On this weekend! The Garden Party, a new summer festival

A new summer festival is coming to Pōneke and it is happening this weekend ( 2oth and 21st Feb) , organised by the wonderful people who have brought us the Verb Festival and The Spinoff. It’s called The Garden Party, and it promises to be a fabulous celebration of music, talks and food aimed at the whole family.

To give you a taste of  just one of the many unmissable delights on offer we have a very exclusive sneak peek at just one of the many highlights:- Navigating the Stars by Taki Rua Productions and Witi Ihimaera. This event integrates readings and live music to bring Māori creation myths vividly to be life.

Navigating the Stars – Taki Rua Productions and Witi Ihimaera

Verb Wellington in partnership with Taki Rua Productions bring Witi Ihimaera’s new book Navigating The Stars off the page, in a special Garden Party performance reading with live music directed and led by Maiava Nathaniel Lees.

Sunday 21 February, 10am

Other Highlights include:

Songs, Stories, Sass and Splash — Sacha Cotter & Josh Morgan in The Treehouse
Illustrator Josh Morgan (Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki, Rongowhakaata) and author Sacha Cotter together are the amazing storytelling/songwriting/award-winning-picture-book-making team, Cotter & Morgan. Together they have created Keys/Ngā Kī, The Marble Maker/Te Kaihanga Māpere, and the 2019 Margaret Mahy Book of the Year, The Bomb/Te Pohū – all published by HUIA. Sunday 21 February

11.30am: Watch out for Sacha and Josh in the Big Fun Family Quiz

12.10pm: Songs, Stories, Sass & SPLASH with Sacha Cotter & Josh Morgan in the Treehouse

Big Fun Family Quiz — with hosts Toby Morris & Toby Manhire
Toby Morris & Toby Manhire (The Spinoff) host a quiz full of fun questions for the whole family with special cameo guests. Win prizes, come dressed as your favourite book characters for bonus points. Sunday 21 February, 11.30am

 

Plus there are loads of other activities planned too (flag makingnature activity fun with Rachel Haydon, a treasure huntstring ‘o’ spells, and the nature activity book walking tour), so keep an eye out for the full timetable on Verb Wellington’s The Garden Party webpage.

So, gather friends and whānau and come along to the Botanic Garden Soundshell on the 20th and 21st of February for a weekend full of the interesting and the delicious!

Diwali celebrations at Wellington City Libraries

“Let each diya you light bring a glow of happiness on your face and enlighten your soul.”
Happy Diwali!

Diwali the Hindu festival of lights symbolizes the spiritual victory of good over evil, knowledge over ignorance and light over dark and is celebrated during the Hindu Luna month Kartika (between mid-October and mid-November) and traditionally takes place over five days with each day having its own associated rituals and ceremonies.

The first day of Diwali involves cleaning and decorating of homes and workplaces often using diyas small earthen oil-filled lamps and also the creation of rangoli; colourful designs made from rice flour, flower petals, coloured sand, quartz powder.

Day two is a day of ritual and prayer and is also used for purchasing of food especially sweets specially made for the festival which are later given as gifts.

Day three is the main day of the festival when homes, temples and rivers are aglow with light. The youngest members of the family visit their elders, and in the evening, people dress in their finest clothes, feast and pray, visit temples, families and sacred places, light lamps and diyas are set adrift on rivers and streams.

Day four celebrates the bond between the wife and husband and in some regions of India husbands will give gifts to their wives.

On the fifth and final day the sister-brother bond is celebrated.

We are celebrating Diwali this year in the libraries in many ways including….

  • From November 2nd our pre-school storytimes will be special Diwali storytimes! At Kilbirnie and Newtown there will also be craft activities afterwards.
  • On Saturday November 7 @ Newtown Library from 10am-4pm we have a live Rangoli being created by artist Jyoti Gosavi.
  • Also have Social Saturday craft for children and adults – bring the family! 2-3pm.

And we have a specially curated range of books, films and music that celebrate the richness of Indian culture below are just a few of our picks. We have a extensive range of great Indian literature in our collections for you to enjoy. These are just a few of the items we hold.


Anita and me / Syal, Meera
“The debut novel from the award-winning screenwriter of Bhaji on the Beach. The story of nine-year-old Meena, growing up in the only Punjabi family in the Black Country mining village of Tollington. This novel is based on the author’s own childhood, growing up in the ’60s as part of the only coloured family living in a Wolverhampton mining village. As in her films, it is filled with warmth, good humour and eccentric characters.” (Catalogue)

The god of small things / Roy, Arundhati
“Set against a background of political turbulence in Kerala, Southern India, ‘The God of Small Things’ tells the story of twins Esthappen and Rahel. Amongst the vats of banana jam and heaps of peppercorns in their grandmother’s factory, they try to craft a childhood for themselves amidst what constitutes their family – their lonely, lovely mother, their beloved Uncle Chacko (pickle baron, radical Marxist and bottom-pincher) and their avowed enemy Baby Kochamma (ex-nun and incumbent grand-aunt). ” (Catalogue)

A suitable boy : a novel / Seth, Vikram
” The classic Number One bestseller from award-winning author Vikram Seth is one of the longest single volume novels ever published .The book follows the fortunes of four Indian families over the course of eighteen months . The novel commences in the fictional town of Brahmpur and is rich in detail and surrounding stories The sequel provisionally titles A Suitable Girl was due to be published in 2017 but as of 2020 is still unpublished ” (Catalogue)


The sweet-vendor / Narayan, R. K.
” The Vendor of Sweets is a fictionalised biography of a sweet vendor in the fictional Indian town of Malgudi. Jagan the main character is a humble , honest and hardworking character . His obsession with his son Mali gradually spoils him and eventually Mali leaves for America with grand schemes which eventually unravel.” ( Adapted from catalogue)

The white tiger / Adiga, Aravind
“Set in a raw and unromanticized India, The White Tiger-the first-person confession of a murderer-is as compelling for its subject matter as it is for the voice of its narrator: amoral, cynical, unrepentant, yet deeply endearing. Balram Halwai is a complicated man. Servant. Philosopher. Entrepreneur. Murderer. Over the course of seven nights, by the scattered light of a preposterous chandelier, Balram tells us the terrible and transfixing story of how he came to be a success in life – having nothing but his own wits to help him along.”” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The guide / Narayan, R. K.
“Formerly India’s most corrupt tourist guide, Raju–just released from prison–seeks refuge in an abandoned temple. Mistaken for a holy man, he plays the part and succeeds so well that God himself intervenes to put Raju’s newfound sanctity to the test. ” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Fasting, feasting / Desai, Anita
“Tells the moving story of Uma, the plain older daughter of an Indian family, tied to the household of her childhood and tending to her parents’ every extravagant demand, and of her younger brother, Arun, across the world in Massachusetts, bewildered by his new life in college and the suburbs, where he lives with the Patton family. From the heart of a close-knit Indian household to the cool centre of an American family, this novel examines a surfeit of feasting and Indian family life, and the self-denial and starving of affluent American women in the land of plenty.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Pather panchali
“Pather panchali is set in rural India and is part part of the classic Apu trilogy of films which are frequently listed among the greatest films of all time. The film begins when a young daughter is caught stealing food for a frail grandmother, the birth of Apu brings joy and hope to the struggling family until the prodigal son endures extreme tragedy in the wake of a destructive monsoon.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Our Exclusive Q and A with Ben Aaronovitch

This is your brain on magic.

Ben Aaronovitch

We recently approached international bestselling author Ben Aaronovitch about the possibility of doing a Q and A, very much expecting a polite ‘no’ in response. So when he kindly agreed, we were thrilled!

