Tā Tipene O’Regan: Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year

E tipu e rea mo ngā rā o tō ao
Ko tō ringa ki ngā rākau ā te Pakeha Hei ara mō tō tinana
Ko tō ngākau ki ngā tāonga a ō tīpuna Māori
Hei tikitiki mō tō māhuna
Ko tō wairua ki tō Atua, Nānā nei ngā mea katoa

It is fitting, following the month of April, to celebrate the goals of, and awards bestowed upon Tā Tīpene O’Regan who relentlessly tackled head on, issues that confronted him and commanded his attention – be it a Tiriti claim, race relations, or other take. As his family said he was a man driven by issues rather than people.

“We must remember to remember – you can never have a vision of what you want to be unless you know where you’re from [to avoid] repeating the mistakes of the past.”

In the area of race relations he believes that Māori are here by right of their indigenous status and that all other peoples are here by right of Te Tiriti. He believes that we must continue to evolve and shape our view of New Zealand as we wish it to be. He is a man who did not fight for full reimbursement for all land lost – he had no wish to bankrupt the country in pursuit of an equitable monetary pay-out. The entire value of Treaty settlements over the past quarter of a century would cover superannuation payments for two months.

“I am concerned that in this great intersection of law and history, to which the Treaty and its outcomes have condemned us, we might begin to so devalue our past, that our history and tradition become mere opinion, blown by political winds and fanned by incessant gusts of media opportunism.’

He sought to invest and grow a putea in a way which would lift his people into an entrepreneurial economic future.

Last month Tā Tipene became the Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year. His life and achievements are set out in the following online articles and videos:

Tā Tipene O’Regan on Wikipedia

Tā Tipene O’Regan: a life spent building a bicultural nation, via RNZ

Tā Tipene O’Regan on Kā Huru Manu

Tā Tipene O’Regan announced as Companion at 2019 Research Honours Aotearoa, via The Royal Society

Tā Tipene O’Regan on Indigenous 100

‘Tūtae in my letterbox’: The flak Sir Tipene O’Regan got for leading Waitangi settlement, via Te Ao Māori News

In pulling together details of Tā Tipene’s life, I find it distressing that whānau should become unwitting victims of harassment and behaviour by people demanding their right to freedom of speech (and action) in order to “punish” a parent’s determination to hold fast to a line of firm belief. As Tā Tipene says, in his stories, it was this side of his life which was most hurtful to his family.

Kōrero by Tā Tipene is available on our catalogue:

New myths and old politics : the Waitangi Tribunal and the challenge of tradition / O’Regan, Tipene
“Negotiating a claim before the Waitangi Tribunal can involve troubling challenges to an iwi’s legitimacy, sometimes from unexpected places. In this unique behind-the-scenes account of the negotiation of Ngāi Tahu’s Waitangi Tribunal claim, Sir Tipene O’Regan describes what happened when claims of New Age mysticism attempted to undermine traditional whakapapa and academic scholarship”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

New Myths and Old Politics is also available to read for free online via Bridget Williams Books.

 

 

 

Whāia te iti kahurangi, ki te tuohu koe, me he maunga teitei.
Seek the treasure that you value most dearly, if you bow your head, let it be to a lofty mountain.

He kōtuku rerenga kotahi: remembering Moana Jackson

He Tangata, he tangata, he tangata: of the people, by the people, for the people.
He hōnore, he korōria ki te Atua he maungārongo ki te whenua. He whakaaro pai ki ngā tāngata katoa.

As 29 April 2022 approaches, the effects of Covid19 means that once more Wellington City Libraries will not mark the signing of Te Tiriti in Te Whanganui-a-Tara with a three-pronged kōrero –i.e. a mana whenua summary of past actions, informed discussion of present aspects of te tiriti and then future thoughts as in: where to now.

The burning question for today is he kupu – “co-governance”.

How I wish that we could call upon Moana to offer up a wise, quiet, succinct non-inflammatory explanation, but, alas, he is no longer with us. This month we are totally devastated by his passing, and the many pages of social media commentary have highlighted and refreshed for us his many words of wisdom. Here was a man who quietly touched the hearts of so many people, yet remained absolutely centred on his whānau.

In his kōrero for the launch of “Imagining decolonisation” at Unity Books, he told us how he would approach an upcoming kōrero by going for a long walk, in order to think carefully of the words and ideas he wished to impart. And often his delivery would begin (or end) with a quiet little story involving a grandchild, and a vision for us all through a child’s lens.

Please find below he poroporoakī ki tēnei tangata mīharo.

Moana Jackson: His legacy will endure, via E-Tangata

Moana Jackson was the most articulate, original and forceful intellectual of his generation, via The Guardian

Moana Jackson has left us with the drive to keep fighting, via The Spinoff

Annette Sykes’ eulogy at Moana Jackson’s tangi.

Below is a list of books written by Moana Jackson, which are held in the library’s collection:

Imagining decolonisation.
“Seeks to demystify decolonisation using illuminating, real-life examples. By exploring the impact of colonisation on Māori and non-Māori alike, ‘Imagining decolonisation’ presents a transformative vision of a country that is fairer for all”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Imagining Decolonisation is also available to read for free online via Bridget Williams Books.

Like a beached whale : a consideration of proposed Crown actions over Maori foreshore claims / Jackson, Moana

Backgrounding the Paeroa Declaration / Jackson, Moana

The Maori and the criminal justice system : a new perspective = He whaipaanga hou / Jackson, Moana

We will not fill the void left by this unique man who had the ability to speak so softly with such devastatingly uncompromising words in explanation of Te Whakaputanga me Te Tiriti.

Moe mai ra e te Matua i roto i tō moenga roa, Haere ki Hawaiiki nui, Hawaiiki roa, ki Hawaiiki pamamao te huinga o ngā wairua o te pō, moe mai ra.

Bridget Williams Books: The Treaty of Waitangi Collection

A selection of book covers from the Bridget Williams Books Treaty of Waitangi Collection

Image showing the BWB logo and a couple book covers from the Treaty of Waitangi Collection


Did you know that your library card gives you access to numerous collections from the award-winning New Zealand publisher Bridget Williams Books? Today we’d like to draw your attention to their outstanding home for online resources regarding the Treaty of Waitangi.

Bridget Williams Books’ Treaty of Waitangi Collection is broken up into different subtopics to assist your learning journey. You might like to start with one of their foundation texts, such as What Happened at Waitangi? by Claudia Orange. Following on from there, you could dive into BWB’s history resources to gain a deeper understanding of the historical context in which the Treaty of Waitangi was signed. One useful text for this might be Redemption Songs by Judith Binney. After that, BWB has also provided a commentary selection, which includes publications such as New Myths and Old Politics: The Waitangi Tribunal and the Challenge of Tradition by Sir Tipene O’Regan. 

