New Zealand material recent arrivals

We returned to He Matapihi library and discovered (as we have not yet been open for a full year) that in June the sun starts to stream in the windows after lunch making our window seat the place to be!  Along with the sunshine we also have the latest New Zealand material to arrive.  As always new New Zealand material covers a range of topics so check these out to see if any interest you.  These titles are proving popular so remember it’s free to place a reserve and have these titles sent to your local branch, or come in and browse the He Matapihi  New Zealand lending collection and try and catch some of the reported six minutes of Wellington sunshine.

Mighty ApeHusna’s story : my wife, the Christchurch massacre & my journey to forgiveness / Ahmed, Farid
“Husna’s Story is written by Husna’s husband Farid Ahmed. They were praying at El Noor Mosque in Christchurch when a gunman burst in and shot and killed 51 people and injured many others in a terrorist attack. This book tells Husna’s story, describing the day of the attack – in all of its normal, mundane detail up until the tragedy, and then the horrendous tragedy of what followed. Interwoven with this is the story of Husna’s life, telling of the selflessness and bravery with which she lived her life. As well as looking after her paraplegic husband, Husna was an important member of the community, helping women when they were giving birth, running classes for children and helping many others. Her last selfless act was going back into the mosque to look for her husband on that fateful day. She had already led the other women and children to safety. Tragically she was shot. Husna’s husband, Farid Ahmed, quite incredibly, forgives the alleged killer. His remarkable philosophy of forgiveness, peace and love is an example of how religion and faith, through personal application, can be a tool for navigating the most horrific of tragedies.” (Publisher’s description)

Mighty ApeThe new photography : New Zealand’s first generation contemporary photographers / McCredie, Athol
“In this handsome book, leading photography curator Athol McCredie tells the story of the beginnings of contemporary photography — also known as art photography — in New Zealand. Through interviews with the photographers Gary Baigent, Richard Collins, John Daley, John Fields, Max Oettli, John B Turner, Len Wesney and Ans Westra, and accompanied by an outstanding introductory essay, McCredie shows how the break-through approach of personal documentary photography created a new field of photography in New Zealand that was not simply illustrative but rather spoke for itself and with its own language.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeNew Zealand seaweeds : an illustrated guide / Nelson, W. A.
“This fully revised edition describes over 150 genera and 250 key species across three main sections covering green, brown and red algae. Each species entry includes up-to-date information on nomenclature, type locality, morphology, habitat and distribution and gives notes on identification and key characters. Features reproductions of the paintings of celebrated botanical artist Nancy Adams.” (Catalogue)

Fish PondThe longest day : standing up to depression and tackling the Coast to Coast / Calman, Matt
“Matt Calman’s most consistent tool for dealing with problems throughout his life was alcohol. But it got to the stage where he was no longer willing to put up with the dark side of his drinking. So he quit. But the problems that had been simmering away for most of his life merely came to a head. It led to a major depressive phase with panic attacks and thoughts of suicide. Finally Matt began the slow climb to rebuild himself with a much stronger foundation. Finally he was ready to find something, or for something to find him. It could have been anything. It just happened to be the Coast to Coast Multisport World Championships, the toughest endurance race in New Zealand. The Longest Day outlines Matt’s path back from the depths of depression, his struggles to learn to run, cycle and kayak at an elite level, and the culmination of all that training: his Coast to Coast race. The book explores the parallels between the inner landscape (his journey to well being) and the outer landscape (the world around him and tackling the Coast to Coast). Through his training he learns about process rather than outcome, and how true success and enjoyment is embedded in the journey (not the destination). Matt is a brave, honest writer with a talent for articulating what is going on inside his head.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeAll the way to summer : stories of love and longing / Kidman, Fiona
“Fiona Kidman’s early stories about New Zealand women’s experiences scandalised readers with their vivid depictions of the heartbreaks and joys of desire, illicit liaisons and unconventional love. Her writing made her a feminist icon in the early 1980s, and she has since continued to tell the realities of women’s lives, her books resonating with many readers over the years and across the world. To mark her 80th birthday, this volume brings together a variety of her previously published stories as well as several that are new or previously uncollected; all moving, insightful and written with love. The final stories trace her own history of love, a memoir of significant people from childhood and beyond” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeThe burning river / Patchett, Lawrence
“In a radically changed Aotearoa New Zealand, Van’s life in the swamp is hazardous. Sheltered by Rau and Matewai, he mines plastic and trades to survive. When a young visitor summons him to the fenced settlement on the hill, he is offered a new and frightening responsibility-a perilous inland journey that leads to a tense confrontation and the prospect of a rebuilt world.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApePoetry New Zealand Yearbook. 2020
“Each year Poetry New Zealand, this country’s longest-running poetry magazine, rounds up new poetry, reviews and essays, making it the ideal way to catch up with the latest poetry from both established and emerging New Zealand poets. Issue #54 features 130 new poems (including by this year’s featured poet, rising star Essa May Ranapiri, and C.K. Stead, Elizabeth Smither, Kevin Ireland, Chris Tse, Gregory Kan, Fardowsa Mohammed and Tracey Slaughter); essays (including a graphic essay by Sarah Laing); and reviews of new poetry collections. Poems by the winners of both the Poetry New Zealand Award and the Poetry New Zealand Schools Award are among the line-up.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeThe case for cannabis law reform / McLeod, Vince
“The Case For Cannabis Law Reform makes a comprehensive argument for reforming our cannabis laws. Across 58 fully-referenced chapters, this book covers practical, moral, economic, cultural, medicinal, historical and spiritual reasons to repeal cannabis prohibition – among others” (Catalogue)

