Share your views on the Central Library by 5pm, Monday 7 September

Thank you to everyone who has made a submission on the future of the Central Library. If you haven’t had the chance to yet – it’s not too late!

You can make your submission by:

  • completing an online submission form
  • picking up a printed submission form from your nearest library branch
  • downloading a freepost printed submission form under the ‘Document library’. You can
  • post it to us on Monday 7 September and it will be counted
  • or scan and email it to centrallibrarysubmissions@wcc.govt.nz by 5pm, Monday 7 September.

Information to help inform your submission

We’ve put together a Statement of Proposal, which outlines the options; how they were assessed and others which were discarded.

You can pick one of the five proposed options, or provide your own idea, or say if you prefer an option which was not put forward.

We were fortunate to have a range of engaging speakers discuss the role of a Central Library; the potential opportunities for creating stronger spaces, connections and meaning for people who use them and the engineering challenges with the current building. You can watch videos of the three webinars below.

Future of the Central Library consultation

Webinar 1 : Who loves our libraries?

Our guest speakers were:

  • MC — Mayor Andy Foster
  • Claire Mabey, Verb Wellington
  • Ella Flavell, Chair Youth Council
  • Sandra McCallum, General Manager Changemakers

Watch the video here:

Webinar 2 : Spaces for everyone

Our guest speakers were:

  • MC — Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons
  • Anne Goulding, Professor of Information Services Management, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Chris Hay, Manager Tūranga Library & Chair-elect Public Libraries New Zealand Juliet Blyth, Chief Executive Read NZ

Watch the video here:

Webinar 3: Why the Central Library closed and restoring the service to Te Ngākau Civic Precinct

Our guest speaker was Tony Holden, Associate, Senior Structural Engineer Aurecon with Peter Brennan, Manager Property, Wellington City Council.

Watch the video here:

Our consultation website, www.letstalk.wellington.govt.nz/centrallibrary, provides news, frequently asked questions, links to key documents such as previous engineering documents and assessments.

If you have any questions you can use the “Ask a question” section towards the bottom of the homepage, or email centrallibrarysubmission@wcc.govt.nz

Thank you for taking the time to shape the future of our Central Library service.

He Timotimo – end of year

Our He Timotimo introductory te reo Māori classes for beginners have now closed for the year and we are exploring what we can offer in 2020.

In the meantime, continue the learning with these suggestions:

Māori made easy : for everyday learners of the Māori language / Morrison, Scotty
“The complete and accessible guide to learning the Maori language, no matter your knowledge level. While dictionaries list words and definitions, and other guides offer common phrases, Maori Made Easy connects the dots, allowing the reader to take control of their language-learning in an empowering and effective way. By committing just 30 minutes a day for 30 weeks, learners will progress at their own pace and adopt the language as best suits their individual needs. Written by popular TV personality and passionate te reo Maori advocate Scotty Morrison, and enhanced by illustrations throughout, Maori Made Easy proves that learning the language can be fun, absorbing – and easy Also available as an eBook.” (Catalogue)

A Māori word a day : 365 words to kickstart your reo / Kelly, Hēmi
“A Māori dictionary for all New Zealanders. Through its 365 Māori words, you will learn the following: English translations; word category, notes and background information; Sample sentences, in both te reo Māori and English”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Te kakano / Moorfield, John C.
“Te Kākano is the beginner-level Māori Language text designed for adults and teenagers.  Changes include six new or improved maps of the main tribal groups and significant Māori place names of New Zealand.  Additions have also been made to the dictionary/index at the end of book, which contains all the vocabulary of the textbook and audio tapes of Te Kākano and includes further information about the place names and tribal names.” (Catalogue)

Infinite wonder – New photography books

Our beautiful planet features heavily in our picks of the recent books this month, both terestrially in amazing photos of New Zealand geological events, and, spectacularly, from space — see the world the way a Nasa astronaut sees it in astronaut Scott Kelly’s photos from his year on the International Space Station. Plus, still photos from David Attenborough’s Our Planet series, and tips for Instagram and iPhone photographers. Have a browse.

Flying high : the photography of Lloyd Homer / Nathan, Simon
“‘Disaster man’ Lloyd Homer photographed events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides around New Zealand for over 35 years. This book features a selection of spectacular colour aerial photohraphs, including high-altitude panoramas, from the GNS Science image library as well as many unique aerial photographs of New Zealand’s national parks and wilderness areas.” (Catalogue)

Infinite wonder : an astronaut’s photographs from a year in space / Kelly, Scott
“The first photo book by the Nasa astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent a record-breaking year in space. This is an awe-inspiring collection of the photos Scott took himself while on board the International Space Station, many of which have never been seen before. Through the photos Kelly took during his time in space, we can learn to see the world in a new way. This book will show you what it’s really like to be a Nasa astronaut.” (Catalogue)

