The Summer Reading Adventure is Complete!

Greetings adventurers of great renown. The 2022-2023 Summer Reading Adventure has now finished! As your local librarians, we have been absolutely delighted to see all your achievements and creativity on display! Congratulations to all tamariki & whānau who took part.

Here are some of the numbers:

  • You read 20221 books over December and January — that’s 326 books a day, or a book every 4 and a half minutes!
  • You wrote, drew, or filmed 6447 book reviews. Many of you loved using emojis to tell us about the books you read!
  • You completed 3505 quests, from exploring and mapping the land to building forts, conducting science experiments to creating beautiful and original works of art.
  • You’ve collected 1259 prizes, including badges, books, pens, pencils and notebooks, vouchers from our wonderful friends at Ben & Jerry’s and Unity Books, and other goodies!

So many of you have picked up prizes already. From today, you can still come in to pick up prizes, but only while stocks last as we’re starting to run out of books and other goodies! Check out a small selection of some of our favourite examples of the awesome activities you did!

Protector of the Cake

Inspired by Ruth Paul’s wonderful picture book, Lion Guards The Cake we asked young people to design their dream cake, or bake it with the help of an adult!

Theo cake

Theo designed and baked this incredible dream cake!


Protector of the Cake: Deon

Deon’s basketball championship dream cake!


Reuben's cake

Reuben’s three-dimensional treat!


A Moveable Castle

Inspired by the classic kids’ novel, Howl’s Moving Castle written by Diana Wynne Jones, we challenged young people to construct a blanket fort & have a whānau picnic!

SuperJesse peaks out of a massive fort!

SuperJesse peaks out of a massive fort!


Savannah's cosy fort!

Savannah’s cosy fort!


Bree's whānau fort!

Bree’s whānau fort!


Every Leaf a Masterpiece

Drawing on the name of Ben Okri’s kids’ book, Every Leaf a Hallelujah, we asked kids to head outside and collect some leaves, flowers, or petals from the ground and use them to make collages and artworks!

Maeve's beautiful design

Maeve’s beautiful design!


Gabriel's pleasingly composed botanical piece!

Gabriel’s pleasingly composed botanical piece!


Josh's leafy triptych

Josh’s leafy triptych


That’s us for now, we’re already looking forward to the next reading adventure!

Happy Lunar New Year!

Read this post in Mandarin

This year on Sunday, 22 January many countries and communities celebrate Lunar New Year, which is the calendar based on the monthly cycles of the Moon’s phases! There are Lunar New Year festivals and celebrations in China, North Korea, South Korea, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, in Chinatowns all around the world, and there are plenty of local events to celebrate in Aoteaora New Zealand too!

Chinese New Year Display and books inChinese languages at Johnsonville Library

Chinese New Year Display and books in Chinese languages at Johnsonville Library.


Library Events

Lunar New Year Mandarin Storytime 10.30-11.00am, Tuesday 24 January

Te Awe Library, 29B Brandon Street, Wellington

To celebrate the 2023 Chinese New Year, Te Awe is going to have a Mandarin storytime on the Tuesday 24 January!

为了庆祝农历新年,提亚威图书馆将于年初三,1月24日(星期二)早上10.30至11时举办中文普通话故事时间

Lunar New Year Storytime Tuesday, 31 January 10:30am

Johnsonville Library, 34 Moorefield Road, Johnsonville 

Celebrate the Lunar New Year with stories, songs, and rhymes in Mandarin, Hokkien, and English.​

欢迎参加Johnsonville图书馆组织的迎中国新年活动. 我们将用普通话, 福建话和英语讲述有趣的故事, 和以歌曲等形式开展与孩子们的互动活动


About the Lunar New Year

2023 is the Year of the Rabbit, in the Chinese zodiac. The rabbit is the fourth zodiac animal. He was a bit arrogant about how fast he was!  He used to tease his neighbour, the Ox for being slow. But one day, the Jade Emperor organised a party to determine the order of the zodiac, in order of who arrived first. The Rabbit arrived early, so he decided to go away and take a nap. When he woke up three other animals had beat him to the party, including the Ox! The rabbit is associated with kindness, quiet confidence and earnestness, which means rabbit might appear quite serious, but always moves forward with feeling and purpose. You can learn more by visiting Year of the Rabbit – Chinese Zodiac on chinesenewyear.net

LNY

Artist impression of Bánh chưng and bánh tét wrapped up for cooking.