Thinking about how best to compile some really good questions for Ben, the answer was obvious: we would ask our library patrons to send in their questions for Ben. The questions we received ranged widely — from enquiries about the Rivers of London series, to examples of how to do research, to experiences writing for Doctor Who.

So, below we now present our interview with Ben Aaronovitch. In our opinion, he was hugely entertaining, insightful and really funny to interview and we thoroughly enjoyed the experience. We wish to extend our most heartfelt thanks to Ben, and of course to our users for supplying the questions. Enjoy!


False value / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Peter Grant is facing fatherhood, and an uncertain future, with equal amounts of panic and enthusiasm. Rather than sit around, he takes a job with émigré Silicon Valley tech genius Terrence Skinner’s brand new London start up – the Serious Cybernetics Company. Drawn into the orbit of Old Street’s famous “silicon roundabout”, Peter must learn how to blend in with people who are both civilians and geekier than he is. Compared to his last job, Peter thinks it should be a doddle. But magic is not finished with Mama Grant’s favourite son.” (Catalogue)

The October man / Aaronovitch, Ben
“If you thought magic was confined to one country-think again. Trier: famous for wine, Romans, and being Germany’s oldest city. When a man is found dead with his body impossibly covered in a fungal rot, the local authorities know they are out of their depth. But fortunately this is Germany, where there are procedures for everything. Enter Tobias Winter, an investigator for the Abteilung KDA, the branch of the German Federal Criminal Police which handles the supernatural.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Rivers of London [3] : black mould / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Something dark and slimy is dripping through the walls of suburban London. Not the usual stuff that smells funny and can be hell on the lungs, this mould is possessed by some dark power full of bad intentions. Looks like it’s another case for London’s one and only trainee wizard cop, Police Constable Peter Grant, and his reluctant partner, Sahra Guleed.  Black Mould ties directly into the Rivers of London continuity, set between Foxglove Summer and The Hanging Tree.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Overdrive cover Remembrance of the Daleks, Ben Aaronovitch (ebook)
“With unfinished business to attend to, the Seventh Doctor returns to where it all began: Coal Hill School in 1963. Last time he was here, the Doctor left something behind – a powerful Time Lord artefact that could unlock the secrets of time travel. Can the Doctor retrieve it before two rival factions of Daleks track it down? And even if he can, how will the Doctor prevent the whole of London becoming a war zone as the Daleks meet in explosive confrontation?” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

For more information on Ben Aaronovitch’s books visit his website. And again, a big thank you to Ben!

Everything Ben Aaronovitch on our Catalogue

Have you ever wanted to write for Doctor Who and want to know how?

  • Have you ever wanted to write for Doctor Who and want to know how ?
  • Would you like to know about the process for writing for television ?

Well here is your chance.

As well as being the internationally bestselling author of Rivers of London series of books and graphic novels, the multitalented Ben Aaronvitch is also a scriptwriter for both Television and radio.

Ben has written for Casualty, Jupiter Moon, Blakes 7 and the longest running Science fiction series in the world Doctor Who. Indeed his first ever script for television was for Doctor Who. Remembrance of the Daleks: the first story in Doctor Who‘s twenty-fifth anniversary season.

Ben will be doing a very special online question and answer event for us in October and we need questions.

So if you’ve ever wanted to ask Ben Aaronovitch a question, now’s your chance!

Simply send us your questions via FacebookTwitterInstagram or email before the end of September and we’ll do our best to ask them during the event.

Overdrive cover Remembrance of the Daleks, Ben Aaronovitch (ebook)
“With unfinished business to attend to, the Seventh Doctor returns to where it all began: Coal Hill School in London in 1963. Last time he was here, the Doctor left something behind – a powerful Time Lord artefact that could unlock the secrets of time travel. Can the Doctor retrieve it before two rival factions of Daleks track it down? And even if he can, how will the Doctor prevent the whole of London becoming a war zone as the Daleks meet in explosive confrontation?” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Rivers of London [3] : black mould / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Something dark and slimy is dripping through the walls of suburban London. Not the usual stuff that smells funny and can be hell on the lungs, this mould is possessed by some dark power full of bad intentions. Looks like it’s another case for London’s one and only trainee wizard cop, Police Constable Peter Grant, and his reluctant partner, Sahra Guleed, set between Foxglove Summer and The Hanging Tree Aaronovitch is joined by Doctor Who writer Andrew Cartmel for this gripping new series.” (Adapted from Catalogue) Also available as an eBook.

Ask Ben Aaronovitch a Question!

We are very excited to announce that in October we will be doing a pre-recorded Question and Answer online event with the international bestselling author Ben Aaronovitch–and we need your help with the questions!

Ben Aaronovitch is one of the most popular science fiction and fantasy writers in the world today. His Rivers of London series has been translated into 14 languages worldwide, with every one of the novels becoming a Sunday Times Top Ten bestseller. Ben has been a screenwriter for Doctor Who, Casualty and has written spin-off novels for Doctor Who and Blake 7. His work has even been adapted into a fantastic graphic novel series.

So if you’ve ever wanted to ask Ben Aaronovitch a question, now’s your chance!

Simply send us your questions via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or email and we’ll do our best to ask them during the event. And in the meantime, check out the selection of Ben’s work we have available to borrow throughout our libraries. Enjoy!

False value / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Peter Grant is facing fatherhood, and an uncertain future, with equal amounts of panic and enthusiasm. Rather than sit around, he takes a job with émigré Silicon Valley tech genius Terrence Skinner’s brand new London start up – the Serious Cybernetics Company. Drawn into the orbit of Old Street’s famous “silicon roundabout”, Peter must learn how to blend in with people who are both civilians and geekier than he is. But magic is not finished with Mama Grant’s favourite son.” (Adapted from  Catalogue)

The October man / Aaronovitch, Ben
“When a man is found dead with his body impossibly covered in a fungal rot, the local authorities know they are out of their depth. But fortunately this is Germany, where there are procedures for everything.Enter Tobias Winter, an investigator for the Abteilung KDA, the branch of the German Federal Criminal Police which handles the supernatural. His aim is to get in, deal with the problem, and get out with the minimum of fuss, personal danger, and paperwork.” (Catalogue)

Foxglove summer / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Ben Aaronovitch takes Peter Grant out of whatever comfort zone he might have found and takes him out of London – to a small village in Herefordshire where the local police are reluctant to admit that there might be a supernatural element to the disappearance of some local children. But while you can take the London copper out of London you can’t take the London out of the copper. Peter soon finds himself caught up in a deep mystery and having to tackle local cops and local gods.” (Catalogue). Also available as an Audiobook. 

The furthest station / Aaronovitch, Ben
” Traumatised travellers have been reporting strange encounters on their morning commute, with strangely dressed people trying to deliver an urgent message. Stranger still, despite calling the police themselves, within a few minutes the commuters have already forgotten the encounter – making the follow up interviews rather difficult. So with a little help from Abigail and Toby the ghost hunting dog, Peter and Jaget are heading out on a ghost hunting expedition…” (Catalogue)

Lies sleeping / Aaronovitch, Ben
“The Faceless Man, wanted for multiple counts of murder, fraud, and crimes against humanity, is on the run. Peter Grant, Detective Constable and apprentice wizard, now plays a key role in an unprecedented joint operation to bring him to justice. But even as the unwieldy might of the Metropolitan Police bears down on its foe, Peter uncovers clues that the Faceless Man, far from being finished, is executing the final stages of a long term plan.” (Catalogue)

The hanging tree / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Suspicious deaths are not usually the concern of Police Constable Peter Grant or the Folly–London’s police department for supernatural cases–even when they happen at an exclusive party in one of the flats of the most expensive apartment blocks in London. But the daughter of Lady Ty, influential goddess of the Tyburn river, was there, and Peter owes Lady Ty a favor. Plunged into the alien world of the super-rich, a sensible young copper would keep his head down. But this is Peter Grant we’re talking about.” (Catalogue)

Rivers of London [1] : body work / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Peter Grant, having become the first English apprentice wizard in fifty years, must immediately deal with two different but ultimately inter-related cases. In one he must find what is possessing ordinary people and turning them into vicious killers, and in the second he must broker a peace between the two warring gods of the River Thames.  The graphic novel is based on the bestselling novel “Rivers of London.” (Catalogue)

Rivers of London [2] : night witch / Aaronovitch, Ben
“Press-ganged into helping a Russian oligarch hunt his missing daughter, PC Peter Grant and his boss, Thomas Nightingale, London’s only wizarding cops, find themselves caught up in a battle between Russian gunmen, a monstrous forest creature – and their nemesis: The Faceless Man. But as Grant and Nightingale close in on the missing girl, they discover that nothing about this case is what it seems!” (Catalogue)

Join us for a Talk with Emily Writes

With the new release of  Is it Bed Time Yet? a hilarious and moving collection of writings about being a parent in Aotearoa by Emily Writes and friends, we invite you to come along to the Central Library for a very special author talk!

