Make New Stories Beyond the Page in the July School Holidays!

Kia ora folks! We are so incredibly excited to announce that the hotly-anticipated Beyond the Page festival is returning this July!

During the school holidays, from the 9th to the 24th of July, libraries across the Wellington region are hosting over 100 awesome, FREE events for tamariki and their whānau, from puppetry, poetry, and costume design experiences through to VR experiences, nature walks, sculpting, and stop motion animation workshops!

There’s something on every day of the holidays, so join us to experience the ‘other’ side of libraries — the side that fizzes and pops, is creative, exciting, and adventurous!

Beyond the Page is a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries, Hutt City Libraries, Upper Hutt City Libraries, Kāpiti Coast District Libraries, and Masterton District Library. You can view the full event calendar and find out more about the festival and our wonderful presenters on the Beyond the Page website, or you can follow the festival on Facebook for regular updates.

Read on to find out about some of the excellent events happening in Wellington City Libraries branches:

Vivita X Beyond the Page: Graphic Novel Series

We’re partnering with Wellington innovation studio VIVITA Aotearoa to bring you the Graphic Novel Series — a group of three workshops focussed on bringing the characters and story of a graphic novel to life, from sculpture and miniatures through to cardboard costumes!

These events are suitable for tamariki aged 9-15, and registrations are required.

  • Cardboard Costumes | Miramar Library | Saturday 9 July, 10am – 12pm (Register here)
  • Serious Sculpting | Te Awe Library | Sunday 10 July, 10am – 12pm (Register here)
  • Miniature Modelling | Johnsonville Library | Sunday 17 July, 10am – 12pm (Register here)

Toro Pikopiko Tales

Have you ever wanted to become a puppeteer? Join the Toro Pikopiko Tales Roadshow to explore an interactive gallery of puppets – from traditionally carved kare-tao puppets, through to puppets inspired by Māori rock art, taniwha, and stories of the land. In this fun-filled workshop, you’ll become the puppeteer!

These events are suitable for tamariki aged 5+ with their caregivers, and registrations are required.

  • Karori Library | Tuesday 19 July, 10 – 11am (Register here)
  • Johnsonville Library | Tuesday 19 July, 2 – 3pm (Register here)
  • Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library | Thursday 21 July, 10 – 11am (Register here)
  • Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library | Friday 22 July, 10 – 11am (Register here)

Stories From Our Place with Zealandia

Listen to bilingual stories about our special Aotearoa plant life and animals, then discover more about them on a guided nature walk with a Zealandia educator! Tamariki registered for the first session can explore Zealandia with their whānau free of charge. At the Cummings Park Library session, we will instead be exploring the unique flora and fauna of the beautiful Cummings Park.

These events are suitable for tamariki of all ages with their caregivers, and registrations are required.

  • Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library | Tuesday 12 July, 2 – 3pm (Register here)
  • Zealandia Te Māra a Tāne | Tuesday 19 July, 1.30 – 3pm (Register here)
  • Zealandia Te Māra a Tāne | Tuesday 19 July, 3 – 4.30pm (Register here)

Poetry Workshop with Sara Hirsch

Have you always wanted to learn how to write poetry? Have you been writing for ages and would love the chance to get some tips and tricks? Whatever your background and experience, everyone is welcome at this inclusive workshop, from newbies to the poetry obsessed.

This event is suitable for tamariki aged 8-12 with their caregivers, and registrations are required.

  • Newtown Library | Friday 15 July, 2.30 – 4.30pm (Register here)

String Bean Puppets: Nan and Tuna

Nan and Tuna have been friends for 80 years and now it is time for one last adventure together. But before they leave they will need to find someone to care for the river. Join us for this special bilingual puppet show presented by Anna Bailey of String Bean Puppets!

This event is suitable for tamariki of all ages with their caregivers.

Due to the interference of COVID-19, this event has been rescheduled. The new date and location are:

  • Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library | Saturday 16 July, 11.00am – 12.00pm (More information)


…and even more!

The holidays are going to be chocka with even more wonderful events, including Bricks and Giggles (LEGO® building galore!), Stop Motion Stories (fun and simple animation workshops!), Box Bonanza (what can you make armed with nothing but a cardboard box and your imagination?), Zine Machine (make your own mini-book!), and Experience VR (enter a whole new world of story through the magic of VR). Registrations are required for some of these events, so make sure you get in quick to secure your place!

Visit the links above to see all the details, or view the whole schedule on the Beyond the Page website. We can’t wait to see you there!