To access this Bridget Williams Books collection, simply head over to our eLibrary resources and scroll down to find Bridget Williams Books. Follow that link to access the collection. You will need your library card number and your pin to login. Happy reading!

Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the Wai 262 Claim

Over 3000 claims have been made to the Waitangi Tribunal during its first 40 years of existence.

Having worked on historical district enquiries, the Tribunal now endeavours to complete the kaupapa enquiries — which cover issues of national significance. Wai 262 claim is a kaupapa inquiry — often referred to as the Flora and Fauna claim.

A report was issued in 2011 for the claim, brought by six iwi, but there is a continuing feeling of dissatisfaction with that report as unfinished business. All six original iwi representatives are now deceased. The breadth of the claim is immense:

The report encompassed the issues of taonga works and intellectual property (trademarks and copyright); taonga species and intellectual property (patents and plant variety rights); management of the environment generally (the Resource Management Act) and the conservation estate specifically (the Department of Conservation); te reo Māori (including tribal dialects); rongoā Māori; the negotiation of international agreements; and the Crown’s control or funding of mātauranga Māori across archives, libraries, museums, the regime governing protected objects, education, the arts.

He Manutukutuku is a commemorative issue for the 40th anniversary of the Waitangi Tribunal. Paul Hamer, p. 56, describes the Wai 262 claim:

Wai 262 is also regarded as the Tribunal’s first ever whole-of-government inquiry, in that it scrutinised the policies and performance of 20 government departments and agencies.

The original claimants: (representing Ngāti Kurī, Te Rarawa, Ngāti Wai, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Kahungunu, and Ngāti Koata) were profiled at the Wai 262 Online Symposium, Waipapa Marae on 19 July 2021. Intro-Speaker presentations from the Wai 262 online symposium and speaker Maui Solomon’s presentation can be viewed online.

You can also watch the full length film Wai 262 online (via NZ On Screen).

Ko Aotearoa tēnei : te taumata tuarua : a report into claims concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity. / New Zealand.

“This version is the full 2-volume report and addresses the Wai 262 claim concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Maori culture and identity. Te Taumata Tuarua describes the claim in depth and gives the Waitangi Tribunals findings and recommendations concerning intellectual property in ‘taonga works’ created by weavers, carvers, writers, musicians, artists, and others; Maori interests in the genetic and biological resources in indigenous flora and fauna, which are the subject of increasing scientific and commercial interest; Maori involvement in decision-making on resource management and conservation; Crown support for te reo Maori, the Maori language; Crown control of matauranga Maori (Maori knowledge and ways of knowing) in arts, culture, heritage, broadcasting, education, and science; rongoa Maori or traditional healing; and Maori input into New Zealand’s positions on international instruments.” (Description from Fishpond)

Te Anamata o Te Tiriti me Tākuta Carwyn Jones: 29 o Paengawhāwhā i Te Whare Pukapuka o Te Awe

He aha? Te Tiriti: ki hea ināianei?
Āhea? Rāpare 29 o Paengawhāwhā, 12:30-1:20pm
Ki hea? Te Whare Pukapuka o Te Awe (29B Tiriti o Brandon)

I runga anō i ngā tohutohu a Māmari Stephens i roto i tana tuhinga “He rangi tā Matawhāiti, he rangi tā Matawhānui”, kāore e tawhiti atu te whakanuitanga 200 tau o waitohutanga o Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Engari ka pēhea ianei te āhua o Aotearoa hei ngā 20 tau e tū mai nei? Ā, ka whakawā pēhea nei ngā tumu kōrero i te tau 2040 i ngā whanaketanga o ngā tekau tau ruarua ka hipa?

Ko tētahi tangata e taea ana pea e ia te whakautu i ēnei pātai ko Tākuta Carwyn Jones (Ngāti Kahungunu). He Ahorangi Tāpiri a Tākuta Jones i Te Kauhanganui Tātai Ture i Te Whare Wānanga o Te Herenga Waka, ā, ko ia hoki te kaituhi o New Treaty, New Tradition – Reconciling New Zealand and Māori Law and co-editor of Indigenous Peoples and the State: International Perspectives on the Treaty of Watangi. Ko ia hoki te perēhitini-ngātahi o Te Hunga Rōia Māori o Aotearoa, me te ētita-ngātahi o te Māori Law Review me AlterNative – an International Journal of Indigenous Peoples.

E whai wāhi ana hoki a Tākuta Jones ki tētahi atu kaupapa whakahirahira. E rua marama ki muri ka hono atu ia ki te ohu Adaptive Governance me te Policy i te BioHeritage Challenge, Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho, hei kaihautū-ngātahi me Tākuta Maria Bargh. He tūranga whakahirahira tēnei: ki te whakatau me pēhea e taea ai e ngā panonitanga ki te kāwanatanga me te ture i Aotearoa te āwhina ki te whakaora i te taiao o te motu – i mua o te hokinga kore ki muri.

Ki te rapu i ētahi atu kōrero, pānuitia tā mātou uiui ki a Tākuta Carwyn Jones i raro!


E kōrero ana te pae tukutuku a te Adaptive Governance me te Policy (AGP) mō tētahi mataaho āheinga e whakaratoa ana e te whanaketanga o tētahi Rautaki Koiora ā-motu, tae atu hoki ki te WAI 262.  Ka taea e koe te whakamārama i te hiranga nui o WAI 262 me te Rautaki Koiora?

E whakarato ana te Rautaki Koiora i tētahi anga whakahaere matua mō te whanake i ngā mahere koiora ā-takiwā, ā-rohe hoki puta noa i ngā tau 30 e tū mai nei i Aotearoa.  E whakarato ana hoki i tētahi moemoeā whaitake me te whakarite i tētahi māramatanga whānui o te wāhi hei whāinga mā tātou hei iwi, ki te tiaki me te hiki i te koioratanga.

Ko te pūrongo WAI 262, Ko Aotearoa Tēnei, me te urutau a te kāwanatanga whānui e whanake mai ana, e whakatau haere ana hoki i ēnei momo take (me ētahi atu), me te arotahi atu ki te whakaurunga a te Māori me te tūranga o te mātauranga Māori.  Ka whakauru hāngai tonu te Rautaki Koiora me Wai 262 ki ngā pātai o te kāwanatanga taiao me te kaupapa here e pā ana ki te tuku ihotanga koiora o Aotearoa.

Me pēhea a Te Mana o te Taiao – te Rautaki Koiora o Aotearoa e whai whakaaro ai ki te pūrongo WAI 262 a Te Rōpū Whakamana i te Tiriti o Waitangi?

