Kaupapa Moana – Seaweek 2024

Seaweek 2024 has just started! Seaweek is New Zealand’s national week for celebrating the sea, and this year it runs from the 2nd to the 10th of March.

Or come and check out the fantastic Seaweek displays in our libraries!

Here in Aotearoa we are surrounded by the sea, so it’s no surprise that our moana is something many of us feel a strong connection to. Every year, Seaweek hopes to inspire us all to engage with nature, explore the ocean, and develop this sense of connection with our environment and the sea. Seaweek is an opportunity to get involved in a community beach clean-up, visit a marine education centre, or just learn more about the oceans around us and what live in them.

If you’re looking for Seaweek activities in Wellington, there are a few events you might be interested in this Saturday the 9th of March. You can celebrate Seaweek at Te Papa and drop in to design your own deep sea fish and go all the way underwater in a Virtual Reality Submarine, or you could visit the Victoria University Coastal Ecology Lab Open Day and explore their interactive touch tanks and learn all about marine biology.

This year, Seaweek’s Ocean Champion Challenge has been refreshed to recognise the variety of actions being taken to protect the ocean and raise awareness. If you know someone who advocates for the ocean through their art, or who collects of contributes data related towards our marine environment, or who uses storytelling to contribute to ocean awareness, education, or conservation, they can be nominated as a Creator, Investigator, or Narrator! You can nominate a friend, or be nominated yourself!

Perhaps you’re keen to investigate Wellington’s beaches and sea life yourself? If you are, here are some books to get you started!

Rock pools : a guide for Kiwi kids / Barraud, Ned
“What New Zealand child is not delighted by a rockpool at low tide, with its colourful, fascinating array of creatures, some still, some flitting about? Rock Pools is a book designed to enhance this experience, with each page presenting an intriguing glimpse into the creatures that inhabit these low-tide wonderlands. All of the common creatures from New Zealand seashore, including crabs, sea anemones, starfish, barnacles and shrimps, and many more, feature in this fantastic book, which cannot help but delight and encourage children to interact with the natural world”–Publisher’s website.” (Catalogue)

Wild Coasts : exploring Aotearoa’s marine reserves / Barraud, Ned
“Aotearoa is renowned for its wild coasts, but after decades of overfishing, many of these marine ecosystems are under serious threat. A crucial response to this has been the creation of 44 marine reserves around our shores, and this book explores six of the most spectacular of these: boat Island, north of Auckland, the Poor Knights Islands, Taputeranga on the south coast of Wellington, Hikurangi at Kaikoura, Piopiotahi (Milford Sound) in Fiordland, and Ulva Island at Stewart Island/Rakiura. Full of fascinating information and wonderful illustrations of the amazing sea life found in the marine reserves, Wild boasts is an inspiring tribute to these safe zones. It will be treasured by all young people who are interested in our marine environment.” (Catalogue)

At the beach : explore & discover the New Zealand seashore / Candler, Gillian
“At the Beach is a delightful introduction to the natural history of the New Zealand seashore. The stage is set with beautiful, factually correct illustrations (including detailed cross-sections) of three familiar habitats – the sandy beach, rockpools and mudflats. Many of the plants and animals that play a part in these rich ecosystems are shown in situ, and readers are directed from there to pages dedicated to detailed coverage of: crabs; sea stars, kina and sea anemones; shellfish; seaweeds, sponges and sandhoppers; fish, jellyfish & shrimps; birds. Aimed at children 5-8 years old, but with appeal for anyone curious about New Zealand’s natural environment, At the Beach is a must for the home, bach, classroom and library. Comes with a removable, waterproof quick-reference guide to common seashore animals.” (Catalogue)

Under the ocean : explore & discover the seas around New Zealand / Candler, Gillian
“Explore the vast ocean, underwater reefs, and the depths of the sea floor and discover some of the creatures that live in the seas around New Zealand… This beautifully illustrated and highly informative book is aimed at children from pre-schoolers up and anyone curious about our ocean and the amazing creatures that live there.”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

The observologist / Clarkson, Giselle
A playful field guide for natural scientists and curious observers of the world right under our noses.

An observologist is someone who makes small scientific expeditions every day, who notices the interesting details in the world around them, and that there are fascinating things to be found in even the most ordinary places.

Above and below : sea and shore / Evans, Harriet
“What wonders wait beneath the waves? Dive in and find out with this beautiful split-page book that celebrates ocean habitats from the sandy shallows to the darkest depths. Turn the page to discover the incredible creatures and plants that lie below the ocean blue. With magnificent mangrove forests, colourful coral reefs and exciting estuaries, there are so many watery worlds to explore.”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

I wonder why the sea is salty and other questions about the oceans / Ganeri, Anita
“Encounter deep-sea volcanoes, electric fish, fierce pirates, and much more! With over thirty bite-sized questions and answers and hundreds of fun and colorful illustrations, this is the perfect guide to the underwater world.”– Page 4 of cover.” (Catalogue)

Ultrawild : an audacious plan to rewild every city on Earth / Mushin, Steve
“Join maverick inventor Steve Mushin as he tackles climate change with an avalanche of mind-bending, scientifically plausible inventions to rewild cities and save the planet. Jump into his brain as he designs habitat-printing robot birds and water-filtering sewer submarines, calculates how far compost cannons can blast seed bombs (over a kilometre), brainstorms biomaterials with scientists and engineers, studies ecosystems, and develops a deadly serious plan for future cities. A tour de force of extreme problem-solving for anyone who loves big ideas.” (Catalogue)

Also available as an ebook.
Hauraki broo / Slade-Robinson, Nikki
“Hauraki Broo, a young Bryde’s Whale, is searching for food but it’s getting harder and harder to find. From award-winning children’s author and illustrator Nikki Slade Robinson comes a beautiful and inspiring tale that addresses the challenges faced by marine life in the Hauraki Gulf, skillfully reminding us of the importance of the conservation of our whole marine environment”– Publisher description.” (Catalogue)

Also available in te reo Māori.

Our blue planet / Stewart-Sharpe, Leisa
“With all its variety, expanse and wonder, discover how much there is to love about Our Blue Planet. Our oceans are home to the greatest diversity of life on Earth and cover 71 percent of the planet. With so much to discover, this book introduces creatures beyond imagination.” — Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

Miracle Seeds, Unicorns and Greedy Peas – New Kids Books in the Collection

There is so much to read, learn and enjoy in the latest bunch of books added to our collection.  You can find out why seals are jerks, or what happens when a greedy pea eats all the food.  Read about a cake-baking inflatable donut or some eerie stories that will make you tremble.  Maybe you’d prefer unicorns, tuatara or seashells.  Whatever you’re interested in, you’ll find something fascinating in this selection.

