Latest Top 10 Childrens Non-Fiction

Now that the Guinness World Records 2018 is all official and on the shelves you can see which record you want to go for! There are some impressive Christmas world records.  If you were going for a record breaking number of lights for a home Christmas display you would have to top 601,736!

If your family force you to go to the beach you can take a world of interest with you! (The Star Wars books are still some of the most popular.) We’re waiting to see what will go on to the library shelves with the release of the new movie!

  1. Minecraft : Guide to exploration, by Stephanie Milton
  2. The LEGO books, by Daniel Lipkowitz
  3. First readers in Māori. various authors, published by Huia
  4. Minecraft : redstone Handbook, by Nick Farwell
  5. Harry Potter and the cursed child, by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K.  Rowling
  6. Guinness world records 2018.
  7. Star Wars: The visual encyclopedia, by Patricia Barr
  8. Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft
  9. Terraria, by Daniel Roy
  10. Pokemon : Classic collectors handbook, from Scholastic

Top 10 Children’s non-fiction September 2017

Empire vs Rebel Alliance… with the next episode just around the corner Star Wars fans are gearing up for another adventure with epic space battles, heroes and villains and new worlds. People, creatures, robots, space travel and planets are such a great source of material that it’s no wonder we have books and comics in every section of the library that delve into this galactic war, and… 3 spots in this Top 10!

Online builders are finding more ways to apply their skills with Terraria.  With books offering you tips and tricks to make the most out of crafting in 2D or 3D =)

This top 10 includes real life heroes – 100 of them! Good night stories for rebel girls, features wildlife advocates, early computer programmers, sports people and an astronaut!

 

  1. Minecraft : guide to the Nether and the End, by Stephanie Milton
  2. The LEGO ideas book, by Daniel Lipkowitz
  3. Harry Potter and the cursed child, by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K. Rowling
  4. Minecraft, by Nick Farwell
  5. Terraria, by Daniel Roy
  6. Star Wars : the visual encyclopedia, by Patricia Barr, Adam Bray and Cole Horton
  7. Pokemon deluxe essential handbook, published by Gosford, N.S.W. : Scholastic Australia
  8. Good night stories for rebel girls, by Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo
  9. Star Wars : The Force Awakens in pictures, by Ryder Windham
  10. Star Wars Character Encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft and Pablo Hidalgo

6 New Non Fiction just in time for the school holidays.

Hey Kids! The last few weeks have been full on with Elections 2017, Day Lights Savings, and now school holidays and sunny days! Whoohoo! Time to bring on the sunscreen and sunnies finally! While you’re at it, come on down to your local library and check out the latest releases of new junior non fiction. This blog post will feature new books to awaken and enhance your creativity in the minecraft world, real life stories about influential women that changed the world and a impact on the people around them and back to school read – I know, early at this stage – to help improve your grammar and punctuation.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of sydneticsMinecraft: Guide to Creative.

Get into Creative Mode with this official Minecraft book from Mojang. Learn the finer points of architecture, art and other creative disciplines with Minecraft Guide to Creative, and put theory into practice to build incredible constructions in Minecraft. Find out how to combine colours and textures to create different themes, devise intricate plans for complex builds, and discover secret hacks to use blocks in clever ways. With insider info and tips from the experts at Mojang, this is the definitive guide to creating in Minecraft.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMinecraft: Guide to the Nether & the End.

“Survival is difficult in the perilous Nether and End dimensions, and you’ll need to up your game if you want to make it back to the Overworld. The official Minecraft : Guide to the Nether & the End will teach you how to navigate the alien terrain, battle the native mobs and find rare blocks and items. With insider info and tips from the experts at Mojang, this is the definitive guide to survival in the Nether and the End”–Back cover.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMinecraft: Guide to Exploration.

The mysterious world of Minecraft is just waiting to be explored. But danger lurks around every corner and survival can prove difficult for even the bravest adventurer. The official Minecraft Guide to Exploration from Mojang will help you to survive and thrive. You’ll learn how to find resources, craft equipment and protect yourself from hostile mobs. Discover which biomes to avoid when starting out, how to build a mob-proof shelter and where to look for naturally-generated structures laden with loot. With insider info and tips from the experts at Mojang, this is the definitive guide to exploration and survival in Minecraft.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsWho says Women Can’t be Doctors?

