nothing

Alone can smell like the only clean sock 

in a wash basket of smelly socks.

Tiana 

 

2.  The Run — Vanessa 

The Run poem image

The run

Goosebumps fled, screaming up my arms

Promptly refusing to hold 

The inevitable droopy puddles

Belonging to my raw feet.

 

Muttering silent cries of regret 

Our class crept up up the road 

As silent as a spider hunting its prey

Shadows flickered in the shallow light

Of the nervous moon 

 

Gravel crunched beneath my shaking feet

Like snapping sticks

We started, clinging tightly together 

As we descended

Down the winding wave of shadows

 

Tall trees loomed threateningly

Over our scrawny group.

A splash was followed closely 

By angry curses up ahead

 

Head torches snapped on

Bobbing up and down like giddy fireflies

While the rain started drizzling down leisurely

 

Centuries later

Soaked, sweaty, and thoroughly mud splattered

We turned around and headed home.

Half way done.

Vanessa

 

3. The Forgotten Lake — Quinn 

The Forgotten Lake

The forgotten lake

My shaking  reflection in the mucky water 

This water used to be clear and beautiful now you can barely see the bottom

The smell of all the trash smells like slaughter

The lake is so rotten and filthy it has become forgotten

Quinn

4. Guen 

Guen poem

Guen 

My name is Guen 

My hair is yellow and blue, wet like rain 

My eyes are orange and big like an elephant 

My smile is funny and tall like a flower garden 

My laugh is white like a keyboard 

My shirt is purple like Shirley 

The sky is purple like tissues 

And I am soft like a puppy 

Guen

 

 

 

 

 

The Summer Reading Adventure for Kids: A Sneak Preview

Read books, explore the city, win prizes!

The Summer Reading Adventure for Kids runs from 1 December 2022 – 31 January 2023 for children aged 5-13. Read books; write, draw or film reviews; and complete quests to earn all kinds of awesome goodies — and you’ll still be home in time for tea! Adults and teens can also take part in their own Summer Reading Adventures — read our News blog for all the info.

Pick up the Adventurer’s Guide from your local library and visit our Summer Reading Adventure website to pre-register and start logging your reading and adventures today.

Read on to find out more!

Continue reading

Tūhono – Dazzling Poems by You!

Tūhono display photo

A beautiful Tūhono display at Cummings Park Library

Exciting times — until December 14th, you can submit your poem for Tūhono 2022, our poetry journal for children and teens in Wellington, Te Whanganui-a-Tara. We’ve already seen some amazing poems come through!

This year, the theme is “Whakangā | Breath.” Whakangā refers to the taking in of breath, or to the process of breathing. It also calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; taking a breath to create calm; taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be.

To help give you some inspiration, we thought we would share again with you some of our favourite poems from Tūhono 2020. Read on, and prepare to be blown away!

1. My Butterfly Journey — Ronan, age 5

Full text of poem written below.
My Butterfly Journey

I can’t move
I’m in a chrysalis
I will have butterfly powers when I come out

I will go where the butterflies go
I will lay eggs
Then I will die

The caterpillar will do the journey back home

— Ronan, age 5

2. The Verselet Tree — Amelia, age 9

Full text of poem is written below.
The Verselet Tree

Wise, knowing and smart,
When I sit beneath you I feel safe,
warm and comforted this feeling makes
me want to drift off in a slow and
steady sleep,
but before I do, a thought comes to my
mind,
the thought grows as I sleep,
When I wake the thought has formed
into a poem.
As I wander home,
I think of the poem and decide to write
it down,
And then I will go back and get
another poem from you.

— Amelia, age 9

3. Connection — Jericho, age 11

Full text of poem is written below.
Connection

I have a connection to music,
as if it’s part of my life,
as it follows the beat of my heart,
over and over again.
It lives deep inside me,
it burns inside my heart,
as an eternal flame,
raging on inside of me.
It shocks my soul,
It runs thru my body,
It harmonises my life,
As if when I listen to it
all fear and pain go away.
Music electrifies my very existence.

— Jericho, age 11

4. Connected — Pemma, age 12

Full text of poem is written below.
Connected

A thread, a rope,
The invisible link between us all,
Connected by soul,
The whispering call.

Shining stars twinkle above,
Our ancestors watching,
With the eye of the crescent moon.

Nature’s melody,
The sweet birds,
Our link with Papatūānuku
Has always been heard.

A thread, a rope,
A quiet trail,
Linked together, connected.

