Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa 2022

Samoan Language Week Banner

Tālofa Lava! 

Sāmoa Language Week | Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa will be celebrated this year from Sunday, 29 May 2021 until Saturday, 4th June 2022. This is a chance for all New Zealanders to celebrate Sāmoan language, Sāmoan culture in New Zealand and around the world, and promote the use of Sāmoan language in schools, at work and at home.

Did you know that nearly 4% of New Zealanders are Sāmoan? That’s almost 200,000 people! Gagana Sāmoa is the 3rd most spoken language in Aotearoa, New Zealand!

Sāmoa has a unique historical relationship with New Zealand. It is the only country that New Zealand has a Treaty of Friendship. The Treaty of Friendship between Sāmoa and New Zealand is like a mutual project to support Tagata Sāmoa (Sāmoan people) to have better opportunities. Being proud of your language is such an important part of feeling proud of your culture.

This year’s theme for Vaiaso o le Gagana Samoa is:

Fa’aāuāu le Folauga i le Va’a o Tautai – Continue the Voyage with Competent Wayfinders of the Ocean.

2022 is also a significant year for the Samoan community, being the 60th anniversary of Samoa Independence. Communities are organising activities to commemorate this milestone, which coincides with Samoa Language Week.

Events for Samoa Language Week

As part of Samoa Language Week, there will be a Pasifika Pool Party! Find out more about the council events here.

Our friend the wonderful librarian Lewis from Johnsonville Library presents a special story in English and Gagana Sāmoa, How Do You Say ‘Thank You’? by Karamia Müller. Many thanks to the publisher Beatnik Publishing for allowing us to share this story!

Find Out More:

You can also visit your local library and borrow some amazing books to learn more about Samoan culture, and practice the language. All our libraries have Samoan books and Newtown Library has the biggest collection! If you don’t have a library card- you can sign up for free. If you are worried about fines- just talk to the staff, they can help.

Awesome Samoan books in our collection:

Losi the Giant fisherman : Samoan myths and legends pick a path collection / Malaeulu, Dahlia
Losi the Giant was the greatest fisherman across all the moana. A mischievous and loyal friend to sea creatures and all humans, Losi will always be remembered as the hero who brought taro, the food of the Gods’, to Earth.

Author and Publisher Dahlia Malaeulu lives in Wellington and has written and published lots of Samoan books. You can read her blog about how Losi the Giant fisherman was shaped by her son Mase who has Autism.

Available from Mila’s Books!

Also, read this really interesting article on the Spinoff!

Samoan heroes / Riley, David
“A collection of inspirational stories of achievers who have Samoan ancestry. It includes: contemporary heroes like Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, Troy Polamalu, Judge Ida Mālosi, Savage and Associate Professor Donna Adis; historical figures like Emma Coe, Tamasese, Salamāsina and Lauaki; legends like Sina, Tiʻitiʻi and Tigilau”–Back cover.” (Catalogue). Also available as an eBook.

Fanene Peter Maivia : son of Samoa / Riley, David
“Fanene Peter Maivia – Son of Samoa is the remarkable story of the first Polynesian to become a star of professional wrestling. Fanene’s life began in Samoa and he took Samoa to the world. He was a pioneer who inspired some of the greatest wrestlers the world has known, including his own grandson, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.”–Publisher’s description.” (Catalogue). Also available as an eBook.

Brush up on your geography and history with…

Samoa / Aiono-Iosefa, Sarona
“Did you know that the English word ‘tattoo’ is supposedly derived from the Samoan word ‘tatau’? Find out about the traditional methods still used by Samoans to apply the amazing tattoos worn by many of the islands’ people today. In this book you will discover that an ‘ie toga is a beautiful and intricate fine mat, woven by Samoan women and used as highly prized gifts, which are made and given to celebrate important occasions. You can also study the climate, population, social structure and political history of the thirteen islands that make up the beautiful countries of American Samoa and independent Samoa (formerly Western Samoa).” (Catalogue).