Come along and have a laugh, share some stories and meet the author herself, Emily Writes. Emily will share a reading from her new book, some stories and answer all of those burning questions, and there might even be a special guest or two!

When and where?

This event will be held at 10:30 am at the Wellington Central Library on Wednesday August 22nd.

Our Baby Rock & Rhyme session with finger dancing and stories runs from 9:30-10:00am in the children’s area, so come along for some fun for the little ones first, then head over to the Young Adults area on the ground floor nearby for some fun for yourself.

You can borrow a copy from us or Unity Books will be available during the event to sell copies of Is it Bed Time Yet? and you may even be able to get your copy signed!

About Emily Writes?

Wellington local Emily Writes is a best-selling author, writer, activist, volunteer and a mother of two. Emily has published two books Rants in the Dark: One Tired Mama to Another and Is it Bedtime Yet? with Penguin RandomHouse. She has been the parenting columnist for the New Zealand Herald and the New Zealand Woman’s Weekly and has also written for Metro magazine. She is currently editor of The Spinoff Parents and a panelist on The Parenting Hour on Newstalk ZB. Emily founded and runs a not-for-profit/volunteer-run charity called Ballet is for Everyone, which provides free ballet lessons for children from low-income homes and children with disabilities and high health needs. She is an advocate for children’s and women’s rights, speaker for The Neonatal Trust and Perinatal Depression and Awareness Aotearoa.

Borrow Emily’s books:

Is it bedtime yet? / Writes, Emily
“The experience of parenthood is different for everyone. And every day can be different too. Read a hilarious and moving collection of perspectives from the well-loved Emily Writes and her friends. Some of them are experienced writers, others have put pen to paper for the first time. If it takes a village to raise a child, then this writing comes from the whole village. Yet every experience is a real one, and you will feel the joy, the horror, the love and the heart-ache as you read about birthday parties, vasectomies, hugs, hospitals and, of course, sleepless nights.” (Catalogue)

Rants in the dark : from one tired mama to another / Writes, Emily
“Popular blogger Emily Writes gives words of encouragement to sleep-deprived parents everywhere. With two small boys, both non-sleepers, Emily finds herself awake in the wee small hours night after night. Her writing is often done then, and she offers her own often hilarious and always heart-warming experiences to other exhausted parents. She describes the frustrations as well as the tender moments of real parenting, as opposed to what you thought it was going to be like, or what well-meaning advice-givers tell you it should be like. A must-have for all new parents and parents-to-be. Emily’s blogs have been wildly popular, as have her on-line columns with New Zealand Woman’s Weekly and The New Zealand Herald.” (Catalogue)

Monsters and Crafts @ Central for the Lōemis Winter Solstice Festival!

This winter, reach way back to your neolithic roots with the Lōemis Winter Solstice Festival. Observe the longest nights of the year and the deep dark of winter with a hearty mix of monsters and crafts, music and feasting, dance and theatre and finish it all off with a fiery waterfront procession.

What is that Monster in the Central Library?

Between June 6th-20th come into the Central Library and behold Seraphina! Representing the messenger, the bringer of birth, death, and rebirth as part of the cosmic fire of creation; in Seraphina’s nest, place hand written notes of what you wish gone and feed it to the cavity in her stomach. In her egg, place your notes containing that which you wish to build anew: your hopes, dreams, and love for the future.

Then, on the night of the Winter Solstice Ritual (June 21st), follow Seraphina, accompanied by a live orchestra, as she begins her procession through Civic Square to the Whairepo Lagoon where she will be set ablaze along with all of the thoughts and feelings you fed through your notes, in an ancient ritual celebrating birth, death, and rebirth.

Did someone say crafting event at the Library?

During Seraphina’s stay at the Central Library, partake in two evenings of crafting and papier-mâché fun with FREE workshops run by local artists Zoe Higgins and Leda Farrow.

From 6-8pm on Wednesday June 6th, celebrate the installation of Seraphina and come along to Central for a FREE Mask Making Workshop lead by artist Zoe Higgins. On the ground floor in the YA area, enjoy an evening getting crafty and making your own papier-mâché mask that you can then wear to the winter solstice parade on June 21.

The following Wednesday (June 13th) at 6-8pm, try your hand at something different with a Silhouette Egg Lantern Workshop lead by artist Leda Farrow. The egg, a universal symbol of life will be an ancient and symbolic inspiration for your lantern which can then be used to light the way for Seraphina during the winter solstice parade.

All materials and paints will be included and provided. Registration is required, as there are a limited number of spaces available.

To register, please contact either the Library or Lōemis via email to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz  or info@loemis.nz, via phone at 04 801 4040 or come and speak to a Librarian to reserve your place.

These events are suitable for people of all ages however children must be supervised by an adult.

What about all of the music and feasting, dance and theatre?

Enjoy feasting and music at the Feast Of Yaldā, take in the wonders of theatre with the innovative work Íkaros and be tempted by an evening of dance with Footnote Dance Company’s production Search Engine, to name but a few.

Make sure you check out the full Lōemis programme and ticketing information at Lōemis.nz

Let’s Boogie: Dance movies

NZ Dance Week is coming up (April 21 – 29) and Central Library is offering some evening events to celebrate it. For more details about the events, see our NZDW blog post. To get you in the mood, check out these DVDs and get ready to boogie!


La la land.
“Mia, an aspiring actress, serves lattes to movie stars in between auditions and Sebastian, a jazz musician, scrapes by playing cocktail party gigs in dingy bars, but as success mounts they are faced with decisions that begin to fray the fragile fabric of their love affair, and the dreams they worked so hard to maintain in each other threaten to rip them apart.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Billy Elliot.
“Set in a northern mining town, against the background of the 1984/’85 miner’s strikes. Billy’s journey takes him out of the boxing ring and into a ballet class where he discovers a passion for dance that inspires his family and whole community and changes his life forever.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Hip hop-eration.
“These senior citizens may each be almost a century young, but for Kara, (94) Maynie, (95) and Terri (93), the journey to Las Vegas and the World Hip Hop Dance Championships is just the beginning of a life’s journey. Along with twenty-four other nonagenarians they defy the odds and hip-hop their way into the hearts and minds of thousands of young fans from around the world. Along the way we hear how these extraordinary characters contributed to New Zealand as we know it. Their stories are a reminder of our history as a nation and the joy of living life to the fullest.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPina.
“A film about the life and work of Pina Bausch, dancer and choreographer, who died in 2009 which features some of her greatest choreographies as performed by her Tanztheater Wuppertal ensemble.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