— Pemma, age 12

5. Little One — Rajvi, age 5

Full text of the poem is written below
Little One

Go to sleep little one
no need to cry
we will be there for you forever ……
oh my baby
go to sleep little one ….
O ho ho ……
Just go to sleep little one

— Rajvi, age 5 (written on 15/10/20 for her younger brother, born on 11/10/20)


Tūhono on the shelves & the web!

Be sure to check out our poetry collections at your local library branch! You can find Tūhono 2020 & 2021 on the catalogue as physcial books, and as ebooks on Overdrive/Libby.

Tūhono. a journal of poetry by Wellington children / 2021
“Whakaata : reflection. This theme links all of the poems in this second edition of Tūhono, which were contributed by young Wellington poets aged 5-12 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout October and November 2021. Poems by writers aged 13-18 are collected in a separate volume. The year 2021 provided us all with plenty of opportunities to reflect. What’s really important? What falls by the wayside when times are tough? What do you see looking back at you when you gain the courage to hold the mirror up to the light? Anxious, loving, hopeful, angry, quirky, imagistic, insular, exuberant – these poems are a kaleidoscope. At one end we put in our certainties and our questions, our need to understand and to express. As for what we see at the other end? Well, you’re reading it. WCL would like to thank Kimi Ora School for generously providing beautiful artworks created by their students to accompany their poems.”–Overdrive catalogue.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono. a journal of poetry by children and teens / 2020 
“Tūhono : connection. This is the theme that binds together all 197 poems you are about to read, which were contributed by young Wellington writers aged 5-18 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout the month of November 2020. The year 2020 was challenging for many people. Some had to spend time apart from their friends and the people they love. Some had to find ways to live with uncertainty and the sense that everything might not be okay in the world. But taken together, these poems represent a constellation of thoughts, ideas, worries, anxieties, hopes, loves, and dreams about how we find ways to connect, even in the face of adversity.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono: A journal of poetry by Wellington children / 2021 (eBook via Libby/Overdrive)
“Whakaata : reflection. This theme links all of the poems in this second edition of Tūhono, which were contributed by young Wellington poets aged 5-12 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout October and November 2021. Poems by writers aged 13-18 are collected in a separate volume.

The year 2021 provided us all with plenty of opportunities to reflect. What’s really important? What falls by the wayside when times are tough? What do you see looking back at you when you gain the courage to hold the mirror up to the light? Anxious, loving, hopeful, angry, quirky, imagistic, insular, exuberant – these poems are a kaleidoscope. At one end we put in our certainties and our questions, our need to understand and to express. As for what we see at the other end? Well, you’re reading it.

WCL would like to thank Kimi Ora School for generously providing beautiful artworks created by their students to accompany their poems.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono. a journal of poetry by children and teens / 2020
“Tūhono : connection. This is the theme that binds together all 197 poems you are about to read, which were contributed by young Wellington writers aged 5-18 and collected by Wellington City Libraries throughout the month of November 2020. The year 2020 was challenging for many people. Some had to spend time apart from their friends and the people they love. Some had to find ways to live with uncertainty and the sense that everything might not be okay in the world. But taken together, these poems represent a constellation of thoughts, ideas, worries, anxieties, hopes, loves, and dreams about how we find ways to connect, even in the face of adversity.” (Catalogue)

What’s On for Kids in the CBD?

Warning: This blog post is intended for parents and caregivers — kids read on at your peril!

Kia ora folks! As we hurtle towards the summer, a lot more families will be heading into the city centre to visit the waterfront, go shopping, explore the city streets, and perhaps even visit one of our three CBD libraries! And if you’re coming into the city with a child in tow, what could be a nicer thing to do than join one of our wonderful city centre librarians for a lovely Preschool Storytime or Baby Rock and Rhyme session? Read on to find out more about when and where you can expect to find something to do with your preschooler in the central city.


Te Awe Library

A spooktacular Halloween display in the kids’ area at Te Awe Library.

Te Awe Library is our largest CBD library, located between Brandon Street and Panama Street, just off Lambton Quay. At Te Awe, you can find a huge children’s section, lots of cosy nooks to curl up and read in, free bookable meeting rooms, as well as a big collection of books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, and even vinyl records for adults and children alike to browse — and don’t forget the excellent Collective Coffee Shop is located conveniently within the library for a great way to start the day with your tamariki!

What’s on for tamariki at Te Awe?