Picture books

The princess and the (greedy) pea / Hodgkinson, Leigh
“We all know ‘There was an old lady who swallowed a fly’. But have you heard the one about the greedy pea who swallowed a sprout? And slurped up the soup… gobbled the cake… and drank all the tea… And made one particular princess very… grumpy.” (Catalogue)

What you need to be warm / Gaiman, Neil
“During the coldest season, when the world feels scary, what do you remember about being warm? Baked potatoes. Trust. A kettle on the stove. Blankets. A smile. And, most of all, the reassurance that you belong.” (Catalogue)

Seals are jerks / Chapman, Jared
“Seals are Lorelei’s favorite animal: they’re so cute and cuddly and best buddies with penguins. Well… that’s what she thought before learning the ugly truth — some seals EAT penguins! She doesn’t want to believe it at first, but she drags Penguin, the classroom guest, and seal whistleblower, to Antarctica to prove Penguin wrong and confront Seal face-to-face. And Seal finally reveals the truth.” (Catalogue)

Too much! : an overwhelming day / Gutiérrez, Jolene
“Sometimes everything is too much! Too loud, too bright, and all too overwhelming. Writing from her own experience with sensory processing disorder, Jolene Gutiérrez’s compassionate picture book explores the struggles of a sensorily sensitive child and how they settle themselves. Joined by Angel Chang’s beautiful illustrations, young readers will learn that it’s OK if some days are too much.” (Catalogue)

Comic Books

The miracle seed / Lemelman, Martin
“The thrilling true story of an ancient plant, wonderfully reborn in the modern era through the hard work of two female scientists. Thousands of years ago, in a time of rebellion, the Jewish people fought against their Roman rulers. The brutal Emperor Titus ordered the destruction of everything precious to the Jews: towns, villages, even their beloved Judean date palm trees. Centuries passed. The Jewish people were scattered, and the Judean date palm faded into extinction. Then, in 1963, a team of archaeologists uncovered two-thousand-year-old date palm seeds at the ruined fortress of Masada. For another forty years the seeds waited–until 2004, when Israeli scientist Dr. Sarah Sallon had a big, courageous idea. What if those ancient seeds could bring the Judean date palm back to life? Dr. Sallon recruited her friend Dr. Elaine Solowey, and their amazing experiment began…” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Eerie tales from the school of screams / Annable, Graham
“School is tough. School is scary. School is EERIE. No one knows this better than Davis and Emily. But they’re not scared of school because of tough tests or merciless vice-principals. No, they’re scared because their teacher wants her students to present the class with the spookiest, most chilling stories they can think of. Are you ready to stare down “The Face in the Forest”? Do you think you can handle the truth behind “The Village that Vanished?” Lock the doors, turn on all the lights, and arm yourself with candy– you’ll need all the help you can get to face these nightmares.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The Inflatables in Snack to the future / Garrod, Beth
“Determined to turn Lynn’s frown upside down on her birthday, Donut attempts to bake the best cake EVER, but when his secret recipe accidentally sends the inflata-gang and bouncy BFFs time traveling, they must face some fearsome foes to get back home.” (Catalogue)

Chapter Books

Project F / DuPrau, Jeanne
“WELCOME TO THE FUTURE. There are no cars, planes, television, or smart phones. Climate change wreaked havoc on Earth hundreds of years ago, and now people live a simpler life. Then thirteen-year-old Keith uncovers a secret. It’s a mysterious mission known only as Project F. It’s advanced, it’s scientific, and it’s going to change the world. It’s exactly the kind of adventure Keith has always longed to be a part of. And what is adventure without a little danger, right? But how much danger is Keith willing to risk? For himself? For his family? For his community? For the entire world…?” (Catalogue)

Green / Gino, Alex
“Crushes are confusing. Green is very lucky. They’ve got a supportive dad, friendly neighbors, and good friends. They’ve figured out a lot of things…but they can’t figure out what to do about Ronnie. Ronnie’s a boy who’s been in Green’s class for awhile. He’s sweet. Funny. And lately Green’s heart has raced a little faster whenever he’s around. Green is pretty sure about their own feelings, but when it comes to how Ronnie feels, they have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA. When Green doesn’t get a part in the school musical — a very untraditional version of The Wizard of Oz — they join the crew to work alongside Ronnie. Is this a good idea? Green’s about to find out…” (Catalogue)

Neon and the unicorn hunters / Pounder, Sibéal
“Now a fully-fledged unicorn (no, not the horse kind, the ultra-powerful human-looking kind), Neon Gallup is LOVING her secret double life in the extraordinary UNIverse, creating goo-powered magic and going on adventures with her unicorn friends. Little does she know that she has been spotted opening a portal by none other than the neighbourhood unicorn hunter, Priscilla. Now that she’s seen Neon’s portal opener, Priscilla is determined to steal it and destroy unicorns once and for all. With the unicorn hunters closing in on all sides, will Neon discover the sinister plot in time to save the day once again?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Cut loose / Stroker, Ali
“Thirteen-year-old Nat jumps at the chance to participate in the middle school regional theatre competition where the winner gets to perform on Broadway, but when stressful rehearsals negatively impact her friendships, she starts to wonder if it is worth doing theatre at all.” (Catalogue)

Non-Fiction

A shell is cozy / Aston, Dianna Hutts
“From the acclaimed duo Dianna Hutts Aston and Sylvia Long comes this gorgeous look at the fascinating world of shells. From land snails to freshwater mussels, giant clams to tiny, an incredible array of shells are showcased in all their splendor. Poetic in voice and elegant in design, this carefully researched book will spark the imaginations of children in classroom reading circles as well as on parents’ laps.” (Catalogue)

What is war / Altarriba, Eduard
“What is War? is a book designed to offer a simple answer to all the questions kids might ask when hearing about war and conflict. Why do countries or different ideological groups fight? What are the key points between different types of conflict? Is there such a thing as a just war? What are the tools used to wage war, from weapons to propaganda? How can we end wars, and who are the real winners and losers? This book tells the reader through clear explanations punctuated by historical and contemporary examples what war is and how it can be prevented.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Tuatara : a living treasure / Furze, Katie
“Meet Tuatara, ancient wonder, wildlife treasure … and survivor! Blinking, she pulls her scaly body into the light. She’s as long as a finger, and with the row of spines on her back she looks like a baby dragon. Tuatara are survivors of an ancient era and sometimes referred to as living wonders – their closest relatives died out during the time of the dinosaurs 60 million years ago!” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The world of Studio Ghibli / Leader, Michael
“Welcome to the world of Studio Ghibli, a place where you can learn to fly on the slightest breeze and where monsters are never what they seem. Whether you dream of riding on a dragon’s back like Chihiro, catching the Catbus with Mei or living in a moving castle with the wizard Howl, this book will show you Studio Ghibli’s most beloved characters and films. Why not dress up with Kiki and Pazu, cook ramen with Ponyo or make your very own animated soot sprite? What are you waiting for? The magic is just a train ride away.” (Catalogue)