Imagining decolonisation. 
“Decolonisation is a term that scares some, and gives hope to others. It is an uncomfortable and bewildering concept for many New Zealanders yet needed if we are going to build a country that is fair and equal for all who live there. This book sets out the case for decolonisation by illuminating through anecdotal, real life examples — what decolonisation might look and feel like.” (Catalogue)

2020 Ockham NZ Book Awards: Non-Fiction Winners!

Last week we profiled the fiction and poetry winners of the 2020 Ockham NZ Book Awards. This week we celebrate the non-fiction winners!

“It is rock-star writing: entertaining, revealing and incredibly heartfelt”

The 2020 General Non-Fiction Award went to Shayne Carter, musician and front man of Straitjacket Fits and Dimmer, for his memoir, Dead People I Have Known (Victoria University Press). Carter also won the E.H. McCormick Prize for best first work of General Non-Fiction. The category judges said of the first-time author’s work: “It is rock-star writing: entertaining, revealing and incredibly heartfelt”.  Rachel King’s marvelous Spin Off essay  about Dead People I Have Known noted that: “The best thing about the book is Shayne’s ability to fully recreate a scene as if he is standing right there experiencing it, and we are standing there with him”.  Reserve a copy of this powerful book here.

Watch Shayne Carter read from Dead People I Have Known here.

“From the obscure and ephemeral to the well-known and loved, the images allow us to be witness to – and challenge us to learn from – our shared past of resistance, dissent and activism”

Stephanie Gibson, Matariki Williams (Tūhoe, Te Atiawa, Ngāti Whakaue, Ngāti Hauiti), and Puawai Cairns (Ngāti Pūkenga, Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāiterangi) – three Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa curators – won the 2020 Illustrated Non-Fiction Award for their work Protest Tautohetohe: Objects of Resistance, Persistence and Defiance. The judges observed that: “From the obscure and ephemeral to the well-known and loved, the images allow us to be witness to – and challenge us to learn from – our shared past of resistance, dissent and activism”.

Alice Webb-Liddall wrote that: “Movements led by Māori, by women and by children continue to shape New Zealand’s community and policy, and have made us world leaders in areas like women’s suffrage. A collection of objects become the markers of every movement, and Stephanie Gibson, Matariki Williams and Puawai Cairns have collated some of the most important, most beautiful and most confronting of these”. Reserve a copy of this fascinating and important book here.

Watch Stephanie Gibson read from Protest Tautohetohe: Objects of Resistance, Persistence and Defiance here.

“The book is not only a reflection of New Zealand’s diversity of people and whenua, but also speaks to how we interact with our environment” 

The 2020 Judith Binney Prize for best first work of Illustrated Non-Fiction went to Chris McDowall and Tim Denee for We Are Here: An Atlas of Aotearoa (Massey University Press). RNZ noted that this book “is not only a reflection of New Zealand’s diversity of people and whenua, but also speaks to how we interact with our environment”. Reserve a copy of this book, which is more than just an atlas, here.

Ockham NZ Book Awards Illustrated Non-Fiction Long List

As well as General Non-Fiction, the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards have a special category for Illustrated Non-Fiction. The 2020 long list for this category, which has just been announced, includes magnificently illustrated books that both inform and entertain.

The Ockham short lists will be announced on 4 March, and the final prize winners will be presented with their awards on 12 May.

Check out the titles in the Illustrated Non-Fiction Award category long list!

Crafting Aotearoa: a cultural history of making in New Zealand and the wider Moana Oceania / Chitham, Karl
“A major new history of craft that spans three centuries of making and thinking in Aotearoa New Zealand and the wider Moana (Pacific). Paying attention to Pākehā, Māori, and island nations of the wider Moana, and old and new migrant makers and their works, this book is a history of craft understood as an idea that shifts and changes over time.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Protest Tautohetohe: objects of resistance, persistence and defiance / Gibson, Stephanie
“Aotearoa New Zealand has a long legacy of activism. This richly illustrated book brings together over 300 objects made by protestors to proclaim and symbolise their causes and their struggles. From banners to badges, t-shirts to tea towels, posters to photographs, it is a vivid reflection of 250 years of resistance and persistance.” (Catalogue)