  • Preschool StorytimeWednesdays at 10.30am (new time!)
    Fun and interactive stories, songs, and rhymes to inspire your preschooler and grow a love of literacy. Through stories and play, children learn how to express themselves and understand the world around them. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
  • Baby Rock and RhymeMondays at 2.00pm and Thursdays at 10.30am
    Join us for these fun and free sessions for parents and carers to interact with their babies through songs and stories. Rhyme, rhythm, repetition and music are the building blocks of language for babies. Recommended for pēpī aged 0-2 with their caregivers.
  • Monthly Mandarin StorytimesFirst Tuesday of the month at 10.30am
    Regular Mandarin storytimes are starting up again! Join us for these special bilingual events run by our talented staff and learn more about Chinese story, music, and culture. All are welcome, whether or not you speak Mandarin as your first language. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
    普通话讲故事时间。提亚威 图书馆 上午10.30—11am。 每个月的第一个周二。
    互动和有趣的故事和童谣时间,激发儿童对文学的热爱。通过故事和玩耍,儿童会学习自我表述, 并了周围的世界。
    建议2-4岁儿童和家长参加。免费。
  • LEGO® TimeSaturdays at 2.00pm and Sundays at 11.00am
    Come down to the library and get creative in these free-build sessions with our extensive LEGO® collections. Builders of all ages and experience levels are welcome to get stuck in! Recommended for tamariki, rangatahi, and pākeke aged 5+. Children under the age of 14 should be accompanied by a caregiver.

How to get to Te Awe

All CBD buses go past Te Awe Library — get off at the Lambton Central stops by David Jones for easy access to the library via Panama Street. Free bike parking is available on Grey Street, and paid street parking is available on Panama and Brandon Streets. Visit this link for directions to Te Awe Library from your current location.


Arapaki Library

A beautiful display at Arapaki Library in celebration of Diwali 2022.

Arapaki Library is located on Manners St, perfect for families who live in the city centre or who travel through for work or school. At Arapaki, you can find a great selection of kids’ books, as well as books in a variety of community languages, including Korean, Japanese, French, Russian, Persian and Spanish.

What’s on for tamariki at Arapaki?

  • Preschool Storytime — Thursdays at 10.30am
    Fun and interactive stories, songs, and rhymes to inspire your preschooler and grow a love of literacy. Through stories and play, children learn how to express themselves and understand the world around them. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
    Our storytimes at Arapaki are very popular with local preschools, but all are welcome to join in on the fun!

How to get to Arapaki

Like Te Awe, all CBD bus routes go directly past Arapaki Library — get off at the Manners Street at Willis Street stop if you’re coming from the Courtenay Place end of town, or at the Manners Street at Cuba Street stop if you’re coming from the railway station end of town. Limited paid parking is available near the library on Victoria Street or Willis Street. Visit this link for directions to Arapaki Library from your current location.


He Matapihi Library

A lovely Pride display from the team at He Matapihi Library, in the small amphitheatre used for events.

Our smallest CBD location, He Matapihi Library is located on Molesworth Street, on the ground floor of the National Library building. He Matapihi’s unique collection contains only books written by New Zealand authors, with a special focus on books of significance to Māori as well as to Wellingtonians specifically. With the wonderful Home Cafe right next door, He Matapihi is the perfect spot for families to chill out together!

What’s on for tamariki at He Matapihi?

  • Preschool StorytimeMondays at 10.30am
    Fun and interactive stories, songs, and rhymes to inspire your preschooler and grow a love of literacy. Through stories and play, children learn how to express themselves and understand the world around them. Recommended for tamariki aged 2-4 with their caregivers.
  • Craftivity — Saturdays at 10.30am
    Bust the indoor boredom and join us for free arts and crafts for kids at the library! Our talented staff are full of ideas, and we can’t wait to see yours! This is a guaranteed fun time for tamariki and the whole whānau to enjoy together. Recommended for tamariki aged 4+ with their caregivers.

How to get to He Matapihi

The Library is in walking distance of Wellington Railway Station — get off at Wellington Station and turn right up Molesworth Street. For bus users, the 14 and 22 are regular services that go via the library — get off at the Molesworth Street – Cathedral stop. Otherwise, paid parking is available near the library on Molesworth Street and Aitken Street. Visit this link for directions to He Matapihi Library from your current location.

Go The Ferns! Aotearoa Women’s Sports Teams in the Spotlight


With the Black Ferns currently playing in the Rugby World Cup, and the Football Ferns soon to kick off in the 2023 Fifa Women’s Football World Cup, we thought we’d train the spotlight onto our amazing NZ female sports teams that are shining bright and creating sporting history! You’ll also notice a trend with the naming of our national women’s teams – most names incorporate a variation of the silver fern – an emblem that has become synonymous with New Zealand athletes and sports teams.