For more new books in the collection, go to: What’s new / February 2024 (wcl.govt.nz)

Cheese, Cryptids, Crime and Cooking – New Kids Books in the Collection

It’s a new year, and we have some amazing and exciting new books in our collection for kids. Among many other new titles available this month, get your teeth into a cheesy picture book, explore the world of cryptids in a new comic, or delve into crime or learn to cook! Take a look at some of our suggestions below.

Picture Books

The Big Cheese / John, Jory
“The Big Cheese is the best at everything, and brags about it, too. When the annual Cheese-cathlon comes around, the Big Cheese is prepared to win, as always. But what happens when the quiet new kid, Wedge Wedgeman, comes out on top? Is a slice of humility all the Big Cheese needs to discover that some things are better than being the best?” (Catalogue)

Look / Woodcock, Fiona
“A brother and sister spend an exciting day at the zoo where they find balloons, baboons, kangaroos, and more. Told entirely through illustrations and single words containing a double “O”.” (Catalogue)

Geoffrey gets the jitters / Shireen, Nadia
“Geoffrey’s got the jitters! It started last night when he was thinking about school – a funny, wiggly feeling in his tummy that grew and grew. But when Geoffrey’s tummy jitters started talking to him – that’s when he knew they were out of control. Geoffrey had to do something.” (Catalogue)

When grandpa wore a tutu / McMillan, Dawn
“Back in the day, Grandpa was a dairy farmer who milked cows while dreaming of dancing ballet. His dream comes true when the local farmers put on a performance of Swan Lake at the country hall and Grandma sews him a tutu ready for his starring role. Together with his farmer friends, they dance up a storm, wearing a variety of unusual footwear, including Grandpa in his gumboots!” (Adapted from Catalogue)


Comics

Cryptid kids [1] : the Bawk-ness Monster / Goetter, Sara
“Before she moves away to a new city, Penny wants to prove that she was truly saved from drowning by the Bawk-ness Monster but instead must rescue kidnapped cryptids from an evil collector along with Luc and K.” (Catalogue)

Duel / Bagley, Jessixa
“Sixth grader Lucy loves fantasy novels and is brand-new to middle school. GiGi is the undisputed queen bee of eighth grade (as well as everything else she does). They’ve only got one thing in common: fencing. Oh, and they’re sisters. They never got along super well, but ever since their dad died, it seems like they’re always at each other’s throats. When GiGi humiliates Lucy in the cafeteria on the first day of school, Lucy snaps and challenges GiGi to a duel with high sisterly stakes. But after their scene in the cafeteria, both girls are on thin ice with the principal and their mom…” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Things in the basement / Hatke, Ben
“It was supposed to just be a normal basement – some storage boxes, dust, you know, the usual basement stuff. But when Milo is sent by his mother to fetch a sock from the basement of the historic home they’ve moved into, Milo finds a door in the back that he’s never seen before. Turns out that the basement of his house is enormous. In fact, there is a whole world down there. As Milo travels ever deeper into the Basement World, he meets the many Things that live in the shadows and gloom… and he learns that to face his fears he must approach even the strangest creatures with kindness.” (Catalogue)

Mabuhay / Sterling, Zack
“First-generation Filipino siblings, JJ and Althea, struggle to belong at school. JJ wants to fit in with the crowd, while Althea wants to be accepted as she is. But between the leftover Filipino food their mom packs for their lunches to having a last name that nobody can pronounce, any sense of belonging seems like a long shot. But when witches, ogres, and other creatures from those same stories appear in their town and threaten their family, JJ and Althea realize that the myths their parents have always told them may be more real than they’d suspected. Can JJ and Althea embrace who they really are and save their family?” (Adapted from Catalogue)


Chapter Books

The after school crime club / Webster, Hayley
“Willow has always felt like an outsider at school, but she and her Nanna were so alike that she never felt alone. Now Nanna is gone and Willow is adrift. So when a group of girls offer her friendship in exchange for “fun” stealing dares, Willow can’t say no. But as the dares escalate, she has to ask herself: How far will she go to fit in?” (Catalogue)

Stuntboy, in-between time / Reynolds, Jason
“Portico Reeves is the greatest superhero a lot of people have never heard of. He likes it that way–then no one can get in the way of him from keeping other people safe. Super safe. He’s Stuntboy. There’s been one major fail. He couldn’t save his parents from becoming Xs. Which is a word that sounds like coughing up a hairball. But don’t talk to him about the divorce, because of the hairball thing, and also, it gives Portico the frets. What’s also giving him frets is his parents living on two separate floors in their apartment building. So when Portico and new friend, Herbert, and best best friend, Zola, discover an empty apartment, unlocked, they are psyched. It’s a perfect hideout, and hangout, and it’s not half anyone’s…it’s all theirs. Problem is, that gives some Grown Up People the frets, which leads to double frets for Portico. And he’s not sure his arsenal of stunts can combat that.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Tiny the secret adventurer / Bushby, Aisha
“Tiny is a small creature with a big heart living in a school garden. Her animal neighbours don’t like her because she looks like a human. They think humans are big, noisy and messy and they’re scared. But when Frog is in danger Tiny comes to the rescue and makes friends!” (Catalogue)

Alebrijes / Higuera, Donna Barba
“For 400 years, Earth has been a barren wasteland. The few humans that survive scrape together an existence in the cruel city of Pocatel — or go it alone in the wilderness beyond, filled with wandering spirits and wyrms. 13 year-old pickpocket Leandro and his sister Gabi do what they can to forge a life in Pocatel. When Gabi is caught stealing precious fruit from the Pocatelan elite, Leando takes the fall. But his exile proves more than he ever could have imagined — far from a simple banishment, his consciousness is placed inside an ancient drone and left to fend on its own. But beyond the walls of Pocatel lie other alebrijes like Leandro who seek for a better world — as well as mutant monsters, wasteland pirates, a hidden oasis, and the truth.” (Adapted from Catalogue)


