Gasav Ne Fäeag Rotuạm Ta: Rotuman Language Week 2022

Noaʻia ʻe mḁuri gagaj ʻatakoa! Welcome to Gasav Ne Fäeag Rotuạm Ta | Rotuman Language Week 2022.

Poster courtesy of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.

What is Rotuman Language Week?

New Zealand is the only country in the world where the languages and culture of our Pasifika cousins are celebrated. Fäeag Rotuạm, the Rotuman language, is the first of nine Pasifika language weeks this year, and it runs from the 8th May – 14th May 2022. Rotuma Day itself was on the 6th of May.

Where is Rotuma you ask? The main island of Rotuma is about 13km by 4km and is about 580km from Fiji’s capital, Suva. Rotuma is a dependency of Fiji, so Rotumans will usually speak Fijian and English too! There are about 2000 Rotumans living on the island, and 10,000 living in mainland Fiji and globally.

More information about Rotuma Day and the history of Routma can be heard in this article from Radio NZ.

This year’s theme for Gasav Ne Fäeag Rotuạm Ta is:

Vetḁkia ‘os Fäega ma Ag fak hanua – Sustaining our Language and Culture.

In these times, when it sometimes feels like things are just moving too fast, we think this is a wonderful idea to reflect on.

So how do you speak Rotuman?

Well, Rotumans roll their ‘R’s and pronounce ‘G’ with a smooth ‘ing’ sound, similar to how ‘ng’ is pronounced in te reo Māori.

Here are some key phrases in Rotuman [Row-too-man]:
Noa’ia [Noah-e-yah]= Hello, greetings.
Ka ‘äe tapen? [Car eh tar-pen] = How are you?
Gou lelei fḁiåksia [Ngou leh-lay for-yak-see-yah] = I am well thank you.
Figalelei [Fee-nga-leh-lay] = Please
Fḁiåksia [Foyak-see-yah] = Thank you
Hanis ma röt’åk [Hah-niece mah röt-ack] = Sorry
La’ ma ḁlalum [Lah mah aw-lah-loom] = Goodbye (only to those leaving)
Fu’ ma ḁlalum [Foo mah aw-lah-loom] = Goodbye (only to those staying)

Find more words and phrases in this language guide produced by the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.

The Ministry for Pacific Peoples provides great resources and information about our Pasifika languages and cultural events. Visit the official NZ Rotuman Language Week Facebook page, and the official website, for more information about Rotuman Language Week 2022!

Tālofa Lava! Celebrate Samoa Language Week 2021!

Tālofa Lava! Samoa Language Week will be celebrated this year from Sunday, 30 May 2021 until Saturday, 5th June 2021. The event aims to raise awareness of the Samoan language, celebrate Samoan culture in New Zealand and around the world, and promote the use of Samoan language in schools, at work and at home. 



This year’s theme is “Poupou le lotoifale. Ola manuia le anofale” which means “Strengthen the posts of your house, for all to thrive”.

For more information on events and ideas on how to celebrate, visit the following websites:

Also you can visit your local library and borrow some amazing books on ways to:

Learn Samoan!

image courtesy of syndeticsLittle kiddy Sāmoan.

“This book packs in a lot of common words and phrases. It is a great resource for anybody wanting to learn Samoan.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Samoan picture dictionary.

“Contains over 1000 commonly used words, and words needing further explanation are given in English and Samoan sentences to aid comprehension. Word lists include parts of the body, telling the time, colours, numbers, days of the week and months of the year” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Samoan Picture Dictionary.

“The Samoan Picture Dictionary is an excellent resource for people beginning to speak or write Samoan. It contains over 1000 commonly used words, and words needing further explanation are given in English and Samoan sentences to aid comprehension. Wordlists include parts of the body, telling the time, colours, numbers, days of the week and months of the year.” (Catalogue)

image courtesy of syndeticsFirst readers in Samoan.

“These bilingual books are ideal for beginning learners of Samoan, with simple language and stories, and illustrations that support the text. Each book has a glossary that gives a clear English translation of the Samoan text. All of the books have been translated into Samoan by Ainslie Chu Ling So’o who is a language consultant specialist at the Ministry of Education, Sport and Culture in Samoa.” (Catalogue)

Search the catalogue here for other books to brush up your Samoan language skills.

You also read about Samoan heroes such as…

image courtesy of syndeticsSamoan heroes.

“A collection of inspirational stories of achievers who have Samoan ancestry. It includes: contemporary heroes like Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, Troy Polamalu, Judge Ida Mālosi, Savage and Associate Professor Donna Adis; historical figures like Emma Coe, Tamasese, Salamāsina and Lauaki; legends like Sina, Tiʻitiʻi and Tigilau.” (Catalogue) Also available as an eBook. 

image courtesy of syndeticsFanene Peter Maivia : son of Samoa.
“Fanene Peter Maivia – Son of Samoa is the remarkable story of the first Polynesian to become a star of professional wrestling. Fanene’s life began in Samoa and he took Samoa to the world. He was a pioneer who inspired some of the greatest wrestlers the world has known, including his own grandson, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.” (Catalogue) Also available as an eBook.

