Armistice Centenary: Remembering the Contributions of Māori, Chinese, and Pasifika Men

https://natlib.govt.nz/records/22893971
Pioneer Battalion performing a haka. Royal New Zealand Returned and Services’ Association:New Zealand official negatives, World War 1914-1918. Ref: 1/2-013282-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. https://natlib.govt.nz/records/22893971 

On Sunday 11 November the world commemorates 100 years since the signing of the armistice that ended the First World War in 1918. Over 100,000 New Zealanders served during the war and more than 18,000 were killed. This had a devastating affect on people at home and on November 11 1918 the armistice came as a huge relief that was met with joy and thankfulness. Armistice Day has since become a time to reflect on the losses of the war, the hopes of peace, and the contributions of all who served.

An often unknown part of New Zealand’s involvement in the First World War is the courageous participation of Māori, New Zealand Chinese, Cook Island Māori, Fijians, Niueans, Tongans, Samoans, Tuvaluans, and men from Kiribati and Norfolk Island. More than 2,200 Māori and around 500 Pasifika men served overseas with the New Zealand Forces. Just like other ANZAC soldiers these men left their homes, families, and cultures to go to the other side of the world and fight in what was hoped to be ‘the war to end all wars’. They frequently experienced racism, deprivation, and a lack of acknowledgement after the war of their valuable contribution. The story of Te Hokowhitu a Tu, the Māori Pioneer Battalion, is an important part of our First World War history and we have a good selection of items in our library that chronicle the Battalion and the involvement of soldiers from the Pacific.

To learn more, check out the display of books on the second floor at the Central Library and explore the titles and websites listed below:


Te Hokowhitu a Tu : the Maori Pioneer Battalion in the First World War / Christopher Pugsley.
“Distinguished military historian Chris Pugsley recounts the story of the Māori Pioneer Battalion for a new generation. Drawing on rare archival material and previously unpublished diaries and letters, he tells not only the wider story of the the Battalion’s military exploits but also gives a vivid account of the daily life of the soldiers on active service. Illustrated with a large number of fascinating photographs, the book also includes a complete list of all those soldiers who fought with the Battalion.” (Adapted from book cover)

Maiea te tupua : whānau accounts of Waikato-Maniapoto World War One veterans and one conscriptee : commemorating 100 years of World War One / produced by Pūrekireki Marae with the support from Te Pua Wānanga ̄ki te Ao of the University of Waikato, the Waikato Raupatu Lands Trust, the Maniapotō Māori Trust Board, Trust Waikato and Te Puni Kōkiri.
This beautifully illustrated book contains whānau accounts of Waikato-Maniapoto World War One veterans and one conscriptee. It was written by Tom Roa and Maehe Paki and gives moving personal accounts from family members.

Syndetics book coverMaori in the great war / James Cowan.
“In 1914 the population of New Zealand was little more than one million, of whom 50,000 were Maori. Eventually 2227 Maori men served overseas, the vast majority volunteers. 336 paid the supreme sacrifice, of whom 196 were killed in action or died of wounds. A further 734 were wounded, an over-all casualty rate approaching 50%. This revised; Maori in the Great War; contains appendices specifying full details of every soldier who served as well as the Roll of Honour.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNiue and the Great War / Margaret Pointer.
“The story of tiny Niue’s involvement in the Great War has captivated people since an account was first published by Margaret Pointer in 2000. In 1915, 160 Niuean men joined the NZEF as part of the 3rd Māori Reinforcements and set sail to Auckland and then Egypt and France. Most had never left the island before, or worn shoes before. Most spoke no English. Most significantly, they had no immunity to European disease. Within three months of leaving New Zealand, over 80 per cent of them had been hospitalised.” (Adapted from book cover)