In Vietnam, Lunar New Year is marked by the Tết Nguyên Đán festival, which is associated with lots of important customs and wonderful foods! Bánh chưng and bánh tét are some of the tasty festival cuisines, made from glutinous rice, mung beans, pork. Bánh chưng is cooked in squares wrapped in lá dong leaves, and bánh tét is cooked in cylinders wrapped in banana leaves, which is then cut into wheel-shaped slices.

Illustration of hanbok

Artist impression of hanbok.

In South Korea and North Korea, Lunar New Year is known as Seollal and is celebrated through important traditions, games, food and often by wearing the beautiful colourful hanbok, which are usually worn on special occasions.

In Malaysia, Chinese people and other ethnic groups like Malay and Indian also celebrate Lunar New Year together. You can say “Selamat Tahun Baru Cina” to a Malaysian which means “Happy Chinese New Year” in Malay. Chinese people will have a reunion dinner on the Lunar New Year’s Eve. the children will receive “ang pao”, red envelopes with money inside, on the first day of the Lunar New Year from the elderly people, represent a kind of blessing and good luck. In return, children need to say some good words back to the elderly people, like stay healthy, stay happy, and “wishing you safety all the time

You can learn more about Lunar New Year is celebrated in other countries by reading some great articles from the list of lunar new year articles from ThoughtCo.com, and by checking out some of the wonderful books listed below.

Books

The 12 days of Lunar New Year / Lettice, Jenna
“Count out twelve ways to celebrate Lunar New Year!… This cheery addition to the 12 Days series celebrates tradition, culture, and family in the lead-up to Lunar New Year! Young readers and their caregivers will enjoy counting all the different ways they can engage with their communities and honour their ancestors…” (Abridged from catalogue)
Lunar New Year / Eliot, Hannah
“Introduces Lunar New Year, describing the food, decorations, and activities of the holiday.” (Catalogue)

Happy Chinese New Year! : A Festive Counting Story / Ho, Jannie
“Count to twelve with the zodiac animals as they get ready to celebrate Chinese New Year! Sweet, colorful illustrations introduce each of the zodiac animals as they bring special items to the celebration. Xīn Nián Kuài Lè! Happy Chinese New Year! The zodiac animals are ready to celebrate Chinese New Year with traditions and a big feast! Little ones can count to twelve as each animal prepares for the holiday…” (Abridged from catalogue)

Korean celebrations : festivals, holidays and traditions / Cho, Tina
“Korean Celebrations takes young readers on an exciting exploration of Korea’s colorful festivals and family celebrations–wonderful days that are filled with exciting activities and delicious foods.” (Abridged from catalogue)
Vietnamese children’s favorite stories / Tran, Phuoc Thi Minh

One of the special stories in this book explains why you shouldn’t sweep the house on Tết Nguyên Đán! Along with this story of Lunar New Year, there is a collection of wonderful stories connected to five great virtues of Vietnam: Nhan (Compassion), Le (Rituals), Nghia (Righteousness), Tri (Wisdom), and Tin (Trust).

Lunar New Year Around The World: Celebrate The Most Colourful Time Of The Year / Li, Amanda
“Find out all about Lunar New Year and how it is celebrated in different communities across the world!” (Catalogue)

Home for Chinese New Year : a story told in English and Chinese / Wei, Jie
“The Chinese New Year is a time for family reunions. This Chinese children’s story tells a delightful trip with lots of cultural details along the way! Jia Jun’s Dad worked out of town all year around. Now it’s time for him to come home…” (Abridged from catalogue)

Wellington City Libraries has children’s books and bilingual editions available in community languages from many different cultures!

Maylasia NY photo

Photograph by our blog author’s family of celebrations in Malaysia!

Gong Xi Fa Cai” 恭喜发财 — May you be happy and prosperous! 