Brush up on your geography and history with…


image courtesy of syndeticsSamoa.

“Did you know that the English word ‘tattoo’ is supposedly derived from the Samoan word ‘tatau’? Find out about the traditional methods still used by Samoans to apply the amazing tattoos worn by many of the islands’ people today. In this book you will discover that an ‘ie toga is a beautiful and intricate fine mat, woven by Samoan women and used as highly prized gifts, which are made and given to celebrate important occasions. You can also study the climate, population, social structure and political history of the thirteen islands that make up the beautiful countries of American Samoa and independent Samoa (formerly Western Samoa).” (Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsSamoa & Tuvalu.

This book contains information about the history, culture and people of Samoa and nearby Tuvalu. A great book to have just in time for Samoan Language week.

A Polynesian movie night at home with…

image courtesy of amazon.comMoana.

“Celebrate Samoan language week and get into the Polynesian spirit by watching Disney’s Moana! The film follows the journey of a spirited teenager named Moana as she meets the once-mighty demi-god Maui, and together they traverse the open ocean, encountering enormous fiery creatures and impossible odds.” (Catalogue)


image courtesy of syndeticsMoana : original motion picture soundtrack.

“Moana is the 56th animated feature from Disney, an ocean adventure about a teenaged girl from a tribal community on a mystical island in the South Pacific. Its soundtrack offers both 45 minutes of score and a set of original songs co-written by a trio of musicians with impressive pedigrees. Highlights include “We Know the Way,” sung by Miranda and Foa’i, and the soaring “How Far I’ll Go,” delivered by Auli’i Carvalho in the title role, with a second version by Canadian pop singer Alessia Cara. Among other names appearing on the soundtrack are Dwayne Johnson, who sings “You’re Welcome” as Maui, and Jermaine Clement of Flight of the Conchords, who sings “Shiny” as the menacing crab Tamatoa. Closing out the song portion of the album and bringing listeners back to contemporary reality are Jordan Fisher and a rapping Miranda in a reprise of “You’re Welcome.” ~ Marcy Donelson.” (Catalogue).

Also check out these YouTube clips from the movie soundtrack: “How far I’ll go” and “You’re Welcome!”


Thank you and Happy Samoa Language week!

Fa’afetai ma fiafia Vaiaso o le Gagana Samoa!

Tālofa Lava! Celebrate Samoa Language Week 2020!

Tālofa Lava! Samoa Language Week will be celebrated this year from Sunday, 24 May 2020 until Saturday, 30 May 2020. The event aims to raise awareness of the Samoan language, celebrate Samoan culture in New Zealand and around the world, and promote the use of Samoan language in schools, at work and at home. 
This year’s theme is “Tapena sou ōso mo lau malaga” — “Prepare yourself a gift for your travels”.

image courtesy of ministry of peoples pacific

For more information, on events and ideas on how to celebrate, visit the following websites:

Also you can visit your local library and borrow some amazing books such as:

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Samoan picture dictionary.

“Contains over 1000 commonly used words, and words needing further explanation are given in English and Samoan sentences to aid comprehension. Word lists include parts of the body, telling the time, colours, numbers, days of the week and months of the year”–Publisher information.

image courtesy of syndeticsFirst readers in Samoan.

“A set of ten readers in āamoan for first learners of Sāmoan”–Publisher information.

image courtesy of syndeticsTasi, lua, tolu, fa! : counting in Samoan.

Simple text and illustrations introduce the numbers 1 to 15 in the Sāmoan language. Suggested level: junior.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Samoan picture dictionary.

The Samoan Picture Dictionary is an excellent resource for people beginning to speak or write Samoan. It contains over 1000 commonly used words, and words needing further explanation are given in English and Sāmoan sentences to aid comprehension.

image courtesy of syndeticsLittle kiddy Sāmoan.

This book packs in a lot of common words and phrases. It is a great resource for anybody wanting to learn Sāmoan.

Thank you and Happy Samoan Language week!

Faafetai and fiafia samoa gagana vaiaso!

Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa

 

Kia ora and Talofa!

O au I le Faletusi. I am at the library. 

It is raining outside and it is a perfect day for me to look at and share some of our beautiful bilingual, multilingual and monolingual books with you.

 

E te tautala I se gagana Sāmoa?  Do you speak some Sāmoan?

Image Courtesy of Syndetics

Vāteatea

If you read this, it might make you think about some of what surrounds us -our sun, moon and planets.
It will be so wonderful to be able to describe the beautiful things around you in more than one language!