Ko tētahi o ngā āhuatanga matua o te pūrongo WAI 262 ko te miramira i ngā hapori Māori tae atu ki ngā iwi, hapū me ngā whānau, me tā rātou mahi ki te whakatakoto i ō rātou wawata mō te whakahaere i te hononga a te tangata ki te taiao, me te whai i ngā tikanga pūataata e haepapa ai ngā kāwanatanga ā-rohe, kāwanatanga matua hoki ki te whakauru atu ki aua wawata.  E āta mohimohi ana te pūrongo ki te kī ko tā te whāinga ā-Tiriti me rapu ki te whakamana i ngā hapori Māori i te tuatahi ki te whakatau take ka pāpā atu ki ō rātou taonga (tae atu ki ngā āhuatanga o te taiao), ā, i ngā wāhi e hiahiatia ana ētahi tauira whakahoa, me whakauru te Māori ki ngā whakataunga take, kaua ko te tū hei kaitohutohu anake i te kaiwhakatau.  Ko tētahi o ngā putanga whaikī o Te Mana o te Taiao, ko te whakatinanatanga e ngā hoa Tiriti, whānau, hapū me ngā iwi ngā tūranga matua hei kaitiaki.

Ko tētahi atu mahi o nāianei a te AGP ko te whanake-ngātahi i ngā tikanga ā-ture e “whai reo ai te taiao”.  He aha ētahi whai wāhitanga?

Ko ētahi o ngā momo tauira ka whai wāhi pea i konei ko ngā mea pēnei i te whakamana i te whakatangata ā-ture ake o ngā āhuatanga horanuku, pērā i tērā i kitea ake mō Te Urewera (he papa ā-motu i mua) me Te Awa Tupua ( ko te awa o Whanganui i mua).

He whai tikanga nui te whakaaro o ngā tauira kāwanatanga rerekē.  He tauira āu e hoahoa-ngātahitia ana e koe i tēnei wā, ā, kua whakamātauria?

He whānui tonu ngā āhuatanga e whai wāhi atu ana ki ngā tauira kāwanatanga rerekē.  E tūhuratia ana e mātou ngā whakaaro mai i Te Ao Māori mō te whakarite i ngā hononga ki te tangata, ina koa, a te tangata ki te taiao.  E whai ana mātou ki te arotake i ētahi o ngā tauira o nāianei mō te kāwanatanga-ngātahi kua whanaketia mā te tukanga whakatau take Tiriti me ētahi atu horopaki, ā, kua whakaritea e mātou tētahi pūrongo o ngā taputapu pūtea kua hoahoatia hei tautoko i te koioratanga me te whakapoapoa i ētahi tauira rerekē o te kāwanatanga.

He aha ō matapae mō te whakatinanatanga o ēnei tauira kāwanatanga i te anamata?

Me āta aro te whakatinanatanga ki te horopaki ā-takiwā, te taiao ā-takiwā, me ngā hononga ā-takiwā.  Ko tētahi āhuatanga ka whaitake nui pea i roto i te whakatinanatanga ko te whakamana i ngā hapori ā-takiwā ki te whakatinana i tā rātou tūranga hei kaitiaki.

I a tātou e titiro ana ki ētahi tauira kāwanatanga rerekē me ngā tikanga ā-ture mō Aotearoa, tērā anō ētahi tauira o tāwāhi e pīata mai ana, e whai take ana?

Ehara i te mea kei Aotearoa anake ēnei take, nō reira he nui ngā mahi puta noa i te ao e whakauru atu ana ki tēnei tūmomo wāhi ōrite.  I Aotearoa nei, kua waia tātou ki te whakapūnga o ngā whakaritenga mana tūmatawhānui, engari i ngā pūnaha kotahitanga  pēnei i Amerika, Kanata, ā, tae atu pea ki Ahitereiria, e hāneanea ana ki a rātou te whakaaro o ngā ao rerekē o te mana whakahare me te horahora i ngā whakataunga take.  Nā tēnei ka hua mai pea ētahi wāhi mō ngā tauira kanorau, kāwanatanga ā-takiwā hoki.

Ki ōu whakaako ka pēhea te whai o ēnei tauira me ēnei kaupapa here i ngā raru nui pēnei i te urutā KOWHEORI-19 o te wā nei?

Ka urutau pai pea ki te kanorau o ngā matea ka hua mai i tēnei momo raru nui.  I te mea hoki ki te whakamanahia ngā hapori ā-takiwā, ka whai rātou i ngā mahi e hāngai ana ki ō rātou āhuatanga ake, te tiaki i ngā tāngata – arā i kitea tēnei i ngā wāhi arowhai ā-hapori i whakaritea e ētahi rōpū Māori, ā-iwi hoki, ā, i whakahaeretia i te wā e taumaha ana te urutā i Aotearoa.

The Future of Te Tiriti with Dr Carwyn Jones: 29 April at Te Awe Library

What? Te Tiriti: Where to Now?
When? Thursday 29 April, 12:30-1:20pm
Where? Te Awe Library (29B Brandon Street)

As Māmari Stephens points out in her essay “He rangi tā Matawhāiti, he rangi tā Matawhānui”, the 200th anniversary of the signing of te Tiriti o Waitangi isn’t far off. But what will Aotearoa look like 20 years from now? And how will historians in 2040 judge the developments of the past few decades?

One person who may be able to answer these questions is Dr Carwyn Jones (Ngāti Kahungunu). Dr Jones is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law at Victoria University and the author of New Treaty, New Tradition – Reconciling New Zealand and Māori Law and co-editor of Indigenous Peoples and the State: International Perspectives on the Treaty of Watangi. He’s also co-president of Te Hunga Rōia Māori o Aotearoa – The Māori Law Society and co-Editor of the Māori Law Review and AlterNative – an International Journal of Indigenous Peoples.

Dr Jones is involved in another significant project as well. Just over two months ago he joined the Adaptive Governance and Policy team at the BioHeritage Challenge, Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho as co-lead with Dr Maria Bargh. The role is a significant one: to work out how changes to governance and law in New Zealand can help save the country’s environment – before it’s too late.

To find out more, read our interview with Dr Carwyn Jones below!


The Adaptive Governance and Policy (AGP) website mentions a window of opportunity provided by the development of the national Biodiversity Strategy, as well as WAI 262. Could you explain the importance of WAI 262 and the Biodiversity Strategy?

The Biodiversity Strategy provides a key organising framework for developing local and regional biodiversity plans across the next 30 years in Aotearoa. It provides an important vision and ensures that there is a common understanding of where we as a country need to get to in order to protect and enhance biodiversity.

The WAI 262 report, Ko Aotearoa Tēnei, and the whole of government response that is developing, also addresses similar kinds of issues (amongst many others), with a particular focus on Māori participation and the role of mātauranga Māori. The Biodiversity Strategy and WAI 262 both engage directly with questions of environmental governance and policy relating to New Zealand biological heritage.

