Kia hiwa rā! New books in the Māori Collection

Ngā mihi o te kōanga. Spring has brought some outstanding new books to our Māori Collection including Tīmoti Karetu and Wharehuia Milroy’s new book He Kupu Tuku Iho: Ko te Reo Māori te Tatau ki te Ao. Written completely in te reo Māori, and with no accompanying English translation, He Kupu Tuku Iho is a treasure trove of concepts, culture, and language for fluent readers (or enthusiastic learners) of te reo rangatira.

Other new additions include Treasures of Tāne: Plants of Ngāi Tahu, a beautifully illustrated and informative book about native plants and their uses from a Ngāi Tahu perspective, and Conversations About Indigenous Rights, an exploration of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples and its impact on Aotearoa ten years on from its signing.

Syndetics book coverHe kupu tuku iho: ko te reo Māori te tatau ki te ao / Tīmoti Kāretu, Wharehuia Milroy.
“He pukapuka tēnei nā ēnei ruānuku matararahi mō ngā kaupapa mātuatua o te reo me ngā tikanga. Ko ētahi o ngā kaupapa ko te mana, te tapu, te wairua, te whakapapa, te kawanga whare, te poroporoaki, te kōrero paki, me ngā kaupapa o te reo me ngā tikanga o te ao hurihuri nei. Hei tauira ō rāua reo mō ngā ākonga me ngā kaikōrero ka whai mai. Nā te mahi ngātahi a Te Wharehuia rāua ko Tīmoti me tētahi rōpū o Te Ipukarea hei hopu i ngā kōrero, hei tuhituhi i aua kōrero, ka hua mai te pukapuka nei hei taonga mā ngā reanga o nāianei me āpōpō.” (Na te kaitā tēnei whakarāpopoto)

“Published completely in te reo Māori, this landmark book has chapters on key aspects of Māori language and culture and is authored by two of Aotearoa’s pre-eminent kaumātua, Tīmoti Kāretu and Wharehuia Milroy. The authors discuss key cultural concepts including mana, tapu, wairua, whakapapa, ritual, farewell speeches and Māori humour. Language and cultural issues of the modern world are also discussed. The language used is an exemplar for learners and speakers of te reo Māori.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Image from Huia PublishersTreasures of Tāne: plants of Ngāi Tahu / Tipa, Rob
“This is an accessible guide to native plants of the South Island, traditional Māori uses of them, their history, and traditions. The text describes the characteristic features, natural environment, and uses of each plant, listed alphabetically for quick reference. There are close-up shots of each plant, photographs of the plants in their habitats, and images of the fruit and flowers for easy identification. Written by a journalist, the guide is engaging, enlightening and user-friendly.” ( Adapted from publisher information)

Syndetics book coverConversations about indigenous rights: the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Selwyn Katene and Rawiri Taonui.
Conversations About Indigenous Rights provides an assessment of how New Zealand is meeting its obligations under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples, ten years on from its signing. It shows the strong alignment between the Treaty of Waitangi and the Declaration, and examines how the Declaration assists the interpretation and application of Treaty principles of partnership, protection and participation. Drawing on both scholarship and lived experience, Conversations About Indigenous Rights features chapters by Moana Jackson, Dame Naida Glavish, Sir Pita Sharples, Rawiri Taonui, Selwyn Katene, Sheryl Lightfoot, Steve Larkin, Anaru Erueti, Jessica Ngatai, Fleur Te Aho, Tracey Whare, Pushpa Wood and Jason Mika.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Global roaming: short stories / Blank, Anton
Global Roaming explores love, intimacy, and the inter-connectedness of the global village. Set in New Zealand, Asia, and Europe the short stories in this collection explore identities in crisis and the complex external forces that shape who we are. Author Anton Blank is a writer, publisher and social entrepreneur who lives in Auckland. He has an extensive history in Māori development and literature. He is the editor and publisher of New Zealand’s only Māori journal Ora Nui.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Alternative : an international journal of indigenous peoples. Volume 14. Issue 2. 2018
The latest issue of AlterNative (a journal dedicated to scholarly research about, and from the perspective of, indigenous peoples) includes an interesting article titled Māori women leading local sustainable food systems (pages 147- 155). This article examines four community food initiatives in Aotearoa, what ‘food sovereignty’ means to Māori women, and the role women play within the four initiatives. The issue also includes eight other fascinating articles about indigenous peoples in the wider world.

