Picture Books: New Releases in October 2021!

Spring is around the corner! Why not spring on down to Wellington City Libraries for some new children’s picture books to keep you amused . So what are you waiting for? Go down to your local branch and borrow the following books:

image courtesy of syndeticsOutfoxed.

“Harold is unlike any other fox. He hates eating chicken, for one thing. He much prefers reading detective novels. When Harold’s father challenges him to catch a chicken as part of his initiation into adulthood, Harold is faced with a dilemma–should he obey his father and endanger the chicken’s life, or do what his heart tells him is right? The latest title from award-winning illustrator Claudia Boldt, Outfoxed introduces a smart, independent-minded character in Harold the fox and is sure to become a bedtime favorite.” (Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsAttack of the Giant Baby.

“This is a book about a baby destroying his sister’s make-believe play from the perspective of the castle’s occupants. A Giant Baby has been spotted in the kingdom! Summon the special advisors. Send out the knights in shining armour. Let loose the monster-size bear!” (Catalogue).

A shelter for sadness.

“A small boy creates a safe space for his sadness, a shelter where it can curl up small, or be as big as it can be, where it can be noisy or quiet, or anything in between. The boy can visit the shelter every day, sometimes every hour and he knows that one day Sadness may come out of the shelter and they will look at the beautiful world together”–Back cover.

image courtesy of syndeticsStop that dinosaur!

“I was in my Granny’s kitchen eating extra-special cake, when the walls began to tremble and the roof began to SHAKE. KNOCK! KNOCK! KNOCK! Ring! Ring! Ring! Oh MY – a dino’s at the door. And now it’s taken Granny … SOMEONE STOP THAT DINOSAUR! Chase down the GRAN-NAPPING brontosaurus in this rollicking, rhyming, ROAR-some romp. Can you catch the naughty dinosaur and get back to Granny’s house before Mum comes home at six o’clock?”–Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsDifferent : a great thing to be!

“This joyful rhyming book encourages children to value the “different” in all people, leading the way to a kinder world in which the differences in all of us are celebrated and embraced. Macy is a girl who’s a lot like you and me, but she’s also quite different, which is a great thing to be. With kindness, grace, and bravery, Macy finds her place in the world, bringing beauty and laughter wherever she goes and leading others to find delight in the unique design of every person.” (Catalogue). Also available as an eBook.


image courtesy of syndeticsBodies are Cool.

“From the acclaimed creator of Dancing at the Pity Party and Roaring Softly, this picture book is a pure celebration of all the different human bodies that exist in the world. Highlighting the various skin tones, body shapes, and hair types is just the beginning in this truly inclusive book. With its joyful illustrations and encouraging refrain, it will instill body acceptance and confidence in the youngest of readers. “My body, your body, every different kind of body! All of them are good bodies! BODIES ARE COOL!” (Catalogue).

image courtesy of syndeticsDon’t hug Doug (he doesn’t like it).

“Doug doesn’t like hugs. He thinks hugs are too squeezy, too squashy, too squooshy, too smooshy. He doesn’t like hello hugs or goodbye hugs, game-winning home run hugs or dropped ice cream cone hugs, and he definitely doesn’t like birthday hugs. He’d much rather give a high five–or a low five, a side five, a double five, or a spinny five. Yup, some people love hugs; other people don’t. So how can you tell if someone likes hugs or not? There’s only one way to find out: Ask Because everybody gets to decide for themselves whether they want a hug or not.” (Catalogue).

How DO Things Work?

Kia ora!  Have you ever looked at a machine and wondered how it works?  Or wondered how things in space work?  What about inside your body?  There are so many questions about the world!

Well, the good news is we have lots of kids books that explain and describe the inner workings of all sorts of interesting topics.  You name it, we’ve got a book to tell you how it works.  To get you started, we’ve selected a few interesting books for you to choose from.  But there are plenty more available to satisfy your curiosity.

Motorbikes / Oxlade, Chris

Find out all of the workings of some of the most amazing motorcycles.  This easy to read book breaks down many of the parts and what they do, with bright, clear illustrations.