Frances Hodgkins: European journeys
“This vivid and revealing book is published alongside a landmark exhibition focused on one of our most internationally recognized artists, Frances Hodgkins. Complete with a rich visual chronology of the artist’s encounters abroad, alongside over one hundred of Hodgkins’ key paintings and drawings, the book is an illuminating journey that moves us from place to place through the writings of a number of distinguished art historians, curators and critics.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Funny as: the story of New Zealand comedy / Horan, Paul
“On TV, film, and live, New Zealand comedy has never been bigger. Published alongisde a major Television New Zealand documentary series, Funny As is a big, authoritative, funny history of New Zealand’s funny men and women. From capping bands to the Topp Twins, hori humour to Billy T James, Lynn of Tawa to Fred Dagg, New Zealanders have made each other laugh in ways distinctive to our peoples and our culture. In 400 pictures and a text built on deep research and over 100 interviews with comics, this book will be Funny As.” (Catalogue)

We are here: an atlas of Aotearoa / McDowall, Chris
“This compelling mix of charts, graphs, diagrams, maps and illustrations is beautiful, insightful, and enlightening. It helps us make sense of our country, to grasp its scale, diversity and intricacies, and to experience feelings of connection to land, to place, to this time in our history, and to one another. By making data visible, each graphic reveals insights: Who visits us? How many fish are in the sea? How do we hurt ourselves? Where do our cats go to at night?  Essays by some of New Zealand’s best thinkers complete the package.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Louise Henderson: from life
“This is the first major survey of the life and work of French-born, New Zealand artist Louise Henderson (1902-1994). Featuring work from across Henderson’s seven-decade career, the book and accompanying exhibition trace the development of the artist’s bold and colourful abstract style. Henderson worked alongside other major figures including Rita Angus, John Weeks, Colin McCahon and Milan Mrkusich and was one of the first New Zealand artists to commit herself to an overtly modern style.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

McCahon country / Paton, Justin
“In this landmark book, celebrated writer and curator Justin Paton takes readers on a journey through the landscape of Aotearoa, as the artist loved and painted it. From Otago to Canterbury, Takaka to Taranaki, Muriwai to Northland and many more places in between, Paton brings his curator’s eye to a selection of nearly 200 of McCahon’s paintings and drawings, including iconic and beloved works and others never before published.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Colin McCahon: there is only one direction. Vol. I 1919-1959 / Simpson, Peter “In the first of a two-volume work chronicling 45 years of painting by New Zealand artist, Colin McCahon, leading McCahon scholar, writer, and curator Peter Simpson chronicles the evolution of McCahon’s work over the artist’s entire career. Each volume includes over 300 colour illustrations, with a selection of reproductions (many never previously published), plus photographs, catalogue covers, facsimiles and other illustrative material.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

The meaning of trees / Vennell, Robert
“This treasure of a book pays homage to New Zealand’s native plant species while telling the story of plants and people in Aotearoa. Beautifully illustrated with botanical drawings, paintings and photographs, it shows us how a globally unique flora has been used for food, medicine, shelter, spirituality and science. From Jurassic giants to botanical oddballs – these are our wonderful native and endemic plants.” (Adapted from our catalogue)


The New Photography: New Zealand’s First-generation Contemporary Photographers / McCredie, Athol
“Athol McCredie is a leading NZ photography curator and in this beautiful book he tells the story of the beginning of contemporary/art photography in Aotearoa. Photographers discussed include Gary Baigent, Max Oettli, and Ans Westra.” (Adapted from Fishpond)

New Zealand at War, home and abroad – History Picks for July

This month’s history picks reach the regular quota of World War Two content, with Smoky the Brave also scoring highly on the animals-with-jobs meter and Ake ake kia kaha e! : Forever Brave! looking at the iwi who contributed to the Maori Battalion, both abroad and at home. Elsewhere we go back in Aotearoa’s history with Vincent O’Malley’s The New Zealand Wars providing a detailed look at an oft-neglected topic in our past.

The promise : love and loss in modern China / Xinran
“Xinran begins with the magic and tragedy of one young couples wedding night in 1950, and goes on to tell personal experiences of loss, grief and hardship through China’s extraordinary century. In doing so she tells a bigger story – how traditional Chinese values have been slowly eroded by the tide of modernity and how their outlooks on love, and the choices they’ve made in life, have been all been affected by the great upheavals of Chinese history. A spell-binding and magical narrative, this is the story of modern China through the people who lived through it, and the story of their love and loss.” (Catalogue)

Smoky the brave / Lewis, Damien
“In February 1944, as Japanese advances threatened to engulf Australasia, a four-pound Yorkshire terrier was discovered hiding in a Japanese shell scrape amidst the thick jungles of Papua New Guinea. A mystery, she was adopted by Corporal William ‘Bill’ Wynne. Living in his tent, sleeping on felt salvaged from a card table, and sharing his rations, Smoky became the de facto mascot of the regiment. She went on to fly numerous missions, cocooned in a pack hanging next to the machine-guns used to repel marauding Japanese fighters.” (Catalogue)

North Korea in 100 facts / Monti, Ruth Ann
“Ruth Ann Monti teases out the truth about North Korea to provide an illuminating insight into a society that might just as well be in outer space for most in the West. Did you know, for instance, that high school students are required to complete an 81-hour course on current leader Kim Jong-un? Or that everyone must wear a Kim badge at all times? How about the fact that Kim Jong-il, kidnapped two of South Korea’s film industry giants and made seven films with them – including a Socialist version of Godzilla?” (Catalogue)