Overdrive cover Our Planet, Alastair Fothergill (ebook)
“With a foreword by Sir David Attenborough, breathtakingly beautiful still photography, and compelling text expanding on the remarkable TV stories, this companion book presents a whole new view of the place we call home. Featuring some of the world’s rarest creatures and previously unseen parts of the Earth — from deep oceans to remote forests to ice caps — Our Planet takes nature-lovers deep into the science of our natural world. This book captures in one concise narrative a fundamental message: what we do in the next twenty years will determine the future of not just the natural world but humanity itself.” (Overdrive description)

How to photograph absolutely everything / Ang, Tom
“This practical guide will teach you how to take the best possible photo in any situation imaginable with clear step-by-step guidance from expert photographer, Tom Ang. From still-life to sports photography, cityscapes and landscapes, and tackling children’s parties to capturing the magic of seasonal celebrations, How to Photograph Absolutely Everything is the essential guide to improving your digital photography skills and getting the most out of your camera.” (Catalogue)

Hashtag authentic : finding creativity and building a community on Instagram and beyond / Tasker, Sara
“Sara Tasker, Instagram-guru and social media influencer, shares her secrets for turning an interest in Instagram into a thriving business. Instagram is the fastest growing social media platform, with 400 million monthly active users worldwide, half of them under 25. While some of these people use the app as a personal tool, many also use it to build their creative business endeavours, from food and drink to fashion and lifestyle. Sara Tasker has tapped into this as an Instagram coach, an iPhoneographer and social media influencer. Her chronicle of authentic everyday life and her mindful Me and Orla blog has developed into a business in which she allows access to free insta-tips, alongside some hugely popular paid for e-courses for independent creatives.” (Catalogue)

The enthusiast’s guide to iPhone photography : 63 photographic principles you need to know / Duggan, Seán
The Enthusiast’s Guide to iPhone Photography: 63 Photographic Principles You Need to Know teaches you what you need to know in order to shoot great images with your iPhone. Sean Duggan covers the iPhone’s basic and advanced camera controls, the apps you need most for shooting and processing your images, and the principles you need to know in order to capture and share great, creative, beautiful images with your mobile device. ” (Catalogue)

PressReader Update – Stuff Ltd content restrictions

Do you use PressReader? Stuff Ltd PressReader publications, including the Dominion Post are now only available to view on library computers or by using a phone or device connected to the library wifi.

This means they will no longer be able to be accessed remotely either via the PressReader app or by logging in to the website using your browser outside of a Wellington City Libraries’ branch.

To access Stuff Ltd publications in our libraries:

  • Use one of the Library computers and login to PressReader via the library website
  • Connect to the wifi with your own device at any branch and login to PressReader via the library website

This change may take effect over the next few days. It is important to note that this was a decision made by Stuff Ltd, and the restrictions only apply to Stuff Publications. PressReader provides access to thousands of other publications that you can continue to enjoy outside of the Library, at home or using the app.

Below is a full list of the Stuff titles that are affected:

  • Sunday Star Times
  • Sunday News
  • Southland Times (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • Waikato Times (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • Dominion Post (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • The Press (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • Nelson Mail (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • Timaru Herald (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • Manawatu Standard (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • Taranaki Daily News (Weekday & Weekend Editions)
  • Marlborough Express
  • TV Guide
  • NZ House and Garden
  • NZ Gardener

If you have questions or need help with PressReader please email us at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz or pop into your local branch.

A cloud a day – October 2019 science books

Sometimes we all need encouragement to look up from our lives and work, and really enjoy the natural world around us. This month, our favourite pick is a book that encourages you to do just that, and for extra enjoyment and to make you smile, is a product of the “Cloud Appreciation Society” — A Cloud a Day.

Also featured this month, a slightly older (from mid 2019) but very popular title at the moment — Invisible women : exposing data bias in a world designed for men (also available as an eBook and eAudiobook). Plus, bestselling author of The Secret Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben, lets us in on the quintessentials of his forestry knowledge and everything you need to make a woodland walk. Enjoy!

A cloud a day / Pretor-Pinney, Gavin
“The stresses of the digital world mean that it’s no more important than ever to engage with the natural world.  A Cloud A Day is a beautifully illustrated book containing 365 skies selected by the Cloud Appreciation Society. There are photographs by sky enthusiasts around the world, satellite images and photographs of clouds in space, as well as skies depicted by great artists over the centuries. The clouds are accompanied by enlightening explanations, fascinating snippets of cloud science, poetry and uplifting quotations.  The perfect dip-in-and-out book for anyone who wants to de-stress and reconnect with nature, A Cloud A Day will inspire you to open your eyes to the everyday beauty above and to spend a moment each day with your head in the clouds. ” (Catalogue)

Invisible women : exposing data bias in a world designed for men / Criado-Perez, Caroline
“Imagine a world where your phone is too big for your hand, where your doctor prescribes a drug that is wrong for your body, where in a car accident you are 47% more likely to be seriously injured, where every week the countless hours of work you do are not recognised or valued. If any of this sounds familiar, chances are that you’re a woman. Invisible Women shows us how, in a world largely built for and by men, we are systematically ignoring half the population. It exposes the gender data gap – a gap in our knowledge that is at the root of perpetual, systemic discrimination against women, and that has created a pervasive but invisible bias with a profound effect on women’s lives. From government policy and medical research, to technology, workplaces, urban planning and the media, Invisible Women reveals the biased data that excludes women.” (Catalogue)