The Black Ferns – New Zealand women’s rugby team

New Zealand women's national rugby union team - Wikipedia

New Zealand women’s national rugby union team logo

The Black Ferns are New Zealand’s senior women’s rugby team and have a world ranking of #2 with World Cup titles in 1998, 2002 2006, 2010 and 2017; and they will be playing in the Finals of World Cup as I type! The Black Ferns became the first women’s team to ever be named the World Rugby Team of the Year in 2019.

[NOTE: The Black Ferns and All Blacks play Rugby Union, which is a slightly different game to Rugby League.The NZ women’s Rugby League team is called the Kiwi Ferns]

Rugby World Cup 2021 – There’s a heap of firsts at this tournament.

This is the first time the women’s version of the Rugby World Cup will be played in New Zealand, and in the Southern Hemisphere. And it’s the first World Cup tournament to go ahead since the Covid-19 pandemic began (this event was delayed a year, and why it’s still called RWC2021).

It’s also the first time it won’t be called the Women’s Rugby World Cup. Just the Rugby World Cup – the same name as the men’s tournament.

It’s also the first time poi are handed out free to everyone attending the games – part of the Wā Poi (It’s Poi Time) movement to get the crowd twirling poi to support the teams.

The Football Ferns – New Zealand women’s football team

NZ Football - HOME

NZ Football logo

The New Zealand women’s national football team,  the Football Ferns, is governed by New Zealand Football (NZF). The New Zealand national team qualified for the 2007 FIFA Women’s World Cup, held in China in September 2007. This was their first World Cup in 16 years, and the second since their 1975 debut in international competition. Because  New Zealand is co-host the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup alongside Australia, the Football Ferns automatically qualify as co-host.

The Silver Ferns – New Zealand women’s netball team

New Zealand national netball team - Wikipedia

New Zealand national netball team logo

The Silver Ferns have won the Netball World Cup five times (in 1967, 1979, 1987, 2003 and 2019), and have won the netball gold medal at the Commonwealth Games twice (in 2006 and 2010).

Netball has been played in New Zealand since 1906. It is the most popular female sport in New Zealand. It was originally called women’s basketball and was played outside on grass courts. Players wore full-length skirts, hats, blouses and shoes. The net was a basket, closed at one end, so the referee had to clamber up and retrieve the ball after each goal! It was not until 1970 that the sport became officially known as netball in New Zealand. Today’s netball is fast-paced, physical and usually played on asphalt or indoor courts.

Even now, it is changing fast, with Fast5 Netball World Series taking place in Christchurch in November 2022. Fast5 is a variation of netball using only five players (regular netball has seven players a side) and features shortened games and goals worth multiple points.

The White Ferns – New Zealand women’s cricket team

New Zealand women's national cricket team - Wikipedia

New Zealand women’s national cricket team logo

The NZ women’s cricket team make its test cricket debut in 1935 against England.  In 1973 the first Women’s Cricket World Cup took place. The White Ferns are one of only three teams (NZ, England and Australia) to have participated in all ten editions of this tournament, winning in 2000 and making it to the finals on four occasions.

In 1992 The national women’s team was named the White Ferns at the same time as the men became the Blackcaps.

The Tall Ferns – New Zealand women’s basketball team

See the source image

New Zealand women’s national basketball team logo

Both national sides (the Tall Ferns – women, and the Tall Blacks – men) made their Olympic debuts in 2000 at Sydney. And both teams won silver medals in the 2006 Commonwealth Games. The Tall Ferns then qualified for their third successive Olympics in 2008 at Beijing, but didn’t qualify for the 2016 and 2020 Olympics (which were held in Tokyo in 2021).

The Black Sticks – New Zealand women’s hockey team

See the source image

New Zealand Black Sticks Hockey team logo

Modern hockey emerged in England in the second half of the 19th century. Women played hockey from the 1880s, with a women’s inter-provincial match held in 1899. Hockey was the first team sport played at international level by New Zealand women, who competed against a touring English women’s team in 1914. From the 2000s both the national men’s and women’s teams are known as the Black Sticks.


