ANZAC Day 2019

ANZAC Day is a very special public New Zealand holiday that falls this year on Thursday 25th April.

What is ANZAC Day?

ANZAC is an acronym for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps and is a very special day where New Zealanders and Australians remember the men and women that served and lost their lives in War.

Why is ANZAC Day celebrated on 25th April?

April 25th was the day when the New Zealand and Australian soldiers first landed at Gallipoli in 1915.

image courtesy of syndetics

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndetics

 

 

 

 

 

 

How do we commemorate this day?

  • Going to the Dawn Parade and watching the service men and women march to their local war memorial where they are met by family and the community.
  • Going to the ANZAC Day Service were the community come to lay wreaths in remembrance of the fallen soldiers.
  • Wearing a red poppy. Why? These flowers were the first to bloom over the graves of soldiers in France and Belgium and have become a symbol of remembrance.
  • Eating ANZAC biscuits. Why? The biscuits were sent by wives and women’s groups to soldiers abroad because the ingredients did not spoil and the biscuits kept well during naval transportation.

 

image courtesy of syndetics

Where can I find information about the ANZACs and Anzac Day?

ManyAnswers has a page dedicated to websites, resources and ways to search for information about the ANZACs and ANZAC Day. You can also refer to this previous post, which  provides a list of websites that will provide you with reliable information about ANZAC Day and World War 1.

Will the libraries be open on ANZAC Day?

We are closed on ANZAC Day and will open usual hours from Friday 26th April.

Also check out these amazing stories about ANZAC Day.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsAnzac Day : the New Zealand story : what it is and why it matters.

“This book exposes the rich history behind Anzac Day, seeking to answer the many questions children often ask their parents and teachers around the 25th of April every year. It covers all aspects of Anzac Day, from the Gallipoli Campaign and the Great War, right through to the format of the commemorative services held annually throughout the country. The author identifies important memorials around New Zealand, examines the national anthem, the tradition of Anzac biscuits and the Last Post, Reveille music, plus much more. She also offers websites and projects for further study. The thoroughly researched information is presented alongside numerous images, both historic and contemporary, giving children a very clear view of the significance and background to Anzac Day”–Publisher information. Suggested level: primary, intermediate, junior secondary.

 


image courtesy of syndeticsMy grandad marches on Anzac Day.

“This is a simple, moving look at Anzac Day through the eyes of a little girl. It explains what happens on the day and its significance in terms that a young child can understand.”–Back cover.

image courtesy of syndetics

War Horse.

Joey the horse recalls his experiences growing up on an English farm, his struggle for survival as a cavalry horse during World War I, and his reunion with his beloved master.Joey the horse recalls his experiences growing up on an English farm, his struggle for survival as a cavalry horse during World War I, and his reunion with his beloved master.

 

image courtesy of syndetics ANZAC Animals.

“True tales of the mascots and working animals that helped Anzac soldiers, sailors, pilots and medics do their jobs in wartime. You’ll meet some well-known animals, such as Murphy the donkey, who carried the wounded in Gallipoli, and Caesar the Red Cross Dog. But also included are the hard-working horses, camels and mules, and the dogs that barked a warning when enemy planes were approaching, as well as the mischievous monkeys that had the men laughing”–Publisher information.

 

IMAGE COURTESY OF SYNDETICSThe Anzac violin : Alexander Aitken’s story.“This a WWI-era picture book intended for children and based on true events and a real-life young soldier from Dunedin named Alexander Aitken, who was a brilliant mathematician and a gifted violinist, as well as an artifact – the violin – that has survived the war and remains on display at Otago Boys High to this day”–Publisher information.

 


image courtesy of syndeticsThe ANZAC Puppy.

“This story is based on the true story of Freda, a dalmatian and the dog mascot of the NZ Rifles during World War 1. It’s a simple story about the reality of war, hardship, friendship and love”–Publisher information.

image courtesy of syndeticsCaesar the Anzac dog.

A fictionalised account of Caesar the bulldog, the mascot of the 4th Battalion (A Company) New Zealand Rifle Brigade, who served in World War One and died in action. Suggested level: primary, intermediate.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Anzac tree.

Inspired by the story of two soldiers who planted two trees on their farm before they headed to the Great War, the story of the Anzac Tree is one that looks at the lives of those left behind in times of war.

 

 

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