Samoa & Tuvalu / Guile, Melanie
This book contains information about the history, culture and people of Samoa and nearby Tuvalu. A great book to have just in time for Samoan Language week.
Learn some simple words and phrases

  • Tālofa lava: Hello (formal)
  • Mālō le soifua: Hello/Good health
  • ‘O ā mai ‘oe? How are you? (to one person only)
  • Manuia fa‘afetai: Good, thank you
  • Manuia le aso: Have a great day
  • Tōfā soifua: Good bye (formal)

Faʻafetai lava ma ʻia manuia tele le Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa!

Thank you and have a very blessed Sāmoan Language Week

Gasav Ne Fäeag Rotuạm Ta: Rotuman Language Week 2022

Noaʻia ʻe mḁuri gagaj ʻatakoa! Welcome to Gasav Ne Fäeag Rotuạm Ta | Rotuman Language Week 2022.

Poster courtesy of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.

What is Rotuman Language Week?

New Zealand is the only country in the world where the languages and culture of our Pasifika cousins are celebrated. Fäeag Rotuạm, the Rotuman language, is the first of nine Pasifika language weeks this year, and it runs from the 8th May – 14th May 2022. Rotuma Day itself was on the 6th of May.

Where is Rotuma you ask? The main island of Rotuma is about 13km by 4km and is about 580km from Fiji’s capital, Suva. Rotuma is a dependency of Fiji, so Rotumans will usually speak Fijian and English too! There are about 2000 Rotumans living on the island, and 10,000 living in mainland Fiji and globally.

More information about Rotuma Day and the history of Routma can be heard in this article from Radio NZ.

This year’s theme for Gasav Ne Fäeag Rotuạm Ta is:

Vetḁkia ‘os Fäega ma Ag fak hanua – Sustaining our Language and Culture.

In these times, when it sometimes feels like things are just moving too fast, we think this is a wonderful idea to reflect on.

So how do you speak Rotuman?

Well, Rotumans roll their ‘R’s and pronounce ‘G’ with a smooth ‘ing’ sound, similar to how ‘ng’ is pronounced in te reo Māori.

Here are some key phrases in Rotuman [Row-too-man]:
Noa’ia [Noah-e-yah]= Hello, greetings.
Ka ‘äe tapen? [Car eh tar-pen] = How are you?
Gou lelei fḁiåksia [Ngou leh-lay for-yak-see-yah] = I am well thank you.
Figalelei [Fee-nga-leh-lay] = Please
Fḁiåksia [Foyak-see-yah] = Thank you
Hanis ma röt’åk [Hah-niece mah röt-ack] = Sorry
La’ ma ḁlalum [Lah mah aw-lah-loom] = Goodbye (only to those leaving)
Fu’ ma ḁlalum [Foo mah aw-lah-loom] = Goodbye (only to those staying)

Find more words and phrases in this language guide produced by the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.

The Ministry for Pacific Peoples provides great resources and information about our Pasifika languages and cultural events. Visit the official NZ Rotuman Language Week Facebook page, and the official website, for more information about Rotuman Language Week 2022!

Te Vāiaho o te Gagana Tokelau 2021

Fakamālo atu kia te koutou uma! Welcome to Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau | Tokelau Language Week 2021. Tokelauan is spoken by around 1,600 people on the three atolls of Tokelau — Nukunonu, Fakaofo, and Atafu — and over 2,000 people in Aotearoa. Tokelauan people are an important part of our community here in Wellington, with over 4,000 people of Tokelauan descent living in the region — around half of the whole Tokelauan population in Aotearoa. (Source: 2018 Census)

This year, the theme for Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau is:

“Tokelau! Tapui tau gagana ma tau aganuku, i te manaola ma te lautupuola.” | “Tokelau! Preserve your language and culture, to enhance spiritual and physical wellbeing.”

Help us celebrate this special time for the community by learning more about Tokelau’s unique culture, language and history through the books and other resources below!