Non Fiction

David Atherton’s baking book for kids / Atherton, David
“Preheat the oven and get cracking–there are bakes to make! From snacky samosas to hot cross hedgehogs, from loaves baked in flowerpots to an ombre cake (your friends will think it came from a fancy bakery), these recipes are so delicious and easy to follow, they’ll have the reader named star baker in no time! Featuring oven-hot tips, a review of a baker’s cupboard, an equipment list, step-by-step instructions, and delightful illustrations by award-winning illustrator Harry Woodgate, this collection of mouthwatering recipes from David Atherton will bring little bakers and their loved ones together in the kitchen again and again.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Welcome to the mysteryverse / Gifford, Clive
“Science is pretty amazing, but even though we know more about our universe than ever before, there still remain lots of unanswered questions that fascinate and perplex even the greatest scientific minds. This book is a compendium of these riveting unsolved mysteries, that still have us wondering… How? What? Why? From the personal (Why do we have fingerprints? Why do we yawn?) to the fundamental (How did life begin? Is anybody out there?) to the downright funny (Why do cats sit in circles?) The colourful and arresting artwork draws readers in further to ask How? What? And Why? This riveting book will capture the imagination of curious minds young and old. Maybe they can solve some of these riddles. Or maybe, some things will remain in the Mysteryverse …” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Invisible things / Miller, Andy J
“This creatively wacky and interactive exploration of the abstract concepts of the human experience, such as feelings and thoughts, encourages readers to look past the visible and connect with the things that are not seen.” (Catalogue)

For more new items in the collection, go to: What’s new / January 2024 (wcl.govt.nz)

Dinosaurs!

If you’ve been doing the Summer Reading Adventure then you might have hunted around your local library to find hidden dinosaurs as part of the Library of Adventure challenge. Or if you’ve been hanging out in Pōneke then you might have seen ads for the new Dinosaurs of Patagonia exhibition at Te Papa. So let’s dive into the wonderful, weird, and even a little bonkers world of dinosaurs.

What are dinosaurs?

Assembled skeleton of a tyrannosaurus rex, focused on the skull.

A scary T-Rex has been humbled by the passage of time.

While dinosaurs are famous from movies like Jurassic Park and iconic childhood shows like The Land Before Time there is more to them than how they are pictured on the big screen. For example, dinosaurs get a bad rep for being carnivorous monsters in movies but most of them (65%) were actually herbivores who had plant-based diets long before veganism became cool. And, even though The Land Before Time features some cool dinosaurs, some of them didn’t even exist at the same time! (Littlefoot is an apatosaurus, a species which lived nearly 80 million years before the saurolophus species that Ducky belonged to).

Anyway, dinosaurs are extinct (that means they aren’t around anymore) reptiles which roamed the earth between 251 and 65 million years ago! The three main periods when dinosaurs lived are: the Triassic period (251 – 200 million years ago), the Jurassic period (200 – 145 million years ago) and the Cretaceous period (145 – 65 million years ago) which are collectively known as the Mesozoic Era.  Defining characteristics of dinosaurs include that they had tails, laid eggs, lived on land, had two holes in the skull behind each eye, and the term dinosaur does not include the animals which flew or swam during the same period.

How do we learn about dinosaurs?

Nine dinosaur eggs fossilized in dirt.

Thankfully no mad scientist can use these to reincarnate dinosaurs, but they look cool.

Scientists called palaeontologists study fossils (the preserved remains of ancient creatures) to figure out what the earth was like thousands, and even millions of years ago. Even though Aotearoa might seem far away and difficult to get to for reptiles, dinosaurs still existed here because at the time they lived the world looked a lot different. During the Triassic and early Jurassic period, New Zealand (and Australia, South America, India, Africa and Antartica) were part of a supercontinent called Gondwanaland! This means dinosaurs didn’t have to swim across the Indian Ocean to find their way here, they could just walk.

For a long time people assumed that dinosaurs never roamed Aotearoa but in 1975 that changed thanks to amateur palaeontologist Joan Wiffen. Joan Wiffen, along with her husband Pont, discovered the tail bone of a theropod in 1975 and thus found proof that dinosaurs did once exist here, opening up lots of interesting and exciting scientific possibilities. Over the next three decades she discovered bones from an ankylosaur, mosasaurs, plesiosaurs and a titanosaur. If you now want to become an amateur palaeontologist yourself then you’re in luck! The library has plenty of books on dinosaurs which can help you learn more about these awesome creatures.

Books about dinosaurs:

Lots of things to know about dinosaurs / Maclaine, James
“Open this book to go back in time and meet lots of incredible dinosaurs. Featuring incredible illustrations and fun facts, this book is a great introduction to the world of dinosaurs. (Adapted from Catalogue)

Dinosaurium / Murray, Lily
“This junior edition of ‘Dinosaurium’ is perfect for those with a love of the natural world. Wander the galleries — open 365 days a year — and discover a collection of curated exhibits on every page.” (Catalogue)

Fossil / Taylor, Paul D
“Packed with striking photography, Eyewitness Fossil explores the creatures and plants that lived long ago. Become an eyewitness to the natural treasures found in rocks in this picture-led reference guide that will take you on a visual tour of all things fossils. Children will be mesmerized by the bones, teeth, and plants from long ago that have all been turned to rock.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Dinosaurs : the myth-busting guide to prehistoric beasts
“Discover what dinosaurs were REALLY like in this myth busting book! Find out how the real dinosaurs actually lived, looked and sounded in this fascinating book. While popular Hollywood movies have given us a simplistic view of these magnificent creatures, the latest scientific research is changing assumptions and providing a far different perspective.” (Catalogue)

Dinosaur / Lambert, David
“Meet the incredible creatures of the prehistoric world. This essential guide to dinosaurs, from tiny, chicken-sized Compsognathus to the mighty, long-necked Brachiosaurus, this book unearths fascinating facts about these prehistoric creatures. With colourful and factual illustrations, informative labels, statistics and fun-filled facts, this is the perfect all round guide for dinosaur lovers and budding palaeontologists.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Books about palaeontologists:

Dinosaur hunter : Joan Wiffen’s awesome fossil discoveries / Hill, David
“The true story of palaeontologist Joan Wiffen, whose fossil discoveries proved that dinosaurs lived in ancient New Zealand.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Paleontologists / Gibson, Karen Bush
“Discover the stories of Mary Anning, Mignon Talbot, Tilly Edinger, Zofia Kielan-Jaworowska, and Mary Leakey, five female palaeontologists who thrived while making breakthrough discoveries of ancient life from millions of years ago! In Gutsy Girls Go for Science: Palaeontologists with STEM Projects for Kids, readers ages 8 to 11 do fun hands-on projects while learning about these women and the fascinating lives they led in the field and in the lab.” (Catalogue)