Whāia te mātauranga – Seek knowledge: New books

Te Kō Para Para book cover

Whāia te mātauranga hei oranga mō koutou; Seek after wisdom for the sake of your well-being. This wonderful whakataukī reflects the importance of learning, so if you are seeking to increase your knowledge of Te Ao Māori check out the fascinating Te Kōparapara: An Introduction to the Māori World which leads this eclectic list of new additions to our Māori collection  – your mind and well-being will benefit!

Syndetics book coverTe Kōparapara: An Introduction to the Māori World
“Like the clear morning song of te kōparapara, the bellbird, this book allows the Māori world to speak for itself through an accessible introduction to Māori culture, history, and society from an indigenous perspective. In 21 illustrated chapters, leading scholars introduce Māori culture, Māori history, and Māori society today (including 21st century issues like education, health, political economy, and identity).” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWāhiao: the people of Whakarewarewa / Dr Marian Maré and Dr Aloma Parker.
“This book traces the history of the Wāhiao people, weaving oral and recorded history to illustrate their relationship with the thermal valley of Te Whakarewarewatanga-o-te-ope-taua-a-Wāhiao.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke tangata: Māori in Markets and Cities / Brian Easton for Te Whānau o Waiparera.
“Heke Tangata can broadly be translated as ‘migration of the people’, and in this book economist Brian Easton tracks the major relocations Māori have made into the cities and market economy since 1945. The picture that emerges is stark: Māori remain a generation behind Pākehā in economic well-being. Commissioned by Te Whānau o Waipareira, this is a concise, clear overview for policy discussion and general understanding of Māori economic participation in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand.” (Adapted from the publisher’s website)

Māori healing remedies: Rongoā Māori / Murdoch Riley; photos by Phil Bendle.
“A useful book of time-tested Māori herbal therapies. By quoting the words of practitioners of herbal medicine, and by describing some of the practices and karakia associated, this book becomes a compendium of therapies for arthritis, insect bites, skin complaints, sprains, etc. With photographs that identify many indigenous plants used by Māori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTwo voyages: the first meeting of Māori and Europeans, and the journeys that led to it / by David Horry.
“This book follows two voyages; that of Abel Tasman in the Heemskerck and Zeehaen, and the Polynesians in the waka Kurahaupō. It describes the journeys to their dramatic point of coincidence in Golden Bay.” (Back cover)

Te reo o ngā toi: A Māori language dictionary of the arts.
This excellent Māori language dictionary of the arts will be an invaluable aid to teachers working in bilingual and Te Reo Māori immersion schools and settings, or those wanting to increase their vocabulary of the arts world. It includes a traditional Māori-English, English-Māori dictionary at its beginning and then moves into more detailed explanations, examples and photographs. From music to art to woodwork you can find all the language you need in this helpful and well designed book published by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga/the Ministry of Education and He Kupenga Hao I Te Reo.

Tirohanga whānui: Views from the past: an exhibition of paintings from the Fletcher Trust Collection / Peter Shaw.
Tirohanga Whānui is the companion piece to the 2017 exhibition of paintings from the Fletcher Trust Collection held at Te Kōngahu Museum of Waitangi in Northland. Notes on the paintings were written by the Trust’s art curator, Peter Shaw, and notable works include the early nineteenth century painting attributed to John Jackson of Ngā Puhi chiefs Hongi and Waikato, and a drawing from 1826 of Māori weapons, implements and utensils by French engraver Ambroise Tardieu. Beautiful reproductions provide a unique insight into the history of Te Tai Tokerau and Aotearoa.

Make it your Māori New Year’s resolution to learn more about Matariki and Puanga!

Wellington City Library starts Māori New Year 2018 with this updated selection of books about Matariki and Puanga. We have also included some useful links that will take you to informative websites and digital resources. As Matariki continues its resurgence, and becomes an increasingly important part of New Zealand’s calendar, make it your Māori New Year’s resolution to learn more about Matariki and Puanga!