The New Zealand Wars = Ngā Pakanga o Aotearoa / O’Malley, Vincent
“The New Zealand Wars were a series of conflicts that profoundly shaped the course and direction of our nations history. The wars are an integral part of the New Zealand story but we have not always cared to remember or acknowledge them. Today, however, interest in the wars is resurgent. Public figures are calling for the wars to be taught in all schools and a national day of commemoration was recently established.” (Catalogue)

The Plimmer legacy : a family story from early Wellington to modern farming in the Rangītikei / Dawson, Bee
“From Wellington’s Plimmer Steps to the green hills of Motukawa. This is the story of a family – several generations of influential people – starting with ‘the father of Wellington’, John Plimmer, whose statue stands at the bottom of Plimmer Steps on Lambton Quay. Stories of Victorian and Edwardian life in the capital city lead on to the diverging paths of later generations, with an ongoing involvement in commerce, politics and farming.” (Catalogue)

Armageddon and paranoia : the nuclear confrontation / Braithwaite, Rodric
“In 1945, the atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and warfare was never the same again. There are few villains in this story: on both sides of the Iron Curtain, dedicated scientists cracked the secrets of nature, dutiful military men planned out possible manoeuvres and politicians wrestled with potentially intolerable decisions. None of them wanted to start a nuclear war, but all of them were paranoid about what the other side might do.” (Catalogue)

American cipher : Bowe Bergdahl and the U.S. tragedy in Afghanistan / Farwell, Matt
“Private First Class Bowe Bergdahl left his platoon’s base in eastern Afghanistan in the early hours of June 30, 2009. Since that day, easy answers to the many questions surrounding his case–why did he leave his post? What kinds of efforts were made to recover him from the Taliban? And why, facing a court martial, did he plead guilty to the serious charges against him?–have proved elusive.” (Catalogue)

Ake ake kia kaha e! : forever brave! : B Company 28 (Maori) Battalion, 1939-1945 / Gardiner, Wira
“A truly unique insight into the impact the Second World War had on the iwi of the central North Island and Bay of Plenty districts (including Te Arawa, Ngati Tuwharetoa, Tuhoe, Whanau-a-Apanui, Ngati Maru and Ngati Paoa) focusing on the region’s war effort not only overseas, but also at home and in government. Through personal recollections, eyewitness accounts, numerous anecdotes and highly illustrated throughout, the book tells the fascinating story of the B Company’s war, capturing the special `spirit’ of the Maori Battalion.” (Catalogue)

Tiriti Talks: Morgan Godfery — Te Arawhiti / Māori Crown Relations and the Tiriti

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the third of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  14 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Morgan Godfery

Morgan Godfery has whakapapa links to Te Pahipoto hapū of Ngāti Awa, and Lalomanu of Hāmoa/Samoa.  He is a political writer (but not a member of any political party).

His strong commitment to issues affecting Māori has driven his weekly/daily  comments  on social media via his twitter account and e-Tangata. An earlier focus of his writing was his blog, Maui Street.

Although the blog is now inactive, there is an impressive list of his published work there.

Read Morgan Godfery on Bridget Williams Books

You can read two of Morgan’s works online — Māui Street and The Interregnum — through our Bridget Williams Books Text Collection subscription (log in with your library card at the links below to start reading):

Māui Street / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“Morgan Godfery is one of New Zealand’s most energising young thinkers. In just a few years he has become a leading voice in the country’s social and political life. Starting out under his own banner, ‘Māui Street’, his writing now appears across national and international publications. This curated selection brings together the best of Godfery’s writing. Read together, the collection charts the emergence of a significant New Zealand voice.” (Bridget Williams Books)

The Interregnum / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“In BWB’s latest book of essays, edited by Morgan Godfery, ten of New Zealand’s sharpest emerging thinkers gather to debate the ‘morbid symptoms’ of the current moment, from precarious work to climate change, and to discuss what shape change might take, from ‘the politics of love’ to postcapitalism”. The Interregnum interrogates the future from the perspective of the generation who will shape it.” (Bridget Williams Books)

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Tiriti Talks: Jen Margaret – The State of the Pākehā Nation

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the second of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  7 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Jen Margaret

Jen Margaret is a Te Tiriti educator who devotes her time to working with individuals and organisations to deepen our understanding and application of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Her kōrero in this Te Tiriti talk series is based on the State of the Pākehā Nation essay commissioned for Waitangi Day 2018, entitled Ka pū te ruha, ka hao te rangatahi: change in the Pākehā nation. It explores the necessity to unravel privilege, racism and colonisation, and suggests ways in which Pākehā might work to do so.

Jen’s work is guided by the whakataukī : “Ko koe ki tēnā, ko ahau ki tēnēi I kīiwai o te kete”

This whakataukī has been adopted to convey the differing roles and responsibilities for Tangata Tiriti and Tangata Whenua within the Treaty relationship.