– Blog by Wei Jing & Joseph

2022 Round-Up: Children’s Non-Fiction

Following up our twin blogs rounding up some of the best picture books of 2022 and some of the best children’s fiction of 2022, now it is time for non-fiction to shine!

This isn’t an exhaustive list, but we are taking the opportunity to highlight some of our favourite books published in 2022!

If you’d rather browse through the newest books we have added to our shelves, head on over to the New Material page on our website.

 

Tāwhaki : the deeds of a demigod / Mead, Sidney M

We might be cheating with this one, as it is a republication of a classic work by Hirini Moko Mead, first published in 1996. But this edition has beautiful illustrations by Scott Pearson.

Like Māui, Tāwhaki was a powerful demigod. This wonderful book shares three of the adventures of Tāwhaki.

Squawk! : Donovan Bixley’s forest birds of Aotearoa / Bixley, Donovan

After his 2021 book, Donovan Bixley’s draw some awesome : drawing tips & ideas for budding artists, was shortlisted in New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults, Bixley is right back at it with another amazing pukapuka!

If you are interested in knowing more about the top New Zealand children’s books of this year, have a read of our previous post about the 2022 NZCYA Book Award winners. If you haven’t already, these books are definitely worth checking out!

You don’t know what war is : the diary of a young girl from Ukraine / Skalietska, Yeva

At the front of our minds this year, has been the international conflict between Russia and Ukraine. Wellington is home to thousands of people of Ukrainian and Russian descent, some of whom have moved here this year to escape the conflict.

You might still have a lot of questions about what is happening and why. Earlier this year, we prepared a blog called understanding Ukraine and Russia: a guide for kids and their adults. We hope this will be useful for your whānau.

Another way that you can learn more is through this pukapuka, a diary by a 12-year-old girl who is experiencing the conflict directly.

Roar squeak purr : a New Zealand treasury of animal poems

Here’s a fun compendium of over 200 animal themed poems from Aotearoa New Zealand! If you’re in the mood for more local poetry, don’t forget to check out Tūhono. a journal of poetry by Wellington children / 2021 (wcl.govt.nz), the 2021 edition that Wellington City Libraries published this year!
LGBTQ+ icons : a celebration of historical LGBTQ+ icons in the arts / Keehnen, Owen
“From music to movies, literature to dance – the arts have always been influenced by the work of LGBTQ people. LGBTQ+ Icons spotlights the history and contributions of 50 pioneering artists who lived and worked around the world….” (Abridged from Amazon catalogue)

Before music : where instruments come from / Pimentel, Annette Bay
“Music doesn’t come out of nothing. It always starts somewhere… with something… with someone. Discover how music is made in this survey of musical instruments from around the world. Organized by material-from wood to gourds to found objects and more-Before Music marries a lyrical core text with tons of informational material for curious readers. In the narrative text, readers will encounter makers as they source their materials and craft instruments by hand, drawing the line from the natural world to the finished product and its sound. The sidebars offer much more to discover, including extensive instrument lists, short bios of musical innovators, and more”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)
Egg carton crafts / Rathburn, Betsy
“How can you reuse a leftover egg carton? This colorful title offers eight fun ideas! An introduction explains the importance of reusing items, and a materials and tools list puts everything you need in one place. Step-by-step instructions combine with bright, easy-to-understand photos to guide readers through the process of making each craft. Along the way, tips provide hints to make crafting easier or remix crafts into new creations!” (Catalogue)
breath with me coverBreathe with me : using breath to look after my tinana, hinengaro and wairua / Tutagalevao, Abel Junior
“Your breath is a taonga that you can use anytime to calm you. Breathing is easy to do and can help relax your tinana,hinengaro, and wairua. We can be on our way to a happy day!” (Catalogue)
The very hungry caterpillar’s very first encyclopedia
“This first encyclopedia covers all the big topics for little learners, including science, history, space, and the natural world. Explore deep underground and high in the sky, travel the globe on ships and trains, and find out about dinosaurs, plants and animals, the human body, and much, muche more. The Very Hungry Caterpillar’s Very First Encyclopedia features vibrant photography alongside more than 250 timeless illustrations from the World of Eric Carle, giving young children a charming overview of everything they need to know”– Page 4 of cover.” (Catalogue)

playing with fire book cover imagePlaying with fire = Ta’alo i le afi / Riley, David

David Riley is a gem, writing some more phenomenal retellings of Pasifika stories in 2022! You might have seen some of his wonderful books in our Pacific Language Week posts during 2022!