The red shoes.
“Film of the ballet based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale of a young girl who cannot stop thinking about her red dancing shoes. In this modern version, Vicky Page finds herself caught between simple human passion and artistic devotion to the ballet.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSwing time.
“Fred Astaire plays a gambler intent on raising $25,000 in New York in order to marry his fiance back home. Romantic complications occur when he meets dancing teacher, Ginger Rogers.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

The dancer
“French singer/actress Soko and Lily-Rose Depp lead a star-studded cast in Stephanie Di Giustos spectacularly mounted screen biography, inspired by the true story of two rival pioneers of modern dance and theatrical performance in late 19th-century Paris. Nothing in her background destined Loe Fuller (Soko) to become the toast of the Belle Epoque cabarets or to perform at the Paris Opera. However, meeting with Isadora Duncan (Depp) a beautiful young prodigy hungry for glory that threatened everything.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Shall we dance?.
A funny comedy set in Japan about a middle aged discontented workaholic who find his passion – and himself in ballroom dancing. A hilarious and highly recommended film! (Katie)

Footloose.
“A city boy comes to a small town where rock music and dancing have been banned.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Black swan.
In order for prima ballerina, Nina to embrace her dark side for her role as the white and black swan in Swan Lake, she loses grip on reality, as well as herself. Overall a gripping film that will have you on edge from start to finish and visualises the dark side of dance and ballet. It is also nice to see a darker and provocative side of Natalie Portman and is a welcome change from the sweet, innocent girly roles she has previously played. (Katie)

Strictly ballroom.
Things get messy in the world of Australian ballroom dancing – and dance politics when a championship ballroom dancer and his ugly duckling dance partner decide to compete together and break all the rules in dancing. Directed by Baz Luhrmann and part of “the red curtain trilogy”*, Strictly Ballroom is a great film with awesome dance moves, a killer soundtrack and a true celebration of dancing. [*The Red Curtain Trilogy has been described by Luhrmann as following a specific filmmaking technique, not necessarily a trilogy in the traditional sense. The Red Curtain Trilogy is the title given to the first three films directed by Baz Luhrmann: Strictly Ballroom, Romeo and Juliet and Moulin Rouge]. (Katie)

NZDW 2018 - Dance movies

Modern Bodies: The Best of Dance Biographies

No art form better captures the passion and politics of humanity than dance. From the Soviet-American ballet rivalry of the Cold War to the rise of Lindy Hop in 1920s Harlem to the emergence of waacking from the LGBTQI clubs of 1970s LA, dance explores—and occasionally crosses—boundaries of nation, culture, gender and sexuality. New Zealand is no exception, and as part this year’s Dance Week we’ve got Dancing Through the Pages, a series of talks and performances by Wellington-based dancers and artists. And if you can’t wait until then, we’ve also got some great dance biographies, from Vaslav Nijinsky to Michael Jackson and beyond!


Syndetics book coverNijinsky / Lucy Moore.
“The first major biography for forty years tells the tragic story of ballet’s great revolutionary, Nijinsky. ‘He achieves the miraculous,’ the sculptor Auguste Rodin wrote of Vaslav Nijinsky. He embodies all the beauty of classical frescoes and statues. Like so many since, Rodin recognised that in Nijinsky classical ballet had one of the greatest and most original artists of the twentieth century, in any genre.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Syndetics book coverModern bodies : dance and American modernism from Martha Graham to Alvin Ailey / Julia L. Foulkes.
“In 1930, dancer and choreographer Martha Graham proclaimed the arrival of “dance as an art of and from America.” Through their art, modern dancers challenged conventional roles and images of gender, sexuality, race, class and regionalism. Modern Bodies exposes the social dynamics that moved modern dance to the edges of society, a place both provocative and perilous.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Syndetics book coverJosephine Baker / written by José-Louis Bocquet ; art by Catel Muller ; historical consultant, Jean-Claude Bouillon-Baker.
“Josephine Baker was 19 years old when she found herself in Paris for the first time. Overnight, the young American dancer became the idol of the Roaring Twenties, captivating Picasso, Cocteau, Le Corbusier and Simenon. After World War II, Baker devoted herself to the struggle against racial segregation, battling the humiliations she had for so long suffered. She would sing of love and liberty until the day she died.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Syndetics book coverHe’s got rhythm : the life and career of Gene Kelly / Cynthia Brideson & Sara Brideson.
“He sang and danced in the rain, proclaimed New York to be a wonderful town and convinced a group of Parisian children that they had rhythm. One of the most influential and respected entertainers of Hollywood’s golden age, Gene Kelly revolutionized film musicals with his innovative and timeless choreography.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Syndetics book coverDarcey Bussell / Darcey Bussell.
“Darcey Bussell is widely considered to be one of the greatest English ballerinas of all time. Her stellar career spanned two decades of magnificent dance where she worked with Dame Margot Fonteyn, observed an aging Nureyev, crossed swords with rival prima ballerina Sylvie Guillem, argued the finer points of technique with Sir Kenneth MacMillan and danced for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Syndetics book coverMoonwalk / Michael Jackson.
Moonwalk is the only book about his life that Michael Jackson ever wrote. It chronicles his humble beginnings in the Midwest, his early days with the Jackson 5 and his unprecedented solo success.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Syndetics book coverAmerica dancing : from the cakewalk to the moonwalk / Megan Pugh.
“An exuberant history of American dance, told through the lives of virtuoso performers who have defined the art. The history of American dance reflects the nation’s tangled culture. Dancers from wildly different backgrounds learned, imitated and stole from one another. Audiences everywhere embraced the result as deeply American.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Syndetics book coverRemembering Nureyev : the trail of a comet / Rudi van Dantzig ; translation by Katie de Haan.
“Famously volatile, fickle in his passions for people, but with astonishing charisma onstage and off, Rudolf Nureyev is regarded as one of the greatest male ballet dancers of the twentieth century. This is a book balletomanes cannot miss, with an eagle-eyed sharpness that never dissolves into hagiography or gossip.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary.)

Dancing Through the Pages @ Central

April 21 – 29 is NZ Dance Week #NZDW2018 and we are celebrating here at the Central Library with Dancing Through the Pages, a series of evening talks from some of Wellington’s finest performing artists talking about their craft with a short taste of their live performances as well!

Have you ever wanted to know what it takes to choreograph a work or compose music for dance? Or wondered what the day to day looks like for a dancer or how they shake stage-fright? Or are you just simply curious about their current reading lists? Dancing Through the Pages is a unique opportunity to meet artists at the top of their game with the chance to ask them any burning questions you have about their art-form.

So come along and fill your evenings with movement, music and intrigue among the book shelves!

What’s the Schedule?

Tuesday 24 April/ 6pm  –  Sensory Dance Theatre
Sacha Copland & Emma Coppersmith from Java Dance Theatre will give an insight into creating a sensory experience for theatre goers. Learn about Java’s immersive processes and how food can make a great stage companion and open up a world of ritual.

Thursday 26 April / 6pm – A Song & Dance
Come along and hear contemporary dancer/choreographer Lucy Marinkovich and jazz musician Lucien Johnson  talk about their creative partnership, following their 2017 award-winning dance-theatre show, Lobsters. Find out about collaboration and why it’s important in the arts, plus treat your ears to some smooth saxophone from Lucien.

Friday 27 April 6pm – A Choreographer at Work
Meet Loughlan Prior; dancer, choreographer, filmmaker and a Royal New Zealand Ballet staple. Come along to this final session of Dancing Through the Pages and hear Loughlan talk about his creative process, plus get a behind the scenes glimpse into the mechanics of choreographing a duet. Featuring special guests RNZB dancers Luke Cooper and Georgia Powley

 

Want to know more about the artists?