Jen has published the following resources which are listed on her website:

Working as allies, non-indigenous supporters of indigenous justice in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngā Rerenga o Te Tiriti provides guidance to groups and organisations within the community sector regarding engaging with the Treaty of Waitangi.

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Motu Kairangi – A free lunchtime kōrero

Nau mai, haere mai

Wellington City Libraries presents a free lunchtime kōrero about the history of Te Motu Kairangi (The Miramar peninsula).

WATTS PENINSULA: Public walking trails will be established and Fort Ballance will be restored.

The Speaker Morrie Love will mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Te Whanganui-a-Tara, on the 29th April 1840 in his kōrero of Te Motu Kairangi.

Date: Monday 29th April

Place: St Andrew’s Conference Centre, Hall (access to the right of the St Andrew’s on the Terrace building)

Time:  12:30 – 1:15pm

Enquiries to ann.reweti@wcc.govt.nz

One version of the story of the settlement of the eastern shores of Te Whanaganui-a-Tara by Ngāi Tara, Ngāti Itra is told by Elsdon Best in The land of Tara – we have this digitised version  on our Māori Resource page.

The migrations of iwi and hapū from the East Coast – the stories of Ngāti Porou / Ngāti Kahungunu are a complex acount of journeys, fighting and intermarriage.  “Ngāti Kahungunu” was the blanket label given to the eastern tribes by Te Atiawa as the Taranaki iwi sought to plant their foothold on the western shores and the inner harbour between 1820s and 1840s – up to the arrival of the New Zealand Company and its first six ships of immigrants in 1839-1840.

You can also check out our Te Whanganui-a-Tara index of Māori history and here are some eBooks from our catalogue on ‘Te Tirit o Waitangi’.

The Treaty of Waitangi / Orange, Claudia
“Since its publication in 1987, Claudia Orange’s book has become the standard guide to one of the key documents in New Zealand history, selling over 40,000 copies. The complexities of the Treaty, which have done so much to shape New Zealand history for nearly 200 years, are thoughtfully explored as Orange examines the meanings the document has held for Māori and Pākehā. A new introduction brings it up to date with all that has happened since, complementing the book’s lucid and well-researched exploration of how and why the Treaty was signed.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi [electronic resource] / Calman, Ross
“The book’s first two parts consider how the Christian word was spread and how Maori responded, explaining the identification they felt with the Israelites of the Old Testament. The third part relates the rise of indigenous religious movements, from the early Papahurihia through Pai Marire, Ringatu and the Parihaka Movement, and the later incarnations of the Arowhenua Movement in the South Island and what remains today’s leading Maori church, Ratana.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi settlements
“The settlement of iwi claims under the Treaty of Waitangi has drawn international attention, as other nations seek ways to build new relationships between indigenous peoples and the state. Here leading scholars consider the impact of Treaty settlements on the management and ownership of key resources (lands, forests and fisheries); they look at the economic and social consequences for Māori, and the impact of the settlement process on Crown–Māori relationships. And they ask ‘how successful has the settlement process been?'” (Catalogue)

The story of a treaty / Orange, Claudia
“The Treaty of Waitangi is a central document in New Zealand history. This lively account tells the story of the Treaty from its signing in 1840 through the debates and struggles of the nineteenth century to the gathering political momentum of recent decades. The second edition of this popular book brings the story up to the present”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

Nostalgia is popular this month in the NZ Collection

We hope that it will soon be the start of the golden weather for Wellington as here amongst the new books is Bruce Masons The End of the Golden Weather, the play which was first performed in 1959 and references a very different New Zealand from today. Also a nostalgic look at cars from the 1950’s to the 1970’s in We Had One of Those Too! There are biographies from Lizzie Marvelly and the iconic dance legend Jon Trimmer. Other topics include Eco homes, Anzacs, the Pacific, All Blacks and other sporting pursuits. As always a great variety on the new book shelves of the New Zealand Collection.

The end of the golden weather; a voyage into a New Zealand childhood. / Mason, Bruce
“First performed in 1959, The End of the Golden Weather has become a part of New Zealand history, a touchstone of New Zealand experience” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverWe had one of those too! / Stephen Barnett.
We Had One of Those Too! celebrates even more motoring memories from New Zealand’s golden age of motoring. Filled with a beautifully illustrated collection of cars, from the 1950s through to the 1970s, that Kiwis loved and drove during that period, this book is literally a nostalgic drive down memory lane. We Had One of Those Too! showcases the cars that have become icons of New Zealand popular culture, and that we, or our parents and grandparents owned. ” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverEco home : smart ideas for sustainable New Zealand homes / Melinda Williams.
“Everything you need to know to build, renovate or just live in an eco-friendly and sustainable way. With loads of inspirational photographs of New Zealand homes, this book is packed full of practical and accessible information. It presents the modern home by moving from room to room, to look at structural materials, furnishings and general life hacks to improve your personal green-star rating. As well as the living spaces (kitchen, bathroom, bedrooms, office, living area, utility rooms and outdoor areas) it also looks at the wider issues – why make an eco home at all?” (Syndetics summary)

Saviours of Zion : the Anzac story from Sinai to Palestine 1916-1918 / Archer, Christopher J.
“The book tells the story of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR Brigade) which fought as part of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) in the Sinai and Syria/Palestine from 1916 through to 1918. They operated in the Sinai alongside four Australian Light Horse Brigades (ALH Brigades) as part of Lieutenant General Sir Philip Chetwode’s ‘Desert Column’ but after June, 1917 they were reconstituted as The ‘Australian and New Zealand Division’ under Lieutenant General, Sir Harry Chauvel who commanded the ‘Desert Mounted Corps'”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

That F word : growing up feminist in Aotearoa / Marvelly, Elizabeth
“A wake-up call and a battle-cry for all Kiwi women. Lizzie Marvelly tells the story of New Zealand’s feminist roots, then traverses the modern landscape, tearing apart areas of gender imbalance and pervading attitudes to Kiwi women. In particular, Lizzie examines how men have been brought up with certain values — the rugby, racing and beer mentality we know all too well. Lizzie grew up an ardent Chiefs and All Blacks fan, but a wiser head now recognises that there are still endemic issues for society to address. Lizzie speaks about her own first-hand experiences with sexism and male misconduct, while also offering advice to young girls on how to take full control of their lives.” (Catalogue)

Why dance? / Trimmer, Jon
“An autobiography of Sir Jon Trimmer. The book is in two parts. The first is a narrative of Sir Jon’s career. In the second part he discusses aspects of dance and his career and has tips for aspiring dancers –Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

New Zealand’s great walks : the complete guide / Hersey, Paul
New Zealand’s Great Walks are truly world class. In a country blessed with hundreds of spectacular tracks to choose from, these are considered the best of the best. They pass through some of our most breathtaking landscapes – including golden sand beaches, ancient rainforests and high mountains.” (Catalogue)

The Pacific : in the wake of Captain Cook with Sam Neill / Wilson-Anastasios, Meaghan
“A rich, complex and engaging account of Cook’s voyages across the Pacific, from actor and raconteur Sam Neill, in which Sam Neill retraces Cook’s footsteps, in the 250th anniversary year of Cook’s first voyage. Captain James Cook first set sail to the Pacific in 1768 – 250 years ago. These vast waters, one third of the earth’s surface, were uncharted – but not unknown. A rich diversity of people and cultures navigated, traded, lived and fought here for thousands of years.” (Catalogue)

Sport and the New Zealanders : a history / Ryan, Greg
“For many in New Zealand, prowess at sport replaces the social graces; in the pubs, during the furious session between 5pm and closing time an hour later, the friend of a relative of a horse trainer is a veritable patriarch. Sport has played a central part in the social and cultural history of Aotearoa New Zealand throughout its history. This book tells the story of sport in New Zealand for the first time, from the Māori world to today’s professional athletes. Through rugby and netball, bodybuilding and surf lifesaving, the book introduces readers to the history of the codes, the organisations and the players.” (Catalogue)

The jersey : the secrets behind the world’s most successful team / Bills, Peter
“New Zealand rugby is a dynasty that transcends all national barriers. As a culture and a model of humility and consistent success, which have led them to three Rugby World Cups, the world of rugby continues to look to the New Zealand model for guidance. Traditionally, the renowned All Blacks and those charged with guiding them have kept their rules of engagement close to their chests. The Jersey tells an extraordinary story with unprecedented access and insight, and explores the basic requirements and immense challenges required not only to become number one in the world, but remain consistently at the top.” (Catalogue)

Rugby rebel : the All Black accused of being a traitor / Tobin, Christopher
Rugby Rebel investigates a sensational accusation made against brilliant All Black winger Duncan McGregor that he sold team secrets which cost the Original All Blacks their unbeaten record on the famous 1905 tour of Britain, France and the United States. What made it worse was that McGregor’s Accusers were some of his fellow All Blacks. But has his name been unfairly besmirched? This book tells McGregor’s extraordinary and previously untold story. Rugby Rebel shatters myths, offers new insights and provides enough information for the reader to decide whether McGregor was hero, or as his deractors claimed, villain.” (Catalogue)

What’s new in the NZ Collection this month?

Odyssey of the Unknown ANZAC book cover

The wonderful thing about the New Zealand Collection new books shelf is the amazing variety of topics that you will find here.  As we fast approach the 100th anniversary of the end of World War One there are still lots of new titles about the ANZACS and World War One topics.  There are new additions to the poetry collection. Fascinating histories of the Great South Road, the Waikato river and Steam Punk Oamaru.  Beautiful books about New Zealand birds of prey and Banks’ illustrations of botanical treasures from Cook’s voyages.  This list ends with a thought provoking book about the history and the current situation in West Papua.