“Fire is one of the most precious elements we know. You can cook with it. You can dry things with it. You can even sit around it and tell stories like this one. But how did fire get to Samoa?”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

 

 

2022 Round-Up: Picture Books

We’ve already highlighted some of the wonderful Children’s Fiction titles that have been published this year, and now it’s time for the Picture Books to shine!

Picture Books are wonderful things to read with your tamariki. While they’re written for a younger audience they can still cover some pretty serious topics. With themes from grief and loss to friendship and fun, these books are a wonderful tool to use to help build our children’s understanding of the world around them.

While this list is quite a short one, if you would like to browse through a longer selection we have a list of the Best Picture Books of 2022 available over on the Libby App. Or you can scroll through the latest titles we’ve added to our collection on our New Material page – you can browse back through each month of the year, and filter books by age and genre too.


The cream of the 2022 Picture Book crop has got to be Ruth Paul’s Lion Guards the Cake, which won the Picture Book Award at this year’s New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults (NZCYA Book Awards).

Lion guards the cake / Paul, Ruth
We’re big fans of Ruth Paul here at Wellington City Libraries (she is a local author, after all!) and are really thrilled that this book has been recognised by the Awards. We predict this book will be a favourite bed-time read for ages to come, as it’s already a favourite for storytime in our libraries — it’s impossible not to feel some kinship with this cheeky lion as he fabricates more and more reasons why perhaps just a little bit more of the cake needs to be nibbled away… it’s a sacrifice, but someone’s got to do it!

To read more about this year’s NZCYA award winners you can read our blog post about the winners, or head over to the NZCYA Book Awards website itself!


Is this your class pet / Cummings, Troy
Arfy is a wonder of a dog – he can write! And when he accidentally fetches a turtle and can’t figure out which classroom the turtle belongs to, he writes letters to all the classes to try to find its home.

Also available as an ebook.
Two dogs / Falconer, Ian
From the author of the Olivia picture books comes the story of these two very noble looking, but very mischievous dachshunds. One is cautious, one is reckless. What happens when they escape out their back door?
Words about birds of Aotearoa New Zealand / Fuller, G. F.
This book combines our native birds, poetry, and the art of Geoffrey Fuller. Each double page spread highlights a different bird in their habitat, alongside a charming poem about them.

This is a New Zealand picture book.


Goat on a trampoline / Harrop, Amy
Lily Goat discovers a new skill, which should be pretty easy to guess from the title! But when her prideful boasting lands her in trouble she needs her friends to come to her rescue and teach her (and us) something about kindness.

This is a New Zealand picture book.
Kororā and the Sushi Shop / Keegan, Linda, Jane
This picture book tells the true (and local!) story of a penguin who kept coming back to a sushi shop, right by the Wellington Railway Station. The shop was so enticing that the little kororā even took a friend along! And now we can read the story in this delightful book.

This is a New Zealand picture book.
Mama and mummy and me in the middle / LaCour, Nina
This is a lovely story about a little girl with two wonderful parents, but when her Mummy goes away on a work trip things aren’t quite the same at home with only Mama around. This book explores what it’s like to miss someone, and then the awkwardness when they return.
The Grizzled Grist does not exist / MacIver, Juliette
A class goes on a trip through the Dismal Hills, with their teacher reminding them that “The Grizzled Grist does not exist!” But when she’s proven wrong it’s lucky that one student is very skilled at hiding. This is a fun rhyming story, with lots of details to look for in the illustrations.