Get your game-face on and check out these books about some of the world’s amazing women athletes and the sport they play:

Stacey Waaka : world champion rugby player / Riley, David
“Follows Stacey’s journey from Ruatoki to the rugby stadiums of the world. Read about some of the many challenges she’s been through, including a terrifying bus crash, and how she overcame them. Find out how her faith, family, friends, coaches, teachers and culture have guided and powered her to aim high in life”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Netball / Gifford, Clive
“Build your netball skills with the Sports Academy series. Looking to take up a new sport? Or just thinking about ways to keep fit and healthy? This book is a great introduction to all the important netball skills you’ll need. Full of skills tips and illustrations showing key techniques, you’ll discover everything- from offence to defence. The series Sports Academy covers rules, equipment and major competitions through specially commissioned, step-by-step illustrations that clearly shows skills and techniques needed for a sport.” (Catalogue)

The ultimate guide to women’s football / Thorpe, Yvonne
“Dip into this fun, fact-packed book to discover the best of women’s football, from the world’s top leagues, players and competitions to awe-inspiring goals, dazzling skills and memorable celebrations. Football is fast becoming the top participation sport for women in the UK, with almost three million active players. With the next Women’s World Cup just around the corner in June 2019, The Ultimate Guide to Women’s Football offers young readers a great way into the game and provides practical advice on how they can start playing the beautiful game themselves. A perfect read for football fans aged 8 and up.” (Catalogue)

She shoots, she scores / Clarke, Catriona
“She Shoots, She Scores! tells the empowering story of how women’s football has become one of the fastest-growing sports in the world.  Young football fans will discover how the early female players overcame prejudice to set up their own teams, and read the compelling stories of players who beat the odds to become famous around the world” (Catalogue, abridged)

Hockey / Dufresne, Emilie
“From running to rugby, it’s time to get sporty. Pick a side, lace up your trainers and jump in! these informative titles will tell you everything you need to know to get into sports. Know the rules, learn the lingo and get kitted up. Check out your sporting girl heroes in the player profile, and learn what favourite sport is doing to your body. Tackle rugby, swing into tennis or make a splash in swimming — whether you’re a fierce footballer, speedy sprinter or a brilliant basketball player, we want to be on your team! Go girls!” (Catalogue)

The warm sun on my face : the story of women’s cricket in New Zealand / Auger, Trevor
“It is the story of a game played for the sheer love of it, and of the hard work of the dedicated souls who built and sustained women’s cricket, often in the face of challenge and adversity. ” (Catalogue, abridged)

Top basketball tips / Rissman, Rebecca
“Swish! Every basketball player dreams of the perfect shot. Look inside to learn mechanics and tips to take your game to the next level.” (Catalogue)

Rising above. Inspiring women in sports / Zuckerman, Gregory
“Behold the power of women! These are the inspirational real-life stories of female superstar athletes Serena and Venus Williams, Simone Biles, Carli Lloyd, and more — role models all. For sports fans, aspiring athletes and readers of sports biographies. The athletes featured in this book met earth-shaking challenges head on, and through hard work and perseverance, went on to conquer the sports world. This collection of mini biographies, complete with first-hand content drawn from interviews, is a source of inspiration and self-empowerment for kids and sports fans of all ages. ” (Catalogue, abridged)

Women in sports : 50 fearless athletes who played to win / Ignotofsky, Rachel
“Illustrated profiles of fifty pioneering female athletes, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Women in Science. A charmingly illustrated and inspiring book, Women in Sports highlights the achievements and stories of fifty notable women athletes–from well-known figures like tennis player Billie Jean King and gymnast Simone Biles, to lesser-known athletes like skateboarding pioneer Patti McGee and Toni Stone, the first woman to play baseball in a men’s professional league. Covering more than forty sports, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about notable women’s teams throughout history, pay and media statistics for female athletes, and muscle anatomy. Women in Sports celebrates the success of the tough, bold, and fearless women who paved the way for the next generation of athletes” (Catalogue)

Parihaka Day 2022

On the coast of Aotearoa, near Mount Taranaki, there is a very important place called Parihaka which has a lot to teach us about the history of injustice in New Zealand, and the importance of hope and peace.

In the years following the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in 1840, colonial greed and racism enabled the government to unlawfully confiscate land and wage war against groups of Māori who sought to defend their territory.

During the 1860s, the community at Parihaka became a haven for different groups of Māori, and a place of resistance to land confiscation and encroaching settlement. The people of Parihaka had a peaceful campaign, led by Te Whiti and Tohu, that consisted of ploughing up confiscated land, removing surveying pegs, and placing fencing.

In response, the government arrested these peaceful people and sent them far away, to Wellington, and to the South Island where they were forced to build roads. On 5 November 1881, Parihaka was invaded by a military force of 1600 armed constabulary. Māori people who were not originally from the Parihaka area were forced to leave. Violence was inflicted against the people. Their leaders were arrested. Buildings were damaged. Te Whiti and Tohu were held without trial for two years, before returning home in 1883.