The inspiring and highly recommended story, life and achievements of Elizabeth Blackwell, the first female doctor – and certainly not the last- doctor in America. This book also describes the limited career prospects available to women in the early nineteenth-century, the opposition Blackwell faced while pursuing a medical education, and her pioneering medical career that opened doors for future generations of women. A Librarian’s choice all the way!

 

image courtesy of sydnetics
Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls.

What if the princess didn’t marry Prince Charming but instead went on to be an astronaut? What if the jealous step sisters were supportive and kind? And what if the queen was the one really in charge of the kingdom? Illustrated by sixty female artists from every corner of the globe, Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls introduces us to one hundred remarkable women and their extraordinary lives, from Ada Lovelace to Malala, Amelia Earhart to Michelle Obama. Empowering, moving and inspirational, these are true fairy tales for heroines who definitely don’t need rescuing. Another Librarian’s choice all the way!

 

image courtesy of syndeticsVisual guide to grammar and punctuation.

Get to grips with grammar and punctuation with this simple clear visual guide. Supports curriculum teaching for ages 6 and up.

 

 

 

Rise of the Robots: Doing it Gangham Style!

Wellington City Libraries are embracing the following trends: technology, coding and robots. To support the Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) learning platform, we now have two new team members to assist library staff in this process in the form of Nao Robot twins: Blue and Red.

Blue and Red are fully automated Nao, (pronounced ‘now’) humanoid Robots. They are 58cm tall, autonomous, and fully programmable. They walk, talk, listen to you, and even recognise your face. Blue and Red can even whip out a few dance moves to Thriller by Michael Jackson, Gangnam style by PSY and more! Like most humans, if the robots fall down they manage to get themselves back up again, along with a few grunts and groans, and touch wood without any broken limbs or bones.

The robots made their official debut at Wellington Central Library on Monday 10th of July, at the ‘Meet the Robots’ event, part of the Beyond the Page literary festival for children during the school holidays. Apart from a few technical difficulties and performance anxiety issues, for both the librarians’ and robots the event proved to be a success. Blue and Red were the main attractions and stole the show. Parents and kids were whipping out their cell phones to photograph and film the robots paparazzi style! Everyone was mightily impressed with what the robots could do. They loved the performances and there were a lot of ‘ooohs’, ‘aaahs’ and giggling, and a huge round of applause at the end! Overall Blue and Red are a welcome addition to the library, as well as an ideal learning platform for teaching STEAM subjects. With the robots on our team, Wellington City Libraries can continue to work alongside organisations, such as schools, businesses and Information Technology Institutes.  Together we’ll ensure the STEAM platform is promoted and taught to the wider community – Gangnam style!

6 New Non Fiction on gaming, animals and improving your memory.

Hey kids! More hot new junior non fiction for your reading pleasure. This blog post features books where the gaming theme continues, books that can help improve your memory and heart-warming stories about inspirational animals and humans that have made their mark on the world. Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsGame on! : video game history from Pong and Pac-man to Mario, Minecraft, and more.

The gaming theme continues. This book is your one stop shop to the gaming culture and history of video games that ranges from Pong and Pac-Man to Mario, Minecraft and much more. “A middle-grade nonfiction book about the history and impact on pop culture of video games”– Provided by publisher.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHow to remember (almost) everything ever.

Can you remember the names of every player on your favorite football team, yet still manage to forget what day it is? This book reveals how your memory works, explaining cool tricks and skills that can help to train your memory to remember everything–ever!

 

 

http://www.wcl.govt.nz/easyfind/?hreciid=|library/m/wellington-carl|0001220245 Big book of animals : a LEGO adventure in the real world.

Lego and animals rolled into one fun book! Go wild in the animal kingdom with a host of LEGO minifigures. Young readers will meet the coolest creatures out there and watch the minifigures put the fun into facts. You’ll find great building and play ideas as well. Ideal for lego fans.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsRadiant child : the story of young artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocked to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen. But before that, he was a little boy who saw art everywhere: in poetry books and museums, in games and in the words that we speak, and in the pulsing energy of New York City. Now, award-winning illustrator Javaka Steptoe’s vivid text and bold artwork echoing Basquiat’s own introduce young readers to the powerful message that art doesn’t always have to be neat or clean–and definitely not inside the lines–to be beautiful.

image courtesy of syndeticsSwimming with sharks : the daring discoveries of Eugenie Clark.