This is a New Zealand picture book.
Cat’s first baby / Nelson, Natalie
When there’s a new baby around, it’s not only the human members of the family who have to get used to the changes! After all, there’s this new creature in the house that Cat is pretty sure isn’t also a cat. This board book is a companion to Dog’s First Baby.
Daddy’s rainbow / Rowland, Lucy
This picture book explores what it is like for a child to lose a parent. Erin’s daddy shows her all the different ways to find colour in the world, even when the day is dismal and wet. But when he’s not there anymore and the world goes grey, will Erin be able to find those colours again?
No home for a wētā / Thatcher, Stephanie
Wētā is sick of living with her rowdy and rambunctious family, so she decides to move out. But when she finally finds her perfect, quiet, and peaceful new home she realises there’s something missing. This is a fun rhyming story about family and the things you can find outside in Aotearoa.

This is a New Zealand picture book.

2022 Round-Up: Children’s Fiction

Now that we have reached the end of 2022, it’s time to take a look back through some of the books that have been published over the last twelve months. This is in no way an exhaustive list, merely a selection of titles that caught our eyes and stuck in our memories over the past year.

We have a longer list of the top 2022 eaudiobook and ebook titles that are available over on the Libby App for you to check out! Did your top read of 2022 make the list?

If you’d rather browse through the newest books we have added to our shelves, head on over to the New Material page on our website. Here you can browse month by month through our new titles, and to make it easier you can filter by audience and genre so you’re only looking through what you’re interested in.

If you are interested in knowing more about the top New Zealand children’s books of this year, have a read of our previous post about the 2022 NZCYA Book Award winners (that stands for New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults). If you haven’t already, these books are definitely worth checking out!

Now read on for a selection of 2022 Children’s Fiction… And feel free to let us know what your favourite books of 2022 have been!

Bruno and Frida / Bradman, Tony
Orphaned Bruno, struggling through war-torn eastern Germany in 1945, finds an unlikely friend in Frida, a Russian dog sent into Germany with a bomb strapped to her. If you’re a fan of Michael Morpurgo, this book is for you.

This is a dyslexia-friendly book.

The lords of night : a shadow bruja novel / Cervantes, Jennifer
This is the latest book we have in the Rick Riordan Presents publishing series. Percy Jackson fans will enjoy the story of Renata, shadow bruja, as she finds herself on a quest to stop the nine Aztec Lords of Night from being awakened.

Also available as an eaudiobook and an ebook.


Fire horse / Chapman, Linda
Fire Horse is the first in Moonlight Riders, a new series by Linda Chapman, who is also the author of many other series including Star Friends and My Secret Unicorn. In Fire Horse, Amara joins the Moonlight Stables and immediately feels a special connection with a pony called Ember. When she discovers that Ember is a magical Fire Pony, will she be able to keep him safe from the rival Night Riders?
Echo / Kelly, Arlo
Arlo Kelly, author of Echo, is a Kāpiti teenager who was only fifteen when Echo was published! Inspired by holidays spent in Gisborne, Echo is about Eric, a boy with low vision, and his struggle for independence and his friendship with a whale.
Answers in the pages / Levithan, David
A book for younger readers by well-known YA author David Levithan. Donovan’s class is reading The Adventurers, but when his mum reads it she tries to get it banned from the school because two characters might be gay. The story is told from Donovan and his classmate Gideon’s points of view, with chapters from The Adventurers scattered throughout.
Sadiq series / Nuurali, Siman
2022 brought with it four new books in the Sadiq series by Siman Nuurali. Sadiq and his family are (like the author) Somali American. Throughout the series Sadiq explores friendship, his community, and trying new things.
Emma Every Day series / Reid, C. L
Emma is Deaf, uses a cochlear implant to help her hear, and uses sign language as well. In this series of short chapter books, Emma and her best friend Izzie go apple picking, learn to tap dance, and play soccer – and often things don’t always go exactly to plan!
The best liars in Riverview / Thompson, Lin
When Joel goes missing, Aubrey feels responsible and also that they’re the only person who can find him and bring him home. Joining Aubrey on the day-long search through the woods and along the river, we learn about their friendship and the events that led to Joel disappearing, and the journey turns inward as Aubrey makes some discoveries about gender identity, friendship, and family.
Showtym Viking / Wilson, Kelly
An autobiographical story by sisters Kelly and Amanda Wilson about Amanda’s decision to make horses her future. Kelly, Amanda, and their sister Vicki are all showjumpers and prominent equestrians, and have worked with New Zealand’s Kaimanawa horses.
Elisabeth and the box of colours / Woodfine, Katherine
Away at boarding school, Elisabeth loves to paint and draw and fill the world with colour. But when her father dies and her world goes grey, will she be able to find her colours again? This short book is based on the childhood of French painter Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun.