Despite all of this harm, Parihaka was rebuilt by its people, and still thrives today. Parihaka reminds us of what hope and working together can achieve, especially in the face of injustice.

The memorial at Pukeahu War Memorial Park

A Place to Remember

At Pukeahu War Memorial Park, on the north-west corner of the old Dominion Museum building, there is a memorial dedicated to the people of Taranaki and Parihaka who were imprisoned in the Mount Cook barracks. The memorial represents a prisoner wrapped up in a blanket. The base of the monument is made of stones from Taranaki. As you wander through Wellington, this is the perfect spot to take a moment to reflect on the Parihaka legacy of peace.

Online resources for tamariki to learn more about Parihaka

Image: Parihaka by Josiah Martin on DigitalNZ.

Parihaka | AnyQuestions

AnyQuestions offers free online homework help to New Zealand school students. AnyQuestions provides a librarian chat service, from 1pm to 6pm Monday to Friday during the school year. The website also has great ManyAnswers articles on important topics and places. This Parihaka article will help show you more great places to find information!

One of the other great sources is the National Library topic explorer page for Parihaka, which has links to photographs, articles, and videos.

Pukapuka for tamariki to learn more about Parihaka

Syndetics book coverMaumahara ki tērā Nōema / nā Jennifer Beck rāua ko Lindy Fisher ; nā Kawata Teepa i whakamāori.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)
Syndetics book coverRemember that November / written by Jennifer Beck ; illustrated by Lindy Fisher.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPeace warriors / Raymond Huber (2015)

This book tells the heroic stories of brave New Zealander’s and people around the world who used non-violent resistance to pursue paths of peace. One of the stories is of Archibald Baxter, who refused to fight in World War 1 because he did not believe in killing. He faced brutal punishment and rejection for his courageous choice.

Keenan Book Cover
Amorangi and Millie’s trip through time / Keenan, Lauren
“Amorangi and Millie lost their mum. Their only clue to her whereabouts is a carving on a tree that says, I’m in the past! Rescue me! To do this, Amorangi and Millie must travel up every branch of their family tree and collect an object from each ancestor they meet. They must then be back in the modern day before the sun sets, or they’ll all be trapped forever in the past. In their travels, the children experience aspects of events in New Zealand history, such as the invasion of Parihaka, the Great Depression, World War Two, the Musket Wars and the eruption of Mount Taranaki. They also experience changes in the town and landscape, the attitudes of people and the way people live their lives”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Author Interview: Bill Nagelkerke

Header - Kids Blog - The Ghost House

Click this banner to go straight to the interview!

What better way to celebrate Halloween than checking out an interview with author Bill Nagelkerke about his spooky new children’s novel The Ghost House!

The Ghost House revolves around 13-year-old David, whose family has moved to a house on the edge of the Red Zone in Christchurch. When David ventures into the forbidden Red Zone he stumbles upon an old villa that survived the earthquakes! The house speaks to him and begs him to help.

Bill Nagelkerke has written short stories, poems, plays and books for all ages, as well as translating other people’s books from Dutch into English.

He has won the Storylines Margaret Mahy Medal and Lecture Award. His children’s book, The Ghosts on the Hill was a Storylines Notable Book and joint winner of the 2021 Storylines What Now Kids’ Pick Award.

The Ghost House is a poignant and eerie supernatural tale aimed at readers 8 – 13 years that carefully navigates the line between being deliciously spine tingling without ever crossing the line into becoming full out frightening. It is beautifully and evocatively written using very carefully chosen words and language to describe the settings and characters.

Click the above banner to go to the interview, or click here: https://www.mixcloud.com/wellingtoncitylibraries/bill-n/

This interview was done in conjunction with The Cuba Press, and Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM. This interview was conducted by Neil Johnstone.

Find out more about Radioactive FM on their website!

You can reserve a library copy on our catalogue or buy your own copy through The Cuba Press! Check out the full range of titles by Cuba Press here!


Here’s some of Bill’s other books available at your library!