What’s inside a black hole? : deep space objects and mysteries / Solway, Andrew

“This astronomy series looks at different aspects of the universe we live in.” (Catalogue)

Inside the bees’ hive / Ang, Karen

“Hundreds of buzzing worker honeybees build a yellow structure called a comb inside a tree trunk. The comb is made up of many small, six-sided rooms that the bees make out of wax. These rooms, called cells, will be used to hold baby bees and sweet, gooey honey. Welcome to the bees’ hive! ” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Spacecraft / West, David

“Learn all about spacecraft, from the first space capsules to space planes and space shuttles.  Find out something amazing about each vehicle and then turn the page to see it sliced in two where its innermost secrets will be revealed.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What’s eating you? : parasites – the inside story / Davies, Nicola

“There is one group of creatures who live on or in the bodies of other animals – in skin, hair, fur, feathers, blood, guts, livers, hearts and lungs. They are parasites. Uncover the secrets of their amazing life-cycles and dare yourself not to scratch or groan as you read.” (Catalogue)

Aircraft / Graham, Ian

Find out how all kinds of aircraft work and how they are laid out inside.  Lots of clear illustrations and information on different types of aircraft.

See inside weather and climate / Daynes, Katie

Filled with facts from how hurricanes and floods happen to how global warming is affecting the Earth’s climates. This is a lift-the-flap book that introduces readers to the science of weather. The work is filled with facts from how hurricanes and floods happen to how global warming is affecting the Earth’s climates.” (Catalogue)

How cities work : explore the city inside, outside and underground / Hancock, James Gulliver

“From the sewers to the skyscrapers, this book takes young readers to the heart of the city.  Get ready to explore the city in a whole new way. This innovative book for younger readers is packed with city facts, loads of flaps to lift, and unfolding pages to see inside buildings and under the streets.  Discover where people live and peek behind closed doors to see what’s going on in houses and apartments, or why not find out about what goes on underneath the streets you walk on every day? (Adapted from Catalogue)

Running the country : a look inside New Zealand’s government / Gill, Maria

“What does the government do to keep New Zealand running smoothly? How does parliament work and what is the job of the MPs? From the Bill of Rights to the way we vote, from parliamentary headquarters to the local council — and everything in between — Maria Gill explains our system of government. You will discover facts about laws, our currency, voting at the elections and the role of the media. There are fascinating profiles of New Zealand leaders, illustrated by cartoonist Malcolm Evans, along with photographs, amazing statistics and useful ‘google this’ Internet links to find out more.” (Catalogue)

The fantastic body : what makes you tick & how you get sick / Bennett, Howard J

“Jam-packed with fun facts, cool diagrams, and gross stories, and written by a successful, practicing pediatrician, this fun and comprehensive reference book with DIY projects is ideal for kids who want to know more about the mysterious stuff going on inside their bodies.” (Catalogue)

How computers work / Hubbard, Ben

“Ever wonder what goes on inside your computer? Take a look into how processors, networks and more are all connected.” (Catalogue)

Inside of a dog : what dogs see, smell, and know / Horowitz, Alexandra

“From an animal behaviorist and dog enthusiast comes an adorable guide to understanding how our canine friends see the world. Want to know what dogs are thinking? What they feel, and what they can spell with that great big nose of theirs? Here’s your chance to experience the world nose first, from two feet off the ground. What do dogs know, and how do they think? The answers will surprise and delight you as dog owner and scientist Alexandra Horowitz explains how our four-legged friends perceive their daily worlds, each other, and us. This book is as close as you can get to knowing about dogs without being a dog yourself.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What do we do with all that poo?

All living creatures poo! Big ones like elephants do big poos, and little ones like ants do tiny poos, and human beings are somewhere in the middle! There a lots of more scientific terms for poo: ‘faeces’, ‘stool’ or ‘bowel movement’, and ‘scat’ is the term for the poo of a wild animal.

But why do we have to poo, what is it, and where does it all go when you flush the toilet?

Flush Toilet Illustrations And Hand Hygiene clipart drawing free imageThe purpose of poo is to remove waste from your body – especially the leftover bits of food that your body can’t use, such as fruit pips and vegetable skins. About 75% (three quarters) of a typical poo is water. The water helps to make the poo soft so it can get out of the body easily. The rest of the poo consists of broken-down body cells, fat and minerals and leftover food waste (those fruit pips and vege skins mentioned above). But did you know that your poos are alive?? Your intestines contain billions of bacteria that help digest food. When the bacteria come out in poo, about half of them are still alive. The live bacteria can make you ill if they get into your stomach. This is why poo can be harmful, and you have to flush it away and wash your hands.