The fossil hunter / Winter, Kate
“Unearth the mysteries of ancient fossils and discover the life and legacy of Mary Anning in this beautifully illustrated, fact-filled book for curious young readers. Mary Anning was a fossil hunter, scouring the cliffs and seashores of Lyme Regis for strange rocks and shells. Mary’s fossils paved the way for modern palaeontology and helped to piece together a picture of how the dinosaurs lived and evolved.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Mary Anning / Sánchez Vegara, Ma Isabel
“When Mary was little, her family was very poor. She used to help her dad to comb for shells and bones up high on dangerous cliffs. After receiving a book as a gift from a kind benefactor, Mary learned all about fossils. She continued to hunt for them and made the startling discovery of a complete skeleton of an ichthyosaur. Sadly, she wasn’t allowed to study along with all the other men, but she carried on making her own discoveries and advising the Geological Society when they needed help. It took a lifetime to receive recognition but we all remember her now as the mother of palaeontology.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Pūngāwerewere: Spider!

If you’re taking part in the Summer Reading Adventure this year you’ll have come across a few different challenges that ask you to go outside and take a close look at what’s around you. There’s The Upward Looking Urban Photographer which asks you to look upwards in a place familiar to you and spot something new, there’s On the Mountain – Matairangi Quest which challenges you to visit the Matairangi Nature Trail on Mount Victoria and tell us about something you learned or spotted there, there’s Nature’s Perfect Challenge where we ask you to use your senses to investigate the natural world around you, and of course there’s He Rapa Ngāngara te Mahi | The Great Bug Hunt where we challenge you to search out some creepy-crawlies outside.

One creature you might come across while you’re completing these activities is the pūngāwerewere (or spider), and we thought we’d share some of the really interesting things about spiders with you.

Have you heard of the strange phenomenon where spiders’ webs can blanket an entire area of plants including trees? The phenomenon is a survival tactic called ballooning and it is where spiders spin large webs which catch onto grass, shrubs and trees to escape threats like flooding. This happened a couple of years ago in the state of Victoria, Australia, after a storm caused flooding and left the ground covered in a ballooning blanket of webs.

Spiders are amazing creatures that have adapted to find all sorts of ways to survive. Sadly, they get a really bad rap as their scary appearance makes many people frightened of them. Did you know that the irrational fear of spiders is called Arachnophobia? This word comes from Greek mythology, where Arachne, a skilled weaver, was turned into a spider by the goddess Athena after winning a weaving competition with the goddess (Athena was not happy!).

20 fun facts about spiders

1)Black spider in web clip art, cute style 12cm | This clipart… | Flickr Spiders are not insects. Instead, spiders are known as arachnids because they only have two body segments instead of three. Other arachnids are scorpions, mites, and ticks.
2) Spiders spin webs to catch other bugs to eat, but not all spiders make webs! Some actively hunt their prey and pounce.
3) Most spiders are not dangerous to humans.
4) The wolf spider carries her babies on her back with her.
5) Most spiders live on land, but a few, like the raft spiders, live in and on water. These spiders can “run” across the water’s surface.
6) On average, it takes a spider about 60 minutes to spin a web.
7) Spiders are just as valuable to the world as larger animals, but most people don’t realize it. Many spiders are becoming endangered and are disappearing due to loss of habitat (home).
8) The average house has 30 spiders.
9) You are always three feet away from a spider.
10) Grass spiders build a web on top of the grass. Their webs form a funnel shape, which is not sticky.
11) The silk strands in a web are 5x stronger than a piece of steel the same size.
12) Spiders have short hairs on their feet that allow them to walk upside down on ceilings and over glass.
13) Spiders are found everywhere in the world except for the cold polar regions of the Arctic and Antarctic.
14) The average life of a spider is one to two years. Although the female tarantula may live up to 20 years!

I’m trying to love spiders : (it isn’t easy) / Barton, Bethany
“This fresh and very funny non-fiction picture book shares lots of fascinating facts about spiders in an entirely captivating way. If I’m Trying to Love Spiders doesn’t cure your spider phobia, it’ll at least make you appreciate how amazing they are…and laugh a lot as you learn about them.”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

Bug lab for kids : family-friendly activities for exploring the amazing world of beetles, butterflies, spiders, and other arthropods / Guyton, John W.
“Prepare to cozy up with spiders, centipedes, butterflies, and bees, to name just a few! In Bug Lab for Kids, Mississippi State University associate professor, extension entomologist (bug expert), and educator John W. Guyton shares his knowledge and excitement about all things beautiful, creepy, and crawly.” (Catalogue)

Australia’s most dangerous spiders– and their relatives / Riley, Kathy
“Dangerous to people or not? Learn how to recognise the most deadly spiders – and how to help someone who has been bitten. Discover the amazing tricks spiders use to catch plenty of insects for their dinner. Find out how to tell thich sipder made the huge web that appeared in your garden overnight. Inspect some astonishing close-up photos of spiders on the hunt for food or hiding from their enemies.” (Catalogue)

Insects and spiders / Parker, Steve
“A first nature book about insects and spiders for children, this is the perfect companion for young minds eager to learn about the world of bugs. Children are encouraged to investigate and record all the creepy crawlies they find, and get hands on with the fun activities, from making your own bug hotel to collect insects in to building an ant farm.With a mix of fantastic photographs and beautiful illustrations Insects and Spiders takes you through everything you need to know about these minibeasts. Learn what termites build their nests from, how an earwig looks after her eggs, and why wasps have black and yellow stripes.” (Catalogue)


Want to read some fiction books that feature spiders?

