Top 10 children’s non-fiction for December 2016

This month’s Top 10 has so many great books in it!  The new Annual a group of New Zealand writers, illustrators, musicians and poets have come together, sourced by Kate deGoldi and Kate Paris from Gecko Press.

Lego and Minecrafters have the virtual and real life block worlds covered and beautiful photos from Vesa  Lehtimäki show off the lego model world.

Maori myths and legends illustrator and author Peter Gossage, died this year, so it’s a fitting tribute that his books should still be so popular with younger readers.  His iconic images live on in the books he created.  His illustrations were also part of animated versions, here for your viewing pleasure.

 

Here’s your Top 10 for December: 

1. LEGO, by Daniel Lipkowitz

2. Hacks for Minecrafters, by Megan Miller

3. Harry Potter and the cursed child, by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K. Rowling

4. Minecraft : Redstone Handbook, by Nick Farwell

5. Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft and Pablo Hidalgo

6. Minecraft. Construction Handbook, by Matthew Needler

7. Small scenes from a big galaxy, by Vesa  Lehtimaki

8. Pokemon gotta catch ‘em all! published by Scholastic

9. Annual edited by Kate de Goldi and Susan Paris

10. Maui and other Maori legends, by Peter Gossage

 

Top 10 Children’s Non-Fiction September 2016

Harry Potter in the Non-Fiction section? What’s going on?

As the new Harry Potter book came out in the format of a play, or script, it can be found with other theatrical greats in the literature section where the other plays hang out.  The play version of The Witches by Roald Dahl hangs out there along with Shakespeare!

 

1. Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton

2. LEGO, by Daniel Lipkowitz

3. Minecraft, by Megan Miller

4. Star Wars, by David West Reynolds

5. Minecraft, by Nick Farwell

6. Harry Potter and the cursed child, by Jack Thorne, J. K. Rowling and John Tiffany

7. Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

8. Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam

9. Small scenes from a big galaxy, by Vesa Lehtimaki

10. How Maui found his father and the magic jawbone, by Peter Gossage

Top 10 Children’s Non-Fiction for August 2016

Lego, Minecraft and Star Wars are yet again leading as the favourites of the Children’s non-fiction world.  But… Language books are a really cool part of the non-fiction collection. First readers in Maori nearly squeaked into the Top 10 this month.  So for those of you practicing the Reo you can find a good start in these pukapuka. Ka wani ke! (Awesome!)

 

1. LEGO, by Daniel Lipkowitz

2. Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton, illustrated by Joe McLaren

3. Star Wars, by Adam Bray

4. Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

5. Minecraft, by Nick Farwell

6. Small scenes from a big galaxy, by Vesa Lehtimaki

7. Minecraft hacks master builder, by Megan Miller

8. Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam

9. Star Wars, by David West Reynolds

10. Lego Star Wars in 100 scenes, by Daniel Lipkowitz

Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori: Māori Language Week

arohatialogoKia ora tamariki! That means ‘hello kids’! This week in Aoteroa New Zealand we celebrate a very special event that doesn’t happen anywhere else in the world: Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori, Māori Language Week.

When English speakers began arriving in New Zealand over 200 years ago, Māori was the main language spoken, and many settlers had to learn te reo so that they could trade with the Māori people.

However, as more Pākehā (white skinned) came to our country and Māori people learned to speak in English, te reo was used less and less.

At school, Māori children were often encouraged to speak in English only, and some were even punished for speaking in their native tongue.

iStock_000008775653SmallBy the mid-late 1900s (about 50 years ago), very few New Zealanders were able to speak fluent te reo, and people became concerned that the Māori language was dying out.

As a result of this, te reo Māori was recognised as an official language of New Zealand in 1987, and Māori Language Week was started the same year to help promote the language and encourage the use of te reo Māori in everyday life.

Nowadays, te reo is a well known aspect of Māori culture and an important part of New Zealand’s history. It is taught in schools and kindergartens, and children can even go to special schools called Kura Kaupapa that only speak in te reo.

The use of Māori words in everyday life is also much more common, and you have probably seen signs in te reo around your local community, at the library and at school.

iStock_000018236895SmallBut even though we have made some really great improvements over the last 30 years, we still have a long way to go. You can do your bit by using te reo this week.

Here is a useful phrase to get you started:

Q. ‘Kei te pehea koe?’ (How are you?)

A. ‘Kei te pai!’ (I am good) ……….Or you might also be ‘harikoa’ (happy), ‘pouri’ (sad) or ‘hemokai’ (hungry).

Check out our Māori language books on the library catalogue!

 

Matariki: What is it all about?

iStock_000002751348SmallMatariki, the Māori New Year, means ‘tiny eyes’ or ‘eyes of god’ and is celebrated in June when a small group of stars called Pleiades rises above the horizon, bringing the old year to a close and starting a new year.

According to myth, when Ranginui, the sky father, and Papatūānuku, the earth mother, were separated by their children, the god of the winds, Tāwhirimātea, became so angry that he tore out his eyes and threw them into the heavens.

Various Māori tribes celebrated Matariki at different times. Some held festivities when Matariki was first seen in the dawn sky; others celebrated after the full moon rose or at the beginning of the next new moon. The full moon was celebrated in Wellington on June 6 this year, making the start of Matariki.

iStock_000008775653_SmallMatariki is celebrated for the rest of month, and different tribes and Iwi celebrate the New Year in a variety of different ways. Traditionally, Matariki was a time to finish storing food for the winter, weave new clothing and baskets, listen to the stories of our ancestors, and learn about the natural world.