Books

Check out some of these books from our children’s section from and about Tokelau, and in Gagana Tokelau:

Tokelau heroes / Riley, David
“Tokelau Heroes tells the inspirational stories of achievers who have Tokelauan ancestry. It includes legends like Hina; historical figures such as Ihaia Puka; and contemporary heroes like Opetaia Foa’i. It’s written to inspire young Tokelauans, to encourage reading and promote literacy.” (Catalogue)

Illustrated history of the South Pacific / Stenson, Marcia
“The South Pacific is not only our geographic environment, it is also our cultural environment, and many New Zealanders trace their ancestry to Polynesian seafarers. This book is an introduction to the history of the South Pacific. A companion book to Illustrated History of New Zealand, also written by Marcia Stenson, it covers the following topics: geology and geography, the arrival of the first people to the Pacific, European exploration, war in the Pacific, political issues both historic and current.” (Catalogue)

Ko te aho mālie o Filipo = Filipo’s fun day / Swan, Epi
“Describes Filipo’s full-on day at ʻakoga kāmata.” (Catalogue)

Te faitauga o nā ika : ko he tala faka-Tokelau mai Niu Hila / Lemisio-Poasa, Nila
“Amanaki is taught the Tokelau way of counting fish by his uncle. Suggested level: primary, intermediate, junior secondary.” (Catalogue)

Ko te tokotoko o toku tupuna = Papa’s tokotoko / Sione, Emeli
“Alo, the eldest grandson, initially rejects, but in the end takes on his responsibility to be a support for his grandfather.” (Catalogue)

Valigā magō : Painting sharks / Baker, Vaitoa
“It’s painting day at school. Hale and his best friend Ioane choose to paint pictures of sharks.” (Catalogue)

Also, visit this link to find even more children’s books in Gagana Tokelau at your local library.


Virtual Storytime

Head on over to our YouTube channel where you can watch and listen to our librarian Lewis read a special story — Lightning Boy from Tokelau Heroes by David Riley, a modern retelling of a traditional Tokelauan legend. We would like to thank David for allowing us to share this beautiful story with you throughout Tokelau Language Week this year — fakafetai, David! Make sure to check out the Reading Warrior website to find more stories of the Pacific from David and his collaborators.



More Resources

Check out the following websites to find out more about the atolls of Tokelau and this beautiful country’s culture, language and history:

Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niuē 2021

Fakaalofa lahi atu ki a mutolu oti! Welcome to Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niuē | Niuē Language Week 2021. With over 30,000 people of Niuean descent living in New Zealand, the Niuean population is our fourth largest Pasifika community.

The theme for Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niuē this year is:

“Kia Tupuolaola e Moui he Tagata Niuē” | “May the Tagata Niuē thrive.”

Join us at Wellington City Libraries as we celebrate this special time by exploring Niuē’s unique culture and language through books and other resources below!


Books

Check out some of these books from our children’s section from and about Niuē, and in Vagahau Niuē:

The woman who was swallowed by a whale : a tale from Niue / Wilton, Briar
“The woman who was swallowed by a whale is a folktale ; Niue : rock of Polynesia is a short factual introduction to the country and culture.” (Catalogue)

Kuaka visits Niue / Peterson,Vanessa
“Uses a story format and the concept of bird migration to introduce places in Niue, food and customs.” (Catalogue)

Tales of Niue nukututaha : in Niuean and English / Feilo, Zora
“A collection of twelve stories in both English and Niuean set on the island if Niue, this is the author’s reinterpretation of myth, legend and storytelling from her native land. Each story is lavishly illustrated by Niuean artist Lange Taufelila.” (Catalogue)

The artist and the whale = Fifine pulotu mo e tafuā : a Niue legend / Riley, David
“Mataginifale is a Niue superhero with a difference. She isn’t known for her super powers, but for her super creativity. One day she had an argument with a whale that tested her thinking skills too”” (Catalogue)

Show day / MacGregor, Jill
“Livisia, who lives in the village of Alofi South on the island of Niue, describes how her village hosts Show Day, a day of celebrations for the whole island. Includes some Niuean words and a glossary. In picture book format.” (Catalogue)

We are the rock! / Riley, David
“In We are the Rock, contemporary Niueans, historical and legendary figures tell their stories of focus, expression and achievement. They are Niuean tāoga (treasure) and include: * Dr Vili Nosa – the first Niuean awarded a Phd* Tutina Pasene – business woman and fashion designer* Sully Paea – youth worker* Pero Cameron – basketballer* John Pule – artist and writer* Frank Bunce – All Black* Stephanie Tauevihi – actress and singer* Che Fu – rapper/ singer* Fao and Huanaki – discoverers of Niue* Leveimatagi and Leveifualolo – legendary explorers.” (Catalogue)