Mānawatia a Matariki!

“Mānawa maiea te putanga o Matariki
Mānawa maiea te ariki o te Rangi
Mānawa maiea te mātahi o te tau

Celebrate the rising of Matariki
Celebrate the rising of the lord of the sky
Celebrate the rising of the New Year

For the first time in Aotearoa, Matariki will officially be celebrated as a rā whakatā ā-ture (public holiday) on Friday 24 June 2022.

It is an opportunity for all people of Aotearoa to come together and reflect on the year that has passed, celebrate the present, and plan for the future.”(Mānawatia a Matariki)

In Aotearoa, the Matariki star cluster can be seen for most of the year, but in May the stars set below the horizon and during June or July each year, they rise again. The rising of Matariki marks the start of the Māori new year and is a time of remembrance, peace, and celebration. Traditionally nine stars were visible. These are named individually with each star signifying an important aspect of Te Ao Māori. Tohunga (skilled experts) would observe how the stars looked in the sky and make predictions on the coming year according to their appearance.

Celebrating Puanga

Many Māori in the west of New Zealand observe the rise of Puanga about two weeks earlier than Matariki. Puanga can be seen in the eastern sky and it signals the approach of dawn as if “the sun itself is pushing it from behind”. Puanga is celebrated by our Wellington mana whenua, Te Āti Awa as well as other Taranaki Iwi, Whanganui Iwi, Ngāpuhi, Rēkohu/Wharekauri and Moriori from the Chatham Islands. “Puanga kai rau” means Puanga of abundant food and gives credit to the fruits which Puanga brings.

The Matariki cluster is known throughout the world by many names including the Pleiades star cluster. In Greek ancient mythology, the Pleiades were seven sisters. The sisters’ names were Alcyone, Celaeno, Electra, Maia, Merope, Sterope (or Asterope), and Taygete. Puanga is known by some other cultures as Rigel.


Te Iwa o Matariki (The Nine Stars of Matariki)

Matariki – signifies reflection, hope and our connection to the environment

Pōhutukawa – connects with those who have passed on

Waitī – ties to bodies of fresh water and the food within it

Waitā – ties to the ocean and the food within it

Waipuna-ā-rangi – associated with the rain

Tupuānuku – is for food that grows within the soil

Tupuārangi – is for food that grows up in the trees

Ururangi – is the star associated with the winds

Hiwa-i-te-rangi – the youngest, is the wishing star that also ties into our aspirations for the coming year


Matariki Connections

Competition for Ages 512

Matariki is a good time to reflect on our lives and the world around us, celebrate the present, and think about the future.

In this competition, discover and draw what one star connection means to you! Use the above descriptions to choose an aspect of life associated with a star, and then illsutrate what it means to you!

The competition runs from 21–30 June.

Find out about the star connections here, or on the entry form at libraries and community centres. You can enter online at wcl.govt.nz/matarikiconnections

Win some lovely pukapuka!




Hot off the press!

The Astromancer: The Rising of Matariki. / Ihimaera, Witi
“The Astromancer is looking for four new apprentices to learn about Matariki and the Maramataka calendar. She chooses three boys and an orphan girl, Aria, who will come only if she can bring her smelly dog. Aria, though, is bored by the lessons, and she doesn’t want to be told what to do. But these are dangerous times, and Ruatapu the Ravenous is about to threaten the safety of the whole tribe. Will Aria step up to save them? Also available in te reo Maori as Te Kokorangi.” (Catalogue)
Te Kokorangi: Te Aranga o Matariki. / Ihimaera, Witi
“E kimi ana a Te Kokorangi i etahi pia hou tokowha hei ako i nga korero o Matariki me te maramataka. Kowhiria ana etahi tama tokotoru, me tetahi kotiro, he pani, ko Aria te ingoa. Tohe ana a Aria kia haere ano ko tana kuri haunga i tona taha. Ka ahua hoha a Aria i nga akoranga, kaore hoki ia e pai kia tohutohungia ia. Engari kua noho morearea te iwi. Taihoa pea ratou ka tino raru i a Ruatapu Te Pukurua. Ae ranei ma Aria ano te iwi e whakaora?” (Catalogue)

Want to find out more to help you celebrate Matariki?

Mānawatia a Matariki

Matariki at Te Papa

Matariki ki Pōneke

Matariki | AnyQuestions 

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa

Matariki: Te Tau Hou Māori

Te Aka Māori Dictionary

Wellington City Libraries: Matariki

 

Ngā mihi o te tau hou Māori!