Image Courtesy of Syndetics

 If you listen to the rhyme, it could help you to learn Māori, Fijian, Sāmoan, and Tongan words for the numbers one to ten.

Here are ten readers for Samoān Language Learners.

Image Courtesy of Syndetics

Samoan Heroes

 

If you read this, you can learn more about Associate Professor Donna Adis, Judge Ida Mālosi and Tim Cahill.

 

 

 

Haera rā and Tofa!

Focus On: Niuean Language

Hello! Fakaalofa atu!

Recently New Zealand celebrated Niuean Language Week – Vagahau Niue Weekand we have books to help you discover and explore the language, the culture and the people of Niue.

 

Give it a go! Here are some handy phrases to try:

 

Ko au he Fale Tohi.

I am at the library.

 

Ko au ne totou tohi.

I am reading a book.

 

Iloa nakai e koe ha vagahau Niue?

Do you know any Niuean langauge?

 

Nàkai.    

No.

 

Begin your language learning journey here:

Tau matatohi Faka-Niue : Niue alphabet with English translation, by Bettina Ikenasio-Thorpe. Learn the basics of the language, the alphabet, numbers and colours.

 

To find out more about the people and the place, dive into these:

The rat and the octopus, by Jill MacGregor. Pita, who lives in the village of Tuapa on the island of Niue, describes how to catch an octopus with a lure shaped like a rat. Includes some Niuean words and a glossary.

The uga hunt, by Jill MacGregor. Arfa, who lives in Niue, describes how he and his father hunt for huge coconut crabs called uga.

Show day, by Jill MacGregor. Livisia, who lives in the village of Alofi South on the island of Niue, describes how her village hosts Show Day, a day of celebrations for the whole island. Includes some Niuean words and a glossary. In picture book format.

 

Haia! Allright!

Mālō e lelei! Tongan Language Week 2018

Mālō e lelei! Hello!

Here, in Aotearoa, it is Uike Kātoanga’i ‘o e Lea Faka-Tonga- Tongan Language Week.

It begins Sunday 2 September and finishes on Saturday 8 September 2018 but you can continue learning and celebrating Tongan Language all year round!

Take your time and enjoy the sights and sounds using ‘ihe laipeli – your library!

 

‘Oku ke lava ‘o lea faka-Tonga?’    ‘Do you speak Tongan?’

‘Ikai.’     ‘No.’

You could start by reading  Tongan for Kids by Jahri Jah Jah.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bettina Ikenasio-Thorpe’s books will help with learning the alphabet, numbers and colours in Tongan. She has three awesome books: ‘Alafapeti : Tongan alphabet with English translationNgaahi lanu : colours in Tongan and English, and Lau ‘a e taha ki he hongofulu : counting one to ten in Tongan and English.

 

‘Oku ke lava ‘o lea faka-Tonga?’      ‘Do you speak Tongan?’

‘Oku ou lea faka-Tonga si’isi’i pē’    ‘I speak a little Tongan.’

These stories are written by Carolyn Collis with an English translation on the back cover.

     

 

‘Oku ke lava ‘o lea faka-Tonga?’      ‘Do you speak Tongan?’

‘ ‘Io.’      ‘Yes.’

Aiani and the Pia Ghost  is great for Tongan speakers. Give it a go!

The International Children’s Digital Library is a great place to find books and stories from different cultures all around the world.

 

 

Would you like to know more about the people of Tonga? David Riley’s Tongan Heroes is a good place to start and has great illustrations by Michael Mulipola.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And, lastly, here are some other amazing books about Tonga and Tongan stories…

 

Ko e Mali : ko e talanoa faka-Tonga mei Nuʻu Sila by Christine Nurminen

A story about a traditional Tongan wedding that takes place in New Zealand


The Mouse and the Octopus, by Lisala Halapua

Retells a traditional Tongan fable about a mischievous mouse, who is rescued by an octopus, but tricks his saviour. This represents the origins of traditional fishing lure design.

 

 

 

Kelea’s Clothes, by Jill MacGregor

Kelea, who lives in Tonga, describes some of the special clothes she wears for different occasions, including the ta’ovala and kiekie. Contains some Tongan words and glossary.

 

 

 

 

Monū’ia – Good Luck!

 

Tālofa Lava! Celebrate Samoan Language Week 2016

Did you know that Samoan is one of the most commonly spoken languages in New Zealand? In fact, we have over 12,000 Samoan language speakers in Wellington!

Samoan Language Week starts on Sunday 29 May and runs through to Saturday 4 June. It was first celebrated in 2007, and the event aims to raise awareness of the Samoan language, celebrate Samoan culture in New Zealand and around the world, and promote the use of Samoan language in schools, at work and at home. This years’ theme is “E felelei manu ae ma’au i o latou ofaga – Birds migrate to environments where they survive and thrive”.