How could Te Mana o te Taiao – Aotearoa NZ Biodiversity Strategy take the Waitangi Tribunal’s WAI 262 report into account?

One of the central features of the WAI 262 report is the emphasis on Māori communities, including iwi, hapū, and whanau, being able to proactively set out their aspirations for managing the relationship between people and the environment and having transparent mechanisms to ensure that central and local government are accountable for engaging with those aspirations. The report is careful to note that a Tiriti-consistent approach should first seek to empower Māori communities to make decisions that affect their taonga (including aspects of the natural environment) and that where partnership models are required, these must involve Māori participation in decision-making, not merely acting in an advisory capacity to the decision-maker. One of the stated outcomes of Te Mana o te Taiao is that Treaty partners, whānau, hapū, and iwi are exercising their full roles as kaitiaki.

Another current AGP activity is the co-development of legal mechanisms that “give voice to nature”. What would this include?

Some of the kinds of models that might be included here could be things like the recognition of legal personality of landscape features as we have seen with Te Urewera (formerly a national park) and Te Awa Tupua (formerly the Whanganui river).

The idea of alternative governance models is also really interesting. Are there any you’re co-designing at the moment, and have they been scenario tested yet?

There are a whole range of things that contribute to alternative governance models. We’re exploring ideas from Te Ao Māori about organising relationships between people and, particularly, between people and the environment. We’re aiming to evaluate some of the existing models of co-governance that have been developed through the Treaty settlement process and other contexts, and we commissioned a report on financial instruments that are designed to support biodiversity and incentivise different modes of governance.

How do you see these governance models being implemented in the future?

The implementation needs to be sensitive to local context, the local environment, and local relationships. One aspect that is likely to be important in implementation is to empower local communities to exercise their role as kaitiaki.

When looking at different governance models and legal mechanisms for Aotearoa, are there overseas examples that have stood out as potentially useful?

Of course, these issues are not unique to Aotearoa and so there is a lot of work going on around the world that is engaging in this same kind of space. New Zealand tends to have quite a centralised understanding of the organisation of public power, whereas in federal systems such as the USA, Canada, and to some extent even Australia, there is more comfort with the idea of different spheres of authority and diffuse decision-making. That can sometimes create space for diverse and localised governance models.

How do you think these models and policies would approach crises like the current COVID-19 pandemic?

Likely to respond well to the diversity of need that this kind of crisis creates. Generally, if local communities are empowered, they will take steps, appropriate to their local circumstances, to keep people safe – as we saw with some of the community checkpoints that a number of Māori and iwi-based groups established and managed through the height of the pandemic in Aotearoa.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi – 6th February events

Here in Wellington we’re far away from Waitangi where the official Waitangi Day commemorations happen every year. But did you know that we’re lucky enough to be able to visit the Treaty itself locally at the He Tohu exhibition at the National Library?

He Tohu is a permanent exhibition of three Aotearoa New Zealand constitutional documents, and preserves these powerful taonga for future generations. The three documents are:

  • He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni (1835)
    Declaration of Independence of the United Tribes of New Zealand
  • Te Tiriti o Waitangi (1840)
    Treaty of Waitangi
  • The Women’s Suffrage Petition (1893)
    Te Petihana Whakamana Pōti Wahine

On Waitangi Day this year you can visit the National Library for a 30-minute guided tour exploring this multi-award winning exhibition. Tours begin on the hour and half hour between 9.30 am and 4.30 pm, and there’s much more happening besides.

As part of the commemorations, our own He Matapihi Library (housed on-site at the National Library), will be open for the day for browsing, and will host a children’s puppet show by String Bean Puppets.

Please note that He Matapihi will be the only Wellington branch library open on Waitangi Day, and will open from 9:30am – 4:30pm.

What?
Nan and Tuna — a bilingual puppet show, presented by Stringbean Puppets.

Where?
He Matapihi Molesworth Library, 70 Molesworth St, Thorndon.

When?
Saturday 6th Feb at 10:30am

“Nan and Tuna have been friends for 70 years and now it is time for one last adventure together. But before they leave they need to find someone to care for the river. A bilingual puppet show about eels, rivers and friendship.”

The National Library have a full day of activities planned so there will be lots more to see and do, including:

  • Arts and crafts activities for the whole whānau
  • Historical footage of Waitangi Day commemorations curated by Ngā Taonga Sound and Vision
  • A Māori pronunciation workshop to learn more about the Māori words used in Te Tiriti o Waitangi
  • An installation of giant banners featuring four Treaty signatories, including local rangatira Te Wharepōuri

Waitangi Day at the National Library

He Matapihi will also have a display of books about the Treaty of Waitangi, including some of these:

The Treaty of Waitangi / Calman, Ross
“The best basic introduction to the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand’s founding document; it summarizes the history of the Treaty and race relations in New Zealand/ Aotearoa How well do any of us know what the Treaty document means? In this easy-to-follow book, Ross Calman looks at what New Zealand was like before the Treaty and how this important document has effected the way we live now.” (Catalogue)

The Treaty of Waitangi / Orange, Claudia
“Today the Treaty has come to signify what both joins and divides the people of this country. It had different meanings also to those present at the 1840 signing -the new arrivals and the tangatawhenuathen occupying the land. To the British, it was the means by which they gained sovereignty over the country; for Maori, it represented something closer to partnership. That these distinct meanings were conveyed in texts written in different languages only added to the complexities now woven around this crucial agreement.Claudia Orange’s remarkable history was first published in 1987. ” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi : questions and answers
” Covering many historical and contemporary issues, it is for people who want to gain a basic knowledge about the Treaty of Waitangi and its implications, as well as for those who want to refresh and update their understanding. It includes a summary of legislation and events since 1840 which have breached the Treaty, and a comprehensive reading list for further information. ” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi settlements
“The settlement of iwi claims under the Treaty of Waitangi has been a prominent feature of New Zealand’s political landscape over the last thirty years. In this timely book, leading scholars offer the first analysis of the economic and social impact of the settlement process.” (Catalogue)

Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Morris, Toby
“Ground-breaking full-colour graphic novel about Te Tiriti o Waitangi | The Treaty of Waitangi. Accessible, engaging, image-rich design. Dual-language flip book with Maori and Pakeha authors Ross Calman and Mark Derby. Text in te reo Maori version developed by Maori Language Commission-registered translator Piripi Walker. Reviewed by some of Aotearoas foremost Te Tiriti o Waitangi experts to reflect current scholarship. Includes a link to both versions of the treaty translated into thirty other languages and New Zealand Sign Language.” (Catalogue)

Treaty to Treaty : a history of early New Zealand from the Treaty of Tordesillas 1494 to the Treaty of Waitangi 1840 / Bennett, R. S.
“This book is a large & detailed history of early NZ and includes events elsewhere in the world that have had an effect on this country. The size of this project and the author’s wish to bring to the fore interesting and important material not covered in other historical work has necessitated the production of three volumes rather than the one as originally intended. Volume One contains essays on background topics.” (Catalogue)

The Signing of Te Tiriti, Wellington, 29 April 1840

Did you know that as well as being signed in Waitangi on 6 February 1840 the Treaty of Waitangi was also signed in other parts of Aotearoa throughout that year?