The sewage / wastewater journey

Treatment plant at Moa Point.

Image: Treatment plant at Moa Point. Courtesy Wellington.govt.nz

Once you’ve flushed the toilet, this then becomes sewage. Sewage (or wastewater) is from all our sinks, toilets, laundries, kitchens and bathrooms. This waste flows through a network of underground pipes and pumping stations to one of the treatment plants in Wellington. There are two sewage treatment plants in Wellington – Moa Point and the Western Treatment Plant (Karori) – and a sludge treatment plant at the Southern Landfill.

At the Moa Point Treatment Plant, sewage travels through a series of screens, and tanks before being discharged as liquid into Cook Strait.

  • Non-organic – large materials such as toilet paper are first removed using screens. This rubbish is washed and compressed and sent to the Southern Landfill for disposal.
  • Solid sewage (sludge) – as sewage travels through the tanks, the majority of solids are removed. This sludge is taken to the Southern Landfill Sludge Treatment Plant where it is de-watered (water removed from solids).
  • Effluent – a series of tanks  use a combination of sedimentation and bacteria to decompose almost 70% of  material. Remaining liquid effluent is exposed to ultraviolet light (such as the sun) to destroy any harmful bacteria. The treated liquid is finally discharged, through a long outfall pipe, 1.8km into Cook Strait.

Here’s a really good flow chart that explains the process in more detail:

The Treatment Process


FAQs

Stinky Face Cliparts - Bad Smell Png , Free Transparent Clipart - ClipartKeyQ: Why is poo brown?
A: The brown colour comes from bilirubin, a chemical made from dead red blood cells.

Q: Why does poo smell?
A: The smell mainly comes from bacteria, and the gases and chemicals they release.

Q: Why does everyone think that poo is gross?
A:  We have evolved to find the look and smell of poo disgusting. this makes us avoid it, helping to keep us safe from infection and germs.


So if you’re not too grossed out by now, Wellington City Libraries have loads of books for all ages about this rather stinky subject! Here’s just a few…

You wouldn’t want to live without poo! / Woolf, Alex
“Learn the surprising truth about just how important poo really is: it keeps our bodies healthy, and can also be used to power our cars, heat our homes and help grow our crops.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Poo in the zoo / Smallman, Steve
“Zoo Keeper Bob is exhausted. There’s too much poo in the zoo – and he’s the one who has to scoop it up. Then one day, a mysterious glowing poo appears! Could it be alien poop from outer space? And what on EARTH will Bob do with it?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

My amazing poo plant / Simons, Moya
“Emma can’t have a pet as she lives in an apartment. Her mum loves pot plants and encourages Emma to think of having a plant as a pet. Emma isn’t interested until one day, when a low-flying bird drops a poo in an empty plant pot and her mum tells her if she waters it a poo plant might grow from the seeds in the bird’s dropping. Emma enters her poo plant into the most unusual pet category of her class pet show.” (Catalogue)

What do they do with all that poo? / Kurtz, Jane
“There are so many different kinds of animals at the zoo, and they each make lots of poo. So what do zoos do with all of that poo? This zany, fact-filled romp explores zoo poo and all of the places it ends up, including in science labs and elephant-poo paper–even backyard gardens!” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The clue is in the poo and other stuff too / Seed, Andy
“A funny and fascinating natural history of animal droppings, tracks and other traces, exploring what we can learn about animals from what they leave behind. Fully-illustrated and in a large format, this will be a visually appealing book for any child with an interest in animals and nature.” (Catalogue)

Loos save lives : how sanitation and clean water help prevent poverty, disease and death / Boyd, Seren
“Who knew toilets were so interesting – and so important? You probably use a toilet several times every day. Flush, turn on the tap, wash your hands – then forget all about it. But did you know that 2.4 billion people across the world don’t have somewhere they can go to the toilet safely, and over 1 billion people don’t have access to any kind of sanitation or clean water at all? Poor sanitation and restricted access to a toilet is more serious than you might think. It prevents children (and especially girls) from going to school, it means communities may have to walk miles to access safe drinking water and it kills. Poor sanitation means poor hygiene, which means illnesses and viruses are more easily spread. Going to the toilet out in the open makes people vulnerable and puts them in danger.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Everybody poos / Gomi, Tarō
“All living things do different sorts of poo. Some are different colours, others have different smells or sizes. Some do it on land, some poo in water. This children’s book has a no-nonsense approach to the bodily function to encourage children not to be ashamed about potty training.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

13 New Non Fiction that will leave you spellbound!

Hey Kids!