Odyssey of the unknown Anzac / Hastings, David
“Ten years after the end of World War I, the Sydney Sun reported that an unknown ANZAC still lay in a Sydney psychiatric hospital. David Hastings follows this one unknown ANZAC, George McQuay, from rural New Zealand through Gallipoli and the Western Front, through desertions and hospitals, and finally home to New Zealand.” (Publisher information)

Gallipoli to the Somme : recollections of a New Zealand infantryman / Aitken, A. C.
“Alexander Aitken was an ordinary soldier with an extraordinary mind. The student who enlisted in 1915 was a mathematical genius. Everything he saw, he could remember. Aitken began to write about his experiences in 1917 as a wounded out-patient in Dunedin Hospital. Every few years, when the war trauma caught up with him, he revisited the manuscript, which was eventually published as Gallipoli to the Somme in 1963. Aitken writes with a unique combination of restraint, subtlety, and an almost photographic vividness. For this edition, Alex Calder has written a new introduction, annotated the text, compiled a selection of images, and added a commemorative index identifying the soldiers with whom Aitken served.” (Publisher information)

All guts no glory : Nelson Tasman nurses and chaplains of World War One 
“Several members of the New Zealand Society of Genealogists Nelson Branch have researched the lives of many of those nurses and chaplains who had an association with the Nelson Tasman area. This book captures the brave and courageous nurses and chaplains who were often very close to the firing line. Several chaplains were killed and 10 New Zealand nurses went down with the ship when the Marquette was torpedoed. The nurses worked in frozen, leaking tents and draughty huts often wearing tin hats and having to rush to a trench for safety when the hospitals were being bombed.” (Catalogue)

Whisper of a crow’s wing / Cullinane, Majella
Whisper of a Crow’s Wing, is the work of a poet with a distinct and powerful voice. Cullinane conjures the ghosts that haunt places and objects; our inner and outer world, with rich, physical language. She writes with lyrical intensity about motherhood and family life, including the experience of miscarriage, and the process of moving through grief and loss to a place of acceptance and healing. This is a profound collection from a poet alive to the hidden world of memory and imagination, of the sublime in the everyday, tempered always by a shadow of the fragility of life and love.” (Catalogue)

Ghost South Road / Hamilton, Scott
“The Great South Road was built in 1862 to carry a British army into the Waikato Kingdom. When the British invaded the Waikato in 1863, soldiers shared the road with Maori refugees from Auckland. Today the eroding earthen walls of forts and pa and military cemeteries remember the road’s history. They sit beside the car dealerships and kava bars and pawn shops of South Auckland. Ghost South Road features obscure as well as famous figures from New Zealand history and illustrates the epic walk that the author and photographers made along the two hundred kilometre length of the Great South Road.” (Catalogue)

The Waikato : a history of New Zealand’s greatest river / Moon, Paul
“From snow to surf, the Waikato is New Zealand’s longest river. This fascinating account takes a historical journey along its 425 kilometre length, uncovering extraordinary reports of the people, places and events along its route. Historian Paul Moon traces the Waikato’s path until it exits into the Tasman Sea at Port Waikato. Along the way he uncovers settlements that have disappeared, sites scarred by wars, some of the world’s most convulsive geological events, great tragedies, and the remarkable stories that have taken place along the river.” (Abridged from Catalogue)

Penguins under the porch : a Yorkshireman’s ode to Oamaru / Harbourne, David
“David Harbourne first stumbled across Oamaru more or less by chance while on a short visit to New Zealand from his home in Yorkshire, England. He quit his job, travelled half way round the world and spent a long and very happy time poking around and talking to anyone who would talk back. He ate whitebait frittata, muttonbird and Kurtoskalacs, and became an honorary Oamaruvian just in time for the Victorian heritage celebrations. The result is this entirely quirky, often hilarious, anecdotal “ode” to a town David Harbourne believes is a jewel in New Zealand’s crown.” (Catalogue)

The hunters : the precarious lives of New Zealand’s birds of prey / Stewart, Debbie.
“The majestic New Zealand falcoln in flight looks like a sleek killing machine – but it is one of the most endangered and misunderstood birds in our nation today. This landmark book presents all of our amazing birds of prey, from the cute ruru (or morepork) we hear calling in the night, to the hawks that hover over roadkill on our highways. Stunning photographs show the lives of these birds in intimate close-ups, and the stories make a case for their continuing protection as a vital part of our fragile ecosystem.” (Catalogue)

Joseph Banks’ Florilegium : botanical treasures from Cook’s first voyage
“Joseph Banks accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage round the world from 1768 to 1771. Banks, along with the Swedish naturalist Daniel Solander, collected exotic flora from Madeira, Brazil, Tierra del Fuego, the Society Islands, New Zealand, Australia and Java, bringing back over 1300 species that had never been seen or studied by Europeans. The Florilegium was never published in Banks’ lifetime, and it was not until 1990 that a complete set in colour was issued in a boxed edition under the direction of the British Museum. It is from these prints that the present selection is made.” (Catalogue)

See no evil : New Zealand’s betrayal of the people of West Papua / Leadbeater, Maire
See No Evil issues a challenge to New Zealanders. The book begins by relating the little-known history of West Papua, but its focus is on the impact of New Zealand’s foreign policy on the indigenous Melanesian inhabitants. The consequences of repressive Indonesian rule have been tragic for the West Papuan people, who are experiencing ‘slow genocide’. West Papua remains largely closed to foreign journalists, but its story is now beginning to be heard.” (Catalogue)

New Fiction from Aotearoa New Zealand

This Mortal Boy book cover

New to the world, or new to Wellington City Libraries, these titles from local authors showcase a range of talents, beginning with Fiona Kidman’s new book about the ‘jukebox killer’ in Auckland in 1955. These tales explore New Zealand influences through eras and locations influencing lives we can recognise and feel kinship with.

