7 New Non Fiction to read during August.

Spring into reading with this new selection of junior non fiction about great explorers, animals and the world during the month of August.

Enjoy!

 

Explorers: Amazing Tales Of The World’s Greatest Adventures.

Meet famous explorers and adventurers in this exciting non-fiction storybook for children. Venture into steaming jungles in search of lost temples, fight off frostbite in the Arctic, and blast off into space!

There Are Bugs Everywhere.

There are bugs everywhere! Some of them live in jungles, some of them underwater, and some certainly live in your house. There are Bugs Everywhere is the second in a series of non-fiction books from Britta Teckentrup.

Wild In The Streets: 20 Poems Of City Animals.

A beautifully illustrated book which pairs poetry with non-fiction, telling the fascinating stories of the animals that have found their homes in urban landscapes all over the world.

Save The Gorilla (Animal SOS!).

Gorillas are magnificent creatures of the forest and are loved by many people. So why are they under threat of extinction? Find out all about gorillas, the threats that they face, what is being done to try and save them and how you can help to answer their SOS call.

Weird and Wonderful Animals.

Follow the adventures of an intrepid explorer, and meet some of the world’s most bizarre animals! Did you know there’s a wasp that looks like a panda, a basilisk snake that runs over water, a butterfly with a large skull on its body, and a fish that seems to be wearing lipstick?

image courtesy of syndeticsRebel Dogs! Heroic Tales of Trusty Hounds.

Tail wagging tales of real life Rebel Dogs! Get your paws on the stories and secrets of some of history’s most heroic hounds! An engaging collection packed with over 30 real life dogs, including film stars with fur, hounds that love to help, superstars of science and war heroes; these rebel dogs are the stars of their own stories.

How Trains Work.

How Trains Work takes kids on a fun behind-the-scenes adventure to discover the secrets of train travel. From the earliest steam locomotives to modern super-speedy bullet trains, we peek inside trains, carriages, routes and stations to reveal how they operate and transport people.

10 New Non Fiction to read during winter.

Hey kids! Winter is coming, and there are bound to be days where you will be spending more times indoors – whether it is at your local library or in the comfort of your own home. Luckily there is some awesome new non fiction available in the junior non fiction collection at your local library! Check out these books that will help you brush up on your English/grammar skills, prehistoric animals, and so much more!

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsPlanetarium.

Check out the latest book which is part of the “Welcome to the museum series”, a collection of books where the museum is open all hours!

Welcome to the planetarium! A book that houses a huge collection of astronomical objects and enables you to explore the universe in all its glory!

Hands down, one of the best books on planets!

Have a look at other books in the series, such as AnimaliumHistorium and Dinosaurium,

images courtesy of syndetics

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndetics

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe science of warfare : the ferocious facts about how we fight.

Want to learn the science of warfare? Then this is the book for you! This ferocious books of facts of how the best in warfare fight will tell you all you need to know. From medieval trebuchets and siege towers to the tanks and high-powered aircraft of today, it is an eye-opening introduction to the mechanics of warfare.

 

 

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Lizards.

Whether they already own one, or beg for one each Christmas and birthday, children love pets, and PET PALS is the perfect title for any pet-loving child out there. From where they sleep to what they eat, and how you can make them feel safe and at home, this book provides all the pet care advice you could possibly need. Adorable photos, and gentle, accessible text, makes this the perfect guide for all pet carers – whether they own a pet or not!

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsAmazing transport : journey through the history of transport.

Fasten your seat belts and get ready to zoom through the history of transport and discover incredible facts about all kinds of vehicles along the way. With wonderfully intricate illustrations from Chris Mould, Amazing Transport tells the story of some of science’s most recognisable inventions in a way you’ve never seen before. Prepare yourself for the journey of a lifetime.

Hands down, one of the coolest books on transport I have ever seen! Ideal for anyone who is interested in transport and history!

 

 

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My first dictionary.

My first dictionary contains core words, with clear definitions, simple spelling tips and fun wordplay activities. This is a great book to help improve children’s reading, writing and spelling.