If you want to find out more about Samoa, or learn Samoan, we have some great resources to help you get started!

Head over to the online catalogue and start searching today (and don’t forget, if you need to reserve an item from another library, reserves are FREE on all children’s cards).

Malo e lelei!

Celebrate Tongan Language Week 30th August – 5th September 2015.

Tonga

Click to enlarge

This year’s theme is Fakakaloa Aotearoa ‘aki ‘a e faiva ‘a e Tonga – Enriching Aotearoa with Tongan arts. This celebration provides an opportunity to celebrate through music, song, dance, food, crafts and language.

Did you know…? There are more Tongan people born in New Zealand than there are in Tonga, giving lea faka-Tonga (the Tonga language) and anga faka-Tonga (Tonga culture) a special place here.

Have a go a Lea Faka-Tonga.

The basic level of counting in Tongan is easier then you think. All you have to do is learn the numbers 0-10 then you can count from 1-99. Follow these simple rules.

Counting 1-99 in Tongan

  • numbers 0-9 noa, taha, ua, tolu, fā, nima, ono, fitu, valu, hiva
  • the number for 10 is hongofulu (hoh-ngoh-foo-loo)
  • the number for 100 is teau (teh-ah-oo)
  • every other number is literally the words 0-9 combined: twenty becomes two zero – ua noa
  • three exceptions to the rule 22, 55 and 99 words shortened to uo ua, nime nima, hive hiva

Example: How do you say the following numbers in Tongan?

  1. 19 (nineteen) – taha hiva
  2. 44 (fourty four) – fā fā
  3. 99 (ninety nine) – hive hiva
  4. 87 (eighty seven) – valu fitu

Test: Can you saying the following numbers in Tongan?

  1. 15 (fifthteen)
  2. 33 (thirtythree)
  3. 50 (fifty)
  4. 11 (eleven)

Here are some fun online learning games for Tongan, and a simple guide to the language for beginners.

 Or try a book!

 

Niue Language Week 6-13th October

Falaalofa lahi atu!

 

The theme for Niue Language Week is ‘fakamau, fakamanatu mo e fakaaoga tumau e vagahau Niue‘ which means ‘maintain, retain and develop the Niue language’.

The Pacific Island of Niue is very small and has a population of 1’400 people. It’s known as The Rock of the pacific, and is located about 2’400kms northeast of New Zealand. Niueans are automatically New Zealand citizens and have the same queen as New Zealand – Queen Elizabeth II.

90-96 % of Niueans live in New Zealand (22,473 people in 2006) and is our 4th largest Pacific Island population group. This also means that 70% of those that can speak Niuean live in New Zealand.

This week is Niuean Language week . Because the population is small and most of the Niueans live in New Zealand (where English is mostly spoken), it’s really important that the language is learnt and used by Niueans so that it survives.

Here’s a useful language guide for everyday words. You can also visit the official Niuean language website too, and the Wikipedia page is good for language experts. Why not give some words and sentences a go?

 

Here’s some cool facts about Niue:

  • It’s the largest coral island in the world
  • It was settled by Polynesians from Samoa in 900AD. The first European to see Niue was Captain James Cook in 1774AD
  • Captain Cook called the island Savage Island because he thought the islanders had blood smeared all over them. ‘Niue’ means ‘behold the coconut’.
  • Niue has free wireless internet for everyone who lives there. The first country to do so.
  • Every primary and secondary student has a lap top provided for them to do their school work on.
  • There is only 1 TV channel, 1 newspaper and 1 radio station.
  • Air New Zealand is the only airline that flies to Niue.
  • February is the hottest month, and March is the wettest (most rain falls over summer). Temperatures as high as 38 degrees have been recorded in Niue! That’s hot!
  • Niue is home to the Coconut Crab, that largest living crab in the word! It can grow up to 91cms wide. Scary!
  • Niue is on the other side of the International Date Line, which means that is is 23 hours behind New Zealand. Which means that at the moment it is yesterday in Niue.

Tongan Language Week 1-8 September

Mālō e lelei! This week is Tongan Language Week – Uike Kātoanga’i ‘o e Lea Faka-Tonga

Did you know…

  • At the time of the last census (which was in 2006), there were 50,000 Tongans in New Zealand
  • They were the third largest Pacific group, after Samoans (131,000) and Cook Islanders (58,000), and the fastest growing group
  • Tongans born in New Zealand account for 56% of the total world-wide Tongan population. this means there are more Tongans born in NZ then there are in Tonga.
  • Just over 60% of Tongans speak the Tongan language, but only 40% of those born in New Zealand speak it.
Why not give the Tongan language a go this week? Here’s some great books to get you started:
 
And here’s a great website with some useful phrases. See if you can you figure out what this means: Hoku vakapuna tētē ‘i ‘olunga fono ‘i he toke

Toki sio!