The maths of life and death : why maths is (almost) everything / Yates, Kit
“Few of us really appreciate the full power of maths – the extent to which its influence is not only in every office and every home, but also in every courtroom and hospital ward. In this eye-opening and extraordinary book, Yates explores the true stories of life-changing events in which the application – or misapplication – of mathematics has played a critical role: patients crippled by faulty genes and entrepreneurs bankrupted by faulty algorithms; innocent victims of miscarriages of justice and the unwitting victims of software glitches. You will discover why it’s always sensible to question a statistic, often vital to ask for a second opinion and sometimes surprisingly handy to stick to the 37% rule…” (Catalogue)

Walks in the wild : a guide through the forest with Peter Wohlleben / Wohlleben, Peter
“Bestselling author of The Hidden Life of trees, Peter Wohlleben, lets you in on the quintessentials of his forestry knowledge. He invites you on an atmospheric journey of discovery. Learn to find your way around the woods without a compass or GPS, which berries and mushrooms are good to eat, how to read animal tracks and what it’s like to spend a night alone in a forest. Walks in the Wild has everything you need to make a woodland walk – be it spring, summer, autumn or winter – into a very special experience.” (Catalogue)

The selfish ape : human nature and our path to extinction / Money, Nicholas P
“Weaving together stories of science and sociology, The Selfish Ape offers a refreshing response to common fantasies about the ascent of humanity. Rather than imagining modern humans as a species with godlike powers, or Homo deus, Nicholas P. Money recasts us as Homo narcissus, paragons of self-absorption. This exhilarating story takes in an immense sweep of modern biology, leading readers from earth’s unexceptional location in the cosmos, to the story of our microbial origins, and the workings of the human body. Written in a highly accessible style, it is a perfect read for those interested in science, human history, sociology, and the environment.” (Catalogue)

2020 guide to the night sky : southern hemisphere / Dunlop, Storm
“A comprehensive handbook to the planets, stars and constellations visible from the southern hemisphere. 6 pages for each month covering January-December 2020. Diagrams drawn for the latitude of southern Australia, but including events visible from New Zealand and South Africa.” (Catalogue)

Central Library loans extended to 19 June

We’re providing a further extension to the due date for Central Library items from 1 May to 19 June. The new due date of 19 June applies to all Central Library items except for those that have been reserved by other customers.

For items with reserves, Library staff will contact customers directly to let them know any items they have that must be returned to a branch library, or to the returns box at 101 Wakefield Street.

You can still return your Central Library items to any of our branch libraries at any time, or hold on to them for now.

Free membership to Hutt City Libraries

Thanks to the generosity of Hutt City Libraries, Wellington City Libraries customers can sign up for free to access Hutt City Libraries’ collection. Just bring your Wellington City Libraries card to any Hutt City Library branch.

Details:

I have already paid for non-resident access to Hutt City Libraries. Can I get a refund?

Yes. Contact Hutt City Libraries for a refund.

How long will my membership be valid for?

Wellington City Libraries’ members will be signed up for a period of 3 months initially.

Can I access Hutt City Libraries’ eResources? (eBooks, eAudiobooks and subscription databases)

Just the physical collection. However, our Wellington City Libraries’ eLibrary is available to you 24/7.

Can I renew and reserve Hutt City Libraries’ books?

Yes!

Will I be charged overdues if Hutt City Libraries’ items become overdue?

Yes — overdue charges will accrue to your Hutt City Libraries membership (not your Wellington membership — the two will be separate) if items are returned late.

What hours are you open this weekend?

Longer branch library hours start Monday 15 April for a number of our branch libraries. To tide us over till these new hours begin, we’ve made a few adjustments to our opening hours just for tomorrow, Saturday 13 April.

Library locations not listed below will be open their normal Saturday hours.

Stop in and top up your weekend reading material!

Extra branch hours – Saturday 13 April

Location Hours (13/04/19)
101 Wakefield Street 9am – 1pm
Karori Library 9am – 5pm
Kilbirnie Library 10am to 5pm
Newtown Library 10am to 5pm

Mystery Writers Panel this Saturday night at Karori

Are you a fan of mysteries? The Ngaio Marsh Awards and Wellington City Libraries invites you to Mystery in the Library this Saturday night (13 April, 6pm, at Karori Library), a fantastic (and free!) after-hours event featuring four outstanding and highly acclaimed local storytellers.

Dame Fiona Kidman, Jennifer Lane, Kelly Dennett and Kirsten McDougall will discuss how they craft memorable characters and page-turning storylines, whether fictional or factual, and infuse their books with real-life issues and insights into people and society. Brannavan Gnanalingam will prosecute the offenders.

You can read profiles of all our speakers at the links below:

Dame Fiona Kidman
Dame Fiona Kidman
Kirsten McDougall
Kirsten McDougall
Jennifer Lane
Jennifer Lane
Kelly Dennett
Kelly Dennett