 

 

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My first thesaurus.

My first thesaurus is an easy-to-use word finder containing more than 100 key words and more than 1,000 secondary words, as well as synonyms and antonyms. Simple example sentences and amusing cartoons clarify and visually reinforce word meanings while making the process of discovery fun. The thesaurus can be used alongside its companion title, My first dictionary.

 

 

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Weather and the seasons.

This book is a good introduction to weather and the seasons, describing what is a cloud, why rainbows form, and how animals migrate for the winter, and includes four weather-related science projects.

 

 

image courtesy of syndetics

Taniwhasaurus : the true story of finding the dinosaurs of Zealandia.

Tells the story of Joan Wiffen, a self-taught fossil hunter who discovered the first evidence of dinosaurs in New Zealand.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMaria Montessori.

New in the critically acclaimed Little People, BIG DREAMS series, discover the incredible life of Maria Montessori, the pioneering teacher and researcher. Maria grew up in Italy at a time when girls didn’t receive an equal education to boys. But Maria’s mother was supportive of her dreams, and Maria went on to study medicine. She later became an early years expert – founding schools with her revolutionary educational theories and changing the lives of many children. This moving book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the educators life.

Wonderful world of Lego!

Lego Fanatics, brace yourself.

Lego mania has been unleashed all around Wellington City Libraries with Lets Go Lego, with the release of The Lego Movie 2; TV show Lego Masters Australia and an outstanding collection of  books that will inspire your Lego creativity… and addiction. Believe it or not, according to Inner Child Learning, Lego Bricks have been applauded by teachers and parents as one of the best toys for learning, building creativity, and strengthening fine-motor skills. Lego Bricks are an open-ended toy, meaning they can become just about anything a child or adult imagines, including an educational tool.

What are you waiting for? Its time to come on down to your local library and unleash your inner Lego master!… by…


Attending one of our Lets Go Lego sessions at the following branches:

Newtown Library: Third Monday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm

Miramar Library: Fourth Thursday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm

Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: Second Thursday of each month, 3:30-4:30pm.

Khandallah Library: First Friday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm.

Karori Library: Third Saturday of each month, 2.00-3.00pm.

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: Second Thursday of each month, 3.30-4.30pm.

For further information email WCL enquiries or check out the library event calendar for dates.

 

Borrowing Lego books from your local library, such as:

iamge courtesy of syndeticsLego City : busy word book.

Jam packed with busy and colourful scenes from LEGO City sets and more than 750 words. LEGO City is the perfect place for early readers to encounter plenty of exciting words for the first time, including vocabulary for buildings, vehicles, jobs and activities. Fun, interactive activities such as spotting recurring characters and naming favourite vehicles keep children engaged and encourage repeat reading.

image courtesy of syndeticsGenius LEGO inventions with bricks you already have : 40 new robots, vehicles, contraptions, gadgets, games and other fun STEM creations.

The world of Lego, science and engineering combines with this amazing books that gives you ideas on how to transform your bin of LEGO® bricks into amazing, movable toys, machines and gadgets. It’s easy and fun to build each of these awesome contraptions and games by following the clear step-by-step instructions and photographs. No matter what you end up creating, you’ll learn exciting new things about science, impress your family and have a blast along the way. A must have book and resource to read, especially with Techweek 2019 around the corner!

image courtesy of sydneticsAmazing brick mosaics : fantastic projects to build with the Lego blocks you already have.

“Every LEGO-loving kid has at least one huge bin of bricks the sets are built, dismantled, and typically never built again and this book gives them dozens of ways to reuse them in fun projects that range from easy to challenging. Featuring a simple yet elegant mosaic technique, step-by-step instructions, and full-color photographs for making 25 cool two-dimensional pictures, Amazing Brick Mosaics offers unique projects that will delight any LEGO enthusiast”–Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick city. New York : 20 unofficial LEGO® projects to build!