Syndetics book coverKoe kau to’a na’anau poletau/Valiant volunteers: soldiers from Tonga in the Great War / Christine Liava’a.
“At the beginning of the Great War, 1914-1918, the British Empire rallied to Lord Kitchener’s call to arms. British men in Tonga, a protectorate of Britain, although never part of the Empire, heeded his call and enlisted in the Australian and New Zealand forces. Some Tongan men joined them. This book lists the names of these men with their military details, family information, awards, and their deaths. Many photographs are included. An overview of their service and a chronology of events are also given.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Le fitafita mai Samoa/The force from Samoa: soldiers from the Samoan Islands in the Great War / Christine Liava’a.
“At the beginning of the Great War, 1914-1918, Western Samoa was invaded and captured by a New Zealand force acting on behalf of Britain. Australia similarly invaded and captured German New Guinea. Thus the German possessions in the South Pacific were rendered incapable of assisting in the German war effort. American Samoa remained neutral until 1917, when American men were registered as available for service, Volunteers from both Western and American Samoa enlisted in New Zealand, Australia, America and Britain. This book lists all the men from the islands of Samoa who served in these forces, with their military details, family information, awards, and deaths. Photographs of as many as possible are included. An overview of the situation and events in Samoa, a chronology, and several appendices are also given.” (Syndetics summary)

Soldiers from the Pacific: the story of Pacific Island soldiers in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in World War One / Howard Weddell ; edited and produced by Peter Cooke, Defence of NZ Study Group.
“During World War One over 1,000 men from Cook Islands, Fiji, Niue, Tonga, Kiribati, Tuvalu, Samoa and Norfolk Island volunteered to join the New Zealand Military Forces. Their service included Gallipoli, France, Egypt and Palestine. Despite the fact that 107 of these men died of disease or enemy action, 73 were wounded in action and three became prisoners of war, regrettably their story has yet to be told. They served New Zealand and this is their story.” (Back cover)

Chinese Anzacs : Australians of Chinese descent in the defence forces 1885-1919 / by Alistair Kennedy.
Chinese ANZACs discusses the little known participation of Australian-born and New Zealand-born Chinese in the defence forces during the First World War. Includes a list of New Zealand-born Chinese in the NZEF 1915-1919.

Websites:

Te Puni Kōkiri: Kei Wareware Tātou, Lest We Forget

Te Ara: Māori Contingent in the First World War

New Zealand History: Māori in the NZEF Pioneer Battalion

Te Papa: Were there Pacific Islanders at Gallipoli in 1915?

Sunday 11 November 2018 Commemorations:

Armistice Day 2018 will be marked with events throughout New Zealand including the live-streaming of the Armistice Centenary National Ceremony at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park in central Wellington. Check out this website for details: Armistice Centenary

Armistice Day

Pukapuka hou: New Books from the Māori Collection

But I Changed All That book cover

Biography! Poetry! History! Play! We’ve got it all in this eclectic selection of new books from the Māori Collection. Don’t waste another minute – find one that interests you and get reading! Kia tere!

Syndetics book coverPūkaki: te hokinga mai o te auahitūroa / Paul Tapsell ; whakamāoritanga nā Scotty te Manahau Morrison.
“First published in English in 2000, Paul Tapsell’s award-winning work brilliantly captured the life and transformations of Pūkaki the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor depicted on the New Zealand 20-cent coin. Now a superb translation by Scotty Morrison (also of Ngāti Whakaue descent) makes this illustrated work available entirely in Te Reo Māori.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverKo Rongowhakaata: ruku i te pō, ruku i te ao / he mea tuhituhi nā te iwi te iwi o Rongowhakaata me Michael Keith The story of light and shadow / written by Rongowhakaata iwi with Michael Keith ; translation by Morehu Nikora.  “The Ko Rongowhakaata: Story of Light and Shadow exhibition at Te Papa is a window into the world of Rongowhakaata. The exhibition presents some of their greatest treasures, stories and relationships, and contemporary artistry. This book, in English and te reo Māori, backgrounds those stories and celebrates those treasures in outstanding images.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverKo Taranaki te maunga / Rachel Buchanan.
“In 1881, colonial troops invaded the village of Parihaka in an attempt to quell the non-violent direct action taken by the community against land confiscations. Many people were expelled, buildings destroyed, and chiefs Te Whiti o Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi were jailed. Here Rachel Buchanan tells her personal story and discusses the apologies and settlements that have taken place since the invasion of Parihaka. Lastly, she considers what history and historical time might look like from a Taranaki Maori perspective, and analyses the unfolding negotiations for the return of Mt Taranaki.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Image from Steele RobertsTutu te puehu: new perspectives on the New Zealand Wars / edited by John Crawford and Ian McGibbon “‘The New Zealand Wars of the 19th century are among the most profound influences on the development of modern New Zealand,’ says Sir Jerry Mataparae in his foreword to this book. Chapters discuss the Northern, Waikato, Taranaki, Urewera and other conflicts. Topics include the transportation of Māori prisoners to Van Diemen’s Land; the role of the militia, the navy and coastal steamers; military intelligence; the loyalty of many Māori to the Crown; press reportage here and overseas; the Australian and imperial context – and more.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Syndetics book coverTe mara hupara: 30 ancient Maori artefacts for play, learning and exercise / Harko Brown, Yves Tennessee Brown
“Hupara were an important resource for ancient Māori which were utilised in social protocols, games, exercises, psychological healing practices and as spiritual sanctuaries. Now hupara are enjoying a renaissance in playgrounds, classrooms, and in recreation centres. Te Mara Hupara is suited for developers of parks and reserves, conservationists, promoters of Māori cultural heritage and provides teachers with power-packed information from which to develop cross-curricula studies.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Poūkahangatus / Tibble, Tayi
“This collection speaks about beauty, activism, power and popular culture with compelling guile, a darkness, a deep understanding and sensuality. It dives through noir, whakama and kitsch and emerges dripping with colour and liquor. There’s whakapapa, funk and fetishisation. The poems map colonisation of many kinds through intergenerational, indigenous domesticity, sex, image and disjunction. It all says: here is a writer who is experiencing herself as powerful, restrained but unafraid, already confident enough to make a phat splash on the page.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Image from FishpondI have loved me a man: the life & times of Mika / Mazer, Sharon
“This book chronicles the life of Mika, an iconic gay Māori performance artist. It takes us deep inside the gay and Māori rights movements and reveals to readers a fabulous revolution in performance and identity. This highly visual book interweaves archival and socio-historical research with approximately 200 images that have been hand-picked from Mika’s extensive archive and takes the reader inside the social history of New Zealand from the 1960s to the present day.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

But I Changed All That book coverBut I changed all that: ‘first’ New Zealand women / Jane Tolerton.
Jane Tolerton’s small but informative book contains potted biographies and photographs of notable New Zealand women who were the ‘first’ to do something in a particular field. Māori women are represented and include Makereti, Dame Mira Szaszy, Pikiteora Williams, Ruia Morrison, Iriaka Ratana, Dame Te Atairangikaahu, Merata Mita, Irihapeti Ramsden, and Farah Palmer. If you don’t recognise some of these names have a read of But I Changed All That to find out who they are.

 

Ngā haerenga me ngā tūhuratanga ohorere: Recent Picks from the Māori Collection

Pathway of the Birds book cover

Pathways, journeys, and startling discoveries feature in this month’s recent pick of new books from our Māori Collection along with some interesting items with a kaupapa Māori from the New Zealand Collection.

Explore the pathways our tūpuna took around the Pacific through Pathway of the Birds by Andrew Crowe, continue your te reo Māori journey with Scotty Morrison’s  Māori Made Easy 2, and follow the voyages of James Cook and first contact in the Pacific through the lens of the British Library’s Captain Cook collection in James Cook: The Voyages by William Frame. Finally, we highlight two articles in recent journals where you can learn of startling discoveries regarding the path of destruction an epidemic had among early nineteenth-century Māori, and read about an interesting archaeological quest in Murihiku.

