5 new children’s non fiction to read in term 3.

Here is your chance to discover a hidden world beneath the surface of things. Whether it is what goes on deep within the bowels of a city, what is really going on inside the human body. Or even what is going on right outside your backyard.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsPeeking under the city.

Tall building and bright lights. Honking  and cool water fountains. This is what a city looks like above ground. But what wonders lie beneath? Let’s go below the streets and take a peek.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsPeeking under your skin.

Arms, leg and a big smile. Waving hands and dancing feet. This is what a person looks like from the outside. But what wonders lie inside? Let’s go below your skin and take a peek!

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsPeeking Underground.

Leafy trees and green grass. Chirping birds and children playing games. This is what the earth looks like above ground.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsEgyptian Mummy: The Embalmer’s Handbook.

Prepared to be dazzled and spellbound the glorious mysteries of ancient Egypt. Read this and discover a civilisation of the ancient Egyptians and discover how they embalmed their dead. Contains beautiful illustrations, a guide to Egyptian coffins, ‘true or false’ quizzes, and a spectacular gatefold image of the River Nile.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe beginners guide to netball.

Willing to bring out your inner Silver Fern? This check out this fantastic beginners guide to netball. This book features the basic skills every netballer should be familiar with, no matter what their position. Read about the story of netball as well as Maria’s own journey to becoming an international netball superstar.

 

 

 

New Non Fiction: Back to School numbers.

Welcome to Term 3! I hope you all had a fantastic break over the school holidays.  Here are some new junior non fiction to help you catch up on your school work.
image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndeticsWhy do reptiles have scales? : and other questions about evolution and classification. 
Wildlife wonders? You better believe it. This book covers anything and everything you want/need to know about the classification and evolution of reptiles and how they have adapted to survive the ever changing environment. This is a great book to use for biology projects and homework. Great for Primary and Intermediate level.

You might also want to check out Why do Plants have flowers? and other questions about evolution and classification. Lots of amazing facts about the evolution and classification of plants, like you find out the age of a tree by counting the rings beneath the bark and apparently find out which flower smells of rotting meat – Whoa!. A great resource to sue for horticulture projects and homework.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndeticsIt’s time for Animaths! It’s time to improve your maths sssskills by looking at Shapes with Snakes. Become a “roaring” success with maths by Taking Away with Tigers and some maths ant-ics by looking at Adding with Ants.

These books are great to use to introduce young children to simple key maths concepts with the use of  cut out photos of animals. These books are sure to engage the interest of reluctant mathematicians.

 

 

 

All about the Commonwealthimage courtesy of syndetics

According to WikipediaThe Commonwealth of Nations, commonly known as the Commonwealth (formerly the British Commonwealth),  is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states (including New Zealand) that were mostly territories of the former British Empire, with some notable exceptions. The Commonwealth operates by intergovernmental consensus of the member states, organised through the Commonwealth Secretariat, and non-governmental organisations, organised through the Commonwealth Foundation.

Luckily for the library, we now have a junior non fiction book jam packed with information about the Commonwealth. This informative, fact-packed guide also tells you all about the history and the aims of the Commonwealth since its foundation in 1931. Did you know New Zealand is one of the 53 countries led by HM Queen Elizabeth II? A great book to use for Social Studies homework.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsCool Kids Cook.

Ready for another back to school number that will help you ace Home Economics and allow you to unleash your inner Gordon Ramsey-Jaime Oliver- Nigella Lawson-Chelsea Winter? Donna Hay has released a cookbook for kids. Donna Hay for kids?! How cool is that! Check out the awesome cookbook, catered for cool kids that contains over 40 fun and simple recipes for kids to make for family and friends to enjoy. Found a few tasty numbers like spaghetti bolognese, sausage rolls, chicken noodle soup, cup cakes and chocolate moose. Wow,  I wish I had this book when I was doing Home Economics at school.

 

 

 

image courtesy of knight academy blog

Encyclopedia of the human body : begin to discover the human body.

Got a biology project coming up on the human body? This back to school number can help.  The Encyclopedia of the human body will allow you to discover information about how the human body and anatomy works. You will discover and learn everything from how blood flows through the heart, to how food is digested and where your voice comes from… hmmm!  This is the kind of book that makes *physiology look cool and screams AMAZING!

 

*Physiology: The branch of biology that deals with the normal functions of living organisms and their parts.

 

A closer look at history: New non fiction

Usborne encyclopedia of ancient Egypt

Many books about ancient Egypt focus on Mummies and pyramids, which is a pity because, obviously, the history of an empire that lasted from  1096BCE to 30BCE is much richer than that.  This book encompasses over 1000 years of history, not only focusing on the great Pharaohs, but what everyday life was like for the poorer members of Egyptian society.  There are sections on everything from the Egyptian army to medicine to beauty care.  There are plenty of links to useful websites, as well as a few timelines; one lists the pharaohs in chronological order, the other gives a chronological look at Egyptology and how its changed over the centuries.  This is certainly one of the most through books on ancient Egypt we have in our collection, and a great book for school projects.

 

Stephen Biesty’s Cross-Sections: Castle

This book is a classic and for good reason. As a close look at castle life during the medieval period it’s yet to be bettered. The cross sections of the various parts of the castle are intricately detailed, with explanations of what’s happening in different parts of the drawing. They’re also quite funny; try to spot the sneaky spy and the castle inhabitants getting up to all sorts of things, many of them not exactly appropriate to the situation!  The book manages to be both very informative and extremely fun. As well as the cross sections there are plenty of things like the feudal system, clothing and warfare.  This is THE book to read if you’re at all interested in Medieval castles.

 

 

Deadly days in History

Terry Deary has been writing the Horrible History books for twenty years, and to his credit, they’re still as interesting and funny as they’ve ever been. Rather than focusing on one specific country, this is a look at the days in world history that have been particularly bloody.  True to his established pattern, he doesn’t just stick to Western History; he also looks at the Sepoy and Boxer rebellions, as well as the Battle of Isandlwana.  He also isn’t biased towards any particular group; everyone involved has their savagery discussed.  It’s a great book, even by Terry Deary’s high standards, and well worth reading if you like your history both balanced and gory.

 

 

 

Bones never lie: How Forensic science helps solve history’s mysteries

One of the strangest parts of learning about history is how evolving scientific techniques of the present help us better understand the mysteries of the past. Forensic science is used to solve modern day murders, but it also has its uses in working out just what happened. For example, did Napoleon die of natural causes or was he murdered? Did the Grand Duchess Anastasia survive the massacre of her family by Communists? This book works hard to debunk various theories and explains the science behind each of the conclusions.  But it also takes the time to look at each of the other theories in turn, and treats each one with equal weight.

 

 

New Non Fiction: The gross, the angry and just plain horrible.

Prepare to be shocked! Prepare to be horrified! Prepare to be… grossed out! Read at your own risk!

Check out the new junior non fiction from:

Horrible Histories and Horrible Science:

Angry Animals.

Which scientist ate a poisonous snake for dinner? Where can you find a dragon with bad breath? Who made false teeth for an elephant? Discover all the awful answers and more in the latest book from Horrible Science called Angry Animals. Reading this book will make you think twice about everything you know about your favourite animals. This is the science book to read with all the squishy bits left in!

 

 

 

 

 Cruel Crime.

Horrible Histories and Terry Deary has  done it again with the latest book from the series. Discover all the foul facts, gore and much more in Cruel Crime. You will also discover answers to the following questions like who was sentenced to death, by coffee, Where you could be whipped for flying a kite and why a cockerel was burnt at the stake.

 

 

 

 

National Geographic Kids.

That’s Gross!

Warning! This book may cause cringing, squirming, gasping and outright disgust! Read at your own risk! Sounds like your kind of book? Then keep reading…

Check out this new (and disgusting) read from National Geographic Kids which is bound to make your tummy churn. You will learn about the gross and disgusting trivia that shares historical information, cultural tidbits and sickening scientific sidebars on everything from nose picking and insect-based foods to hairballs and digestive commonalities. More than enough information to put you off your lunch.

 

 

Science Museum.

Brains, bodies, guts and stuff.

Ever wanted to read about the human body with no boring bits? Then look no further. This book explores everything from cells to organs to breathing to blood flow to scabs and rashes to broken bones and brain power. Includes puzzles, quizzes and experiments. Also find out what happens in your head during a headache and what toes are for.

 

 

 

 

 

That’s Gross!

The series title takes the words out my mouth! Check out the new and latest books from this series.

Gross things about your pets.

You think you know everything about your pets. They’re cute, they’re cuddly, they’re… gross! Read all about the gross things that your pets do, like dogs and cats sweating through their paws, rabbits producing two types of droppings and cats drinking grass juice. Some gross things are good, while others are not. Decide for yourself whether those facts are cool or gross.

 

 

 

 

Gross things about your food.

This will make you think twice about the food you eat. Read all about gross things you didn’t know about food, like microorganisms age beef, people in Nigeria eat locuts and  sheep’s cheese is made using maggots. Also learn about some foods that some may find tasty while other might find gross.

 

 

Kids’ Club Review by Catherine: Doctor Judy Moody

Doctor Judy Moody, by Megan McDonald

Judy is in a grump on Monday morning, until she finds out her class is doing a Human Body project at school. Skeletons, bones, cloning and even going to the real live hospital! Judy’s going to have a blast!

3 stars

Reviewed by Catherine from Karori, 10 years old

New Non-Fiction for February!

Want to learn more about stuff? This month in the library we’ve got books about time and how people have measured it in history (The Time Book), words and the English language (The word snoop), the best way to make people laugh (Funny business), some more disgusting facts and trivia (Why does ear wax taste so gross?), and how does the internet work anyway (How did that get to my house? Internet)?

 

For more new non-fiction arrivals have a look at the My Library Children’s Non-Fiction page.

Frankensteinriffic!

If you’d like to have an insider’s view of how the body works, then you should go and check out Dr. Frankenstein’s Human Body Book by Richard Walker. It even has a really cool holographic cover! It’s like stepping inside Dr. Frankenstein’s laboratory and watching him create a human being! It has all these really detailed illustrations and descriptions of how the body works. I truly enjoyed reading it so I hope you’ll take some time to check it out yourself.