This mortal boy / Kidman, Fiona
“Albert Black, known as the ‘jukebox killer’, was only twenty when he was convicted of murdering another young man in a fight at a milk bar in Auckland on 26 July 1955. His crime fuelled growing moral panic about teenagers, and he was to hang less than five months later, the second-to-last person to be executed in New Zealand. But what really happened? Was this a love crime, was it a sign of juvenile delinquency? Or was this dark episode in our recent history more about our society’s reaction to outsiders?” (Catalogue)

The new animals / Adam, Pip
“Carla, Sharon and Duey have worked in fashion for longer than they care to remember, for them, there’s nothing new under the sun. They’re Generation X: tired, cynical and sick of being used. Tommy, Cal and Kurt are Millenials, they’ve come from nowhere, but with their monied families behind them they’re ready to remake fashion. They represent the new sincere, the anti-irony. Both generations are searching for a way out, an alternative to their messed-up reality. Pip Adam’s new novel walks the streets of Auckland city now, examining the fashion scene, intergenerational tension and modern life with an unflinching eye.” (Catalogue)

Death actually : Death. Love. And in between. / Fenwicke, Rosy
“Maggie never wanted to go into the family business, but when her parents die suddenly and her husband has abandoned her and their two children, what choice does she have? So she becomes a funeral director.” (Catalogue)
Set in Queenstown this book encompasses family trials and trivialities with good humour and great characters.

The new ships / Duignan, Kate
“Peter Collie is adrift in the wake of his wife’s death. His attempts to understand the turn his life has taken lead him back to the past, to dismaying events on an Amsterdam houseboat in the seventies, returning to New Zealand and meeting Moira, an amateur painter who carried secrets of her own, and to a trip to Europe years later with his family. An unexpected revelation forces Peter to navigate anew his roles as a husband, father and son. Set in Wellington after the fall of the Twin Towers, and traversing London, Europe and the Indian subcontinent, The New Ships is a mesmerising book of blood-ties that stretch across borders. A novel of acute moral choices, it is a rich and compelling meditation on what it means to act, or to fail to act.” (Catalogue)

Designer days : a story set in Thorndon, Wellington, 2009 / Mercer, R. D.
“‘Down into the dark cave’ Laura says to her baby, pushing the buggy into the underpass. Cave paintings? Yes, indeed, but among them some writing she does not expect to find. Laura and Eddie both resist being constrained by the timetables of office or school. They want the freedom to design their own days. Laura, an IT specialist, craves domesticity. Eddie resents being moved to High School in Wellington. Laura’s husband, Matt, begins to behave curiously.” (Catalogue)

The man who writes the dreams / Barrett, Pera
“A story about following dreams. People have stopped turning their dreams into done-things. Luckily for us, the man who writes the dreams is here to make things right.” (Catalogue)

Equinoctial gales : a story set in Wellington, 1939 / Mercer, R. D.
“There were those who liked to refer to the shopping area of Kelburn as ‘the village’. It gave it status. Did they have in mind some impossible idyll of an English village of established families, in which people knew their place and weather was predictable? The reality of Kelburn in 1930s New Zealand could not have been more different.  A chance event, a “sudden death”, connects the characters in one way or another… But no-one living in Wellington can ignore the weather. They are all affected by its fickleness, its days of violence and its days of blessed calm.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Alternative medicine / Solomon, Laura
“The stories in Alternative Medicine can be broadly defined as black comedy with a twist of surrealism… In ‘The Killing Jar’ a boy’s spider spies on his adulterous father and reports back to its owner. In ‘The New Heart’ a man experiences somebody else’s memories after receiving a heart transplant. The story ‘Mandy’ features a strangely obsessed protagonist. Everyday sadness at a refugee going blind is sketched out in ‘Blindness’. Childhood relationships are depicted in the short story ‘Pets’ and in ‘Piano Lessons/War Stories’ the narrator reflects upon her grandfather’s time fighting in World War 2.  The stories show human life in various forms and endeavours.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Hilary and David / Solomon, Laura
“In Hilary and David, David, a lonely elderly struggling novelist, contacts Hilary, with whom he has a friend in common, via Facebook, and an unlikely friendship develops via a series of messages. The two begin to share details of their past and current lives. Hilary is a solo mother with two children. One of the children has Down’s Syndrome and the other has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Both are struggling… Through a series of messages, Hilary and David share their thoughts on life, the universe, men, women and everything else in between and provide companionship and advice for one another.” (Adapted from Catalogue)