It’s New York – but not as you know it. This unofficial guide helps LEGO® fans of all ages discover Central Park, the Chrysler Building, Brooklyn Bridge and 17 more landmarks recreated in amazing detail by top brick artists from around the world. Then make your own with 20 quick-build projects that include a hot dog cart, yellow taxi cab and subway train.–Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick city. London : unofficial LEGO® projects to build!

It’s London – but not as you know it. This unofficial guide helps LEGO® fans of all ages discover the Houses of Parliament, Tower of London, Covent Garden and 17 more landmarks recreated in amazing detail by top brick artists from around the world. Then make your own with 20 quick-build projects that include an Underground train, a red bus and fish & chips. –Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick city. Paris : fascinating facts and amazing stories.

It’s Paris – but not as you know it. This unofficial guide helps LEGO (R) fans of all ages discover the Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe, Centre Pompidou and 17 more landmarks recreated in amazing detail by top brick artists from around the world. Then make your own with 20 quick-build projects that include Notre Dame, Sacre Coeur and a Tour de France cyclist.–Provided by publisher.

See previous blog posts, (one and two) for other Lego books in the collection.

Star Wars Day back at the library… and May the forth be with you 2019!

Attention all Jedis, Bounty Hunters and Rebels! Star Wars Day is happening again on May the Forth, which is observed and celebrated by fans of the Star Wars franchise. While you’re at it, why not relive and check out the latest non fiction, (as well as Fiction, Audio CDs and movies,) all related to anything and everything from the Star Wars universe!

Enjoy!… and may the forth be with you!

image courtesy of syndeticsStar Wars : aliens, creatures & beasts.

This book is packed with information, illustrations and stories featuring all the amazing aliens, creatures and beasts from the Star Wars saga!

image courtesy of syndeticsStar Wars : 5-minute stories strike back.

Blast off into hyperspace with … twelve action-packed retellings that span the entire Star Wars saga–including two tales from Star Wars: The Last Jedi! Each of these exciting stories can be read in just five minutes.

This comprehensive visual dictionary is the perfect Star Wars book for getting to know the galaxy far, far away. Packed with more than 1,500 stunning images, it showcases major and minor characters including Princess Leia and Luke Skywalker, creatures, vehicles, weapons, props, and items of tech in unparalleled detail. The definitive companion to the Star Wars movies, Star Wars The Complete Visual Dictionary is a must-buy for the beginner and the die-hard Star Wars fan alike.
Offers young Star Wars fans projects and experiments inspired by the Star Wars universe, including instructions on making Jabba slime, Kyber crystals, and an Ewok catapult.
Recreate: Relive your favourite Star Wars moments — Expand: enlarge the Star Wars galaxy! — Challenge: Compete for fun with friends and family — Use it! Build treasures to keep or gifts to give.
This Star Wars encyclopedia profiles over 200 space ships and other vehicles. Find out about deadly starfighters, vast battleships, speeders, bounty-hunter craft, and many more iconic vehicles.
A visual guide to the movie offers a behind-the-scenes look into the lives of Han Solo, his allies and enemies, along with information on the planets, vehicles, and aliens he encounters.
Also check out the teaser trailer to Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, produced, co-written and directed by J. J. Abrams. It will be the third installment of the Star Wars sequel trilogy, following The Force Awakens (2015) and The Last Jedi (2017), and the ninth and final episode of the main Star Wars film franchise.

“The saga comes to an end”… on December 19th 2019, and from the looks of this trailer, they definitely saved the best for last.

Happy Birthday… and death day William Shakespeare!

April is the month for celebrating Easter, ANZAC Day and the birth… and death of famous English playwright and poet, William Shakespeare.

This year marks Shakespeare’s, or the Bard of Avon, (assumed) 455th birthday on the 26th of April and 403rd death anniversary on the 23rd April.

 

How to celebrate?

In addition to the traditional birthday party, cake and presents, why not read all about his life, from his early and humble beginnings in Stratford upon Avon, England to conquering the stage in Queen Elizabeth’s court and the Globe Theatre.

image courtesy of sydneticsMuch ado about Shakespeare : the life and times of William Shakespeare : a literary picture book.