Sam Wu is NOT afraid of spiders! / Tsang, Katie
“The brilliantly funny fourth book in the SAM WU series, starring the bravest scaredy-cat in the world! Perfect for reluctant readers and fans of Tom Fletcher, Pamela Butchart and Humza Arshad’s Badman. Sam Wu is NOT afraid of anything. Well, maybe some things. Like ghosts, sharks … the dark’s pretty worrying too. And not to mention SPIDERS! But Sam’s not going to let anyone know. And so when Tulip, the school tarantula, disappears from her cage, Sam decides it’s up to him and his friends to save the school from the eight-legged escapee … Common childhood fears dealt with in a hilarious, sensitive and accessible way. ding charity, and also writes YA fiction as Katherine Webber.” (Catalogue)

Charlotte’s web / White, E. B.
“One spring morning a little girl called Fern rescues a runt and names him Wilbur. But then Wilbur is sent to live on a farm where he meets Charlotte, a beautiful large grey spider. They become best friends and, when Wilbur is faced with the usual fate of nice fat little pigs, Charlotte must find a clever way to save him.” (Catalogue)

The spider’s song / Longstaff, Simon
“The Spider’s Song is a remarkable debut children’s book, written by Simon Longstaff and illustrated by Dutch artist Marc Van de Griendt. Lose yourself in the enchanted world of The Boffin, who as a young science prodigy dared to compete with Mother Nature and create his very own perfect world. Years go by and the Boffin enjoys his solitude, inventing creatures most bizarre: ovelwoozers, worralots, midbits and phtphts, each more weird and wonderful then the next. That is until a clever spider and a curious girl venture into his world to teach him the most important lesson of all, one he won’t find in any textbook or lab. With subtle messages woven throughout, The Spider’s Song teaches adults and children alike the value of nature, acceptance, humanity and friendship.” (Catalogue)

The very busy spider / Carle, Eric
“The farm animals try to divert a busy little spider from spinning her web, but she persists and produces a thing of both beauty and usefulness. The pictures may be felt as well as seen.” (Catalogue)

Sophie’s masterpiece : a spider’s tale / Spinelli, Eileen
“Sophie the spider makes wondrous webs, but the residents of Beekman’s Boarding House do not appreciate her until at last, old and tired, she weaves her final masterpiece.” (Catalogue)

Stink and the hairy scary spider / McDonald, Megan
“Creepy! Crawly! Criminy! Stink is bonkers about most scientific things. But dangle a spider in front of him and he goes berserk! Stink is so freaked out by spiders that he can’t read about them. He can’t look at them. He can’t think about them. And he for sure can’t touch them! Stink has arachnophobia (a fear of spiders), and he has it bad. But when a hairy backyard emergency arises, Stink is forced to face his fear–and eight beady eyes–head-on. Will he manage to tame the heebie-jeebies, or will he remain stuck in his web of tarantulan terror? ” (Catalogue)

Whales, Wildfire, Worries and Wasabi: New Kids Books in the Collection

Another month of fantastic new books in the kid’s collection!  So many great titles it was hard to choose which ones to share with you here.  You could read about whales, sharks or a two headed chicken!  Maybe you’re keen for adventure, and can follow the magnificent voyagers of the pacific, or survivors of a wildfire, or some impossible creatures?  Take a look at these titles below and maybe try something new!

Picture Books

The great storm whale / Davies, Benji

“Return to the world of The Storm Whale in this dramatic new adventure from globally successful and award‑winning picture book creator, Benji Davies. One stormy night, Noi’s grandma tells him a story. It is a story of a girl, a whale and a friendship that will echo down the generations.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

I’m fabulous crab / Greenberg, Nicki

“Henry the crab grows tired of his dull life, vowing to reinvent himself as blingy, bedazzled, and fabulous.” (Catalogue)

Victor : the wolf with worries / Rayner, Catherine
“Victor the wolf has lots of worries. He worries that he isn’t brave enough, that he isn’t big enough and that he isn’t fierce enough. In fact, Victor feels anxious about almost everything. But when Victor shares his concerns with his best friend Pablo, he starts to feel a bit better. And with Pablo’s help, Victor learns even more ways to deal with those pesky worrying thoughts. And as the worries grow smaller, Victor feels a bit bigger, a bit braver, and bit fiercer inside!” (Catalogue)

Comic Books

Wildfire / Bard, Breena
“Julianna loved her life in rural Oregon. She loved taking care of her farm animals and being part of her local 4H club. But then the unthinkable happened… a wildfire destroyed her family’s home. In the aftermath, her family relocated to Portland, Oregon, where Julianna hopes to put everything behind her. Believing the fire to be the result of kids playing with fireworks, she certainly isn’t interested when her parents and younger sister start getting involved in the growing climate change protests. Emotional and inspiring, Wildfire shows readers that healing from tragedy can take many forms and demonstrates what it means to take action in the face of climate change – and how that action can be different for each of us.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Kariba / Clarke, Daniel
“Siku has always called the Zambezi River her home. She understands the water – and strangely enough, it seems to understand her, too, bending to her will and coming to her aid in times of need. But things are changing on the river – a great dam is being built, displacing thousands of Shonga people – and things are changing in Siku, too, as her ability to manipulate water grows out of control, and visions of a great serpent pull her further from reality and her loving father, Tongai. When Tongai ventures to the Kariba Dam to find a cure for Siku and never returns, she sets off to find him with the help of Amedeo, the young son of Kariba’s chief engineer. But Siku soon discovers that her father has been shielding a terrible secret: Siku is actually the daughter of the Great River Spirit, Nyaminyami, and the only way to bring about the necessary rumuko – a ritual which has brought balance to the Zambezi for centuries – is for Siku to give up the only life she’s ever known.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Beak to the future / Angleberger, Tom
“The two-headed chicken is back, with twice the adventure, twice the jokes, and a lot more heads (wait, did they just accidentally turn into a double-headed space snake?). Having lost the Astrocap somewhere in the multiverse, our intrepid hero dons the Timecap to scour the timestream, which looks a lot like broccoli, in search of it. But danger and drama await with every time-hopping POOZB! of the Timecap, including hungry dinosaurs, fierce werewolves, poet Emily Dickinson, a fish with a mustache who wants to talk about feelings, and even the return of the chicken’s archenemy, Kernel Antlers, the shape-shifting moose!” (Catalogue)

Chapter Books

Calling the whales / Bilan, Jasbinder
“After rowing out to an island near their seaside home, Tulsi and Satchen discover a whale that has been trapped in a fishing net. Determined to try to free the poor creature, they repeatedly dive down into the freezing sea to cut the netting, but eventually, exhausted and with a storm rolling in, they have to admit defeat. As they head for home to seek help, their boat capsizes in the storm and they’re left clinging to it, dangerously adrift. Just as they think all is lost, help arrives from an unexpected source …” (Catalogue)