Ngā mihi ki a koutou katoa i tēnei wā COVID-19.

He pānui tēnei – ānei ngā rauemi ā-ipurangi mā koutou e kimi, mā koutou e tuku i ō koutou kāinga.

Usually our libraries commemorate the signing of Te Tiriti/Treaty of Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara/Wellington, 29 April 1840, through special events, displays, and the lending of relevant books or audio-visual material on the kaupapa of Te Tiriti. 

Unfortunately our bricks and mortar libraries are currently closed due to the COVID-19 crisis. However our Māori Specialist Librarian, Ann Reweti, has put together a comprehensive selection of rauemi/resources about Te Tiriti and its signing in Te Whanganui-a-Tara in 1840. These can be accessed through our website or the internet and we are very pleased to provide online links in this special blog.

Lockdown is the perfect time to learn more about our local history and how modern day Wellington and New Zealand have been shaped by our unique past, and the relationships between mana whenua and the crown. Take some time to have a look at these wonderful resources  – for a concise overview of history, places where treaty copies were signed, and lists of signatories to the treaties in each of eight locations –  from the comfort of your own kāinga/home.

NZHistory.govt.nz – Treaty of Waitangi information includes the following topics: the Treaty in brief; English and te reo Māori texts; signings and locations of eight treaty documents; Tiriti timeline; biographies of Tiriti participants.

Te Ara – always presents a good New Zealand story for any discussion –  and there are three video reconstructions around the the signing of Te Tiriti.

Bridget William Book Treaty of Waitangi Collection – This amazing collection of ebooks is available on our Wellington City Libraries ELibrary page. You will need your library card and pin number to access these full-text scholarly works.

NZETC (New Zealand Electronic Text Centre) – These links will take you to the full text versions of the following books:

Early newspaper articles weave some thoughts of Te Tiriti:

Papers Past – Access to New Zealand newspapers from 1843-1845.  

Times Digital Archive (1785-1985) – Full text and searchable, every page of every issue. You will need your library card and pin number to access these.

Other useful resources, including videos:

British Parliamentary Papers: Colonies

The Waitangi Collection: Nz On Screen

National Library Of New Zealand: He Tohu and He Tohu Kōrero snippets

Te Tiriti Based Futures And Anti-racism 2020  – An online conference, 21-30 March, 2020. Includes Jen Margaret and  Julia Whaipooti.  

There are also fantastic audio tapes available from RNZ:

And don’t forget, you can always see the Treaty itself in Wellington at the National Library of New Zealand.

 

He kohinga o te tau hou

Ngā mihi o te tau hou: amongst this varied collection of new books is a lovely new edition of Ani Mikaere’s The balance destroyed. The illustrations by Robyn Kahukiwa enhance the themes of Ani Mikaere’s thesis of twenty years ago – her research of mana wahine and ira wahine has more than stood the test of time.

Syndetics book coverFaith, politics and reconciliation : Catholicism and the politics of indigeneity / Dominic O’Sullivan.
“Were Catholics guilty of [aiding and abetting] the genocide of indigenous peoples during the colonization of Australia and New Zealand? … In order to answer these and other related questions over the role of the Roman Catholic Church in the colonization of Australia and New Zealand, Dominic O’Sullivan takes us on a theological, philosophical and political journey from the countries of Europe to the colonies of Australia and New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCities in New Zealand : preferences, patterns and possibilities / edited by Philippa Howden-Chapman, Lisa Early & Jennifer Ombler.
“This book outlines the latest thinking about the preferences people have for their urban life, the patterns of urban development in Aotearoa, and the possibilities for our cities in the future.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 7. Responding to the challenges: Māori and urban development by Andrew Waa, John Ryks, Biddy Libersey & Jonathan Kilgour.
p. 129. Unearthing urban Māori : 150+ years of tangata whenua participation in the development of Wellington city by Keriata Stuart.

Syndetics book coverKa hoki tāua ki te whare huri ai ē! / kaiētita Agnes McFarland rāua ko Taiarahia Black.
“This collection of essays, all in Te Reo Maori, explores histories, people and places of significance, and takes the reader into the oral arts, including haka, karakia, and waiata… Ka titiro atu koe ki tetahi mea, ki tetahi whenua, ki tetahi awa, ki tetahi kainga, ki tetahi tangata ka hokia mai ano aua whakaaro me nga ahuatanga i kite ai koe i te wa i a koe e tamariki ana. .. Kai roto i teneki pukapuka e kitea ai te wairua o te kupu, a tena kaiwhakairo i te kupu, whakaniko i te kupu ataahua o roto mai i te rohe o Mataatua.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverDancing with the King : the rise and fall of the King Country, 1864-1885 / Michael Belgrave.
“After the battle of Orakau in 1864 and the end of the war in the Waikato, Tawhiao, the second Maori King, and his supporters were forced into an armed isolation in the Rohe Potae, the King Country. For the next twenty years, the King Country operated as an independent state – a land governed by the Maori King where settlers and the Crown entered at risk of their lives.” (Syndetics summary)

Cover from Fishpond.co.nzTāngata Ngāi Tahu = People of Ngāi Tahu. Volume One / edited by Helen Brown and Takerei Norton.
“Mo tatou, a, mo ka uri a muri ake nei. For us and our children after us. Tangata Ngai Tahu remembers and celebrates the rich and diverse lives of the people of Ngai Tahu. Spanning time, geography and kaupapa, fifty biographies bring Ngai Tahu history into the present.” (fishpond.co.nz)

Syndetics book coverThe balance destroyed / Ani Mikaere ; with images by Robyn Kahukiwa.
Originally presented to the University of Waikato as a Master of Jurisprudence thesis.

Syndetics book coverWater rights for Ngai Tahu : A discussion paper
“In Water rights for Ngāi Tahu, Te Maire Tau considers the historical and political framework that has contributed to the current state of water rights in the Ngāi Tahu takiwā. He explores the customary, legal, and Treaty frameworks that feed into the debate regarding the ownership of water…” (back cover)

Syndetics book coverLeaders like you : New Zealand leaders share stories of courage, failure and commitment / copy, interviews & editing, Nick Sceats and Andrea Thompson ; portraits, Bonny Beattie.
Sceats, Nick and Andrea Thompson. Leaders like you : New Zealand leaders share stories of courage, failure and commitment. 2017.
p. 14. Bennett, Arihia. The power of listening.
p. 128 Dewes, Whaimutu. The evidential leader.
p. 156. Te Tau, Tui. Whe “why not?” leader.