An inspiring true story about Dr. Eugenie Clark aka the “shark lady”, who despite discrimination, became one of the most inspiring scientists in the world and whose revolutionary thinking and research changed the way society viewed marine wildlife.  Overall a fantastic read and ideal for marine biology projects and homework. Great for children aged 5 to 8.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMoto and me : my year as a wildcat’s foster mom.

If you have a weakness for cats and baby animals – like I do, then this is the book for you! This is the story of an orphaned serval cat named Moto. Determined to nurse the kitten back to health and help him learn, grow, and return to the wild, Suzi did everything she could think of to be the best serval mom she could be. She had a little bit of help from a couple other people who had some experience with orphaned wild animals, but for the most part, it was just her and Moto out there, figuring things out based on Suzi’s experience observing animal rescues and her instincts about the animal’s needs. Overall a heart warming story with a happy and satisfying ending!

Top 10 Children’s Non-Fiction March 2017

Great books to get your brains tingling! If you’re building a Minecraft empire or brushing up your acting skills with the Harry Potter script the top issuing non-fiction books have something you’ll love.

Batman and Lego fans are loving the new movie, The Batman movie : the essential guide, by Julia March and The Batman movie : the making of the movie, by Tracey Miller-Zarneke will give you inside knowledge into creating the new Lego legend.  Want to build your own Lego Batman? Minecraft may be the creative space you’ve been looking for!

  1. LEGO series, by Daniel Lipkowitz
  2. Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton
  3. Hacks for Minecrafters, by Megan Miller
  4. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K. Rowling
  5. Minecraft, by Nick Farwell
  6. Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft
  7. Minecraft : Construction Handbook, by Matthew Needler
  8. The Batman movie : the essential guide, by Julia March
  9. Dog, by Juliet Clutton-Brock
  10. Guinness World Records 2017, Craig Glenday editor in chief

Water, water, everywhere!

There has been a lot of talk in the media lately about how clean the rivers and streams are in New Zealand.

Most of us would love to be able to swim in local rivers but unfortunately that is not always the case. Some have so much pollution that it is not safe for us to do so.

Having enough clean water is becoming a really big concern throughout the world. When you turn on the tap at home, stop and think where did this water come from, or why it is that not everyone in the world has enough water?

Did you know that the average family of four uses 45,000 litres of water a year just to wash clothes. That’s 300 bathtubs full. How about that cheeseburger you had for dinner last night. That required 2,400 litres of water to produce. Most of the water is needed for producing the beef and when you include the slice of cheese and the bun that is another 100 litres of water. Even that bar of chocolate requires 1,700 litres of water to produce – in fact chocolate is made from ingredients with large water footprints: cocoa paste, cocoa butter and cane sugar. Cocoa beans are native to rainforests and require vast amounts of water to thrive.

So come on, lets make a start to help clean up our waterways and share these great ideas with your family to help save water

Happy 20th birthday Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) library!

This week on Wednesday 22nd of FebruaryKilbirnie library plaque we celebrate 20 years since the current Ruth Gotlieb/Kilbirnie library opened its doors. Let’s take the opportunity to have a look back on the history of one of Wellington’s busiest branch libraries and the important role it has played in our community for many years.

Interest in the need for a Kilbirnie library was first raised with the Council in 1912, but it wasn’t until 14 years later in 1936 that the Lyall Bay library was opened on the corner of Wha Street and Onepu Road. The library operated there until 1983, when it moved to a new premises just down the road. Kilbirnie library 1997The new Kilbirnie library at 101 Kilbirnie Crescent was then built and opened in 1997. Three years later it was renamed as the Ruth Gotlieb library to recognise Mrs Gotlieb’s outstanding contribution to library services in Wellington. Ruth is still a regular library user, who enjoys visiting “her” library each week!