This is how I roll / Florence, Debbi Michiko
“Susannah Mikami dreams of becoming a famous sushi chef like her dad. And this summer, she plans to learn everything about his traditional kitchen. Only he refuses to teach her, and won’t tell her why. Is it because he doesn’t want her to embarrass him in front of the documentary crew filming at his restaurant? Or worse, because she’s a girl? Either way, Sana decides he’s not the only one who can keep secrets. So when she meets Koji, a cute boy who wants to help her cook up some trouble in the kitchen — and film online tutorials to show the world her mad skills — Sana is all in. But sneaking around means lying to her parents, something Sana’s never done before. Can she take the heat, or will she get out of the kitchen for good?” (Catalogue)

Impossible creatures / Rundell, Katherine
“A boy called Christopher is visiting his reclusive grandfather when he witnesses an avalanche of mythical creatures come tearing down the hill. This is how Christopher learns that his grandfather is the guardian of one of the ways between the non-magical world and a place called the Archipelago, a cluster of magical islands where all the creatures we tell of in myth live and breed and thrive alongside humans. Then a girl, Mal, appears in Christopher’s world. She is in possession of a flying coat, is being pursued by a killer and is herself in pursuit of a baby griffin. Mal, Christopher and the griffin embark on an urgent quest across the wild splendour of the Archipelago, where sphinxes hold secrets and centaurs do murder, to find the truth – with unimaginable consequences for both their worlds.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Non-fiction

Mangō : sharks and rays of Aotearoa / Barraud, Ned
“The oceans surrounding Aotearoa New Zealand are home to over one hundred astonishing and strange species of sharks and rays. This fact-filled book takes you down into the fascinating underwater lives of these expert hunters, illustrates their evolution and explores their place in our culture. And it explains why these ancient fish and their environments need our kaitiakitanga more than ever.” (Catalogue)

The observologist / Clarkson, Giselle
“Observology is the study of looking. An observologist makes scientific expeditions, albeit very small ones, every day. They notice interesting details in the world around them. They are expert at finding tiny creatures, plants, and fungi. They know that water snails glide upside down on the undersurface of the water; not all flies have wings; earthworms have bristles; butterflies taste with their feet. An observologist knows that there are extraordinary things to be found in even the most ordinary places. Facts combine with comics, detailed illustrations, science, and funny stories in this unique, warm, and fascinating account of the small things all around us. Graphic and comic illustrations with funny talking insects make this a playful and informative book one to be treasured in the classroom.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Those magnificent voyagers of the Pacific / Crowe, Andrew
“This epic story begins 5000 years ago, when the ancestors of Polynesians discovered ways to ‘see’ over the horizon to find and settle new islands. As their landfinding skills grew, these people took ever bigger strides across the vast Pacific until they reached South America. It was not until almost every habitable island scattered across the world’s largest ocean was discovered and settled, that others would gain the skills and courage to head far from shore, allowing two great voyaging traditions to meet.” (Catalogue)

For more new books from the collection, go to: What’s new / December 2023 (wcl.govt.nz)

The Uppish Hen — Poems from a 1934 Christmas Stocking

In 1934, a young boy named Derek Challis discovered a collection of poems in his Christmas stocking written by his mother. Derek and his mum didn’t live together, but she loved him very much. His mother was one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s most talented authors, Robin Hyde who wrote many books for older readers using a penname, Iris Guiver Wilkinson. Hyde was also one of the first women who worked as a war correspondent, reporting on the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Derek adored these poems by his mother. On the front page of the manuscript of these poems, Hyde wrote that she “…hopes to have them printed with FUNNY PICTURES, ONE FINE DAY.” In 2023, that fine day finally arrived, and these poems have now been published as a beautiful book with funny illustrations!

Wairarapa writer and filmmaker Juanita Deely made a film about Robin Hyde and her son Derek, called A Home in This World, and became friends with Derek. Deely went on to edit this book of poems The Uppish Hen & Other Poems! The brilliant illustrations are by a Glenorchy artist, Dine. This wonderful book is published by The Cuba Press and is available to buy directly from The Cuba Press and good bookstores, or to borrow from the library.

Earlier this year, our kids’ blog writer Joseph had the wonderful opportunity to interview Juanita Deely, check it out here!

At Wellington City Libraries, He Matapihi ki te Ao Nui, we hope that everyone has all have a great Christmas and gets to spend plenty of time with their loved ones, and to remember everyone that we hold dear.

The Uppish Hen & Other Poems / Hyde, Robin (ed. Deely, Juanita)

A previously unpublished collection by Robin Hyde, one of NZ’s finest authors/ journalists, written for her son, Derek Challis. Richly illustrated by Glenorchy artist Dïne.

Iris and me / Werry, Philippa

Young adults and older readers should also check out the brilliant Iris and Me by  Philippa Werry, which won the Young Adult Fiction Award at the 2023 New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults.  We are lucky to have also had the opportunity to speak to Philippa about the creation of this book — watch her full interview with our Fiction Specialist Neil here.

Percy Jackson is back on screen!

In case you’ve missed it, the new adaptation of the beloved Percy Jackson series just released and our librarians are understandably excited. Earlier this year, the “What Comes Next?” series started by looking at Percy Jackson since it’s a favourite of many who work here. In that post, we focused on fiction books, but for this one we wanted to highlight that the library has excellent non-fiction choices for myth-mad kids as well.

If you loved the gods, goddesses, heroes and monsters mentioned in Percy Jackson then these pukapuka will help you learn even more about where they came from and what they did. There’s also some books on other ancient stories because the Greeks weren’t the only ones with cool gods and goddesses to learn about!

Complete Greek myths / Brook, Henry
“Comprehensive and beautiful volume of Greek Myths, including maps, glossary and every story you can think of! This comprehensive volume of Greek Myths contains all of the best known myths, told in a detailed and fresh way to alight the interest of any child or adult with an interest in the gods and heroes of Ancient Greece. Beautifully illustrated plates introduce all the characters, story by story, from the most famous to the more obscure.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Treasury of Greek mythology : classic stories of gods, goddesses, heroes & monsters / Napoli, Donna Jo
“Presents illustrated retellings of classic Greek myths, sharing the stories of Zeus, Aphrodite, Apollo, Athena, Helen of Troy, Perseus, and Medusa, with sidebars for each god, goddess, hero, and monster that link the tales to constellations, history, geography, and culture, and including profiles, a family tree, and other resources.” (Catalogue)

Greek myths / Braun, Eric
“Make the mythology of Ancient Greece come to life for young readers through engaging stories and dramatic photos and illustrations. Discover the gods and goddesses behind the myths and the powers they used to control and change the world. There’s Zeus, the king of the gods who ruled the sky, and Poseidon, the god and ruler of the seas, plus many more.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Poseidon : earth shaker / O’Connor, George
“Graphically adapts the adventures of the Greek god of the seas, presenting the myth of how Poseidon became the king of the oceans and such stories as Theseus and the Minotaur, Odysseus and Polyphemos, and the founding of Athens.” (Catalogue) While this comic is about Percy’s dad Poseidon there are also comics about lots of the other Olympians, including Zeus, Hades and Athena!