Stop the tour : the diary of Martin Daly, Christchurch, 1981 / Nagelkerke, Bill
“It is 1981 and Martin senses big trouble brewing at home. The South African rugby team has been invited to tour New Zealand. Martin’s sister, Sarah, is out to stop the tour in protest against South Africa’s apartheid system. His rugby-mad dad is equally determined that the tour should go ahead. Martin wishes the whole thing would simply go away … Then a new school leads to a new friendship, and Martin is faced with a choice. He can walk away or he can become involved in something that will end up being bigger than anybody could have predicted”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Ghosts-on-the-Hill-cover-webThe ghosts on the hill / Nagelkerke, Bill
“The year is 1884. The place is Lyttelton, a small and bustling harbour town. Elsie is waiting for the fish to bite. She has her reasons for coming down to the waterfront so often, the main one being the memory of the lost boys. She was one of the last to see them alive, and now she is haunted by what happened to them. When the opportunity comes for Elsie to follow in their footsteps over the Bridle Path, and put their ghosts to rest, she doesn’t hesitate. ‘I’ll be careful,’ she says. But no one knows that the weather is about to change for the worse.”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Emily the Dreadfuls and the Dead Skin Gang / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Emily, the hero of ‘Emily’s Penny Dreadful’, is back. She has an idea for a new ‘dreadful’ story, this time all about a group of burglars who call themselves the Dead Skin Gang. At the same time, Emily starts her own gang, the Dreadfuls. Her best friend Robin, isn’t too keen on joining, while Uncle Raymond doesn’t like all the noise the Dreadfuls make. But then the next door neighbour’s dog goes missing, and the Dreadfuls (and Uncle Raymond) have a job to do”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)
Old bones / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Jamie and his dad have lost the farm in the floods. But Dad’s new partner, Sue, doesn’t seem that upset by the destruction of the farm. The trio move into a large old house in the city, right beside the Avon. While the adults seem content to put their energies into the new house and circumstances, Jamie has a bad feeling about the house and is terrified of the closeness of the river. Something bad happened in this house, he just knows it. Suggested level: intermediate, junior secondary.” (Catalogue)

Kua tā te taimi? : ko he tala Hamoa mai Niu Hila / Nagelkerke, Bill
“Tua and his class are preparing for special visitors. While everyone is getting ready, Tua can’t stop asking, “Is it time yet?” Suggested level: junior, primary. Also available in Cook Islands Māori, Niue language, Sāmoan, and Tongan.” (Catalogue)

Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau: Tokelau Language Week 2022

Fakamālo atu kia te koutou uma!

This year Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau | Tokelau Language Week runs from Sunday 23 October to Saturday 29 October! Our theme for this year is

“Halahala ki vavau, kae ke mau ki pale o Tokelau” which means “To plan for the future is to understand the past.”

Several activities and events will hold throughout New Zealand. Let’s read these books, visit some websites, and celebrate together!

All About Tokelau

Tokelau means “North Wind”, is located about 500km north of Samoa, while the distance between Tokelau and New Zealand is around 3748 km. It used to call as “Union Islands” and changed to Tokelau Islands in 1976. Tokelau has three small tropical coral atolls, which are Atafu, Nukunonu, and Fakaofo. The population in Tokelau is around 1500 people. Their national languages are Tokelauan and English. (Source: UNOCHA)

Books

There are several books in our library collection that will let you know more about Tokelau! Let’s have a look!

Tokelau heroes / Riley, David
“Tokelau heroes presents inspirational stories of achievers who have Tokelauan ancestry.” (Catalogue)

Illustrated history of the South Pacific / Stenson, Marcia
“”The South Pacific is not only our geographic environment, it is also our cultural environment, and many New Zealanders trace their ancestry to Polynesian seafarers. This book is an introduction to the history of the South Pacific. A companion book to Illustrated History of New Zealand, also written by Marcia Stenson, it covers the following topics: geology and geography, the arrival of the first people to the Pacific, European exploration, war in the Pacific, political issues both historic and current.There is also specific information on these island groups: Cook Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Niue, Samoa, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu and the Polynesian outliers.”” (Catalogue)

Havali fakaua ki te fale = Walking home in the rain / Burgess, Feauaʼi Amosa
“Describes a group of children walking home from school in the rain.” (Catalogue)

Ko te tokotoko o toku tupuna = Papa’s tokotoko / Sione, Emeli
“Alo, the eldest grandson, initially rejects, but in the end takes on his responsibility to be a support for his grandfather.” (Catalogue)

Valigā magō : Painting sharks / Baker, Vaitoa
“It’s painting day at school. Hale and his best friend Ioane choose to paint pictures of sharks.” (Catalogue)

Tokelau Song Medley

We also have a beautiful Tokelau Song Medley video would like to share with you guys! Let’s sing together!

(Source: TheCoconetTV)

For more information about Tokelau, you may visit:


That’s it from us today about Tokelau Language Week 2022. Fakafetai and enjoy!