Here in Kilbirnie, we serve a diverse range of library patrons. We are a very multi-cultural suburb, with locals originating from all sorts of overseas locations, such as Asia, India and the Pacific.Kilbirnie library 2017 We also have high populations of both elderly residents and children, which is reflected in our users. Maybe you’ve even visited us with your class from school? The Kilbirnie library has a great collection with something for everyone, and a team of friendly librarians just waiting to help you find the perfect book. If you visit the Ruth Gotlieb library this week, be sure to wish us a very happy 20th birthday!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top 10 Children’s non-fiction January 2017

Ocean dwelling creatures and literature make the grade this month.  The clever people at Te Papa can take you on a virtual journey to the deepest depths, the Abyssopelagic zone, this is even deeper than where they believe the colossal squid had it’s hunting grounds.
Anyone braved the sea out there this summer? Let us know in the comments if you found any cool sea creatures in your ocean exploring =)

  1. Minecraft annual 2017, by Stephanie Milton
  2. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K. Rowling
  3. Minecraft : Redstone Handbook, by Nick Farwell
  4. Supershark and other creatures of the deep, by Derek Harvey
  5. The LEGO ideas book, by Daniel Lipkowitz
  6. Small scenes from a big galaxy, by Vesa Lehtimäki
  7. Minecraft hacks master builder, by Megan Miller
  8. Pokémon gotta catch ’em all, published by Scholastic
  9. Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam
  10. Picturepedia, edited by Ann Baggaley

New Non Fiction to begin the new year!

Welcome to 2017! A new year and  a new start. And so far, it looks very promising at the library with truck loads of new and amazing non fiction where the wonderful world of Harry Potter continues, and collides with an amazing world of fantastic beasts and hidden realms. Further worlds and realms are discovered where imagination takes flight, creativity comes to life, passions are invoked and where heroes, heroines, role models, leaders are discovered.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsAlbus Dumbledore.

The Harry Potter film collection continues with the complete guide to Albus Dumbledore. This book holds photographs, memories, and quotes from the eight Harry Potter films featuring Albus Dumbledore, looking the moments that made him a great wizard and Hogwarts headmaster, and how he guided Harry in his adventures.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsFantastic beasts and where to find them : magical movie handbook.

The spin off of the Harry Potter films comes to life with the release of the magical movie handbook: Fantastic Beasts and where to find them. This book featuring amazing photos and details from the film, this handbook highlights all of your favorite characters, locations, artifacts, spells, and magical moments from the movie.

 

Shakespeare Retold.

The wonderful world of William Shakespeare’s plays comes to life in this illustrated volume which features seven classic plays by William Shakespeare, retold by E. Nesbit in plain English – Great for those who aren’t fluent in Shakespeare’s language.

 

 

A Miscellany of Magical Beasts.

A world of magical, mythical creatures from around the worlds comes to life in this amazing book that details information about  giants, trolls, harpies, unicorns, and much, much more!

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsVolothamp Geddarm’s dungeonology : an epic adventure through the Forgotten Realms.

Take a journey into the Forbidden Realms in this amazing book that provides information on how to best explore the treasure-laden dungeons, mysterious Underchasm, and Icewind Dale.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe curious guide to things that arent.

This guide is a toolkit for kids that teaches them how to think creatively  through deductive reasoning, listening skills, and imagination, as well as help kids then have to figure out the answers through detective work and a little creative reasoning.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsA world of Information.

This book is literally a world of information where essential facts are brought to life by stylish infographics and fascinating commentary! You will discover amazing facts and answers to life’s questions such as How much do clouds weigh? Who invented the pencil? How many ways can you tie a knot?

 

 The Book of Heroes. and The Book of Heroines.

National Geographic’s has done again with these two new books on heroes, heroines and role models. In The Book of Heroes, read and discover the true stories of superheroes, rebels, world leaders, action heroes, sports legends, and many more daring dudes, all of whom played their part to make their mark, make a contribution, and make the world a better place. While Timage courtesy of syndeticshe Book of Heroines covers everything you need to know about female superstars, war heroes, world leaders, gusty gals, and everyday women who changed the world. Both books contain engaging text, high-quality photographs and is a toolkit for every kid with a goal, hope, or dream they want to make a reality.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndetics