September Top 10 non Fiction

Minecraft has entered the ranks for Children’s imagination building. Lego and Star Wars have got competition!

1.  The LEGO ideas book by Daniel Lipkowitz

2.  Star Wars character encyclopedia by Simon Beecroft

3.  Star Wars by David West Reynolds

4.  Lego Star Wars by Simon Beecroft

5.  LEGO super heroes by Daniel Lipkowitz

6.  LEGO play book by Daniel Lipkowitz

7.  Ripley’s believe it or not! Edited by Rosie Alexander

8.  Minecraft by Nick Farwell

9.  Angry Birds Star Wars by Steve Bynghall

10. Moshi Monsters by Steve Cleverley

Top 10 Non-Fiction for June

Most popular facts for Children:

1.   Star Wars by David West Reynolds

2.   Star Wars character encyclopedia edited by Simon Beecroft

3.   Ripley’s believe it or not!  edited by Rosie Alexander

4.   Beware the Sith by Shari Last

5.   The horrible history of the world by Terry Deary

6.   The LEGO book by Daniel Lipkowitz

7.   Guinness world records 2013 by Craig Glenday

8.   Guinness world records 2014 by Craig Glenday

9.   Treasury of Egyptian mythology by Donna Jo Napoli

10. Wow! dinosaur by Douglas Palmer

Most popular non-fiction books in April

Here are the most popular children’s non-fiction books for April! Grab them from your library NOW!

 

1.   Star Wars by David Reynolds

2.   Ripley’s believe it or not! series by Rosie Alexander

3.   Star Wars character encyclopedia by Simon Beecroft

4.   Pokemon ultimate handbook by Cris Silvestri

5.   Treasury of Greek mythology by Donna Jo Napoli

6.   Cat by Juliet Clutton-Brock

7.   The LEGO book by Daniel Lipkowitz

8.   Wow! dinosaur by Douglas Palmer

9.   The Usborne big book of big machines by Minna Lacey

10.  Treasury of Egyptian mythology by Donna Jo Napoli

 

Top 10 non-fiction for February

Favourite facts children borrowed in February:

1.  Star Wars by David West Reynolds

2.  The LEGO book by Daniel Lipkowitz

3.  Ripley’s believe it or not!by Rosie Alexander

4.  Guinness world records 2013 by Craig Glenday

5.  Ara pūretaby Frances Goulton

6.  Pokemon black version & Pokemon white version handbook by Michael G. Ryan

7.  The horrible history of the world by Terry Deary

8.  Guinness world records 2014 by Craig Glenday

9.  Wow! dinosaur by Douglas Palmer

10.  The age of the dinosaurs (12 volumes) by Steve Parker

 

Top 10 non-fiction for December

Here are the most popular non-fiction books for 2013. These make great school holiday reading, grab one for the Xmas break!

1. Ripley’s believe it or not! by Rosie Alexander (new edition available now!)

2. The LEGO book by Daniel Lipkowitz

3. Star Wars character encyclopedia by Simon Beecroft

4. The great prehistoric search by Jane Bingham

5. Roald Dahl’s marvellous joke book by Roald Dahl

6. The horrible history of the world series by Terry Deary

7. Star wars, the clone wars by Jason Fry

8. Art detective by Doris Kutschbach

9. Guinness world records 2014 by Craig Glenday

10. Amazing giant dinosaurs by Marie Greenwood

 

Top 10 Non-fiction for September

Here are the most popular non-fiction books for September 2013.  Lots of space, dinosaurs and history – cool!

1. Star Wars by David West Reynolds

2. The Kingfisher space encyclopedia by Mike Goldsmith

3. The horrible history of the world by Terry Deary

4. Guinness world records 2013 by Craig Glenday

5. Amazing giant dinosaurs by Marie Greenwood

6. Wow! dinosaur by Douglas Palmer

7. Beastly best bits by Terry Deary

8. Guinness world records 2012 by Craig Glenday

9. The wimpy kid movie diary Jeff Kinney

10. The LEGO book by Daniel Lipkowitz

 

Top 10 Non-fiction for August

These are the most sought after kids non-fiction this month. Grab them while they’re hot!

1. Star Wars by David West Reynolds

2. Big book of papercraft by Fiona Watt

3. Star Wars character encyclopedia By Simon Beecroft

4. The LEGO book by by Daniel Lipkowitz

5. Pokemon ultimate handbook By Cris Silvestri

6. The horrible history of the world by Terry Deary

7. The Usborne big book of big machines by Minna Lacey

8. Art lab for kids by Susan Schwake

9. Guinness world records 2013 by Craig Glenday

10. Space by Rob Lloyd Jones

 

Things that will make you go WOW and the World of Wearable Arts!

Things that will make you go WOW!

The WOW series are books unlike any you have ever seen before. Loads of topics, hundreds of pictures, thousands of words, squillions of amazing things to discover and explore…

Find it. See it. Know it…in..

Wow! Dinosaurs.

This book contains information about all the dinosaurs you know and heard of. True to it’s word, Wow! Dinosaurs is crammed full of information that is presented in a way I have never encountered in any other book. It’s a science lab, a museam, a board games and a search engine all rolled into one. You will also a skeleton of a Stegosaurus, giant ocean reptiles as they might have looked in their natural habitat and how they might have died. I hope you will enjoy this book as much as I have. Great for ages 8 to 11 years.

 

 

 

 

Wow! Ancient History.

This book is even better than the dinosaur book. Forget the internet, everything you have ever wanted to know about the ancient world is in one resource. Wow! Ancient History! Crammed full of incredible information about Babylonian architecture, Egyptian Pharoahs, the Roman army, Buddhist monasteries of the Mauryan Empire and South American temples. It’s like a time machine, a search engine and an archaeological dig all rolled into one.  There are loads of history-related topics, hundreds of pictures, thousands of words and loads of amazing things for you to discover and explore.

 

 

 

 

Wow! Science.

Have a science project about the living world?, The earth? Matter and materials? Energy and forces? Space? Look no further, Wow! Science has everything you need and all the answers to ensure you get that well deserved A++! Included in this book are simple explanations and photographs that introduce basic science concepts. Great for primary and intermediate level.

 

 

 

 

Wow! Animal.

Last and certainly not least. Wow! Animal contains facts about every bird, animal, reptile, fish, insect and believe it or nor worm known to man. This book is your one stop world zoo, natural history museam and search engine all rolled into one. So what are you waiting for? Find it. See it. Know it.

 

 

 

 

 

Fairtrade and Fashion.

The True Cost of Fashion: How to shop to change the world.

Strictly speaking this is not a book about wearable arts, but it’s a real eye opener to the possible  reality of where the clotes we buy may come from. By reading this book, you will find out all you need to know about the supply chain, the conditions workers endure and who really makes the profit on the final purchase of the garments you buy. Also discover what enviromental impacts your fashion purchases will have on this planet and find out the answers to the following questions: What does fairtrade mean?, How can retailers make and sell clothes so cheaply and how much do you sepnd on clothes?

 

 

 

 

 

Eco Chic.

Hmm, echo chic indeed. If you are an eco girl looking for fabulous ideas to revamp your room or who loves to set fashion trends and showcase your style? Wellington City Libraries has two new books from this series: Crafts for styling your wardrobe and Crafts for revamping your room. Crafts for styling your wardrobe contains step by step instructions on how you can customize, upcycle and re-vamp your clothes the eco friendly way. Crafts for revamping your room. contains step by step projects to upcycle, customise and add sparkle to your bedroom. You will also learn all about fairtrade, sustainable shopping, ethical fashion and how to achieve your fashion and bedroom design goals without compromising the enviroment.

 

The World of Wearable Arts!

To celebrate WOW, a two hour show held annually in September in Wellington, New Zealand to an audience of 50000 over a twelve show season. Wellington City Libraries has some new and amazing non fiction that can gurentee you creating your own wearable arts award event!

Wearable wonders.

“An introduction to the World of Wearable Art Awards with history and examples, interviews, photographs etc., in a workbook which details how to make your own Wearable Art creation using various art and craft techniques”–Publisher information. Suggested level: intermediate, junior secondary.

Renowned author-illustrator Fifi Colston shares her years of expereince in the visual and wearable arts in this new book where you will learn how to WOW the world with your very own wearable wonder using simple objects such as petals, shells, cardboard, old cans and drink bottles that can be showcased in the world of  wearable arts awards or used as a costume, prop, landscape, weapon and even a creature on stage and in the film industry. A great resource to use and read if you are doing a school/drama production and/or consideirng a career in fashion, set and costume design. Perhaps local schools will find inspiration and ideas for next year’s Smokefree Stage Challenge.

New non fiction : a miscellaneous collection

Definition of miscellaneous, from the Merriam-Webster dictionaryadjective, consisting of many things of different sorts.