There are only a couple of weeks left of spring. Why not spring on down to your local library and check out the latest new junior non fiction!

Read books where you can learn languages with Sesame Street, get spellbound with Harry Potter, read how Maui slowed the sun in English and Te Reo, get your STEAM on and so much more!

Enjoy!


Amazing Inventions.

Odd Science: Inventions is filled with weird and wacky facts that you’ve never heard before. Read about the trainers made of spider silk, wonder at the first record played in space and tell your friends about the robot built in 1937. There are facts about electricity being used as glue, facts about glow-in-the-dark cats and facts about nano-robots that can ‘swim’ inside the body during biopsies!

 


Video Game Creators.

With full-color illustrations and lively text, and chock-full of interesting facts, Awesome Minds: Video Game Creators tells the stories of these amazing men and women who turned a small hobby into a multimillion-dollar industry that changed the way we play and interact, from our living rooms to the arcades, on our computers to our hand-held devices. Awesome Minds: Video Game Creators is the perfect read for those with creative spirits, curious minds, and a love of technology and video games– Provided by publisher.

 


Learn a language with Sesame Street!

Welcome to Mandarin Chinese.

Sesame characters help readers learn Mandarin so they can connect with friends who speak the language. Welcoming words relating to everyday life and friendship give readers new language tools to become smarter, kinder friends.

 


Welcome to French.

Sesame Street characters help readers connect to new friends who speak French. Simple words and phrases relating to everyday life and a colorful approach help readers learn a new language to become smarter, kinder friends.

 


Welcome to German.

Sesame Street characters help readers learn German so they can connect with friends who speak the language. Welcoming words relating to everyday life and friendship give readers new language tools to become smarter, kinder friends.

 


Tales of Aotearoa: How Maui Slowed the Sun in English and Te Reo!

Re-tells the story of how Maui slowed the journey of the sun through the sky each day.

 

 

 

 


Wilma Rudolph.

Read all about Wilma Rudolph, the remarkable sprinter and Olympic champion. This moving book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the athlete’s life.

 


Brilliant Bodies.

Prepare to laugh, marvel and learn with Brilliant Bodies. Jam packed full of facts about elements, organs, hair, feet and so much more!

 

 


Game logic : level up and create your own games with science activities for kids.

This book takes kids on a journey to discover the history of games, and then leads them from their initial idea for a new game through several iterations of a game all the way to playing the final version of a game they created. Explore the processes of both playing and creating games while developing critical and creative thinking skills that apply to tasks and concepts across academic fields. — adapted from back cover.

 


The Unofficial Harry Potter Spell book.

The Unofficial Ultimate Harry Potter Spellbook is a beautiful, elegantly designed reference that details all of the known spells cast in the Harry Potter films, books, video games and card games, as well as official Harry Potter spinoffs, such as Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Each spell is given its own entry including spell name, pronunciation details, a description of the spell effect, spell casting methods, wand movements, hand movements and vocalizations, plus primary sources in which the spell was used. Readers will also find trivia related to each spell, such as who it was used against, what the outcome was, or what a spell’s unusual history might be. There are more than 200 spells in all, plus suggestions for strategic spell use and methods for creating original spells.

 


Never too young! : 50 unstoppable kids who made a difference.

“Meet 50 super-inspiring kids! It’s never too early–and you’re never too young– to make a difference in the world! The amazing musicians, writers, scientists, athletes, activists, and other fascinating kids in this book accomplished great feats by the age of eighteen. They impacted people’s lives by coming up with new inventions, making art and music, competing in sports, and speaking out about important issues. Let their incredible stories inspire you to follow your dreams, achieve your goals, and strive for greatness now!”–Back cover.

 

 


Harry Potter. Spells & charms : a movie scrapbook.