Take a peek behind the curtain to discover the boy, the youth, the man behind some of the greatest works of literature. The life and times of William Shakespeare are richly imagined in this unique biography told using quotes from the Bard himself.

image courtesy of sydneticsWilliam Shakespeare : scenes from the life of the world’s greatest writer.

Follow the amazing life of William Shakespeare, vividly described in words and pictures, with graphic dramatisations of Shakespeare’s most famous plays.

image courtesy of syndeticsShakespeare.

Find out how in Eyewitness Shakespeare and discover the fascinating life and times of one of the world’s greatest playwrights. Travel back in time and follow Shakespeare from his birth in the small town of Stratford-upon-Avon to theatre life in 16th century London. Eyewitness reference books are now more interactive and colourful, with new infographics, statistics, facts and timelines, plus a giant pull-out wall chart, you’ll be an expert on Shakespeare in no time. Great for projects or just for fun, learn everything you need to know about Shakespeare.

 

Read and relive your favourite Shakespeare plays. Wellington City Libraries holds a huge array of plays, including The Taming of the ShrewRomeo and Juliet, Twelfth NightAs You Like It and King Lear.

image courtesy of sydneticsimage courtesy of syndetics

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of sydnetics

 

 


 

You also might be interested in…

image courtesy of syndeticsShakespeare edited by Marguerite Tassi.

A collection of thirty-one of playwright and poet William Shakespeare’s most famous verses, sonnets and speeches.

He was the world’s greatest playwright, and the English language’s finest writer, Shakespeare is the man the Oxford English dictionary credits as having invented over 1700 common words, and to whom we owe expressions such as ‘fair play’, ‘break the ice’, and ‘laughing stock’. The continued timelessness and genius of his work will be celebrated the world over on his special day.

image courtesy of sydneticsShakespeare retold.

This illustrated volume features seven classic plays by William Shakespeare, retold by E. Nesbit. Shakespeare Retold contains a selection of Shakespeare’s tragedies and comedies, including Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, as well as a historical timeline, a list of suggested reading materials, and a short biography of the bard himself.

 

Have some fun with William Shakespeare!

image courtesy of syndeticsPop-up Shakespeare.

“Discover beloved playwright William Shakespeare’s plays and poetry in this spectacular novelty book from the Reduced Shakespeare Company comedy troupe. Featuring dramatic pop-ups and foldouts and loaded with jokes and fascinating facts, this hilariously informative and fully immersive look into the Bard’s world invites you to experience Shakespeare’s works as you’ve never seen them before!” — Back cover.

image courtesy of syndeticsWhere’s Will? : find Shakespeare hidden in his plays.

Each play in this book begins with a summary of the plot and descriptions of the characters. On the following page is a detailed picture showing the setting of the play and within it you can find the characters, William Shakespeare , and a spotted pig.

 

Watch movies inspired by Shakeaspeare’s plays:

image courtesy of amazon.co.ukThe Lion King… inspired by Hamlet.

You can never go wrong with an oldie but a goodie.

Tricked into thinking he caused his father’s death, Simba, a guilt ridden lion cub flees into exile and abandons his identity as the future King. However when the fate of his kingdom is threatened, he is forced to return and take his place as King.

image courtesy of sydneticsGnomeo & Juliet… inspired by Romeo and Juliet.

Caught up in a feud between neighbors, Gnomeo and Juliet must overcome as many obstacles as their namesakes. But with flamboyant pink flamingoes and epic lawnmower races, can this young couple find lasting happiness?


Also check out the sequel, Sherlock Gnomes.image courtesy of syndetics

Garden gnomes, Gnomeo and Juliet, recruit renowned detective Sherlock Gnomes to investigate the mysterious disappearance of other garden ornaments.

 

ANZAC Day 2019

ANZAC Day is a very special public New Zealand holiday that falls this year on Thursday 25th April.

What is ANZAC Day?