Syndetics book coverThe history of Hawke’s Bay / Matthew Wright.
“Hawke’s Bay has a remarkable history, brief by world standards, yet filled with colour, pace and life. This illustrated history covers the broadest sweep of Hawke’s Bay’s past, telling the wider tale of people and their ideals… “(Syndetics summary)
p. 7. Land and people — Māui – arrival of Ngāti Kahungunu – Hawkes Bay during the ‘musket wars’
p. 27. Cowboy frontier – land sharks and proselytes – Donald Mclean’s land purchases – the war at Te Pakiakia –
p. 68. (The land of the shepherd kings) – race, war and politics.

Cover from Fishpond.co.nzSearches for tradition : essays on New Zealand music, past & present / edited by Michael Brown & Samantha Owens.
“In Douglas Lilburn’s famous address to the 1946 Cambridge Summer School of Music, the composer described his ‘search for tradition’ in the music of New Zealand and spelled out his hopes that a distinctive art music might yet emerge here.
p. 59. Alfred Hill’s ‘Māori songs : whose tradition?” by Melissa Cross
p. 125 Whāia te māramatanga : the search for enlightenment by Valance Smith
p. 139 Mai I te pō : the reclamation of taonga pōro as a living treasure by Awhina Tamarapa and Ariana Tikao
p. 223 Shaping traditions of vocality : the lyrical legacy of Kiri Te Kanawa by Jenny Wollerman

Syndetics book coverTelling the real story : genre and New Zealand literature / Erin Mercer.
“Telling the Real Story: Genre and New Zealand Literature interrogates the relationships between genre, realism and New Zealand literature…” (Syndetics summary)
p. 205. ‘Something that described the real New Zealand’ : Keri Hulme’s The Bone people and Witi Ihimaera’s The matriarch.

Syndetics book coverLinguist at work : festschrift for Janet Holmes / edited by Meredith Marra and Paul Warren.
“Throughout her 45-year career at Victoria University of Wellington, Professor Janet Holmes has operated at the cutting edge of sociolinguistics. She is recognised as a field leader, a pioneer for new approaches, and a warm and generous mentor…” (Syndetics summary)
P. 159. Audiences, referees and landscapes : understanding the use of Māori and English in New Zealand dual language picture books through a sociolinguistic lens by Nicola Daly.

Syndetics book coverPetroleum development and environmental conflict in Aotearoa New Zealand : Texas of the South Pacific / Terrence M. Loomis.
“Petroleum Development and Environmental Conflict in Aotearoa New Zealand: Texas of the South Pacific examines the dilemmas associated with economic growth through the expansion of resource extraction. … Terrence M. Loomis analyzes the circumstances under which environmental opposition to state policies to promote oil and gas development–in collaboration with the petroleum industry–, has lead to far-reaching changes in institutional relations between the state and civil society.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 163. Selling the East Coast.
p. 193. Community and indigenous responses to oil and gas development

Treaty talks at Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui in April/May

Wellington Treaty Network has joined with Wellington City Libraries in 2017 to host three events in April and May to commemorate the signing of Te Tiriti in Wellington Harbour, 1840.

We thank Robyn Kahukiwa for her kind permission to use her image created for the Haeata Collective exhibition at the City Gallery, 1990

We thank Robyn Kahukiwa for her kind permission to use her  image created for the Haeata Collective exhibition at the City Gallery, 1990.

The programme will be:

Rangtiratanga in reverse : the Government’s review of Te Ture Whenua Māori by Liz Mellish and Morrie Love

Friday 28 April, 12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Liz Mellish is chair of Palmerston North  Māori Reserve Trust, and Morrie Love is chair of the Wellington Tenths Trust.

Te Ture Whenua Māori Bill [update], is in its final step, due to become an act at the end of this month. We are pleased to host Liz Mellish, Federation of Māori Authorities representative on an advisory committee for the establishment of  the Māori Land Service,  and Morrie Love, who will attempt to guide us through the complex issues surrounding the  Te Ture Whenua Bill/Act.

Changing the narrative, the story of Māori law and Treaty of Waitangi claims and settlement, with Carwyn Jones

Friday 5 May,  12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Carwyn Jones, of Ngāti Kahungunu and Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki iwi,  is a senior law lecturer at Victoria University. His area of expertise is Te Tiriti O Waitangi, Māori Customary Law and Māori Land Use. We look forward to an opportunity to learn of the latest developments  on the claims and settlement processes.

Here is a link to Carwyn’s book, published recently in 2016:

Vic Uni Book CoverNew treaty, new tradition : reconciling New Zealand and Māori law / Carwyn Jones.
“While Indigenous peoples face the challenges of self-determination in a postcolonial world, New Treaty, New Tradition provides a timely look at how the resolution of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims continues to shape the culture of all who are involved – Maori and government alike.” (Syndetics summary)

Te Tiriti in schools and the community  :  new resources to support engagement with the Treaty ; a talk by Tamsin Hanly and Jen Margaret

Friday 12 May, 12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Jen Margaret is an author and a very respected and committed presenter of Treaty workshops, and workshops for organisational change.

Here is a link to her book Working as Allies: supporters of indigenous justice reflect on the Library Catalogue.

Tamsin Hanly will shortly launch her latest publication in the field of New Zealand education, and her colourful website includes: A Critical guide to Māori and Pākehā histories of Aotearoa New Zealand

 small

Kia mau ki te tūmanako, te whakapono me te aroha

First on the list of Māori material this year, is a lovely collection of whakataukī – pearls of wisdom – grouped under six “virtues” mātauranga/wisdom ; māia/courage ; atawhai/compassion ; ngākau tapatahi/integrity ; whakahautanga/self-mastery ; and whakapono/belief. The whakataukī in the heading of this blog is listed under “tūmanako” – and translates as: Hold fast to hope, faith and love.