Diwali Festival of Lights 2022

Remya Baby Rock and Rhyme

Our librarian Remya entertains at a Diwali Baby Rock and Rhyme at Newtown Library

According to the Hindu lunar calendar, around the month of either October or November the most celebrated festival around the world is Diwali – the festival of lights (also known as Deepavali, or दिवाली in the Hindi script).

It is said that the beginning of Diwali celebration started with the epic story of Ramayana. Prince Ram defeated the ten headed demon Ravana, who had kidnapped Ram’s wife Sita.

He then returned to the kingdom of Ayodhya on a night of the new moon, after fourteen years of exile with Sita. The people of Ayodhya welcomed Ram and Sita by lighting rows of oil lamps, celebrating the joyous occasion of having Ram as their future King.

Diwali displays

Some of our Diwali displays at Miramar, Tawa, and Newtown Libraries!

The festival is celebrated as victory of light over darkness, good over evil, and knowledge over ignorance. On Diwali day lamps called rangoli are lit – decorative patterns created with colour sand or flowers – and people young and old wear new clothes, share sweets, and light fireworks. It is a festival of bringing people together, sharing, and caring for one another.

This year Diwali falls on Monday 24th October 2022! Celebrate with Wellington City Libraries and our special Diwali Celebration Collections!

Here are some books for you to check out!

Rama and Sita : the story of Diwali / Doyle, Malachy
“Rama and Sita live happily in the forest until Sita is abducted by the demon king Ravana. Can Rama rescue her – and who is the little white monkey who offers to help?” (Catalogue)

All about Diwali : things to make and do / Haddow, Swapna
“Diwali is one of India’s most significant holidays. This beautiful activity book book is filled with crafts and recipes, fun activities and facts about the Diwali celebrations observed by over one billion people across faiths. Read all about why Diwali is named the festival of lights and discover the stories behind it.” (Catalogue)

Shubh Diwali / Soundar, Chitra
“One family celebrates the Hindu festival of lights”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

The best Diwali ever / Shah, Sonali
“This year, Ariana has plans to make Diwali an extra special celebration, with yummy sweets, divas around the house, pretty clothes, fireworks and… the rangoli competition, of course. Everything would go perfectly to plan if it weren’t for Rafi, her annoying little brother, always up to mischief…and always being clumsy! Will he ruin Diwali too?”–Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

Some Diwali books in Hindi or Tamil languages:

Dīpaka kī dibālī = Deepak’s Diwali / Karwal, Divya (Hindi)
“It’s the worst Diwali ever! Dad has forgotten the sparklers, the fairy lights are broken, and after hearing the story of Rama and Sita, Deepak is sure that the demon king, Ravana, is after him … Part of Mantra Lingua’s Celebration series, this warm contemporary story is interwoven with beautifully illustrated images from Hindu mythology. The book is packed with recipes and activities.” (Catalogue)

Amma kahe kahani Diwali / Mathur, Bhakti (Hindi)
“This is the Hindi version of ‘Amma tell me about Diwali!’ — www.Amazon.com” (Catalogue)

Tipakkin ti pavali = Deepak’s Diwali / Karwal, Divya (Tamil)
“It’s not shaping up to be a good Diwali so far: Dad has forgotten the sparklers, the fairy lights are broken, and, after hearing the story of Rama and Sita, Deepak is sure that Ravana the demon king is after him. Will Deepak’s Diwali be a washout or will the family’s celebration be rescued?” (Catalogue)

Online eBooks on Overdrive/Libby:

Babys First Diwali (cover)Baby’s first Diwali

“Clear pictures and simple read-aloud text introduce baby to Diwali, the festival of light.” (Catalogue)

It’s Diwali / Sehgal, Kabir
“Count along in celebration of Diwali, the Indian Festival of Lights, in this luminous picture book from bestselling mother-son duo Surishtha and Kabir Sehgal. Count up to ten and back down again to the tune of “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe” while learning about the traditions that make Diwali a fun-filled festival!” (Catalogue)

Rama and Sita : the story of Diwali / Doyle, Malachy
“Whether you’re looking for a Diwali gift or a simple introduction to the Diwali story to share with your children, this beautiful book, now reissued in a larger picture book format, is ideal.” (Abridged from catalogue)

Some short phrases in the Hindi language:

Namaste (नमस्ते) – Hello
Dhanyavad (धन्यवाद) – Thank you
Kaise ho aap? (कैसे हो आप?) – How are you?
Badia ho (बडिया हो) – I am well.

Learn more here!

Diwali — Encyclopaedia Britannica (oclc.org)