ANZAC is an acronym for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps and is a very special day where New Zealanders and Australians remember the men and women that served and lost their lives in War.

Why is ANZAC Day celebrated on 25th April?

April 25th was the day when the New Zealand and Australian soldiers first landed at Gallipoli in 1915.

image courtesy of syndetics

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndetics

 

 

 

 

 

 

How do we commemorate this day?

  • Going to the Dawn Parade and watching the service men and women march to their local war memorial where they are met by family and the community.
  • Going to the ANZAC Day Service were the community come to lay wreaths in remembrance of the fallen soldiers.
  • Wearing a red poppy. Why? These flowers were the first to bloom over the graves of soldiers in France and Belgium and have become a symbol of remembrance.
  • Eating ANZAC biscuits. Why? The biscuits were sent by wives and women’s groups to soldiers abroad because the ingredients did not spoil and the biscuits kept well during naval transportation.

 

image courtesy of syndetics

Where can I find information about the ANZACs and Anzac Day?

ManyAnswers has a page dedicated to websites, resources and ways to search for information about the ANZACs and ANZAC Day. You can also refer to this previous post, which  provides a list of websites that will provide you with reliable information about ANZAC Day and World War 1.

Will the libraries be open on ANZAC Day?

We are closed on ANZAC Day and will open usual hours from Friday 26th April.

Also check out these amazing stories about ANZAC Day.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsAnzac Day : the New Zealand story : what it is and why it matters.

“This book exposes the rich history behind Anzac Day, seeking to answer the many questions children often ask their parents and teachers around the 25th of April every year. It covers all aspects of Anzac Day, from the Gallipoli Campaign and the Great War, right through to the format of the commemorative services held annually throughout the country. The author identifies important memorials around New Zealand, examines the national anthem, the tradition of Anzac biscuits and the Last Post, Reveille music, plus much more. She also offers websites and projects for further study. The thoroughly researched information is presented alongside numerous images, both historic and contemporary, giving children a very clear view of the significance and background to Anzac Day”–Publisher information. Suggested level: primary, intermediate, junior secondary.

 


image courtesy of syndeticsMy grandad marches on Anzac Day.

“This is a simple, moving look at Anzac Day through the eyes of a little girl. It explains what happens on the day and its significance in terms that a young child can understand.”–Back cover.

image courtesy of syndetics

War Horse.

Joey the horse recalls his experiences growing up on an English farm, his struggle for survival as a cavalry horse during World War I, and his reunion with his beloved master.Joey the horse recalls his experiences growing up on an English farm, his struggle for survival as a cavalry horse during World War I, and his reunion with his beloved master.

 

image courtesy of syndetics ANZAC Animals.

“True tales of the mascots and working animals that helped Anzac soldiers, sailors, pilots and medics do their jobs in wartime. You’ll meet some well-known animals, such as Murphy the donkey, who carried the wounded in Gallipoli, and Caesar the Red Cross Dog. But also included are the hard-working horses, camels and mules, and the dogs that barked a warning when enemy planes were approaching, as well as the mischievous monkeys that had the men laughing”–Publisher information.

 

IMAGE COURTESY OF SYNDETICSThe Anzac violin : Alexander Aitken’s story.“This a WWI-era picture book intended for children and based on true events and a real-life young soldier from Dunedin named Alexander Aitken, who was a brilliant mathematician and a gifted violinist, as well as an artifact – the violin – that has survived the war and remains on display at Otago Boys High to this day”–Publisher information.

 


image courtesy of syndeticsThe ANZAC Puppy.

“This story is based on the true story of Freda, a dalmatian and the dog mascot of the NZ Rifles during World War 1. It’s a simple story about the reality of war, hardship, friendship and love”–Publisher information.

image courtesy of syndeticsCaesar the Anzac dog.

A fictionalised account of Caesar the bulldog, the mascot of the 4th Battalion (A Company) New Zealand Rifle Brigade, who served in World War One and died in action. Suggested level: primary, intermediate.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Anzac tree.