Syndetics book coverMauri ora : wisdom from the Māori world / Peter Alsop & Te Rau Kupenga.
“Pearls of wisdom contained in proverbs – whakatauk-I – have been gifted from generation to generation as an intrinsic part of the M-aori world. As powerful metaphors, they combine analogy and cultural history in the most economical of words. Short and insightful, they surprise, engendering reflection, learning and personal growth. Mauri Ora links whakatauk-I to key personal virtues idealised across cultures and generations. The virtues – wisdom, courage, compassion, integrity, self-mastery and belief – stem from the science of positive psychology; the study of how to live a better life.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGottfried Lindauer’s New Zealand : the Māori portraits / edited by Ngahiraka Mason and Zara Stanhope.
“From the 1870s to the early twentieth century, the Bohemian immigrant artist Gottfried Lindauer travelled to marae and rural towns around New Zealand and – commissioned by Maori and Pakeha – captured in paint the images of key Maori figures. For Maori then and now, the faces of tipuna are full of mana and life. Now this definitive work collects those portraits for New Zealanders. The book presents 67 major portraits and 8 genre paintings alongside detailed accounts of the subject and work, with essays by leading scholars that take us inside Lindauer and his world.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTakatāpui : a place of standing / [edited by] Jordon Harris.
“Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Māori (takatāpui) tell their stories and reflect on the journey from exclusion and prejudice to taking their rightful place in Aotearoa. Illustrated with stunning colour photographs, Takatāpui features introductions by Witi Ihimaera, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku and the late Henare Te Ua.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe toki me te whao : the story and use of Māori tools / Clive Fugill.
“It is over a century since the last major book on Māori carving tools. Clive Fugill, Master Carver at the NZ Māori Arts & Crafts Institute, tells the mythical, traditional and modern stories of the making and use of carving tools, including the adze (toki) and the chisel (whao) with detailed drawings and photos.” (Syndetics summary)

He iti kahurangi / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Particles are often a source of difficulty to Maori language learners, but using these correctly is essential in order to create a Maori spirit and flavour within the sentence, so that it sounds sweet to the Maori ear, and to follow nga tikanga o Te Reo Maori. Tohunga wetereo Heni Jacob explains the usage of the following pumuri and pumua: ahua, ake, anahe/anake, ano, ata, atu, haere, hanga, hangehange, harukiruki, hawerewere, he, hengahenga, hitarari, hitenga, hoake, hoatu, hoki, ia, iho, kaha, katoa, kau, ke, kehokeho, kenekene/keneuri, kere, kerekere, kino, kita, kitakita, koa, koia, kutikuti, mai, maioio, makehua, makuare/makuware, manunu, marie, matua, morukaruka/moruka, mea ake, na, nawenawe, nei, noa, nge, ngero/ngerongero, ngihangiha, ora, oreore, oti, pai, paku, panuku, patere, pea, penu, petapeta, piropiro, pohapoha, pu, puahoaho, puku, ra, ranei, rawa, rere, rikiriki, rirerire, riro, rukaruka, rukiruki, rukuruku, tahi, taiahoaho, tangetange, tangotango, tata, tere, tiahoaho, tika, tino, tokitoki, tonu, tuauriuri, uriuri, wawe, whaka-, whakaharahara, whakarere, whaioio.” (Syndetics summary)

Tikanga Māori : living by Māori values / Hirini Moko Mead.
“This is an authoritative and accessible introduction to tikanga Maori for people wanting to understand the correct Maori ways of doing things. It covers the ways that tikanga guides relationships between people, people’s relationship with the natural environment, spiritual areas, and health, and it proposes guidelines to test appropriate tikanga Maori responses to new situations and challenges in contemporary life.” (Syndetics summary)

Toitū̄ te whare / kaiētita Agnes McFarland rāua ko Taiarahia Black.
“A collection of articles exploring the role and significance of whare tipuna and marae as sources of traditional and ancestral knowledge, and of the richness of te reo Maori language and literature.
“Ko te kaupapa o te whare tipuna me te marae, he pupuri i nga korero tuku iho a te iwi mai ano i nga tipuna. He wahi hai wananga tahi i nga kaupapa. Ki te kore o tatau whare tipuna me o tatau marae ka ngaro atu tetahi wahi nui tonu o tatau, te iwi Maori. No reira, me kaha tonu tatau ki te whakapakari i a tatau ano, kia mohio pai ai tatau ki nga tikanga i runga i o tatau marae hai huarahi whakatairanga i to tatau reo rangatira. Ki te mau te reo ki roto i o tatau whare tipuna, ki te mau hoki ki te marae ka mau ki nga wahi katoa. Ko te tino putake o tenei pukapuka a Toitu te Whare he titiro atu ki nga papareanga o muri mai kia hangaia he pataka korero ma ratau, he whakatutu atu i nga heru herehere i nga ihoiho o tuawhakarere hai whakatipu whakaaro ma ratau.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWayfinding leadership : ground-breaking wisdom for developing leaders / Chellie Spiller, PhD, Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, John Panoho.
“This book presents a new way of leading by looking to traditional waka navigators or wayfinders for the skills and behaviours needed in modern leaders. It takes readers on a journey into wayfinding and leading, discussing principles of wayfinding philosophy, giving examples of how these have been applied in businesses and communities, and providing action points for readers to practise and reflect on the skills they are learning.” (Syndetics summary)

New treaty, new tradition : reconciling New Zealand and Māori law / Carwyn Jones.
“Provides a timely examination of how the resolution of land claims in New Zealand has affected Mori law and the challenges faced by indigenous peoples as they attempt to exercise self-determination in a post colonial world. Combinind analysis with Mori storytelling, Jones’s nuanced reflections on the claims process show how Western legal thought has shaped treaty negotiations.” (Syndetics summary)

Maiea te tupua : whānau accounts of Waikato-Maniapoto World War One veterans and one conscriptee : commemorating 100 years of World War One / produced by Pūrekireki Marae with the support from Te Pua Wānanga ̄ki te Ao of the University of Waikato, the Waikato Raupatu Lands Trust, the Maniapotō Māori Trust Board, Trust Waikato and Te Puni Kōkiri.
Accounts by family members of: Te Rauangaanga Mahuta, Kohatu Hari Hemara Wahanui, Tuheka Taonui Hetet, Te Rehe Amohanga, Rotohiko Michael Jones, Joseph Ormsby, William Takoro Kohi.

Syndetics book coverIndigenous homelessness : perspectives from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand / edited by Evelyn J. Peters, Julia Christensen.
“Being homeless in one’s homeland is a colonial legacy for many Indigenous people in settler societies. The construction of Commonwealth nation-states from colonial settler societies depended on the dispossession of Indigenous peoples from their lands. Essays … argue that effective policy and support programs aimed at relieving Indigenous homelessness must be rooted in Indigenous conceptions of home, land, and kinship, and cannot ignore the context of systemic inequality, institutionalization, landlessness, among other things, that stem from a history of colonialism…” (Syndetics summary)

Journal articles:

AlterNative ; vol. 12, issue 4 (2016)
p. 341 Te Mata Ira : faces of the gene : developing a cultural foundation for biobanking and genomic research involving Māori by Maui Hudson […et al.]
p. 356 Ngā reanga o ngā Tapuhi : generations of Māori nurses by Leonie Walker, Jell Clendon, Leanne Manson & Kerri Nuku.
p. 369 A cause for nervousness : the proposed Māori land reforms in New Zealand by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 380 E Hine : talking about Māori teen pregnancy with government groups by Anna Adcock, Beverley Lawton & Fiona Cram
p. 396 Indigenous positioning in health research : the importance of kaupapa Māori theory-informed practice by Elana Curtis.