Syndetics book coverMatariki : the star of the year / Rangi Matamua.
“In mid-winter, Matariki rises in the pre-dawn sky. Based on research and interviews with Maori experts, this book seeks answers to questions such as What is Matariki? Why did Maori observe Matariki? How did Maori traditionally celebrate Matariki? When and how should Matariki be celebrated?and explores what Matariki was in a traditional sense so it can be understood and celebrated in our modern society.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year: Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori: nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura. B.Ed., Dip. Tchg, Dip. Film & TV, Cert. Tertiary Teaching.
“Most of the tribes of the Maori people in Aotearoa observed Puanga to mark the beginning of the Maori New Year. Through the study of the oral literature we are able to gaze into the past to understand how Maori perceived the star Puanga in ancient times.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Image from FishpondMatariki : the Māori New Year / Libby Hakaraia.
“A general introduction to Matariki looking at: mythology, Maori and western perspectives; around the world – ancient constellation recognised in Greece (Pleiades) and in the Pacific (Matali’i, Mataliki, etc); celebrations; navigation;  planting and harvesting; and Matariki today – ways to celebrate.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCelebrating the southern seasons : rituals for Aotearoa / Juliet Batten.
“In the tenth anniversary edition of this unique work, author Juliet Batten sheds more light on customs, symbols and meanings attached to seasonal changes. She reports on Matariki and other forms of celebration that New Zealanders have inherited, found, devised and adapted. She also suggests readings, myths and stories to enrich our holidays.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNight skies above New Zealand / Vicki Hyde.
“From the Matariki celebrations of the Maori new year to Captain Cook’s search for accurate longitude, people in Aotearoa/New Zealand have always looked to the skies. Night Skies Above New Zealand tells of our astronomical heritage from the early voyagers to the research being undertaken today. The book provides a thorough yet readable introduction to the skies of the southern hemisphere and current astronomical knowledge, from the formation of our solar system to the violent death of giant stars.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Image from FishpondTātai arorangi, Māori astronomy : Work of the gods / Kay Leather and Richard Hall. Kay Leather and Richard Hall explore astronomy through a Maōri lens.  Myth cycles are discussed and star charts are included along with a comprehensive glossary.

Syndetics book coverTe kāhui o Matariki : contemporary Māori art of Matariki / edited by Libby Hakaraia and Colleen Waata Urlich ; photography by Norman Heke.
“This beautifulbook contains contemporary artwork, photography, poetry and short writings including personal experiences of Matariki – the Maori New Year. It also contains an introduction and background to Matariki. The artists include painters, sculptors, photographers, weavers, and carvers.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverA concise encyclopedia of Maori myth and legend / Margaret Orbell.
“Based on The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Maori Myth and Legend this is a concise guide to Maori myths and legends, religious beliefs, folklore and history. More than 300 entries, arranged alphabetically, reveal the subtlety and complexity of the traditional Maori view of the world, and a large index provides cross-referencing.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe taiao: Māori and the natural world.
“In this richly illustrated book, Maori scholars and writers share the traditional knowledge passed down the generations by word of mouth. It provides a unique window on the relationship of the people of this land with their environment, as well as the profound knowledge and necessary skills they needed to survive here.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe seven sisters of the Pleiades : stories from around the world / Munya Andrews.
“The legends of the Seven Sisters of the Pleiades that poets, priests, prophets, shamans, storytellers, artists, singers, and historians have told throughout time are retold in this compilation of the stories that have found their inspiration in nine beautiful stars clustered together in the night sky. Serious astronomical research complements the variety of mythological explanations for the stars’ existence by providing the modern world’s scientific understanding of them.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Te mahi māra hua parakore : a Māori food sovereignty handbook / nā Jessica Hutchings.
“Jessica Hutchings (hua parakore gardener, activist, academic and certified Te Waka Kai Ora grower) explains the political implications of the decisions that we make about growing and eating kai. She encourages us to take control over the food security of our whanau, providing practical advice on how to grow kai in accordance with the kaupapa of hua parakore, inspiring us with stories of hua parakore heroes and reassuring us that becoming a hua parakore gardener is a journey that anyone can embark on.”(Syndetics summary)

Further books to explore:

The illustrated encyclopedia of Maori myth and legend / Margaret Orbell.

The astronomical knowledge of the Māori genuine and empirical : including data concerning their systems of astrogeny, astrolatry, and natural astrology, with notes on certain other natural phenomena / by Elsdon Best.

Māori agriculture : the cultivated food plants of the natives of New Zealand : with some account of native methods of agriculture, its ritual and origin myths / by Elsdon Best.

Matariki : te whetũ o te tau=Aotearoa Pacific New Year.