Packed with inserts, concept illustrations, and behind-the-scenes photography, Harry Potter: Spells and Charms: A Movie Scrapbook is a guide to the spells and incantations of the Harry Potter films. A must-have collectible for all Harry Potter fans.


5 New Non Fiction from the ‘DK findout!’ series, lego, coding and augmented reality.

Hey Kids!

Check out the latest new non fiction at Wellington City Libraries. Lots of cool books about from the DK findout! series, lego, coding and augmented reality. Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick by Brick dinosaurs.

Brick by Brick dinosaurs will teach you how to build more that 15 amazing prehistoric projects, with clearly illustrated step-by-step instructions. An ideal book for anyone who loves lego and dinosaurs.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsCoding for kids : create your own videogames with Scratch.

Explains how to use the programming language Scratch to create computer games, presenting projects that can be altered as young readers gain proficiency.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsWorld War I.

Have you ever wanted to find out how the First World War began? Or how soldiers lived and fought in trenches? This book from the DKfindout! series is packed with surprising facts and amazing pictures for World War 1. It’s a small book filled with big ideas. — Cover.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHuman Body.

Look inside your brilliant body with DK’s brand new human body book. DKfindout! Human Body will satisfy any child who is eager to learn and acquire facts – and keep them coming back for more! From gooey gastric juices, to our amazing brains, and everything in the human body in-between, this book will give kids the understanding they crave about how our bodies work. DKfindout! Human Body explains the complex systems like digestion that keep us ticking over, and will satisfy any budding biologist.DKfindout! Human Body will surprise and delight young readers aged 6 to 9.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMicromonsters.

“IExplore Micro Monsters is an amazing book that reveals the tiny creatures all around us that are normally invisible to the human eye. Marvel at these incredible mini monsters – and watch as Digital Magic makes them leap off the page! Fact-filled spreads give the reader background information on each tiny beast: where it’s found, what it does and how it survives in even the harshest conditions, from skin cells to outer space! Then simply open the app on your smartphone or tablet to trigger the AR action and awaken the Digital Magic. The book comes to life using the latest technology of augmented reality with the free app. All you need is a smartphone or tablet.”–bookdepository.com.

4 Science Non Fiction: The Magic School Bus Collection

Check out The Magic School Bus collection, written by Joanne Cole and published by Scholastic.  This series is rated “the bestselling science series ever”, and “the freshest, most approach to science for children”, by the New York Times.  Join Ms Fizzle and her students on gripping and unorthodox adventures where kids will be introduced through storytelling to the basic concepts of science in all areas such as biology, astronomy, and  paleontology.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsIn the time of the dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs, adventure, science  and time travel all rolled into one in this book. The magic school bus turns into a time machine and transports Ms Fizzle and her class back into the prehistoric times, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Highly recommended!

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsLost in the Solar System.

Take a special field trip in the magic school bus with Ms. Frizzle and her class, where they go into outer space and visits each planet in the solar system. Includes narrated version on audio disc.

 

Also check out the nonfiction companion to the original Magic School Bus series.

 

The Magic School Bus presents…

images courtesy of syndeticsThe Human Body.

This is a book about the human body (combined with facts and a story) that makes learning and science more fun, interactive and innovative.This book is packed with incredible photographs, amazing facts and everything you have ever wanted to know about your brain, bones, lungs, muscles and much, much more!

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsSea Creatures.

Join Ms Fizzle and her class on another special field trip on the magic school bus where they take a journey to the ocean where they learn about the different creatures that live there. This week is Sea Week – Dive into some fishy books! Glub glub!

 

 

 

5 new children’s non fiction to read in term 3.

Here is your chance to discover a hidden world beneath the surface of things. Whether it is what goes on deep within the bowels of a city, what is really going on inside the human body. Or even what is going on right outside your backyard.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsPeeking under the city.

Tall building and bright lights. Honking  and cool water fountains. This is what a city looks like above ground. But what wonders lie beneath? Let’s go below the streets and take a peek.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsPeeking under your skin.

Arms, leg and a big smile. Waving hands and dancing feet. This is what a person looks like from the outside. But what wonders lie inside? Let’s go below your skin and take a peek!

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsPeeking Underground.

Leafy trees and green grass. Chirping birds and children playing games. This is what the earth looks like above ground.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsEgyptian Mummy: The Embalmer’s Handbook.

Prepared to be dazzled and spellbound the glorious mysteries of ancient Egypt. Read this and discover a civilisation of the ancient Egyptians and discover how they embalmed their dead. Contains beautiful illustrations, a guide to Egyptian coffins, ‘true or false’ quizzes, and a spectacular gatefold image of the River Nile.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe beginners guide to netball.

Willing to bring out your inner Silver Fern? This check out this fantastic beginners guide to netball. This book features the basic skills every netballer should be familiar with, no matter what their position. Read about the story of netball as well as Maria’s own journey to becoming an international netball superstar.

 

 

 

New Non Fiction: Back to School numbers.

Welcome to Term 3! I hope you all had a fantastic break over the school holidays.  Here are some new junior non fiction to help you catch up on your school work.
image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndeticsWhy do reptiles have scales? : and other questions about evolution and classification. 
Wildlife wonders? You better believe it. This book covers anything and everything you want/need to know about the classification and evolution of reptiles and how they have adapted to survive the ever changing environment. This is a great book to use for biology projects and homework. Great for Primary and Intermediate level.

You might also want to check out Why do Plants have flowers? and other questions about evolution and classification. Lots of amazing facts about the evolution and classification of plants, like you find out the age of a tree by counting the rings beneath the bark and apparently find out which flower smells of rotting meat – Whoa!. A great resource to sue for horticulture projects and homework.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndeticsIt’s time for Animaths! It’s time to improve your maths sssskills by looking at Shapes with Snakes. Become a “roaring” success with maths by Taking Away with Tigers and some maths ant-ics by looking at Adding with Ants.

These books are great to use to introduce young children to simple key maths concepts with the use of  cut out photos of animals. These books are sure to engage the interest of reluctant mathematicians.

 

 

 

All about the Commonwealthimage courtesy of syndetics

According to WikipediaThe Commonwealth of Nations, commonly known as the Commonwealth (formerly the British Commonwealth),  is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states (including New Zealand) that were mostly territories of the former British Empire, with some notable exceptions. The Commonwealth operates by intergovernmental consensus of the member states, organised through the Commonwealth Secretariat, and non-governmental organisations, organised through the Commonwealth Foundation.

Luckily for the library, we now have a junior non fiction book jam packed with information about the Commonwealth. This informative, fact-packed guide also tells you all about the history and the aims of the Commonwealth since its foundation in 1931. Did you know New Zealand is one of the 53 countries led by HM Queen Elizabeth II? A great book to use for Social Studies homework.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsCool Kids Cook.

Ready for another back to school number that will help you ace Home Economics and allow you to unleash your inner Gordon Ramsey-Jaime Oliver- Nigella Lawson-Chelsea Winter? Donna Hay has released a cookbook for kids. Donna Hay for kids?! How cool is that! Check out the awesome cookbook, catered for cool kids that contains over 40 fun and simple recipes for kids to make for family and friends to enjoy. Found a few tasty numbers like spaghetti bolognese, sausage rolls, chicken noodle soup, cup cakes and chocolate moose. Wow,  I wish I had this book when I was doing Home Economics at school.

 

 

 

image courtesy of knight academy blog

Encyclopedia of the human body : begin to discover the human body.

Got a biology project coming up on the human body? This back to school number can help.  The Encyclopedia of the human body will allow you to discover information about how the human body and anatomy works. You will discover and learn everything from how blood flows through the heart, to how food is digested and where your voice comes from… hmmm!  This is the kind of book that makes *physiology look cool and screams AMAZING!

 

*Physiology: The branch of biology that deals with the normal functions of living organisms and their parts.

 

A closer look at history: New non fiction

Usborne encyclopedia of ancient Egypt

Many books about ancient Egypt focus on Mummies and pyramids, which is a pity because, obviously, the history of an empire that lasted from  1096BCE to 30BCE is much richer than that.  This book encompasses over 1000 years of history, not only focusing on the great Pharaohs, but what everyday life was like for the poorer members of Egyptian society.  There are sections on everything from the Egyptian army to medicine to beauty care.  There are plenty of links to useful websites, as well as a few timelines; one lists the pharaohs in chronological order, the other gives a chronological look at Egyptology and how its changed over the centuries.  This is certainly one of the most through books on ancient Egypt we have in our collection, and a great book for school projects.