Te Tiriti talks at Central Library

On Friday 29 April Wellington City Libraries, in collaboration with Wellington Treaty Network, begins a series of three “Tiriti” talks at Central Library covering themes of past, present and future.

1
Hineteiwaiwa. Haeata Collective, 1990, Robyn Kahukiwa, artist : Mana Tiriti
Friday 29 April 12.30pm:
The series begins with stories of the local signatories to Te Tiriti within the rohe of Te Whanganui-a-Tara, April and May, 1840.
Mana Whenua – Honiana Love, Mark Teone, Kura Moeahu — describe whānau who put their marks to Henry Williams’ “treaty” sheet no. 8, April, 1840.

There will be stories of Kumutoto, Pipitea/Waiwhetu, and Piti-one – describing well-known identities, such as Te Puni, Wi Tako, and others less well-known, but whose life histories are important to us, ngā uri of those who made their hikoi to this rohe in 1820s-1840s.

2
Claudia Orange. ‘Treaty of Waitangi – Creating the Treaty of Waitangi’, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 16-Nov-12
Licensed by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage for re-use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence.

Friday 6 May 12.30pm:
The theme of the second week is a contemporary issue: Clean Water — and illustrates local solutions for a global problem.
Ray Ahipene-Mercer was at the forefront of the drive for clean water, joining the Wellington Clean Water Campaign, 1984, and taking a claim to the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986. This claim was put on hold when Wellington citizens began to see the need for changes to the local sewage treatment. Concern for the water issues led to collaboration with Aila Taylor, (Motunui Claim) and other iwi, in raising awareness of nationwide issues of pollution.

3Image courtesy of wellington.govt.nz
Morrie Love will speak also – his theme: his experiences with indigenous freshwater fish – important tales so little known to many people of this rohe.

Friday 13/5 12.30pm:
The third week centres on the Pākehā engagement with the Treaty – describing a thirty year collective action by Project Waitangi/Wellington Treaty Network whose members were challenged by questions along the lines of: – “so what are you doing about the treaty”?
Speakers include Mary Haggie, Jeff Drane and Jen Margaret.

4
Nau mai, haere mai ki to tātou whare pukapuka : Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui

In conclusion:
Would you have voted for a flag like this? Kiwi iwi flag by Mere Drake (nee Wehipeihana)
5
This design acknowledges the unique place of Tangata Whenua and their partnership with Tangata Tiriti in the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and illustrates the following themes:
• A marriage contract of aroha, Tangata Tiriti signed on behalf of the Crown which enabled may peoples to come to New Zealand
• The beautiful colours of the rainbow represent the many cultures of New Zealand
• The weave represents integration of cultures
• Our links to the islands are also acknowledged and form a cross an important part of our heritage

Talking about the Treaty

Display stand at the Takapuna LibraryTalk Treaty : Kōrerotia Te Tiriti is a display which features series of short video clips of well-known New Zealanders sharing their views about the Treaty of Waitangi and its implications.
This will be available in the Central, Miramar and Tawa libraries from 1 February, and Cummings Park branch from 9th February. Those stands will then travel to Kaori, Johnsonville and Newtown libraries in Mid March.
Topics covered include identity, te reo, coming to a greater understanding (between Māori and Pakeha), and cultural differences.
More info.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi: Past, Present Future

Kia ora koutou! Here at He Kōrero o te Wā, we have some special events coming up for you. For three weeks we will have free lunchtime talks relating to Te Tiriti in Wellington.  The series kicks off on Tuesday 29 April, and will all be held at Wellington Central Library from 12.30-1.30:

Tuesday 29 April – Past: Te Tiriti signings, April/May 1840
Miria Pomare and Te Ati Awa Whānau.
Learn more about the wāhine and rangatira of Ngāti Toa and Te Atiawa who signed Te Tiriti.

Tuesday 6 May – Present: ‘Wai 262’ flora and fauna claim
Aroha Mead
Join with Aroha to unravel complexities of flora, fauna and taonga, including traditional knowledge and intellectual property rights over cultural ideas, design and language.

Tuesday 13 May – Future: Te Tiriti relationships: the way ahead
Kiritapu Allan, Hannah Northover and Fetu-ole-moana Tamapeau
Convenor: Jen Margaret (Wellington Treaty Network)
Hear a panel of speakers provide their perspectives on the future of Te Tiriti relationships.

Come along to expand your knowledge about Te Tiriti o Waitangi with reference to the past, the present and the future.

treatyb
Treaty of Waitangi. Dominion post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP-Ethics-Waitangi Day and Treaty of Waitangi-03. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23090536

In the meantime, you can learn more with these books from our collection:

Syndetics book coverThe Treaty of Waitangi companion : Māori and Pākehā̄̄ from Tasman to today / edited by Vincent O’Malley, Bruce Stirling and Wally Penetito.
“Since the Treaty of Waitangi was signed by Maori chiefs and Governor Hobson in 1840 it has become the defining document in New Zealand history. From the New Zealand Wars to the 1975 Land March, from the Kingitanga to the Waitangi Tribunal, from Captain Cook to Hone Harawira, The Treaty of Waitangi Companion tells the story of the Treaty and Maori and Pakeha relations through the many voices of those who made this country’s history.Sourced from government publications and newspapers, letters and diaries, poems, paintings and cartoons, the Companion brings to life the long history of debates about the Treaty and life in Aotearoa.” (abridged from syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverKo Aotearoa tēnei : te taumata tuarua : a report into claims concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity.
“This report address the Wai 262 claim concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity. It is divided into two levels, a shorter summary layer subtitle “Te Taumata Tuatahi,” and a fuller, two-volume layer subtitled Te Taumata Tuarua.” (library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverThe story of a treaty / Claudia Orange.
“The Treaty of Waitangi is a central document in New Zealand history. This lively account tells the story of the Treaty from its signing in 1840 through the debates and struggles of the nineteenth century to the gathering political momentum of recent decades. The second edition of this popular book brings the story up to the present.” (library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverTreasured possessions : indigenous interventions into cultural and intellectual property / Haidy Geismar.
“On September 13, 2007, the United Nations adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The document recognized collective property rights of tangible and intangible resources. Several decades before the declaration, indigenous peoples globally were employing cultural and intellectual property laws to assert claims to their cultural resources. Using two different Pacific nations, Vanuatu and New Zealand, Geismar explores the varying mechanisms employed by the Maori and indigenous people of Vanuatu in asserting intellectual and cultural property rights. This richly textured analysis details the intricate interplay of indigenous rights against the emerging body of laws. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. R. Campbell The University of MontanaCopyright American Library Association, used with permission.” (abridged from CHOICE)