Syndetics book coverPathway of the birds: the voyaging achievements of Maori and their Polynesian ancestors / Andrew Crowe.
“This book tells of one of the most rapid phases of human migration in prehistory, a period during which Polynesians reached and settled nearly every archipelago scattered across some 28 million square kilometres of the Pacific Ocean, an area now known as East Polynesia. An engaging narrative and over 400 maps, diagrams, photographs, and illustrations, convey some of the skills, innovation, resourcefulness, and courage of the people that drove this extraordinary feat of maritime expansion.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori made easy 2: the next step in your language-learning journey / Scotty Morrison.
“The bestselling Māori made easy gave learners an accessible and achievable entry into te reo Māori and Scotty Morrison now offers a second instalment to help readers continue their learning journey, picking up where the first volume left off. Māori made easy 2 unpacks more of the specifics of the language while still offering an easy, assured approach. By committing 30 minutes a day for 30 weeks, learners can build their knowledge in a practical, meaningful and fun way.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJames Cook: the voyages / William Frame with Laura Walker.
“Interweaving accounts of scientific discovery with the personal stories of the voyages’ key participants, this book explores the charting of the Pacific and the natural world by James Cook and his crew, the first encounters and exchange between Western and indigenous cultures, and the representation of the voyages in art. The illustrations include the only surviving paintings by Tupaia, a Polynesian high priest and navigator who joined the first voyage at Tahiti and sailed with Cook to New Zealand and Australia. James Cook: The Voyages offers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to discover the extensive Captain Cook collection of the British Library, including original maps, artworks, journals, and printed books.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Turnbull Library Record, Volume 50, 2018 Death and Disease at the Dawn of New Zealand’s History is a compelling essay included in the Turnbull Library Record 2018. The author, Simon Chapple, explores evidence of an epidemic amongst Māori circa 1808 – 1810 that might have killed  up to 100,000 people. He argues that these numbers suggest that rather than the 100,000 pre-European population asserted by modern historians and demographers, there was a larger Māori population at the time of initial European contact and that there might have been a population of 200,000 or more. This could have implications for our understanding of colonisation in New Zealand. Definitely something to think about and explore further.

Journal of Pacific Archaeology, Volume 9, No.2, 2018 Read about the archaeological explorations on the Catlins coast at the pre-contact Māori habitation site of Kahukura in the article Excavations at Kahukura (G47/128), Murihiku. Find out about this archaeological journey through an exploration of the methodology behind the research and the resulting data on the way of life of the inhabitants.

 

Kia hiwa rā! New books in the Māori Collection

Ngā mihi o te kōanga. Spring has brought some outstanding new books to our Māori Collection including Tīmoti Karetu and Wharehuia Milroy’s new book He Kupu Tuku Iho: Ko te Reo Māori te Tatau ki te Ao. Written completely in te reo Māori, and with no accompanying English translation, He Kupu Tuku Iho is a treasure trove of concepts, culture, and language for fluent readers (or enthusiastic learners) of te reo rangatira.

Other new additions include Treasures of Tāne: Plants of Ngāi Tahu, a beautifully illustrated and informative book about native plants and their uses from a Ngāi Tahu perspective, and Conversations About Indigenous Rights, an exploration of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples and its impact on Aotearoa ten years on from its signing.

Syndetics book coverHe kupu tuku iho: ko te reo Māori te tatau ki te ao / Tīmoti Kāretu, Wharehuia Milroy.
“He pukapuka tēnei nā ēnei ruānuku matararahi mō ngā kaupapa mātuatua o te reo me ngā tikanga. Ko ētahi o ngā kaupapa ko te mana, te tapu, te wairua, te whakapapa, te kawanga whare, te poroporoaki, te kōrero paki, me ngā kaupapa o te reo me ngā tikanga o te ao hurihuri nei. Hei tauira ō rāua reo mō ngā ākonga me ngā kaikōrero ka whai mai. Nā te mahi ngātahi a Te Wharehuia rāua ko Tīmoti me tētahi rōpū o Te Ipukarea hei hopu i ngā kōrero, hei tuhituhi i aua kōrero, ka hua mai te pukapuka nei hei taonga mā ngā reanga o nāianei me āpōpō.” (Na te kaitā tēnei whakarāpopoto)

“Published completely in te reo Māori, this landmark book has chapters on key aspects of Māori language and culture and is authored by two of Aotearoa’s pre-eminent kaumātua, Tīmoti Kāretu and Wharehuia Milroy. The authors discuss key cultural concepts including mana, tapu, wairua, whakapapa, ritual, farewell speeches and Māori humour. Language and cultural issues of the modern world are also discussed. The language used is an exemplar for learners and speakers of te reo Māori.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Image from Huia PublishersTreasures of Tāne: plants of Ngāi Tahu / Tipa, Rob
“This is an accessible guide to native plants of the South Island, traditional Māori uses of them, their history, and traditions. The text describes the characteristic features, natural environment, and uses of each plant, listed alphabetically for quick reference. There are close-up shots of each plant, photographs of the plants in their habitats, and images of the fruit and flowers for easy identification. Written by a journalist, the guide is engaging, enlightening and user-friendly.” ( Adapted from publisher information)

Syndetics book coverConversations about indigenous rights: the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Selwyn Katene and Rawiri Taonui.
Conversations About Indigenous Rights provides an assessment of how New Zealand is meeting its obligations under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples, ten years on from its signing. It shows the strong alignment between the Treaty of Waitangi and the Declaration, and examines how the Declaration assists the interpretation and application of Treaty principles of partnership, protection and participation. Drawing on both scholarship and lived experience, Conversations About Indigenous Rights features chapters by Moana Jackson, Dame Naida Glavish, Sir Pita Sharples, Rawiri Taonui, Selwyn Katene, Sheryl Lightfoot, Steve Larkin, Anaru Erueti, Jessica Ngatai, Fleur Te Aho, Tracey Whare, Pushpa Wood and Jason Mika.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Global roaming: short stories / Blank, Anton
Global Roaming explores love, intimacy, and the inter-connectedness of the global village. Set in New Zealand, Asia, and Europe the short stories in this collection explore identities in crisis and the complex external forces that shape who we are. Author Anton Blank is a writer, publisher and social entrepreneur who lives in Auckland. He has an extensive history in Māori development and literature. He is the editor and publisher of New Zealand’s only Māori journal Ora Nui.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Alternative : an international journal of indigenous peoples. Volume 14. Issue 2. 2018
The latest issue of AlterNative (a journal dedicated to scholarly research about, and from the perspective of, indigenous peoples) includes an interesting article titled Māori women leading local sustainable food systems (pages 147- 155). This article examines four community food initiatives in Aotearoa, what ‘food sovereignty’ means to Māori women, and the role women play within the four initiatives. The issue also includes eight other fascinating articles about indigenous peoples in the wider world.

Whāia te mātauranga – Seek knowledge: New books

Te Kō Para Para book cover

Whāia te mātauranga hei oranga mō koutou; Seek after wisdom for the sake of your well-being. This wonderful whakataukī reflects the importance of learning, so if you are seeking to increase your knowledge of Te Ao Māori check out the fascinating Te Kōparapara: An Introduction to the Māori World which leads this eclectic list of new additions to our Māori collection  – your mind and well-being will benefit!

Syndetics book coverTe Kōparapara: An Introduction to the Māori World
“Like the clear morning song of te kōparapara, the bellbird, this book allows the Māori world to speak for itself through an accessible introduction to Māori culture, history, and society from an indigenous perspective. In 21 illustrated chapters, leading scholars introduce Māori culture, Māori history, and Māori society today (including 21st century issues like education, health, political economy, and identity).” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWāhiao: the people of Whakarewarewa / Dr Marian Maré and Dr Aloma Parker.
“This book traces the history of the Wāhiao people, weaving oral and recorded history to illustrate their relationship with the thermal valley of Te Whakarewarewatanga-o-te-ope-taua-a-Wāhiao.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke tangata: Māori in Markets and Cities / Brian Easton for Te Whānau o Waiparera.
“Heke Tangata can broadly be translated as ‘migration of the people’, and in this book economist Brian Easton tracks the major relocations Māori have made into the cities and market economy since 1945. The picture that emerges is stark: Māori remain a generation behind Pākehā in economic well-being. Commissioned by Te Whānau o Waipareira, this is a concise, clear overview for policy discussion and general understanding of Māori economic participation in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand.” (Adapted from the publisher’s website)