500 fantastic facts

This book is definitely a miscellany (that’s a collection of various facts). It doesn’t go into much detail about each fact, but what it lacks in depth it makes up in the sheer number of topics covered.  It starts out with the big picture: the solar system is the first thing to be covered. And then it gets smaller and smaller, ending up with ‘miscellaneous’ facts.  It’s a quick and fun read and a great way to learn information for quizzes! You might also find that you get interested in a particular fact, and want to do some more research…

Do you know Dewey? Exploring the Dewey Decimal System

If you’ve ever looked at our non-fiction collection (which I hope you have!) You’ll have noticed that all the books have a number on their spines. This is because all the books are grouped together by subject, so everything is much easier to find! Melvil  Dewey invented the system in 1876, and it revolutionised the way libraries are organised.  This is great book for younger readers explaining what the different numbers mean and how to use the system to find the book you want.

 

 

 

 

You can fill a swimming pool with your spit! : the fact or fiction behind human bodies 

Rather than just a collection of “gross out” facts, this book takes a hard look at all the urban legends and old wives’ tales about the human body.  In fact, after reading this, you might be able to disprove stuff you’ve found out in other books! Of course, the book can get pretty gross, so don’t read it if you have a sensitive stomach, but it’s really interesting book and well worth a read. If only to work out whether eating your crusts makes your hair grow curly.  (Spoiler: it doesn’t.)

 

 

 

 

Let’s Get Art: children look at contemporary New Zealand Art

If you’ve ever been to an art gallery, you might have been surprised that not all the art consisted of paintings or statues. Some of it might look strange or not like ‘real’ art at all. This book looks at the different kinds of “contemporary” art (art that’s made by living artists) and tries to work out what these weird and wonderful pieces are all about.  It’s a good book  that will show you the different sorts of art that New Zealand artists are making today and will perhaps make you think about what the artworks might mean. It’s also a cool looking book; it’s a mixture of painting illustrations and photographs, so the book’s almost a work of art in itself.

 

 

 

Explore! The most dangerous journeys of all time

The price of glory is often danger; this is what this book will teach you. This is especially true if you were an explorer in the days before modern equipment. Marco Polo,  Roald Amundsen, and Yuri Gagarin are just some of the big names you’ll learn about. Of course, it wasn’t always men who were willing to risk their lives to make great discoveries; Mary Kingsley and Gertrude Bell also undertook dangerous voyages.  This book also has survival tips, although whether you’ll want to venture out into the jungle or to Antarctica after reading this book is entirely up to you!

A closer look at history: New non fiction

Usborne encyclopedia of ancient Egypt

Many books about ancient Egypt focus on Mummies and pyramids, which is a pity because, obviously, the history of an empire that lasted from  1096BCE to 30BCE is much richer than that.  This book encompasses over 1000 years of history, not only focusing on the great Pharaohs, but what everyday life was like for the poorer members of Egyptian society.  There are sections on everything from the Egyptian army to medicine to beauty care.  There are plenty of links to useful websites, as well as a few timelines; one lists the pharaohs in chronological order, the other gives a chronological look at Egyptology and how its changed over the centuries.  This is certainly one of the most through books on ancient Egypt we have in our collection, and a great book for school projects.

 

Stephen Biesty’s Cross-Sections: Castle

This book is a classic and for good reason. As a close look at castle life during the medieval period it’s yet to be bettered. The cross sections of the various parts of the castle are intricately detailed, with explanations of what’s happening in different parts of the drawing. They’re also quite funny; try to spot the sneaky spy and the castle inhabitants getting up to all sorts of things, many of them not exactly appropriate to the situation!  The book manages to be both very informative and extremely fun. As well as the cross sections there are plenty of things like the feudal system, clothing and warfare.  This is THE book to read if you’re at all interested in Medieval castles.

 

 

Deadly days in History

Terry Deary has been writing the Horrible History books for twenty years, and to his credit, they’re still as interesting and funny as they’ve ever been. Rather than focusing on one specific country, this is a look at the days in world history that have been particularly bloody.  True to his established pattern, he doesn’t just stick to Western History; he also looks at the Sepoy and Boxer rebellions, as well as the Battle of Isandlwana.  He also isn’t biased towards any particular group; everyone involved has their savagery discussed.  It’s a great book, even by Terry Deary’s high standards, and well worth reading if you like your history both balanced and gory.

 

 

 

Bones never lie: How Forensic science helps solve history’s mysteries

One of the strangest parts of learning about history is how evolving scientific techniques of the present help us better understand the mysteries of the past. Forensic science is used to solve modern day murders, but it also has its uses in working out just what happened. For example, did Napoleon die of natural causes or was he murdered? Did the Grand Duchess Anastasia survive the massacre of her family by Communists? This book works hard to debunk various theories and explains the science behind each of the conclusions.  But it also takes the time to look at each of the other theories in turn, and treats each one with equal weight.