The Zine Machine is at Arapaki!

Image of the Zine Machine at Arapaki Library

Image of the Zine Machine at Arapaki Library

The Lucky Drop Zine Machine is back, this time you can find it at our Arapaki Manners Street branch! This little zine machine will be at Arapaki for the next eight months, before heading on to the next destination in its grand tour of our library branches.


Photo of Zine Machine

The Lucky Drop is a vending machine, run by the local zine organisation Wellington Zinefest, which sells zines made by local Wellington zine-makers. The zines are priced between $1 – $5, and are sold in A6 and A7 sizes. If you are interested in having your zines stocked in the machine, please contact Wellington Zinefest on their site: https://www.wellingtonzinefest.com/luckydrop

Every time the Lucky Drop changes location, it gets a shiny new look! This time it has been painted by Jewelia Howard (@glaciars), who has several of her zines for sale in the machine. Jewelia is an artist and creator based in Wellington. Her work is mainly focused on painting, drawing and digital creation, though she also enjoys experimenting with new mediums and trying different things. Jewelia is active in the New Zealand zine community and a member of the board of Wellington Zinefest. Her work mainly focuses on themes of nature, magic and folklore, with the occasional pop culture thrown in.”

Art by Jewelia Howard Painted on zine machine


As well as the Lucky Drop Zine Machine, Arapaki is also home to the largest zine lending collection in the Wellington City Library network. Our Newtown  and He Matapihi Molesworth Library branches also have zine lending collections. Our zines are free to borrow for three weeks, and can be renewed for another three weeks.

So what are you waiting for? Visit Arapaki today to read a zine or buy a zine! The Lucky Drop is the place to get your zine fix if you want to take them home forever!

 

New Zines!

The most recent Zinefest to be held in Wellington was in July. This time it was a one day event at the Wellington Faculty of Architecture and Design Innovation. Most of Wellington City Libraries lending zine collection is bought locally at Wellington Zinefests. So here are some selected highlights of zines purchased from the Winter Zinefest. They will be available for borrowing soon from the Arapaki Manners Street, He Matapihi, and Newtown branches.

There were several new zines from Zinefest regular, Jewelia Howard. They include a bright pink zine which reviews some of the Barbie Doll movies, and a zine of comfort movies, which lists Jewelia’s favourite “chick flicks”; and my personal favourite, “Hairy Styles”, an illustrated zine of Harry Styles’ hair styles, from 2011 – 2019.

Sally Bollinger also provided several new zines. “The Flat of Whimsy” is an illustrated collection of scenes from her flatting life. While “Menaces and Maledictions” is a cartoon about a vampire in early colonial New Zealand. Plus Bollinger wrote two zines about role-playing games (RPG), and Dungeons and Dragons: “The Adventure Zine” and “A Basic Handbook of our Players”, respectively.

RPG and Dungeons and Dragons was a theme at this year’s Winter Zinefest. @feydayarts has created an extremely fun “Choose Your Own D & D Character” with 12 possible endings. While well-known cartoonist, Dylan Horrocks, has “Secret Door”, a  whimsical zine about a role-playing game on nostalgia and memory.

Another prominent New Zealand writer and artist, Tara Black, was also there with several zines. There were two collections of live drawings done at the Auckland Writers’ Festival 2021, and Featherston Booktown 2021. Plus Black wrote two volumes of cartoon zines about Ana, who is a teenager who lives with her mother and sister. One day she wakes up to find two “Book Dragons” under her bed. They are obsessed with books, and they are actually badgers!

There were also zines featuring local content. David Tulloch’s zine, “Regurgitated Recipes”, which collects recipes from six old New Zealand cookbooks, going back as far as 1944. And also Andrew McCauley’s volume 1 of the “Wellington Grave Explorer’s Guidebook”. This first volume focuses on Karori Cemetery, and highlights the graves of prominent people in the organised labour movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. And finally, @Badbroidery has produced a cute zine for “cat lovers and the zodiac/ horoscope curious” which matches cute line drawings of cats with their zodiac traits.

We want your zines!

Are you a zinemaker? Or perhaps you got creative during lockdown and made a quaranzine? Here at Wellington City Libraries we have lending zine collections at three of our branches: Newtown, Arapaki on Manners, and He Matapihi Molesworth Library. We are happy to take donations of zines for these collections, especially if you made a quaranzine during lockdown. A combination of “quarantine” and “zine”, quaranzines are creative expressions of people’s thoughts and feelings experienced during lockdown.

If you do want to donate a zine, then please drop your donation into any of our branch libraries. It will then get sent to be processed with our zine stickers and added into our catalogue, before joining the zine collection at one of our three libraries.

Zines come to Arapaki Manners Library

Our CBD branch, Arapaki Manners Library on 12 Manners Street, now has a zine collection! Zines are self-published and independently produced print publications. Zine (pronounced “zeen”) comes from the words “magazine” and “fanzine”. Zines come in many different shapes and sizes. They can be handwritten, or computer-printed, and are made by people of all ages. Zines come bound in different ways: some have bindings like books and even ISBN numbers, whereas others will be stitched or stapled together.

The zines are free to borrow, and are issued for three weeks, just like books! Most of the zines in Arapaki’s collection are brand new, and were acquired at the Wellington Zinefest held in November of last year. Nearly all the zines are written by local New Zealand authors and produced in New Zealand.

Our zines are loosely categorised into 6 topics identified by coloured dots on the covers: Comics are orange; Literature, such as poems and stories are green; Personal zines, about the author and their life, are blue; Art zines featuring drawings, photography, etc, are yellow; DIY zines about how to make or do things are black; and lastly, zines about politics, history, and everything else are white.

We also have zine collections at our Newtown and He Matapihi Molesworth branches. So check them all out and get borrowing today!

Khartoum Place – an interview with Frisson

How did you get into making zines?
I got into making zines years ago as a way to promote live music shows. I hand-drew the zines on A4 pages, photocopied them (black and white), and folded or cut and stapled them into tiny booklets. Sometimes I also gave them out in little goodie bags at the shows. This time around I got into zine-making for different reasons. I started writing short stories late last year, and after a couple of months went by without anyone publishing them I decided to start publishing them myself! These days I’m still illustrating the zines, but I’m getting them made through Blurb rather than having to do all that photocopying and stapling. Since I released my first zine I have had a story or two published, but I still intend to release a zine every 2 – 3 months, and I’m currently working on the illustrations for my second one.

Can you give us a short bio about you?
I studied creative writing at Victoria University’s Institute of Modern Letters. I love cats and coffee.

We have read the zine Khartoum Place and loved it. In your words could you please explain to us why you decided to make it and publish it?
Thank you! I have discovered that I really enjoy weaving local, historical elements into my stories. Khartoum Place is a dark but loveable little square in Auckland’s CBD. The square’s mural, an admittedly slightly homely but very historically important memorial to women’s suffrage, is constantly under threat from people who think it’s ugly and want to remove it. The idea of an art historian trying to save the mural, her career and her love affair came to me in a flash while I was waiting for someone to turn up to a work meeting one day.

Once it was out there, did you get any unexpected reactions?
I posted it off to what seemed to me to be New Zealand’s major libraries. I didn’t have any idea what to expect. I’m thrilled that the Wellington and Christchurch Libraries have been in touch, but I’m a bit disappointed in Auckland Library. I keep sneaking in to see if I can find it their zine collection, but I haven’t seen it in there so far…

I also started a Facebook page and a website, and I’ve have some really nice comments coming through from those.

You say your zines are a New Years resolution, can you tell us a little bit more about that?
I’d been writing stories for a while and not getting them published, and the news had broken about Sport losing it’s funding, and I literally woke up on New Year’s Day and thought “I’m going to start a new journal!” So I sat down and mapped out my first issue, and it looked great! But then I thought, ‘wait a minute, this is a lot of work on top of a full time job, and I’m putting myself in a curatorial role and not actually doing what I enjoy, which is writing stories and drawing pictures’. So I decided to start a series of zines under the name Frisson.

What’s on your zine to-do list?
I intend to release a new issue every 2 – 3 months. But most importantly I’d like to connect with other zine makers, so I’m looking forward to checking out a Zine Fest or two.

What would you say to other zine makers?
I wasn’t sure how people would react to the fact that I got my zines made through Blurb rather than laboriously hand-crafting each one. That kind of carry-on was fine for me back when I was working part time in vintage stores and playing in bands. Now that I’m a wage slave getting up at 5.30am in the morning in order to find the time to write stories, I highly recommend outsourcing the production side (unless of course that’s your passion).

Do you have any music/zines/blogs recommendations?
Yes, I really like the New Zealand zine review. They’ve introduced me to all sorts of amazing things.

I’ve also found your blog really helpful. My next zine will have an ISBN number!

An Audience with Ayano Takeuchi

Hi Ayano, thank you for letting us interview you. I have noticed that your zine was selected for Space Invaders (current NGA gallery exhibition), that is really impressive Ayano, congratulations! First of all, we would like to learn a little bit about you, what you like doing? What do you like learning about?

Hi Carla, and thanks. I’ve always liked drawing as a child as it’s something that I still do a bit of in my spare time. I am quite curious and like to learn about c22anything from why mozzie bites itch to Victorian architecture but at the moment I’m interested in Henri Matisse and plan to go the Matisse exhibition in Brisbane at the Gallery of Modern Art. I also really want to see Milford Sound and want to trek in that area too.

Most zine makers start making zines after finding zines they really like or after attending zine festivals. Was this the case for you? How did you first learn about zines? When did you become a zine maker?

My friend made his own little zine and stocked it at Sticky Institute in Melbourne. That was when I was first introduced to zines. I felt a handmade love and individual voice to the works there and naturally wondered if anybody would like my work as well.
Continue reading “An Audience with Ayano Takeuchi”