Inspired by the story of two soldiers who planted two trees on their farm before they headed to the Great War, the story of the Anzac Tree is one that looks at the lives of those left behind in times of war.

 

 

6 New Non Fiction to read by the end of summer!

Hey kids! Check out the latest junior non fiction in the library. Books featured in this post include information about Everest and animals, books to keep you entertained, as well as help you with your maths homework and a movie guide long in the making that will give you insight to the world of the “How to train your Dragon” movie franchise.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsEverest.

“There is a place where a mountain grows. It is the highest spot on Earth, the ultimate challenge for mountain-climbing adventurers, the towering figure of Sagarmatha, the Goddess of the Sky … Welcome to Mount Everest. In this stunning book, travel back to the mountain’s ancient origins, learn about the flora and fauna of its great flanks, and discover the rich culture and history surrounding it.”– Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of syndeticsCardboard creations : open-ended exploration with recycled materials.

Provides instructions for creating art projects using recycled materials, such as cardboard boxes and old jars and containers. Great ideas to keep you amused and entertained indoors on a rainy day.

image courtesy of syndeticsSquares, rectangles and other quadrilaterals.

A picture geometry book that introduces children to quadrilaterals, including parallelograms and trapezoids, using hands-on activities and simple explanations. — Provided by publisher.

image courtesy of sydneticsPolka dot parade : a book about Bill Cunningham.

This is a moving and impassioned picture book about the iconic fashion photographer Bill Cunningham that will inspire young readers to go discover their own ideas of beauty and embolden the world with their own creativity!

image courtesy of syndeticsWild: Endangered animals in living motion.

One of the coolest books I have ever read. Wild captures eight endangered animals in living motion. From the cover panda shown lazily munching on leaves, to an albatross swooping its magnificent wings, to a bumblebee taking a sip of water, Wild throws a spotlight on the mammals, birds, and insects that are threatened with extinction. A librarian’s choice all the way!


image courtesy of syndeticsDragons : ultimate movie guide.

Discover all about your favourite Vikings and their dragons in this ultimate guide to the How to Train Your Dragon trilogy! This definitive, official guide gives you the lowdown on all of Toothless and Hiccups adventuresfrom how they first met to their biggest battles. Find out dragon myths, Viking legends and battle stories in this bumper book of Berk.

Check out the trailer to How to train your Dragon: The Hidden World. The epic conclusion  to the How to train your dragon movie series and one of the best films to date! Absolutely love that Toothless the night fury dragon gets a girlfriend in this film. Hilarious moments include when he tries to impress and flirt with the female night fury.

 

 

 

 

Ghosts, monsters, and naughty gods: All you need to know about Halloween!

To many of us, Halloween is not much more than an excuse to wear a spooky costume, listen to some scary stories and maybe carve up a pumpkin, all while hoovering up more lollies than is probably wise. However, to find out more about why people the world over celebrate this holiday, we have to step back in time to visit the ancient Celts, with quick stopovers in 7th-century Rome and 16th-century Germany along the way.

Let’s go for a spooky ride through time.

The brainy people who study such things generally agree that Halloween finds its roots in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain (pronounced sa-win). Samhain was traditionally held on November 1, and it marked the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter, the “dark half” of the year. Ancient Celts believed that during Samhain the world of the gods became visible to ordinary people, and the gods delighted in frightening and playing tricks on their worshippers. Sometimes they appeared as monsters in the dead of night. Sound familiar?

When the Romans conquered Britain in the 1st century CE, they merged Samhain with their own festival of the dead, Feralia. Now the frightening monsters and delicious treats of the harvest were joined by ghosts and restless spirits. The traditions that make up modern Halloween were starting to take form.

Fastforward to Rome, 7th century CE. Pope Boniface IV brought in All Saints’ Day, originally celebrated on May 13 — within a century, the date was changed to November 1, perhaps in an attempt to replace the pagan Samhain festival with a Christian equivalent. The day before All Saints’ Day was considered holy, or ‘hallowed.’ This is where the word ‘Halloween’ comes from — it is the Hallowed Eve.