Nowadays, New Zealanders are more likely to get together with family and friends, talk about Māori myths and culture, look at the stars through telescopes, and watch kapa haka performances.

If you want to learn more about Matariki, head on over to our catalogue, or check out the Kiwi Families website for heaps of cool ideas and craft activities.

You can find out about Matariki events in Wellington at the Matariki Wellington website.

 

Top 10 Children’s non-Fiction May 2016

Te Whanganui-a-Tara has hit the top 10! The taniwha legend portrayed by Moira Wairama has a Te Reo version, Ngā taniwha i Te Whanga-nui-a-tara in the library.

These titles are great for looking at your hometown as a site for battling behemoths and using your Māori language, these books come with a CD of the tale inside.

Creators of their own worlds are finding inspiration in both the virtual and physical world.  The creators using Lego and Minecraft are holding the sway of the listings.  Master builder Yvonne Doyle is one of the model builders used by DK publishers in their famous Lego books.

How about your own model building? What have you been inspired to build from your library loans? Let us know in the comments.

Here’s May’s top 10 list:

1.  LEGO, by Daniel Lipkowitz

2.  Minecraft, by Megan Miller

3.  Star Wars, by David West Reynolds

4.  Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton

5.  Star Wars, by Adam Bray

6.  Minecraft, by Nick Farwell

7.  Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

8.  Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam

9.  The taniwha of Wellington Harbour, by Moira Wairama

10. Minecraft blockopedia, by Alex Wiltshire

Kids’ Club Review by Molly: Cry of the Taniwha

Cry of the Taniwha, by Des Hunt

It is a about called Matt who goes to Rotorua to stay with his grandmother and her new husband. He is worried about this new husband. Matt also takes his metal detector with him. He finds a skeleton hidden under a pile of mud and dirt.He then goes on an adventure searching for treasure with his new friend from across the fence but it is not all easy going as a local gang gets involved. I liked this book a lot because it was very exciting. I gave it 5 big stars.

5 stars

Reviewed by Molly from Karori and Karori Normal School , 8 years old

New Non Fiction: Back to School, Part 2.

101 Hidden Animals.image courtesy of syndetics

Read this book and discover the amazing ways 101 animals hide in plain sight and defends themselves from predators. Overall this book is a very enjoyable read. There are some fantastic images and amazing facts about how animals hide themselves. For example, bullfrogs rest in shallow water to look just like rocks and zebras’ stripes confuse predators.

 

Ballet Spectacular.image courtesy of http://www.roh.org.uk/

Ballet, spectacular? You bet! Hands down, this is one of the most amazing, beautiful and captivating books I have ever come across in the junior non fiction collection! Grab this book today and get a full and unique insight into the magical world of ballet seen through the eyes of The Royal Ballet!

 

 

Discovering Dinosaurs.image courtesy of syndetics

Check this ultimate, most up to date guide to the age of dinosaurs and discover over 165 fascinating prehistoric creatures from the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods, including every major dino discovery made to date.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHow to be a space explorer.

Ever wanted to go into space? This book gives you the lowdown on everything young explorers needs to know to travel in space, covering what life in zero gravity is like, how to find your way around the solar system, and the all-important question of how to pee in a spacesuit! (Hee, hee, still tickled pink over that one!) Overall a fantastic read, complete with unique illustrations take kids to the heart of the action and amazing photos show what the universe is really like. Not to mention, incredible stories of real-life space exploration for kids aged 8 and up, by author and astrobiologist Professor Mark Brake.

 

How to handle low self-esteem.image courtesy of syndetics

If you feel under pressure or having trouble dealing with what ever life is throwing at you, then this book can help. How to Handle Low Self Esteem is an essential guide that can help you understand how and why you might hold a low opinion of yourself and  what you can do to improve things for yourself. The book highlights areas that may trigger these feelings, such as bullying or peer-pressure. Perhaps you are under pressure because of your sexual orientation, your race or religion or because you simply don’t fit the mould. This book will help you confront your issues and offers solid advice based on the experiences of real people. A great book to read to calm those ‘

 

How to handle bullying and gangs.image courtesy of syndetics

No one should ever have to cope with bullying. Inside this book you will find: Practical advice for dealing with bullies, suggestions as to where you can find support, advice on how to feel positive about yourself.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHow Maui found his father and the magic jawbone.

An oldie but a goodie. Check out this this new addition Peter Gossage’s classic tale about how Maui found his father and the magic jawbone. Perfect timing with Waitangi day around the corner.

 

Celebrate Waitangi Day with these free events in your libraries

Apirana Taylor: Saturday 3st January, 11am – 12pm, Wellington Central Library.

Bring the kids along to a special story session with renowned author, actor and storyteller, Apirana Taylor. Known for his charismatic and engaging style, Apirana will tell traditional tales accented by taonga pūoru and whai (string games).

 

Kōhunga Kōrero: Tuesday 3rd February, 10.30am, Newtown Library

Join us at Newtown Library for a Waitangi day themed session of our regular storytimes in te Reo Maori. 30mins of stories, rhymes, waiata and fun! Suitable for 3-6 year olds and their whanau.

 

Kōhunga Kōrero: Saturday 7th February, 10.30am, Wellington Central Library

Join us in the Children’s section for a special te Reo Storytime with a Waitangi Day theme. 30mins of stories, rhymes, waiata and fun! Suitable for 3-7 year olds and their whanau.

 

 

These events are free and open to everyone. Bookings not required. More Information.