 

Stephen Biesty’s Cross-Sections: Castle

This book is a classic and for good reason. As a close look at castle life during the medieval period it’s yet to be bettered. The cross sections of the various parts of the castle are intricately detailed, with explanations of what’s happening in different parts of the drawing. They’re also quite funny; try to spot the sneaky spy and the castle inhabitants getting up to all sorts of things, many of them not exactly appropriate to the situation!  The book manages to be both very informative and extremely fun. As well as the cross sections there are plenty of things like the feudal system, clothing and warfare.  This is THE book to read if you’re at all interested in Medieval castles.

 

 

Deadly days in History

Terry Deary has been writing the Horrible History books for twenty years, and to his credit, they’re still as interesting and funny as they’ve ever been. Rather than focusing on one specific country, this is a look at the days in world history that have been particularly bloody.  True to his established pattern, he doesn’t just stick to Western History; he also looks at the Sepoy and Boxer rebellions, as well as the Battle of Isandlwana.  He also isn’t biased towards any particular group; everyone involved has their savagery discussed.  It’s a great book, even by Terry Deary’s high standards, and well worth reading if you like your history both balanced and gory.

 

 

 

Bones never lie: How Forensic science helps solve history’s mysteries

One of the strangest parts of learning about history is how evolving scientific techniques of the present help us better understand the mysteries of the past. Forensic science is used to solve modern day murders, but it also has its uses in working out just what happened. For example, did Napoleon die of natural causes or was he murdered? Did the Grand Duchess Anastasia survive the massacre of her family by Communists? This book works hard to debunk various theories and explains the science behind each of the conclusions.  But it also takes the time to look at each of the other theories in turn, and treats each one with equal weight.

 

 

New Non Fiction: The gross, the angry and just plain horrible.

Prepare to be shocked! Prepare to be horrified! Prepare to be… grossed out! Read at your own risk!

Check out the new junior non fiction from:

Horrible Histories and Horrible Science:

Angry Animals.

Which scientist ate a poisonous snake for dinner? Where can you find a dragon with bad breath? Who made false teeth for an elephant? Discover all the awful answers and more in the latest book from Horrible Science called Angry Animals. Reading this book will make you think twice about everything you know about your favourite animals. This is the science book to read with all the squishy bits left in!

 

 

 

 

 Cruel Crime.

Horrible Histories and Terry Deary has  done it again with the latest book from the series. Discover all the foul facts, gore and much more in Cruel Crime. You will also discover answers to the following questions like who was sentenced to death, by coffee, Where you could be whipped for flying a kite and why a cockerel was burnt at the stake.

 

 

 

 

National Geographic Kids.

That’s Gross!

Warning! This book may cause cringing, squirming, gasping and outright disgust! Read at your own risk! Sounds like your kind of book? Then keep reading…

Check out this new (and disgusting) read from National Geographic Kids which is bound to make your tummy churn. You will learn about the gross and disgusting trivia that shares historical information, cultural tidbits and sickening scientific sidebars on everything from nose picking and insect-based foods to hairballs and digestive commonalities. More than enough information to put you off your lunch.

 

 

Science Museum.

Brains, bodies, guts and stuff.

Ever wanted to read about the human body with no boring bits? Then look no further. This book explores everything from cells to organs to breathing to blood flow to scabs and rashes to broken bones and brain power. Includes puzzles, quizzes and experiments. Also find out what happens in your head during a headache and what toes are for.

 

 

 

 

 

That’s Gross!

The series title takes the words out my mouth! Check out the new and latest books from this series.

Gross things about your pets.

You think you know everything about your pets. They’re cute, they’re cuddly, they’re… gross! Read all about the gross things that your pets do, like dogs and cats sweating through their paws, rabbits producing two types of droppings and cats drinking grass juice. Some gross things are good, while others are not. Decide for yourself whether those facts are cool or gross.

 

 

 

 

Gross things about your food.

This will make you think twice about the food you eat. Read all about gross things you didn’t know about food, like microorganisms age beef, people in Nigeria eat locuts and  sheep’s cheese is made using maggots. Also learn about some foods that some may find tasty while other might find gross.