This is a dyslexia-friendly book.

World Arabic Language Day 2022!


السلام عليكم

The 18th of December marks the United Nations Arabic Language Day. Did you know that there are over 300 million native Arabic speakers worldwide? This makes the Arabic language one of the most widely spoken languages in the word.

Arabic is spoken by a diverse range of people across the African continent and the Middle East, including Sudan, Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, and many more. There are also people who live in New Zealand who come from these countries, or whose parents or grandparents come from these countries.

Continue reading

Nowe książki w języku polskim!

Read this post in English!

W końcu są tutaj! Z radością informujemy, że wiele nowych książek w języku polskim są dostępne pożyczyć w Bibliotek Miejskich w Wellington. Jeśli w domu mówicie po polsku, lub chciałbyście nauczyć się polskiego, te nowe książki dla Was i Waszej rodziny będą idealne do wspólnego czytania.

Te książki są w tej chwili na półce w Bibliotece Te Awe, ale możecie je też zamówić przez katalog online, wyszukując „Polish Language Readers” lub „Children 491.858.”

Czytajcie dalej znaleźć sześć naszych ulubionych nowych książek…

Mądra Mysz: Mam przyjaciela kucharza / Butschkow, Ralf
“Mój przyjaciel Stefan jest kucharzem i robi najlepsze spaghetti świata. Zanim jego danie trafią na talerze, trzeba najpierw kupić składniki, przygotować je, ugotować, przyprawić. A wszystko, co gotuje Stefan, jest bardzo zdrowe – nawet desery!” (Katalog)

Dinozaury / Benedetta, Nigelli
Dinozaury to kartonowa książka z serii Motoryka Smyka, która spodoba się najmłodszym dzieciom. Uczyć się wiele nowych słów, wysunić długą szyję brontozaura, odkryć, co na grzbiecie ma inny dinozaur, i sprawdzać, kto wykluje się z jaj. Ta książka to świetna zabawa!

Strażak Sam: Koncert w płomieniach / Tarnowska, Ewa
“Wieczorem, Mike i Elvis, najsłynniejszy rockandrollowy duet Pontypanty, mają dać koncert w mieście. Ale wybucha między nimi wielka kłótnia! Czy pokaz się odbędzie? Czy Samowi uda się pogodzić przyjaciół?” (Katalog)

Mruczęty : kot mikołaja / Rowland, Lucy
Ciepła i zabawna opowieść o kocie świętego Mikołaja. Mruczęty ma skłonności narkoleptyczne – zasypia wszędzie i o każdej porze. Pewnego dnia zasypia wśród prezentów, zawinięty w ozdobny papier, i trafia w nimi do sań. Na sanie dybie szajka złodziei! (Katalog)

Miś Tuliś piecze ciasteczka / Melling, David
“Miś Tuliś uwielbia pyszne miodowe ciasteczka, ale nagle jego miodek znika… Czy Tuliś da się przekonać owcom i spróbuje czegoś innego i nowego? A może nawet to polubi?” (Katalog)

Nasza podróż / Kubiak, Tadeusz
“Krótka wierszowana historia o podróży pociągiem. Są w niej kasa biletowa, perony i zawiadowca z gwizdkiem, opalana węglem lokomotywa, wagon posztowy i wagon sypialny… ale to nie wszystko! Tę książkę można nie tylko przeczytać, lecz także rozłożyć jak scenografię w teatrze. Z jednej strony zobaczycie wtedy mijane po drodze krajobrazy, z drugiej pociąg.” (Katalog)

New Books in Polish!

Read this post in Polish!

They are finally here! We’re excited to announce that a range of new books in the Polish language are available to borrow from Wellington City Libraries. If you speak Polish at home, or would like to learn, these new books will be perfect for you and your family to read together.

These books are currently on the shelf at Te Awe Library, but you can also order them through the online catalogue by searching for “Polish Language Readers” or “Children 491.858.”

Read on to find out about six of our favourite new books:

Mądra Mysz: Mam przyjaciela kucharza / Butschkow, Ralf
“My friend Stefan is a cook, and he makes the best spaghetti in the world! Before his meals hit the plates, you first need to buy the ingredients, prepare them, cook them, and season them. Everything that Stefan cooks is healthy — even the desserts!” (Translated from Catalogue)

Dinozaury / Benedetta, Nigelli
Dinozaury is a board book in the series Smyk’s Motoryka, which are designed to appeal to the youngest children. Learn lots of new words, slide the Brontosaurus’ long neck back and forth, find out what another dinosaur has on its back, and see who is hatching their eggs. This book is so much fun!


Strażak Sam: Koncert w płomieniach / Tarnowska, Ewa
“This evening, Mike and Elvis, Pontypanty’s most famous rock-and-roll duo, are scheduled to give a concert at the port. But they are having a big fight! Will the show take place? Will Fireman Sam be able to bring his friends back together?” (Translated from Catalogue)

Mruczęty : kot mikołaja / Rowland, Lucy
This is a warm and funny story about Santa’s cat. Mruczęty will fall asleep anywhere, at any time. One day he falls asleep among the Christmas presents, wrapped up in wrapping paper, and ends up being a present on a sleigh with a gang of dastardly thieves!  (Translated and adapted from Catalogue)

Miś Tuliś piecze ciasteczka / Melling, David
“Hugless Douglas loves delicious honey cookies, but suddenly his source of honey disappears… can he be persuaded to try something new and different? And maybe even like it?” (Translated from Catalogue)

Nasza podróż / Kubiak, Tadeusz
“This is a short story about travelling by train. In this book you’ll find a ticket office, platforms, a whistle operator, a coal-fired train, a post-coach, and a sleeping car — but that’s not all! This book is not just for reading, but can be spread out like a theatre set! On one side you’ll see the landscapes you pass along the way, and on the other, the body of the train.” (Translated and adapted from Catalogue)

International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People

On 29th November 1977 the United Nations created the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People. This day is to remind people that even though the Palestinians didn’t agree to the creation of the state of Israel in 1948 they still have human rights; the right to decide where they live, where they travel and who their government is.  Both Israelis and Palestinians have the right to live in peace. The hope of the United Nations is to build a future of peace.

In 1948 when Israel was created around 750,000 Palestinians were forced to leave their homes and become refugees (Source: United Nations). This number has grown since then and there are now more than 13 million Palestinian people in the world (Source: IMEMC). Palestinian people speak Arabic, Hebrew, English, and other varieties of Arabic. You may know Palestinian people who live in Wellington or greater New Zealand who arrived here as former refugees.

If you want to read more about Palestine, Palestinians and Israel you could look up these interactive resources:

Many famous writers and poets come from Palestine. Some of these writers are; Mahmoud Darwish, Naomi Shihab Nye and Ghassan Kanafani.

Check out the books about Palestine or by Palestinian authors in our collection. (Remember joining the library is free and if there are some books you would like us to buy you can suggest them to us: Suggestions to Buy Library Items (wcl.govt.nz)

The turtle of Oman : a novel / Nye, Naomi Shihab
“When Aref, a third-grader who lives in Muscat, Oman, refuses to pack his suitcase and prepare to move to Michigan, his mother asks for help from his grandfather, his Sidi, who takes Aref around the country, storing up memories he can carry with him to a new home.” (Catalogue)

Three wishes : Palestinian and Israeli children speak / Ellis, Deborah
“Interviews with Palestinian and Israeli children examine how the war in the Middle East has affected their lives.” (Catalogue) This book is for older children 10+

Tasting the sky : a Palestinian childhood / Barakat, Ibtisam
“When a war ends it does not go away, my mother says. It hides inside us . . . Just forget. But I do not want to do what Mother says . . . I want to remember. In this groundbreaking memoir set in Ramallah during the aftermath of the 1967 Six-Day War, Ibtisam Barakat captures what it is like to be a child whose world is shattered by war.” (Adapted from Catalogue) This book is for older children 10+

A little piece of ground / Laird, Elizabeth
“Twelve-year-old Karim Aboudi and his family are trapped in their Ramallah home by a strict curfew. Israeli tanks control the city in response to a Palestinian suicide bombing. Karim longs to play football outside with his friends. But in this city there’s constant danger. Ages 10+” (Catalogue)

Milet mini picture dictionary : English-Arabic / Turhan, Sedat
“Introduces key English and Arabic words for plants, animals, shapes, food, and other common items.” (Catalogue)

My first book of Arabic words / Kudela, Katy R
“Simple text paired with themed photos invite the reader to learn to speak Arabic.” (Catalogue)

Israel and Palestine / Gallagher, Michael
“This series is a fascinating and informative look at the historical background to world trouble spots. Each title is packed with details, photographs and maps. Ages 10-16.” (Catalogue)

Israel and Palestine / Mason, Paul
“An informed, unbiased review of some of the world’s major conflict zones Global Hot Spots aims to fill in the facts behind the headlines, developing students’ understanding of the historical context of the events they see on TV. It provides accounts of real-life experiences and looks at ‘how history was made’ in these conflict zones.” (Catalogue)

Tūhono: Poets Among Us

Kia ora aspiring poets, and up-and-coming sonneteers! Tūhono, Wellington City Libraries’ poetry journal for children and teens, is now open for submissions until 14 December!

This gives you a little more time to write a poem, and send us your creations! We have loved reading all the wonderful poems sent into us so far!

This year, the theme is “Whakangā | Breath.” Whakangā refers to the taking in of breath, or to the process of breathing. It also calls to mind the idea of inhaling from the world; taking a breath to create calm; taking time to stop, slow down, relax, be.

Enter here!

Click this button to enter!

Unlike some other poetry journals, having your work accepted in Tūhono is not a competition — as long as you follow the rules of submission, every piece of work that gets sent to us will be published. Tūhono itself — the collection of poetry from young people all over Wellington — will be published as an eBook on OverDrive, and in a limited print run for our libraries, so that everyone with a library card can borrow it and bask in your talent and glory! Check out previous editions of Tūhono on our catalogue here.

Last blog, we shared some of the awesome poems from 2020, so for this one, we’ll turn to some of the incredible works from 2021! Here’s a few of our favourites!

  1. Alone Tiana

Alone poem image

Alone

Alone can taste like a sour lolly

Alone can feel like a bee stinging

Alone can sound like a roar of laughter

Alone looks like nothing

Alone can smell like the only clean sock 

in a wash basket of smelly socks.

Tiana 

 

2.  The Run — Vanessa 

The Run poem image

The run

Goosebumps fled, screaming up my arms

Promptly refusing to hold 

The inevitable droopy puddles

Belonging to my raw feet.

 

Muttering silent cries of regret 

Our class crept up up the road 

As silent as a spider hunting its prey

Shadows flickered in the shallow light

Of the nervous moon 

 

Gravel crunched beneath my shaking feet

Like snapping sticks

We started, clinging tightly together 

As we descended

Down the winding wave of shadows

 

Tall trees loomed threateningly

Over our scrawny group.

A splash was followed closely 

By angry curses up ahead

 

Head torches snapped on

Bobbing up and down like giddy fireflies

While the rain started drizzling down leisurely

 

Centuries later

Soaked, sweaty, and thoroughly mud splattered

We turned around and headed home.

Half way done.

Vanessa

 

3. The Forgotten Lake — Quinn 

The Forgotten Lake

The forgotten lake

My shaking  reflection in the mucky water 

This water used to be clear and beautiful now you can barely see the bottom

The smell of all the trash smells like slaughter

The lake is so rotten and filthy it has become forgotten

Quinn

4. Guen 

Guen poem

Guen 

My name is Guen 

My hair is yellow and blue, wet like rain 

My eyes are orange and big like an elephant 

My smile is funny and tall like a flower garden 

My laugh is white like a keyboard 

My shirt is purple like Shirley 

The sky is purple like tissues 

And I am soft like a puppy 

Guen