Zoom forwards in time again to Germany, 16th century CE. The Protestant Reformation, led by people like Martin Luther and John Calvin, put a stop to the still pagan-influenced Halloween festival in most Protestant countries. However, in Britain and Ireland, the festival remained in place as a secular (non-religious) holiday, and the tradition followed English-speaking settlers to the United States, where it is still a hugely important part of the festive calendar. Many of the traditions introduced in the dark and mysterious woods and cairns of ancient Celtia live on to this day in the form of the modern Halloween festival.

Interested in learning more about this fascinating and era-spanning festival, and the people who celebrated it? Why not check out some of these books at your local library:

Celts by Sonya Newland
“The Celts were fearsome warriors, but they also developed trade routes across Europe and made beautiful jewellery. Find out about Celtic tribes, how Boudicca rebelled against the Romans, and how the Celts celebrated with feasts and festivals.” (Catalogue)


Prehistoric Britain by Alex Frith
“From the age of dinosaurs to the Roman invasion, this book tells the story of this vast and exciting period of British history. It describes when and how people first came to Britain, and includes information on the Bronze Age, Iron Age, Celts and the mysteries of Stonehenge. Full of facts, illustrations, photographs, maps and timelines.” (Catalogue)


Celebrate Halloween by Deborah Heiligman
“Vivid images and lively, inviting text illuminate the spookiest night of the year. This book spirits readers on a tour of Halloween celebrations around the globe as it explores the rich history of this holiday and the origins of its folklore, food, games, costumes, and traditions.” (Catalogue)


Traditional celebrations by Ian Rohr
“This interesting book is part of a series written for young students that focuses on a wide variety of celebrations and festivals held for special occasions throughout the world. It focuses on traditional celebrations.” (Catalogue)

Bee Aware Month!

September is Bee Awareness month and this year Apiculture New Zealand are focusing on bee health by educating us on how we can feed the bees and help protect our precious bee population.

Did you know that bees support New Zealand’s agri-industry exports by over $5 billion annually – that is heaps! Plus they help grow one third of all the food we eat as well as helping our gardens flourish and look beautiful.

There is heaps that we can do to help out our little buzzing friends and one of the easiest way is by planting bee friendly plants and flowers. Bees need food so that they can help pollinate the food we eat. Bees will feed on pollen and nectar and this helps them to grow and Bee strong which helps them to fight off disease and parasites.

Bees also need clean water so why not make a shallow container for them to drink from. Just make sure you put pebbles and twigs in the water so the bees have something to rest on while they are drinking.

Another way we can help the bees is to stop spraying our gardens with harmful pesticides which kill the bees.

Palmers Garden Centre who are supporting Bee Awareness Month have information and competitions on their website plus check out their 5 top tips for a bee friendly backyard.

The library also has heaps of books on bees so take a look and… Lets save our bees!

International Asteroid Day

Did you know that there is an International Asteroid Day?

Asteroid Day aims to raise awareness about asteroids and what can be done to protect the Earth, its families, communities and future generations from a catastrophic event.

It was co-founded in 2014  by Dr. Brian May an astrophysicist and rock legend, Danica Remy  president of B612 FoundationRusty Schweickart an astronaut and Grig Richters a German filmmaker.

Following on from this the United Nations General Assembly officially declared June 30th each year as the International Asteroid Day.

June 30 was chosen because it marks Earth’s largest asteroid impact in recorded history, the Siberia Tunguska event, which occurred on the 30 June 1908 and devastated over 2,000 km2 of forest, an area the size of any major city today.

A declaration was created called the 100X Declaration where scientist and technologist who support the idea of saving the earth from asteroids were asked to sign. But the really cool thing is that everyone has the opportunity to sign. To date the 100X Declaration has been signed by more that 22,000 private citizens.

There is heaps of information, resources, movies, videos, fun stuff plus the countdown until June 30 on the official International Asteroid Day website so check it out. And don’t forget we also have lots of information and books in the library.