Myths & legends of Aotearoa : 15 timeless tales of New Zealand / Te Ake Ake, Annie Rae
“Fifteen timeless and essential Maori myths and legends are retold by gifted storyteller Annie Rae Te Ake Ake in this stunning, one-of-a-kind treasury.” (Catalogue)

Norse myths / Ralphs, Matt
“Exciting stories, extraordinary creatures, and compelling gods, goddesses, and heroes come together in this compendium of Norse myths – first told long ago by the Vikings. Read about Thor, the god of thunder and how he once disguised himself as a bride to seek revenge on a giant and retrieve his powerful hammer; Mjoelnir, and how Sif, the goddess of fertility had her long golden hair cut off by Loki, the trickster god. (Adapted from Catalogue)

Egyptian myths / Menzies, Jean
“Delve into a world of strange creatures, magical powers, and warring gods in this thrilling compendium of ancient Egyptian stories. With over 30 exciting tales alongside fascinating historical information, this is a must-have introduction for young readers interested in one of the world’s great early civilizations”–Publisher’s description.” (Catalogue)

Roman myths / Braun, Eric
“Make the mythology of Ancient Rome come to life for young readers through engaging stories and dramatic photos and illustrations. Discover the gods and goddesses behind the myths and the powers they used to control and change the world. There’s Jupiter, who ruled from the Roman pantheon and defended the state, and Neptune, the powerful god of the sea, plus many more.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Cool mythology : filled with fantastic facts for kids of all ages / Croft, Malcolm
“This fun book is a fascinating introduction to world mythology, broken up into handy bite-sized chunks. It covers all the main world mythologies, including Sumerian, Incan, African, Native American, African, Egyptian, Persian, Hindu, Norse and, of course, Greek and Roman. It explores mythological places like Atlantis and various versions of the afterlife, from the idyllic Arthurian Avalon to the rather less pleasant Yomi, the dark and gloomy underworld of Japanese mythology.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

A year full of stories / McAllister, Angela
“This treasury of 52 stories collects a re-telling of myths, fairy tales and legends from around the world, with a story for every week of the year. The book is broken into 12 chapters, for each of the 12 months of the year, and throughout, stories are matched to internationally celebrated dates, including Valentines Day and the International Day of Friendship, as well as seasonal events and festivals.–Publisher.” (Catalogue)

السلام عليكم Arabic Language Day 2023!

السلام عليكم

Asalaamu alaikum!  The 18th of December is the United Nations Arabic Language Day. Did you know that there are over 300 million native Arabic speakers worldwide? This makes Arabic one of the most widely spoken languages in the world.

Arabic is spoken by a diverse range of people across the African continent and the Middle East and is the official language of 22 countries. This includes Sudan, Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, and Palestine.

There are more and more people who live in New Zealand who come from these countries, or whose parents or grandparents come from these countries. You could practice saying “Asalaamu alaikum” as a greeting, or just “Salaam”. Which means peace be upon you. You can answer with “Wa’alaikum salaam”

 

Continue reading

Silent Wonders: Exploring Wordless Picture Books

Wordless books?

Wordless books, far from being ‘silent’, possess the ability to express a variety of feelings and emotions using only pictures! Colours, shapes and illustrations team up to craft awesome adventures, from wild fantasy worlds to personal heartwarming tales.

Guess what? These books are like a secret language everyone can understand. They are perfect for all kind of readers – from those just starting out to multilingual enthusiasts. Whether you’re a grown-up looking for a break from words or sharing the magic with a little one, these books promise a rich experience for readers of all ages.

Don’t skip out on this selection. We’ve got some classic stories and some fresh picks that let you dive into amazing stories without a single worry about words. And wait! there are some breathtaking pages that will have you absolutely hooked.

Ready for a wordless adventure?

All-time classics

The snowman / Briggs, Raymond
“When his snowman comes to life, a little boy invites him home and in return is taken on a flight high above the countryside.” (Catalogue)

The lion & the mouse / Pinkney, Jerry
“In this wordless retelling of an Aesop fable, an adventuresome mouse proves that even small creatures are capable of great deeds when he rescues the King of the Jungle.” (Catalogue)
The red book / Lehman, Barbara
“A little girl walking to school finds a red book in a bank of snow. At school, she opens it to find pictures of a tropical island and a young boy. The boy in her book finds his own red book in the sand. As they turn the pages, they discover themselves looking at each other. The girl has an idea and buys a huge bunch of balloons and floats into the sky. The boy watches her float off in the pages on his book.” (Adapted catalogue)

Great adventures

Wolf in the snow / Cordell, Matthew
“When a wolf cub and little girl are lost in a snowstorm they must find their way home.” (Catalogue)

Journey / Becker, Aaron
“Using a red marker, a young girl draws a door on her bedroom wall and through it enters another world where she experiences many adventures, including being captured by an evil emperor.” (Catalogue)


Migrants / Watanabe, Issa
“The migrants must leave the forest. Borders are crossed, sacrifices made, loved ones are lost. It takes such courage to reach the end. At last the journey is over and the migrants arrive. This is the new place. With forceful simplicity, Migrants narrates the journey of a group of animals leaving a leafless forest.” (Catalogue)

Points of view

The little barbarian / Moriconi, Renato
“Once upon a time, there was a little barbarian who was about to embark on a very dangerous journey. The brave adventurer knew there would be many perils ahead, including one-eyed giants and venomous snakes, manticores and sea serpents. Luckily, a barbarian can always rely on the trusty steed…” (Catalogue)
Zoom / Banyai, Istvan
“A wordless picture book presents a series of scenes, each one from farther away, showing, for example, a girl playing with toys which is actually a picture on a magazine cover, which is part of a sign on a bus, and so on.” (Catalogue)
Flotsam / Wiesner, David
“A pictorial discovery of what happens when a camera becomes a piece of flotsam. A sophisticated picture book. Suggested level: junior, primary.” (Catalogue)


Slice of life

Float / Miyares, Daniel
“Wordless picture book about a boy who loses his paper boat in the rain”– Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

 


Professional crocodile / Zoboli, Giovanna
“In this book without words, Mr. Crocodile gets up every morning and carefully gets ready for work — but just what is his job?” (Catalogue)