Māori healing remedies: Rongoā Māori / Murdoch Riley; photos by Phil Bendle.
“A useful book of time-tested Māori herbal therapies. By quoting the words of practitioners of herbal medicine, and by describing some of the practices and karakia associated, this book becomes a compendium of therapies for arthritis, insect bites, skin complaints, sprains, etc. With photographs that identify many indigenous plants used by Māori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTwo voyages: the first meeting of Māori and Europeans, and the journeys that led to it / by David Horry.
“This book follows two voyages; that of Abel Tasman in the Heemskerck and Zeehaen, and the Polynesians in the waka Kurahaupō. It describes the journeys to their dramatic point of coincidence in Golden Bay.” (Back cover)

Te reo o ngā toi: A Māori language dictionary of the arts.
This excellent Māori language dictionary of the arts will be an invaluable aid to teachers working in bilingual and Te Reo Māori immersion schools and settings, or those wanting to increase their vocabulary of the arts world. It includes a traditional Māori-English, English-Māori dictionary at its beginning and then moves into more detailed explanations, examples and photographs. From music to art to woodwork you can find all the language you need in this helpful and well designed book published by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga/the Ministry of Education and He Kupenga Hao I Te Reo.

Tirohanga whānui: Views from the past: an exhibition of paintings from the Fletcher Trust Collection / Peter Shaw.
Tirohanga Whānui is the companion piece to the 2017 exhibition of paintings from the Fletcher Trust Collection held at Te Kōngahu Museum of Waitangi in Northland. Notes on the paintings were written by the Trust’s art curator, Peter Shaw, and notable works include the early nineteenth century painting attributed to John Jackson of Ngā Puhi chiefs Hongi and Waikato, and a drawing from 1826 of Māori weapons, implements and utensils by French engraver Ambroise Tardieu. Beautiful reproductions provide a unique insight into the history of Te Tai Tokerau and Aotearoa.

Make it your Māori New Year’s resolution to learn more about Matariki and Puanga!

Wellington City Library starts Māori New Year 2018 with this updated selection of books about Matariki and Puanga. We have also included some useful links that will take you to informative websites and digital resources. As Matariki continues its resurgence, and becomes an increasingly important part of New Zealand’s calendar, make it your Māori New Year’s resolution to learn more about Matariki and Puanga!

Syndetics book coverMatariki : the star of the year / Rangi Matamua.
“In mid-winter, Matariki rises in the pre-dawn sky. Based on research and interviews with Maori experts, this book seeks answers to questions such as What is Matariki? Why did Maori observe Matariki? How did Maori traditionally celebrate Matariki? When and how should Matariki be celebrated?and explores what Matariki was in a traditional sense so it can be understood and celebrated in our modern society.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year: Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori: nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura. B.Ed., Dip. Tchg, Dip. Film & TV, Cert. Tertiary Teaching.
“Most of the tribes of the Maori people in Aotearoa observed Puanga to mark the beginning of the Maori New Year. Through the study of the oral literature we are able to gaze into the past to understand how Maori perceived the star Puanga in ancient times.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Image from FishpondMatariki : the Māori New Year / Libby Hakaraia.
“A general introduction to Matariki looking at: mythology, Maori and western perspectives; around the world – ancient constellation recognised in Greece (Pleiades) and in the Pacific (Matali’i, Mataliki, etc); celebrations; navigation;  planting and harvesting; and Matariki today – ways to celebrate.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCelebrating the southern seasons : rituals for Aotearoa / Juliet Batten.
“In the tenth anniversary edition of this unique work, author Juliet Batten sheds more light on customs, symbols and meanings attached to seasonal changes. She reports on Matariki and other forms of celebration that New Zealanders have inherited, found, devised and adapted. She also suggests readings, myths and stories to enrich our holidays.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNight skies above New Zealand / Vicki Hyde.
“From the Matariki celebrations of the Maori new year to Captain Cook’s search for accurate longitude, people in Aotearoa/New Zealand have always looked to the skies. Night Skies Above New Zealand tells of our astronomical heritage from the early voyagers to the research being undertaken today. The book provides a thorough yet readable introduction to the skies of the southern hemisphere and current astronomical knowledge, from the formation of our solar system to the violent death of giant stars.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Image from FishpondTātai arorangi, Māori astronomy : Work of the gods / Kay Leather and Richard Hall. Kay Leather and Richard Hall explore astronomy through a Maōri lens.  Myth cycles are discussed and star charts are included along with a comprehensive glossary.

Syndetics book coverTe kāhui o Matariki : contemporary Māori art of Matariki / edited by Libby Hakaraia and Colleen Waata Urlich ; photography by Norman Heke.
“This beautifulbook contains contemporary artwork, photography, poetry and short writings including personal experiences of Matariki – the Maori New Year. It also contains an introduction and background to Matariki. The artists include painters, sculptors, photographers, weavers, and carvers.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverA concise encyclopedia of Maori myth and legend / Margaret Orbell.
“Based on The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Maori Myth and Legend this is a concise guide to Maori myths and legends, religious beliefs, folklore and history. More than 300 entries, arranged alphabetically, reveal the subtlety and complexity of the traditional Maori view of the world, and a large index provides cross-referencing.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe taiao: Māori and the natural world.
“In this richly illustrated book, Maori scholars and writers share the traditional knowledge passed down the generations by word of mouth. It provides a unique window on the relationship of the people of this land with their environment, as well as the profound knowledge and necessary skills they needed to survive here.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe seven sisters of the Pleiades : stories from around the world / Munya Andrews.
“The legends of the Seven Sisters of the Pleiades that poets, priests, prophets, shamans, storytellers, artists, singers, and historians have told throughout time are retold in this compilation of the stories that have found their inspiration in nine beautiful stars clustered together in the night sky. Serious astronomical research complements the variety of mythological explanations for the stars’ existence by providing the modern world’s scientific understanding of them.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Te mahi māra hua parakore : a Māori food sovereignty handbook / nā Jessica Hutchings.
“Jessica Hutchings (hua parakore gardener, activist, academic and certified Te Waka Kai Ora grower) explains the political implications of the decisions that we make about growing and eating kai. She encourages us to take control over the food security of our whanau, providing practical advice on how to grow kai in accordance with the kaupapa of hua parakore, inspiring us with stories of hua parakore heroes and reassuring us that becoming a hua parakore gardener is a journey that anyone can embark on.”(Syndetics summary)

Further books to explore:

The illustrated encyclopedia of Maori myth and legend / Margaret Orbell.

The astronomical knowledge of the Māori genuine and empirical : including data concerning their systems of astrogeny, astrolatry, and natural astrology, with notes on certain other natural phenomena / by Elsdon Best.

Māori agriculture : the cultivated food plants of the natives of New Zealand : with some account of native methods of agriculture, its ritual and origin myths / by Elsdon Best.

Matariki : te whetũ o te tau=Aotearoa Pacific New Year.

Useful websites:

Te Ara: The Encylopaedia of New Zealand: Matariki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage: Matariki

Te Papa: Matariki

NASA: The Pleiades

Ka nui te ranea o ngā pukapuka hou. An abundance of new books.

Being Together in Place

Ngā mihi o te ngahuru. We have an abundant and varied collection of new books for you in this whakairinga rangitaki (blog post) and there is something for everyone – from social comment to health, from poetry to history. Highlights include Urban Māori: The Second Great Migration which is a timely exploration of the twentieth century Māori migration from rural communities to cities and its impact on Māori identity, and The Moon on my Tongue a wonderful anthology of Māori poetry in English.

Syndetics book coverPou o ue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Ue is the companion book to Cyrus Hingston’s earlier Pou o Whakaue: Marae of Whakaue.  This new volume “…is a history of six marae of Rotorua: the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the hau kainga, and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the tupuna Uenukukopako (Ue) and Te Arawa whanui.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverUrban Māori : the second great migration / Bradford Haami for Te Whānau o Waipareira.
“The post-1945 migration to the cities by Māori transformed Aotearoa New Zealand forever. Exploring what being Māori means today, author Bradford Haami looks back to the experience of the first migrants, and traces the development of an urban Maori identity over the interceding years. Photos and personal korero intersperse a very readable text.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe moon on my tongue : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri, Robert Sullivan and Ben Styles.
“From both revered, established writers and exciting contemporary poets, the work in this anthology offers a broad picture of Māori poetry written in English. There are laments for koro (elders), hopes for mokopuna (grandchildren); celebrations of the land and anger at its abuse; retellings of myth and reclamations of history.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTātai whetū : seven Māori women poets in translation / edited by Maraea Rakuraku and Vana Manasiadis.This is the fourth volume in the Seraph Press Translation Series and is a beautiful little book that celebrates Māori writing and the Māori language. The featured poets include Anahera Gildea,  Kiri Piahana-Wong, Maraea Rakuraku, and Alice Te Punga Somerville. This bilingual collection features a poem each by seven Māori women writers, originally written in English, and a translation in the Māori language.

Syndetics book coverMaea te toi ora : Māori health transformations / Te Kani Kingi, Mason Durie, Hinemoa Elder, Rees Tapsell, Mark Lawrence, Simon Bennett.
“The six contributing authors in the collection include Simon Bennett, Mason Durie, and Rees Tapsell and are all well known in the mental health field. Each discusses aspects of Maori and indigenous health and the importance of culture to diagnosis, patient history, understanding causes, treatment and assessment of outcomes.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverBeing together in place : indigenous coexistence in a more than human world / Soren C. Larsen and Jay T. Johnson ; foreword by Daniel R. Wildcat.
Being Together in Place highlights the challenging, tentative, and provisional work of coexistence between Native and Non-Native peoples in relation to contested spaces such as wetlands, treaty grounds, fishing spots, recreation areas, cemeteries, heritage trails, and traditional village sites.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe New Zealand Wars / Philippa Werry.
“Describing the origins of the wars, where and when they were fought, who was involved, and who they affected, this book also examines war memorials, the work of the Waitangi Tribunal, how the wars have featured in New Zealand arts and how they are remembered today. The story is accessible and full of fascinating detail, eye-witness accounts, illustrations and little known facts, with lists of websites, resources and books for those who want to discover more.” (Adapted from the publisher description)

Syndetics book coverTe Ao Hou : the new world, 1820-1920 / Judith Binney with Vincent O’Malley and Alan Ward.
Te Ao Hou explores the history of Maori and Pakeha from about 1830. As the new world unfolded, Maori independence was hotly contested; Maori held as tightly as they could to their authority over the land, while the Crown sought to loosen it. War broke out and for Maori the consequences were devastating, and the recovery was long, framed by poverty, population decline and the economic depression of the late nineteenth century.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Ao Hurihuri : the changing world, 1920-2014 / Aroha Harris with Melissa Matutina Williams.
Te Ao Hurihuri shows Maori engaged in building and rebuilding their communities through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Maori held fiercely to iwi-specific connectedness, community organisation and te reo me ona tikanga. New kinds of Maori institutions released the dynamism of tangata whenua, but the struggle continued against a background of social and economic hardship that burdens so many Maori lives.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)