Useful websites:

Te Ara: The Encylopaedia of New Zealand: Matariki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage: Matariki

Te Papa: Matariki

NASA: The Pleiades

Ka nui te ranea o ngā pukapuka hou. An abundance of new books.

Being Together in Place

Ngā mihi o te ngahuru. We have an abundant and varied collection of new books for you in this whakairinga rangitaki (blog post) and there is something for everyone – from social comment to health, from poetry to history. Highlights include Urban Māori: The Second Great Migration which is a timely exploration of the twentieth century Māori migration from rural communities to cities and its impact on Māori identity, and The Moon on my Tongue a wonderful anthology of Māori poetry in English.

Syndetics book coverPou o ue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Ue is the companion book to Cyrus Hingston’s earlier Pou o Whakaue: Marae of Whakaue.  This new volume “…is a history of six marae of Rotorua: the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the hau kainga, and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the tupuna Uenukukopako (Ue) and Te Arawa whanui.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverUrban Māori : the second great migration / Bradford Haami for Te Whānau o Waipareira.
“The post-1945 migration to the cities by Māori transformed Aotearoa New Zealand forever. Exploring what being Māori means today, author Bradford Haami looks back to the experience of the first migrants, and traces the development of an urban Maori identity over the interceding years. Photos and personal korero intersperse a very readable text.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe moon on my tongue : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri, Robert Sullivan and Ben Styles.
“From both revered, established writers and exciting contemporary poets, the work in this anthology offers a broad picture of Māori poetry written in English. There are laments for koro (elders), hopes for mokopuna (grandchildren); celebrations of the land and anger at its abuse; retellings of myth and reclamations of history.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTātai whetū : seven Māori women poets in translation / edited by Maraea Rakuraku and Vana Manasiadis.This is the fourth volume in the Seraph Press Translation Series and is a beautiful little book that celebrates Māori writing and the Māori language. The featured poets include Anahera Gildea,  Kiri Piahana-Wong, Maraea Rakuraku, and Alice Te Punga Somerville. This bilingual collection features a poem each by seven Māori women writers, originally written in English, and a translation in the Māori language.

Syndetics book coverMaea te toi ora : Māori health transformations / Te Kani Kingi, Mason Durie, Hinemoa Elder, Rees Tapsell, Mark Lawrence, Simon Bennett.
“The six contributing authors in the collection include Simon Bennett, Mason Durie, and Rees Tapsell and are all well known in the mental health field. Each discusses aspects of Maori and indigenous health and the importance of culture to diagnosis, patient history, understanding causes, treatment and assessment of outcomes.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverBeing together in place : indigenous coexistence in a more than human world / Soren C. Larsen and Jay T. Johnson ; foreword by Daniel R. Wildcat.
Being Together in Place highlights the challenging, tentative, and provisional work of coexistence between Native and Non-Native peoples in relation to contested spaces such as wetlands, treaty grounds, fishing spots, recreation areas, cemeteries, heritage trails, and traditional village sites.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe New Zealand Wars / Philippa Werry.
“Describing the origins of the wars, where and when they were fought, who was involved, and who they affected, this book also examines war memorials, the work of the Waitangi Tribunal, how the wars have featured in New Zealand arts and how they are remembered today. The story is accessible and full of fascinating detail, eye-witness accounts, illustrations and little known facts, with lists of websites, resources and books for those who want to discover more.” (Adapted from the publisher description)

Syndetics book coverTe Ao Hou : the new world, 1820-1920 / Judith Binney with Vincent O’Malley and Alan Ward.
Te Ao Hou explores the history of Maori and Pakeha from about 1830. As the new world unfolded, Maori independence was hotly contested; Maori held as tightly as they could to their authority over the land, while the Crown sought to loosen it. War broke out and for Maori the consequences were devastating, and the recovery was long, framed by poverty, population decline and the economic depression of the late nineteenth century.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Ao Hurihuri : the changing world, 1920-2014 / Aroha Harris with Melissa Matutina Williams.
Te Ao Hurihuri shows Maori engaged in building and rebuilding their communities through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Maori held fiercely to iwi-specific connectedness, community organisation and te reo me ona tikanga. New kinds of Maori institutions released the dynamism of tangata whenua, but the struggle continued against a background of social and economic hardship that burdens so many Maori lives.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)