ABOUT JAVA DANCE THEATRE
Java Dance Theatre is dance theatre that gets under your skin. Founded in 2003 by New Zealand School of Dance graduate, Sacha Copland, Java captures audiences with visceral dance and captivating story-telling. Combining playful physicality, live music and audience immersion Java has captured hearts around New Zealand and the world. Their strong repertoire of original works includes The Wine Project, Dirt and Other Delicious Ingredients, Back of the Bus, The Creamery, Cheese, and Rise.

ABOUT BORDERLINE ARTS ENSEMBLE
The Borderline Arts Ensemble is a performing arts collective established by dancer and choreographer Lucy Marinkovich in 2015 to facilitate her contemporary dance and performance art works. In 2017 Borderline presented Good Good Fortune at the Performance Arcade (Wellington, NZ) and the George Town Arts Festival (Penang, Malaysia), as well as developing choreography for  The Shyness of Trees during an artist residency at Dance Nucleus in Singapore.  Borderline’s first full length dance-theatre work Lobsters premiered in an independent season at Circa Theatre and was the winner of three 2017 Wellington Theatre Awards.

ABOUT LOUGHLAN PRIOR
Loughlan Prior is an Aussie/Kiwi choreographer and performer based in Wellington, New Zealand. He is the choreographer in residence at the Royal New Zealand Ballet (RNZB) and the creative director of Prior Visual, a project based film collective. Loughlan has produced works for the RNZB, the New Zealand School of Dance and recently premiered a piece with the Grand Rapids Ballet in the United States. His film projects have met acclaim both nationally and internationally, his collaborative film Genome featured in Wellington’s treasured 2017 LUX Light Festival.

Can’t get enough of dance?

We completely understand! Not to worry, check out our Q&A with our speakers to find out more about their favourite dance books! Our Librarians have also been putting together some dance themed lists for your reading and viewing pleasure, check out our most recent Biographies Blog Modern Bodies: The Best of Dance Biographies and our latest movies blog of our favourite dance movies!

It’s NZ Dance Week Question Time!

We are counting down to NZ Dance Week (5, 6, 7, 8… get it?) and are getting SO excited for what’s happening at Central Library that week, that librarians have been started tapping and jiving through the shelves! So in the lead up to Dancing Through The Pages we quizzed our upcoming performers about their favourite books and current reading habits!

In order of the week’s performances, we kicked things off with choreographer and Artistic Director of Java Dance Theatre Sacha Copland.

So Sacha, tell us what are you reading at the moment?
“I usually have a few books on the go at any one time. For fun I am reading The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur.  For research for my next work I am reading The Brilliant History of Colour in Art by Victoria Finlay and Chocolate Nations, Living and Dying for Cocoa in West Africa by Orla Ryan. I am really interested in exploring colour more. There is too much monochrome! Also my next work is about chocolate so I have to research every aspect of it before I make it, the good, the bad and the ugly.”

What about your all-time favourite book character?
“This is tricky to answer! Maybe Aomame, a martial-arts instructor and physical therapist from Haruki Murakami’s IQ84. I also love Aliena in The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett.”

Next up we have contemporary dancer and choreographer Lucy Marinkovich along with saxophonist and composer Lucien Johnson who answered our questions with the same creative partnership that we will hear more about at ‘A Song & Dance’!

What are you two reading at the moment?
Lucien: “Talking to My Daughter about the Economy by Yanis Varoufakis
Lucy: “Bright Air Black by David Vann (in preparation for the NZ Festival show OrphEus: a dance opera).”

Do you two have a favourite dance book or magazine?
Lucien: “For me it’s a music book: Music is my Mistress by Duke Ellington.”
Lucy: “Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfeild.”

Lucien, what about your favourite book to recommend?
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin or Symphony for the City of the Dead by M.T Anderson.”

For the final act we asked the same round of quickfire questions to the man behind ‘The Story of LARK’ Louglan Prior, RNZB dancer, choreographer and filmmaker extraordinaire!

What are you reading at the moment?
The History of Bees by Maja Lunde.”

Your all-time favourite book character?
“Albus Dumbledore.”
(We can’t fault you there, #WCLLovesHarryPotter!!)

What about your favourite book to recommend?
The Reader by Bernhard Schlink.”

And final question, do you have a favourite dance book or magazine?
David Hallberg’s autobiography – A Body of Work: Dancing to the Edge and Back and DANZ Magazine.”

Want to know more about Dancing Through the Pages and what’s happening for NZ Dance Week? Check out wcl.govt.nz/danceweek for all of the info, add the Facebook Event to your calendar and follow the hashtag #nzdw2018! We hope to see you there!

Pro-tip: don’t miss our most recent biographies booklist! We’ve hand-picked a selection of some of the prominent dancers in history, from Gene Kelly to Michael Jackson. We couldn’t resist making a list of our favourite dance movies as well, what better reason to relive Footloose is there! Take a look!

NZDW 2018

An evening with astrophotographer Mark Gee

Have you ever sat under the stars, gazed at the night sky and wished you could capture it? Seen photos of the milky way, looked down at your camera and wondered how on earth they did it?

If that sounds like you, then come along to the Central Library and hear Wellington based astrophotographer Mark Gee talk about his photographic journey and share his story of how he came to be the self-taught award winning photographer he is today!

A post shared by Mark Gee (@theartofnight) on Swing by the library after work on Wednesday April 4th at 6pm to meet the man himself and hear about the Art of Night, and learn how you can get started, how to use social media as a marketing tool, and how you can continue to develop as a photographer.

Mark will be talking for about 30 minutes so there will be plenty of question time as well!

Looking for more resources for your own photography?

Check out the free online course available through Lynda.com, with courses on everything from Photography 101, to Exploring Composition, How to Create a Portfolio, using Photoshop, and even Aerial Photography with Drones and a how to on Landscape Photography: Iceland!

All you need to login in your Library card number and your last name.

You can also take a look at our Photography Recent Picks Blog or check out our new collection on Overdrive: Get Creative With Design & Photography

LitCrawl: True Stories Told Live at Central library

That’s right! It’s LitCrawl time again and that means it’s time to get excited because this year is going to be on a whole different level!

With the addition of LitCrawl Extended and events running across the whole weekend, starting on Friday 10th November all the way through to Sunday the 12th, it’s time to come into the library, grab your programme and start planning your crawl.

We will be hosting True Stories Told Live as part of LitCrawl Phase 1, starting at 6pm at the Central Library on Saturday November 11th.

This years theme is ‘Quiet Revolutions’. Totally unscripted, no power points or cue cards, just storytelling in its rawest form!

Featuring Makerita Urale, Witi Ihimaera, Hēmi Kelly, Renèe, Lucy Revill, Rajorshi Chakraborti and Eamonn Marra it’s going to be an unmissable event!

To help everyone get excited and pumped for their crawl, we’ve asked our librarians to share their recommendations. Just like True Stories Told Live, we just asked for everyone’s picks, no theme, no time, no parameters just Librarian’s choices, straight from the heart!

Syndetics book coverLinda’s Pick: Tess / Kirsten McDougall.
“In the silence she could hear the oncoming hum, like a large flock approaching. She didn’t want to hear his story; she’d had enough of them. Tess is on the run when she’s picked up from the side of the road by lonely middle-aged father Lewis Rose. With reluctance, she’s drawn into his family troubles and comes to know a life she never had. Set in Masterton at the turn of the millennium, Tess is a gothic love story about the ties that bind and tear a family apart.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJamie’s Pick: Crisis four : a Nick Stone thriller / Andy McNab.
“Ex-SAS trooper Nick Stone is clever, ruthless and very effective, it is no surprise that he is hired by British Intelligence. Sarah Greenwood is beautiful, intelligent and cunning, and the only woman Stone has ever truly opened up to. But now he has been ordered to hunt her down. Hotly pursued through the American wilderness, Stone finds himself at the center of a deadly game of cat and mouse and must get to the heart of a terrifying conspiracy theory to which only Sarah holds the key.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverFrith’s Pick: Iceland / Dominic Hoey.
“Aspiring musician Zlata meets graffiti artist and part-time drug dealer Hamish at a party. Together, they start to get their lives on track Zlata gets her record deal and album tour, and Hamish gets an exhibition of his art in Auckland, then in Tokyo. Then one of their group of friends kills someone, and everything starts to unravel as they deal (or not) with the aftermath” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTim’s Pick: Leave before you go / Emily Perkins.
No New Zealand novel better captures the sad ambience of finding yourself a little older than you feel ready for and also you’ve just locked yourself out of your flat again. In a good way.
“A generation’s dilemma: should we find real jobs & relationships & houses, or shall we sit here, watch TV & maybe think about going out later? Leave Before You Go is a witty novel from last year’s winner of the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverReece’s Pick: The crossing / by Cormac McCarthy.
“In The Crossing, Cormac McCarthy fulfills the promise of All the Pretty Horses and at the same time give us a work that is darker and more visionary, a novel with the unstoppable momentum of a classic western and the elegaic power of a lost American myth.  An essential novel by any measure, this is a luminous and appalling book that touches, stops, and starts the heart and mind at once.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJess’ Pick: Daughter of the forest / Juliet Marillier.
“A tale of history and heritage, myth and magic, legend and love. Lord Colum of Sevenwaters is blessed with seven children, but it is Sorcha, the youngest and only daughter, who is destined to defend her family and protect their land. The only one who escapes the cruel influence of her father’s new wife, exiled and cast out into the forest and the terrifying world beyond, Sorcha falls into the hands of the feared enemy. Now she is torn between a life she has always known and a love that only comes once.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverZuhara’s Pick: Gone with the wind / by Margaret Mitchell.
“Often remembered for the epic film, Gone With the Wind explores the depth of human passions with an intensity as bold as its setting in the red hills of Georgia. This is the tale of Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled, manipulative daughter of a wealthy plantation owner, who arrives at young womanhood just in time to see the Civil War forever change her way of life. A sweeping story of tangled passion and courage, Margaret Mitchell brings to life the unforgettable characters that have captured readers for over seventy years.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPaul’s Pick: The unthinkable thoughts of Jacob Green : a novel / by Joshua Braff.
“It’s 1977, housewarming, Annie Hall and bar mitzvah parties punctuate Jacob Green’s childhood and require command performances by all the Green family members. Jacob doesn’t mean to disappoint his father, but he can’t help thinking the most unthinkable (and very funny) thoughts about public-school humiliation, Hebrew-school disinclination, and in-home sex education (with the live-in nanny!). This self-assured, comic, yet piercing first novel deftly captures the struggle of an imperfect boy trying to become a suitable son.” ( Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverBeth’s Pick: The English patient / Michael Ondaatje.
“Set during the end of World War II, this novel explores the lives of four very disparate people who find themselves holed up together in a ruined villa north of Florence as the war retreats around them. Michael Ondaatje is the author of Running in the Family and In the Skin of a Lion.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverLigia’s Pick: The book of disquiet / Fernando Pessoa ; edited by Jerónimo Pizarro; translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa.
“An “autobiography” or “diary” containing exquisite melancholy observations, aphorisms, and ruminations, this classic work grapples with all the eternal questions. Now, for the first time the texts are presented chronologically, in a complete English edition by master translator Margaret Jull Costa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSela’s Pick: The bronze horseman / Paullina Simons.
“The war has not yet touched this city of fallen grandeur, or the lives of two sisters, Tatiana and Dasha Metanova. Their world is turned upside down when Hitler’s armies attack Russia and yet there is light in the darkness. Tatiana meets Alexander, a brave young officer in the Red Army. Tatiana and Alexander’s impossible love threatens to tear the family apart and expose Alexander’s dangerous secret, a secret as devastating as the war itself.” (Syndetics summary)

 

Litcrawl 2017

Special Events in March

We have some awesome events lined up this month, leading in with a livestream of the popular TedxWellington event. Tickets to the event itself sold out within minutes, but you can view the entire event over a video stream. There is no entry fee, and you can stay for as long as you like. You can find more details on the event we are hosting here.

While not a library event specifically, it’d be criminal if we didn’t mention Writers Week, happening 9th-13th March. Check the Writers Week website for more details.

You can always check our event calendar to see all events happening in one day, or look further ahead for the rest of the month. See below for what’s coming up this month:

The ACB with Honora LeeOne-off events
– Saturday 5th March – 11am-5.45pm – TedxWellington Livestream (free entry) – Mezzanine floor, Central library
– Saturday 5th March – 11am-12pm – NZ Festival “The ACB with Honora Lee” Children’s Story Reading – Ground floor, Central library

Recurring events
– Wednesdays 2-3pm – Tea & Tales at Johnsonville library
– Wednesdays 5.30-7.30pm – Gamesfest at Central Library
– Thursdays 6pm – Mystery Movie Screenings at Central library (bookings required, phone 801-4068)
– 1st Friday of every month 6.30-7pm – Late night storytime at Johnsonville library
– Last Saturday of every month 10am-3pm – Knitting circle at Central library

Kōhunga Kōrero
– Omāroro (Newtown) – 3rd November – 10.30am (1st Tuesday of each month)
– Korimako ki Ngāio (Cummings Park) – 9th November – 10.30am (2nd Monday of each month)
– Waitohi (Johnsonville) – 17th November – 10.30am (3rd Tuesday of each month, replaces PSST that day)
– Motukairangi (Miramar) – 24th November – 2pm (4th Tuesday of each month)

Special events in November

This month we have some neat happenings around our libraries, plus a few amendments to existing events. You can always check our event calendar to see all events happening in one day, or look further ahead for the rest of the month. See below for what’s coming up this month:

One-off events
– Saturday 7th November – 11am-2pm – “Make Time to Make Zines” workshop for kids – Ground floor, Central library
– Thursday 19th November – 6.30-8pm – An evening with author Emanuel E. Garcia – Ground floor, Central library

Conservation Week 1-8 November
– Monday 2nd November – 10.30am – Conservation Week story time – Tawa Library
– Tuesday 3rd November – 10.30am – Conservation Week story time  Johnsonville Library

StoriesandRhymes Launch Poster MEDIUMRecurring events
– Wednesdays 2-3pm – Tea & Tales at Johnsonville library
– Wednesdays 5.30-7.30pm – Gamesfest at Central Library
– Thursdays 10-10.30am – Ni Hao Children’s Community Chinese storytimes at Central library
– Thursdays 6pm – Mystery Movie Screenings at Central library (bookings required, phone 801-4068)
– 1st Friday of every month 6.30-7pm – Late night storytime at Johnsonville library
– Last Saturday of every month 10am-4pm – Knitting circle at Central library

Kōhunga Kōrero
– Omāroro (Newtown) – 3rd November – 10.30am (1st Tuesday of each month)
– Korimako ki Ngāio (Cummings Park) – 9th November – 10.30am (2nd Monday of each month)
– Waitohi (Johnsonville) – 17th November – *NEW TIME* 10.30am (3rd Tuesday of each month, replaces PSST that day)
– Motukairangi (Miramar) – 24th November – 2pm (4th Tuesday of each month)

Special events in October

Children_s_events_image_SMALLAt the very beginning of October we are hosting jQuery and Python coding workshops for teens. Registrations are essential. We can’t wait!

These go hand in hand with our series of holiday activities called Click, Make, Build and Create. There will be different activities happening at each library, so check with your local branch to find out what’s on offer. Ideal for kids aged 6-12 years old.

The first week of October is Wellington Wellbeing Week – come and learn to use Lynda.com, our newest free database for library users, or take a moment to relax with our adult colouring in activities.

From the 1st of October Central library is hosting a very special photographic exhibiton, with images taken by renowned photographer Ans Westra during the 1975 Land March. Ans Westra will be joining us in conversation at 12.30pm on Tuesday 6th October at the Central library. Please join us for this very special event!

We also have our very first Kōhunga Kōrero storytime at Newtown library since it reopened! Come along on Tuesday 6th October to hear some wonderful stories in te reo!

Please remember all libraries will be closed on Monday 26th October for Labour Day.

You can always check our event calendar to see all events happening in one day, or look further ahead for the rest of the month. See below for what’s coming up this month:

Wellington Wellbeing Week
– Lynda.com expo – 12.30-1.30pm, Tuesday 6th October through Saturday 10th October at Central library
– Adult colouring in activities – Tuesday 6th October through Saturday 10th October at Central library on ground floor and mezzanine landing

Ongoing events
Ans Westra photographic exhibition ‘Not one more acre’ – Central library 2nd floor – from 1st October

One-off events
– Friday 2nd October – 10.30am – “Toot: The World’s Tiniest Whale” storytime at Central library
– Tuesday 6th October – 12.30pm – ‘Not one more acre’ exhibition introduction by photographer Ans Westra at Central library
– Thursday 8th October – 6.30-7pm – Animal Tales storytime at Tawa library

Coding Workshops for Teens at Central library (bookings required)
– Thursday 1st October – 9.30am-3.30pm – Build a website with jQuery
– Friday 2nd October – 9.30am-3.30pm – Build a game with Python

Coding Workshops for teens
Click, Make, Build and Create holiday activities
– Wednesday 30th September – 1-2pm – Island Bay Community Centre
– Wednesday 30th September – 2-3pm – Johnsonville library
– Thursday 1st October – 2-3.30pm – Kilbirnie Library – Movie Making Magic
– Tuesday 6th October – 10-11am – Karori library
– Tuesday 6th October – 2-3pm – Newlands Community Centre
– Wednesday 7th October – 11am-12pm – Central library – Star Wars day!
– Thursday 8th October – 11am-12pm – Tawa Library – Blast off into space!
– Thursday 8th October 2-3.30 – Newtown library – Movie Making Magic

StoriesandRhymes Launch Poster MEDIUMRecurring events
– Wednesdays 2-3pm – Tea & Tales at Johnsonville library
– Wednesdays 5.30-7.30pm – Gamesfest at Central Library
– Thursdays 10-10.30am – Ni Hao Children’s Community Chinese storytimes at Central library
– Thursdays 6pm – Mystery Movie Screenings at Central library (bookings required, phone 801-4068)
– 1st Friday of every month 6.30-7pm – Late night storytime at Johnsonville library – this month’s theme is “Space”

Kōhunga Kōrero
– Omāroro (Newtown) – 6th October – 10.30am (1st Tuesday of each month)
– Korimako ki Ngāio (Cummings Park) – 12th October – 10.30am (2nd Monday of each month)
– Waitohi (Johnsonville) – 20th October – 2pm (3rd Tuesday of each month)
– Motukairangi (Miramar) – 27th October – 2pm (4th Tuesday of each month)

Not One More Acre: A Conversation with Ans Westra at the Central Library

Ans Westra Poster6smallb

This October marks the 40th anniversary of the 1975 Māori Land March – when Dame Whina Cooper lead marchers to Parliament to protest the loss of Māori lands. “Not One More Acre of Māori Land” became the catch-cry of the marchers, who left Te Hāpua in the far north on 14 September as a group numbering no more than 50, and eventually reached Wellington on 13 October as a powerful hikoi numbering at over 5000.

Iconic photographer Ans Westra captured this event and on Tuesday 6 October Wellington Central Library will be hosting a talk with this renowned and well-loved photographer, who will describe her experience of attending and photographing the historic march. From Thursday 1st October there will also be an exhibition of contact sheet prints of Ans Westra’s photographs of the arrival of the march in Wellington on 13 October 1975.

A Conversation with Ans Westra
Tuesday 6 October at 12.30pm
2nd floor, Central Library

Syndetics book coverWashday at the pa / photographs by Ans Westra ; with text by Mark Amery.
Washday at the pa, by New Zealand premier photographers Ans Westra, was first published as a photo-story booklet in 1964 by the Department of Education for use in Primary Schools, but all 38,000 copies were withdrawn following a campaign by the Maori Women’s Welfare League that it would have a ‘detrimental effect’ on Maori people – and that the living conditions portrayed within the book were atypical. A second edition of the booklet was published the same years with some images omitted. This edition is a selection of these two editions together with photographs of the washday family taken in 1988, and includes essays by arts critic, journalist and broadcaster Mark Amery detailing the controversy and background of Washday at the pa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNga tau ki muri = Our future / Ans Westra.
“This timely and visionary new book includes 137 Westra photographs of the New Zealand landscape, with text contributions from Hone Tuwhare, Russel Norman, Brian Turner, David Eggleton and David Lange, who wrote a short piece for Ans as part of an unrealised book project in 1987. Well known for her iconic black and white documentation of Maori culture, Ans Westra is also known for her colour works, which show concern for New Zealand’s destiny, “an island exploited by various waves of settlement”. Shot with Ans’ trusty Rolleiflex camera, the sometimes damning images in Our Future have been made over the last 20 years. “The purpose of the book is to give a directive to the country, an awareness of things changed and lost within its short history. If we don’t plan for the long term and keep taking stop-gap measures, we leave very little behind. Instead of becoming like the rest of the world, this beautiful place should become a shining example of hope for survival in a newly balanced environment.” –Ans Westra.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina [videorecording] : mother of the nation.
“The autobiography of Maori land activist Dame Whina Cooper filmed two years before she died. Born in an earth-floor whare she became a teacher, gum digger, rugby coach, midwife, a tribal leader, president of Maori Women’s Welfare League and controversial leader of the Maori Land March. Who organized her first public protest at the age of 18.” (Library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHandboek : Ans Westra photographs / [exhibition curator and coordinator, Luit Bieringa ; texts, Cushla Parekowhai [et. al]].

Ans Westra [videorecording] : private journeys/public signposts / director, Luit Bieringa ; producer, Jan Bieringa.
New Zealand photographer, Ans Westra, talks about her career.

Special Events in September

newtownNewtown Library has just reopened – hooray! – so it’s back to business as usual, although there is no Kōhunga Kōrero session at Newtown this month.

It’s Chinese Language Week from 7-11 September and we have loads of events happening, make sure to check those out. Don’t forget to come along to our Ni Hao Chinese storytimes which occur every Thursday at the Central library, plus extra sessions from 7-11 September detailed below.

We also have a pop-up non-fiction book sale at Central library from the 15th to the 27th September. Come and grab a bargain!

At the very beginning of October we are hosting jQuery and Python coding workshops for teens. For ease of access and as registrations are essential, they have been included in this month’s event listings. We can’t wait!

You can always check our event calendar to see all events happening in one day, or look further ahead for the rest of the month. See below for what’s coming up this month:

Chinese Language Week (view in Chinese)
— Ni Hao Storytime
Monday 7th September – Johnsonville library – 10.30-11.00am
Tuesday 8th September – Karori library – 10.30-11.00am
Thursday 10th September (every week) – Central library – 10.00-10.30am
Friday 11th September – Kilbirnie library – 11.00-11.30am

— Learn basic Mandarin (Chinese)
Tuesday 8th September – Central library – 1.00-1.30pm
Friday 11th September – Karori library – 3.30-4.00pm

— Tai Chi class
Friday 11th September – Central library – 12.30-1.30pm

Chinese Film Night – “The Bullet Vanishes” (bookings required, phone 801-4068 or 801-4083 (Chinese))
Please note: this film is R16
Wednesday 9th September – Central library – 6.00-8.00pm
Friday 11th September – Newtown library – 6.00-8.00pm

Chinese Painting class
Monday 7th September – Central library – 11.00am-12.00pm

Chinese Calligraphy class
Friday 11th September – Johnsonville library – 11.00am-12.00pm

Central Library tours in Chinese (bookings required, phone 801-4068 or 801-4083 (Chinese))
Monday 7th September – 2.30-4.00pm
Thursday 10th September – 2.30-4.00pm

One-off events
– Wednesday 2nd September – 12.30-1.30pm – Law for Lunch: Stop Workplace Bullying
– Saturday 19th September – 10am-3pm – Knit-a-thon at Central library
– Tuesday 29th September – 10.30am-12pm – Learn to use WCL online resources (for seniors)

Ongoing events
– Non-fiction pop-up book sale – Central library – 15th September to 27th September

Read an eBook Day
– Wednesday 16th September & Thursday 17th September – Central library – 12-2pm
– Friday 18th September – Johnsonville library – 4-7pm
– Friday 18th September – Newtown library – 6-7.30pm

Coding Workshops for Teens at Central library (bookings required)
– Thursday 1st October – 9.30am-3.30pm – Build a website with jQuery
– Friday 2nd October – 9.30am-3.30pm – Build a game with Python

Coding Workshops for teens
Recurring events
– Thursdays 10-10.30am – Ni Hao Children’s Community Chinese storytimes at Central library
– Wednesdays 5.30-7.30pm – Gamesfest at Central Library
– Thursdays 6pm – Mystery Movie Screenings at Central library (bookings required, phone 801-4068)
– Wednesdays 2-3pm – Tea & Tales at Johnsonville library

Kōhunga Kōrero
– Omāroro (Newtown) – No session in September, back to usual from October (1st Tuesday of each month)
– Korimako ki Ngāio (Cummings Park) – 14th September – 10.30am (2nd Monday of each month)
– Waitohi (Johnsonville) – 15th September – 2pm (3rd Tuesday of each month)
– Motukairangi (Miramar) – 22nd September – 2pm (new time) (4th Tuesday of each month)

Special events in August

lflIt’s August already and we have some fantastic Law for Lunch seminars lined up for the month ahead. Learn about how to stay safe online, as well as renter’s rights, how to identify unsafe relationships, plus more, all in our lunchtimes talks. Register your interest over on our Facebook event listings. Refreshments will be provided.

Later in the month we are very excited to host a talk with suspense & thriller writer Michael Robotham, and a talk about volunteering in the Pacific with VSA! See below for more details.

Please note Newtown library is temporarily closed for essential maintenance. The library will reopen on 7 September 2015. You can find more information on the closure here.

You can always check our event calendar to see all events happening in one day, or look further ahead for the rest of the month. See below for what’s coming up this month:

Law for Lunch
– Wednesday 5th August – 12.30pm-1.30pm – Central library ground floor
How to protect yourself from online schemers, scams and shams
– Wednesday 12th August – 12.30pm-1.30pm – Central library ground floor
The law behind child abduction
– Wednesday 19th August – 12.30pm-1.30pm – Central library ground floor
Renting? Make sure your landlord respects your rights
– Wednesday 26th August – 12.30pm-1.30pm – Kilbirnie library
Unsafe relationships – Know the signs to look out for your friends and whanau
Plus one event in September:
– Wednesday 2nd September – 12.30pm-1.30pm – Newlands Community Centre
Stop bullying happening at work

Tales from the BalletTales from the Ballet – Sir Jon Trimmer presents A Midsummer Night’s Dream
– Saturday 1st August 11am-12pm – Central library
– Saturday 8th August 11am-12pm – Karori library
– Saturday 15th August 11am-12pm – Johnsonville library
– Saturday 22nd August 11am-12pm – Kilbirnie library

One-off events
– Wednesday 19th August – 5.30pm-7pm – Volunteering in the Pacific with VSA
Cover from Syndetics– Thursday 27th August – 6pm-7.30pm – An evening with Michael Robotham

Recurring events
*NEW* – Thursdays 10-10.30am – Ni Hao Children’s Community Chinese storytimes at Central library
– Wednesdays 5.30-7.30pm – Gamesfest at Central Library
– Thursdays 6pm – Mystery Movie Screenings at Central library
– Wednesdays 2-3pm – Tea & Tales at Johnsonville library

Kohunga Korero
– Omāroro (Newtown) – No Newtown sessions while library maintenance is taking place
– Korimako ki Ngāio (Cummings Park) – 10th August – 10.30am (2nd Monday of each month)
– Waitohi (Johnsonville) – 18th August – 2pm (3rd Tuesday of each month)
– Motukairangi (Miramar) – 25th August – 2pm (new time) (4th Tuesday of each month)

Special Events in July

Tales of the BalletJuly brings with it the school holidays, and we have loads of activities for kids of all ages this July! Musical activities, ballet presentations, and visits from Paul Beavis, the author & illustrator of Mrs Mo’s Monster. We also have NEW storytime sessions every Thursday, with stories in Mandarin Chinese! Check out the details below!

Please note Newtown library will be temporarily closed for essential maintenance beginning in May. Newtown library will be closed from Wednesday 13 May to Wednesday 22 July inclusive. You can find more information on the closure here.

You can always check our event calendar to see all events happening in one day, or look further ahead for the rest of the month. See below for what’s coming up this month:

Throughout the month:
Māwhai Tuhituhi – online Te Reo writing competition – Monday 27th July-Friday 31st July

Cover from SyndeticsSchool holiday activities:
Musical Madness activities: DIY music & instruments – Monday 6th July-Wednesday 15th July – Tawa, Cummings Park, Kilbirnie, Miramar, Central, Karori libraries, Island Bay Community Centre
Tales from the Ballet: RNZB stories with Sir John Trimmer – Monday 6th July-Thursday 16th July – Central, Karori, Kilbirnie, Johnsonville libraries
Mrs Mo’s Monster: Live reading & drawing sessions with author/illustrator Paul Beavis – Tuesday 7th July-Wednesday 15th July – Central, Karori, Kilbirnie, Johnsonville libraries
First aid skills: have a go! – Tuesday 7th July-Wednesday 15th July – Tawa, Central, Cummings Park, Johnsonville, Karori, Khandallah libraries

One-off events
– Friday 17th July – 2.30pm-5pm & 6.30pm-9pm – Zine-making workshops with artist Kerry Ann Lee – Thistle Hall & Central library (in collaboration with Wellington Zinefest)
– Tuesday 28th July – 12.30pm-1.30pm – Ngā kōrero o Te Whanganui-a-Tara: an iwi perspective – Lunchtime talk with Kura Moeahu
– Thursday 30th July – 12.30pm-1.30pm – Ngā kōrero o Te Whanganui-a-Tara: an iwi perspective – Lunchtime talk with Neavin Broughton

Recurring events
*NEW* – Thursdays 10-10.30am – Ni Hao Children’s Community Chinese storytimes at Central library
– Wednesdays 5.30-7.30 – Gamesfest at Central Library
– Thursdays 6pm – Mystery Movie Screenings at Central library

Kohunga Korero
– Omāroro (Newtown) – No Newtown sessions until after library reopens 22nd July 2015
– Korimako ki Ngāio (Cummings Park) – 13th July – 10.30am (2nd Monday of each month)
– Waitohi (Johnsonville) – 21st July – 2pm (3rd Tuesday of each month)
– Motukairangi (Miramar) – 28th July – 2pm (new time) (4th Tuesday of each month)