Niuean for kids / Jahri Jah Jah
“Learn to speak words and phrases in Niuean. This book packs in many common words and phrases., including greetings, colours, numbers, body parts, animals and farewells. It is a great resource for anybody wanting to learn some basic words in Niuean. Suitable for ages 1+.” (Catalogue)

Illustrated history of the South Pacific / Stenson, Marcia
“The South Pacific is not only our geographic environment, it is also our cultural environment, and many New Zealanders trace their ancestry to Polynesian seafarers. This book is an introduction to the history of the South Pacific. A companion book to Illustrated History of New Zealand, also written by Marcia Stenson, it covers the following topics: geology and geography, the arrival of the first people to the Pacific, European exploration, war in the Pacific, political issues both historic and current.” (Catalogue)


Also, visit this link to find hundreds of children’s books in Vagahau Niuē at your local library.


Virtual Storytime

Head on over to our YouTube channel where you can watch and listen to our librarian Lewis read a special bilingual story — Fifine pulotu mo e tofuā | The artist and the whale by David Riley — in English and Vagahau Niuē. We would like to thank David for allowing us to share this beautiful story with you throughout Niuē Language Week this year — fakaaue lahi, David! Make sure to check out the Reading Warrior website to find more stories of the Pacific from David and his collaborators.



More Resources

Check out the following websites to find out more about Niuē and its culture, language and history:

Vaiaso o te ‘Gana Tuvalu 2021

Talofa koutou! Welcome to Vaiaso o te ‘Gana Tuvalu | Tuvalu Language Week 2021. There are around 5,000 people of Tuvaluan descent currently living in Aotearoa, and around 500 of these people live in Wellington City.

The theme for Vaiaso o te ‘Gana Tuvalu this year is:

“Fakaakoigina tou iloga kae tukeli ke magoi mote ataeao” | “Embracing our culture for a more secure, vibrant future.”

Join us at the library or from home as we celebrate this special time by embracing Tuvalu’s unique language and culture by exploring some of the books and other resources below!


Books

Check out some of these books from the children’s collection in the Tuvaluan language or about Tuvalu:

Samoa & Tuvalu / Guile, Melanie

A comprehensive introduction to the life, history, and people of Samoa and Tuvalu for middle and upper primary students, including information about Tuvaluan land, people, food, customs and traditions, music, and lifestyle.

Illustrated history of the South Pacific / Stenson, Marcia

“The South Pacific is not only our geographic environment, it is also our cultural environment, and many New Zealanders trace their ancestry to Polynesian seafarers. This book is an introduction to the history of the South Pacific. A companion book to Illustrated History of New Zealand, also written by Marcia Stenson, it covers the following topics: geology and geography, the arrival of the first people to the Pacific, European exploration, war in the Pacific, political issues both historic and current.” (Catalogue)

The gifts of Pai and Vau = Meaalofa a Pai mo Vau / Riley, David
“Pai and Vau are Nanumea superheroes who created beautiful things in our world. One day a stranger named Tefolaha came to their island. “This is now my island,” he declared and challenged them to a contest. What kind of contest did he dream up? What would Pai and Vau do if they lost?” (Catalogue) Note: this book is bilingual with text in English and the Nanumean language of Tuvalu

What plants need : a poem from Tuvalu / Molu, Easter

An early reader picture book featuring a beautiful poem from a Tuvaluan author, about the lifecycle of plants from seed to flower. Perfect for very young readers of English.

Ko te kimoa ma te feke : ko te tala mai Tuvalu / Ielemia, Temukisa

A short, fun, and traditional story from Tuvalu all about rats and octopuses! This version of the book is in Tokelauan, but we also have it in Cook Islands Māori and Gagana Sāmoa.


Virtual Storytime

Head on over to our YouTube channel where you can watch and listen to Lewis from Johnsonville and Tawa Libraries read a special bilingual story — Meaalofa a Pai mo Vau by David Riley — in English and the Nanumean language of Tuvalu. We would like to thank David for allowing us to share this beautiful story with you throughout Tuvalu Language Week this year — fakafetai, David! Make sure to check out http://readingwarrior.com/ to find more stories of the Pacific from David and his collaborators.



More Resources

Check out the following websites to find out more about Tuvalu and its culture, language and history: