New DVDs for Te Awe

Here are some new DVDs added to the catalogue over July that are available at our CBD Te Awe Branch, and selected other locations. Also included are some of our On Order titles to give you a taste of what’s about to be released. Note: All ‘On Order’ titles are able to be reserved via the online catalogue.

New Material:
Zappa
The Glorias
Stepping out
Martha’s vineyard mystery collection. 1.
High ground.
The Brokenwood mysteries. Season 7.
Chaos walking

On Order:
Son Of The South
The Crown: Complete Season 4
CB Strike: Lethal White
Inspector Montalbano, 12
While At War
Locked Down
Finding You
No Man’s Land
Gunda










New CDs for Te Awe

I’m Mark, the Customer Specialist for Music & Film at Wellington City Libraries. Here is some of the new material we have been buying for the Music collection at our CBD Te Awe library. My colleague Neil & I decided to do some quick reviews of some new titles. Our limit was a few lines only. Do we actually carefully appraise & select the latest new music releases for your listening pleasure? Or do we just buy every third item on the list and hope it works out? Do we actually know anything about new music? Can you encapsulate an entire album in just a couple of lines? Are we just too old to understand what most of this music is on about? Read on to find out…

Dreamers are waiting. / Crowded House
Mark: The iconic band regroup with help from Finn’s 2 sons & former producer Mitchell Froom. The immediate accessibility and edge of the early Paul Hester albums is gone, bit it’s been replaced by new blood and songwriters that help craft an album that feels warm and comforting. Tones and melodies that slowly creep up on you after repeated listens. Never really a fan of their later work, but I didn’t hate this.
Neil: Crowded House are one of the biggest and most popular in N.Z., having to date sold over 10 million albums. Their popularity with fans remains as was more than amply demonstrated by their recent series of sell-out gigs touring pretty much of all the major New Zealand stadiums. However, for me I just never got them. They just sound bland and this release didn’t change my mind. They undoubtedly have loyal passionate fans and I strongly suspect they will love this new release, as it has been widely acclaimed as a triumphant return to form, but not for me.

Live in Stuttgart 1975. / Can[VINYL]
Mark: This archival release of a 1975 90-minutes concert in Stuttgart comes from a fan’s live tape recordings that have been newly mixed and mastered. This was rated 100 by both Record Collector & Uncut, and I can confirm that it is indeed 100% noodling that takes 90 minutes to go from zero to nowhere…
Neil: Regarded as one of the Classic German Bands from the 70’s, this live recording captures them at the height of their formidable creative powers. The original, now heavily cleaned up and enhanced, recordings came from a fan recording in the audience. The resultant album finds them at their most unrestrained in a 90 minute free flow improvisational work out, powered by the hypnotic drums of Jaki Liebezeit and propulsive bass of bassist Holger Czukay. The tracks flow in and out of each other, an element popping up here, a motif there; it is one of those releases you just need to let go on, and let it wash over you.

Yol. / Altın Gün
Mark: I really enjoyed this. Turkish singers & Dutch musos meet. The female & male leads alternate the vocals, and the tracks are full of cool, catchy, sinuous Middle-East vibes set to synthy grooves. Like the soundtrack to a cool 60’s Spy Film…
Neil: Turkish psy maestros Altin Gun go all 80’s disco on us, in this audacious fabulous and highly unlikely mash up of time jumping styles. Imagine, if you can, music from the Ottoman empire made during the psychedelic 1960’s but using 80’s synths and beats!

Cavalcade / Black Midi
Mark: Chaotic post-punk jams together dissonant noise with squalling saxophones, buzzing baselines & industrial guitar – then follows it with mellow tracks of lounge era styled crooning. A melange of sound that aims to challenge. Scott Walker would probably have liked them…
Neil: An explosion of sound that effortlessly blends beautiful and melodic elements, with often heavy and frantically twisted rhythms. An anarchic, complex, and very ambitious album.

Wink. / Chai
Mark: The genre hopping Japanese female quartet shave off the guitars, pop-punk edges and mash-ups of previous albums ‘Pink’ & ‘Punk’, and go straight for the pop jugular with this album of so smooth tunes. Woozy 70s organs back tracks with whispery 90s R&B vibes, which alternate with catchy electro-pop workouts. Infectious & charming.
Neil: Chai remind me of the musical equivalent of eating a chocolate coated, frosted sugar bomb; the contagious endlessly upbeat energy of the album shines through the whole work like a sugar rush. It is less punk and more pop than the bands previous releases, but that optimistic energy is still very much present.

Be right back. / Smith, Jorja
Mark: 8 track EP supposed to be a stop gap follow up to her 2018 critically-acclaimed, Mercury Prize nominated debut album ‘Lost & Found’ – for which she won her second BRIT Award for ‘Best Female’ and earned herself a nomination for ‘New Artist’ at the Grammy Awards. Melds Jazz, R&B & Trip-Hop influences around her emotive vocals, with songs focusing of self-awareness and empowerment. Worth checking out if you enjoyed the new albums from Arlo Parks or Celeste.
Neil: Super smooth, ultra-stripped back R & B combined with emotionally vibrant lyrics. All delivered using Jorja’s rich, distinctive, mellow, and delicately phrased voice. Chilled.

Jubilee. / Japanese Breakfast
Mark: ‘Japanese Breakfast’ is the solo moniker of Philadelphian Korean-American musician, director, and author Michelle Zauner (her debut memoir debuted at number two on The New York Times nonfiction best-seller list). Her super-catchy third album delivers some sweet 80s indie-pop hooks, and shoegazzy vibes. The self-directed music video for Be Sweet is a very funny X-files homage, with Marisa “Missy” Dabice (from fellow Philly band Mannequin Pussy) and Zauner acting as FBI Agents tracking aliens.
Neil: This indie referenced album is replete with lush horn and string orchestration. A veritable smorgasbord of styles and sub genres, all harnessed to an album that ostensibly about happiness and the pursuit of happiness. It’s an album that in many ways feels like it belongs in this very moment in time. In places it reminded me of ‘War on Drugs’ or ”Wilco’.

Carnage / Cave, Nick
Mark: Deeply reflective pieces. Melancholic music underpins his cavernous voice, as it rumbles through mood pieces that reflect the fear & uncertainty of the last year.
Neil: Nick Caves recent typrich of releases has cemented (as if there was any doubt) his reputation as one of the finest songwriters and performers around. Carnage is a collaboration with long-time friend and fellow ‘Bad seed’ Warren Ellis. The album sits very comfortable within this recent golden period of intense, melancholic and on occasion terrifying works. It is a surreal, stark, and brutal meditation on grief, dark, profound, pained, and melodramatic.

Black sea golden ladder. / Kingi, Troy
Mark: Kingi is now halfway through his 10-albums-in-10-different-genres-in-10-years project. This albums genre is ‘Folk’, a collaboration with co-writer, producer and multi-instrumentalist Delaney Davidson, and sees string drenched autumnal reflections sit next to twangy, gentle guitar porch ruminations on the cycle of life, love and the human spirit.
Neil: The supremely, gifted musical chameleon that is Troy Kingi has shown his musical versatility over several wonderful albums on several occasions in recent years, but who would have thought that his latest musical incarnation would be as a mellow folk maestro? The resulting album is a calm, beautiful, and chilled outing. A fabulous mellow outing, like watching the sun go down on the fragile dream of a late autumn day. Delaney Davidson’s voice adds just a little grit and darkness to the proceedings.

Soberish. / Phair, Liz
Mark: No other singer from her era fell as far as Liz Phair did in the eye of critics, as she shifted from the alt-darling of the Girly-sound tapes & confrontational debut Exile in Guyville, to working with ultra commercial songwriters The Matrix and rapping on Funstyle, the last album she released in 2010. ‘Soberish’ reunites her with Brad Wood, who produced her early albums, and while it still has a pop sheen to it she’s no longer forcing the point as hard as she was towards the end of her initial run. There’s a casualness to the whole thing that makes some tracks & musical ideas seem half formed, but also means the more poppy melodies sit next to the lesser formed sketches with more ease. The musical landscape has shifted so much since her last album, and genres have so little meaning to modern artists, that overt pop music and indie-meandering can now co-exist side by side on albums in a credible way that differentiates todays music from the albums of the 2000’s.
Neil: Liz’s first album in 11 years is a sharply focussed slab of Alt rock. In it she delivers an honest, heart felt work about the various faces and sides of love, and the pressures and damages that can be done by early fame – such as her battle with alcohol. The album reveals a clear-eyed depth of emotional clarity. An artist perhaps for the first time really connecting with inner self on record, or perhaps rediscovering who she is.

No gods no masters. / Garbage (Musical group)
Mark: Garbage in the 2010’s only released 2 albums, which were generally seen as riding the wave of 90s nostalgia. The new album ‘No gods no masters’ has been hailed as a bit of a return to form, with it’s pounding industrial beats and anthemic tracks. Shirley Manson’s lyrics have a more political & socio-politico focus on this album, lockdown and the current social tumult taking the album in a different direction than the initial sessions from 2018. She tackles subjects like Religion, patriarchal structure, injustice, late stage capitalism, misogyny, and white supremacy, while still focusing on the personal with a couple of tracks. However, how much you enjoy this new album may just depend on how much politics you like in your musical mix.
Neil: After a long break Garbage return to their swaggering incendiary best with ‘No gods no easily masters’, their strongest album since Version 2.0. They have reconnected with their dark muses in this powerful, hook laden, anthemic, genre blending rock out of an album.

Back to the future. / Sons of Kemet
Mark: Caribbean and Afro-influenced South London jazz supergroup. Opening track “Field Negus” was recorded during the BLM protests, and the song titles that follow form a cumulative historical narrative of the Afro-centric experience. Free jazz squalls mix with Middle Eastern grooves and Afrobeat, with guest players offering up instrumental talents and raps. Melodicism and anger meet within each track. Not the kind of Jazz you mellow out to….
Neil: Black to the future is Shabaka Hutchings politically charged propulsive Jazz album. It features multiple guests, including rappers and singers from both the U.S. & the UK, and is fundamentally a collaborative piece which aims to unite the different strands of the African diaspora. A passionate, angry, and incredibly powerful album that speaks directly about collective oppression.

Laugh to keep from crying. / Nat Turner Rebellion
Mark: Early ’70s Philly soul band whose music was mostly unreleased, now unearthed almost 50 years after the band’s breakup. Sort of like Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff making an entire album of tracks like Billy Paul’s ‘Am I Black Enough for You?’. Politically charged, anti war themed, full of statements of Black pride and power. Similar to a lot of the counterculture era soul songs that Motown released in the late 60’s, that still seem as relevant now as they were then. A bittersweet release, as songwriter/leader Joe Jefferson is the only band member still alive to see time finally catching up with this great music.
Neil: This album works as a nice historical complementary listen to the previously reviewed ‘Sons of Kemet’ album. ‘Laugh to keep from crying’ was originally recorded in 1969 and with the exception of a few tracks was shelved by the record company after tensions with the label, and is only finally seeing the light of day now. It’s a funk heavy masterpiece of the Philly soul and protest music movement sound. This album isn’t a re-release like so many other albums from this time, it is actually a rediscovery of a long-lost solid gold recording.

Sour. / Rodrigo, Olivia
Mark: Who better to assess the zeitgeist of sad girl pop than two middle-aged men? But seriously.. the massive streaming juggernaut that was Rodrigo’s Drivers License is just the beginning for this Disney+ actress, as it’s easy to see from her debut album that she is a genuine musician with a great soaring voice, a clever knack for storytelling & a biting lyricist reminiscent of Taylor Swift – her biggest influence alongside 90s artists like Alanis Morrissette & Fiona Apple. Being the next generation along from artists like Swift & Lorde, there is a much edgier lyrical focus on anxiety, social media, mental health, negative emotions, toxic relationships and far more F- bombs. She is representative of a whole wave of young female artists where the emotional angst is turned up to 11, but it’s the minute specificity of character details and pop culture drops in her lyrics that give her tracks their universal appeal.
Neil: Already thrust into the public limelight as one of the stars of Disney+ channel. Olivia Rodrigo has very quickly been given the mantel of pop’s newest young star. It can be a very heavy mantel to bear as many previous newest pop stars will testify. The main focus for Rodrigo’s debut album is the subject of failed romance. Rodrigo explores the subject adopting a wide range of styles and genres as if she is trying out various musical identities to see which one suits her own best. Which for a major media superstar under the age of 20 thrust into the limelight sounds like an ideal approach to take.

Earth trip. / Rose City Band
Mark: Initially the solo project of Ripley Johnson of Wooden Shjips, the bands third album (after last year’s Summerlong) features more lilting, rambling, indie country melancholy. The cleaner production brings more of a crisper detailed sound, which drifts pleasantly along, like a gentle walk down a country road, verging into dreamy Mazzy Star/J&M Chain territory on some tracks.
Neil: Neo Psychedelic rockers the Rose City Band deliver a J.J Cale-esque, country rock, Psychedelic journey focusing on inertia and isolation.

M’berra / Khalab
Mark: Collaborative fusion of Italian DJ Khalab and the musician residents of the M’berra refugee camp in south-eastern Mauritania. Khalab fuses the acoustic side of Tuareg music with electronic beats, the voices of the musicians and the everyday sounds of daily life of M’berra. A fascinating mash up of traditional sounds and contemporary productions.
Neil: This is one of those album’s that really transports the listener to new worlds created by the musicians involved. It is a collaborative work between electronic Italian D.J. Khalab and the M’berra Ensemble a community of musicians living in the M’berra refugee camp. The resulting album, both ancient and futuristic, is a breath-taking album of fantastically sculptured tracks and diverse sounds, featuring a dazzling array of instruments from traditional Mali instruments to synth bass’s and guitar.

Afrique victime. / Moctar, Mdou
Mark: Mdou Moctar is a Tuareg singer/songwriter and guitarist from Niger, who found fame via the cell phone music-trading networks of Africa’s Sahel region, before achieving international success through a series of albums that include a Tuareg-language homage to Purple Rain, and a psychedelic album recorded in Detroit. ‘Afrique victime’ is his debut album on indie heavyweight label Matador Records. Gentle acoustic reflections sit next to explosive and driving desert rockers full of fantasticly slinky guitar lines.
Neil: Superb explosive desert rock served up with fiery Psychedelic energy. The album was recorded piecemeal while touring, and the band very deliberately avoided professional studios and engineers seeking a more organic less controlled sound. Listening to the album furthers the ever-increasing evidence that the real beating heart of rock is in African, not some vacuum wrapped L.A. studio. A vibrant, electrifying and brilliantly uplifting album.

If I could make it go quiet / Girl In Red
Mark: Debut album from the Norwegian indie pop musician, following her hit single I Wanna Be Your Girlfriend. Full of noisy punky pop with Swiftian melodies, and later in the album slower synthy R&B sounds. What differentiates her music is the assertive anthems all have a queer focus, with raw lyrics about sex, desire. confusion and self loathing. An artist to watch for future releases.
Neil: Norwegian musician Marie Ulven’s pop punk debut album release was delayed like a lot of things due to Covid 19. It is finally here (she was already an icon in her home country due to herself confessional single releases). In ‘If I could make it go quiet’, we get an album full of candour and self-examination with a maximalist production. The lyrics are often raw and honest explorations of her anxiety, queerness, and moments of depression.

Promises / Floating Points
Mark: Keyboardist and electronic music producer Floating Points melds the tenor sax of Pharoah Sanders with the violins, violas, cellos, and double basses of the London Symphony Orchestra in a series of mellow Movements. Sanders sticks to soft gauzy tones that drift in & out of Orchestral washes that often sound like the quiter scenes in Blade Runner, or shades of old Bernard Herrmann scores. Dramatic strings evokes a melancholy yearning, and a nostalgic, dreamy, cinematic vibe to relax to.
Neil: Recorded over the course of five years this hybrid very tranquil, ambient, free-form jazz and classical inflected album is elegant, refined, and full of quiet moments of sonic beauty. Although it is an experimental album, it’s an exceptionally balanced, considered, and timeless work. To really appreciate it a relaxed deep listen is highly recommended. A perfect way to unwind from the rigors of the day.

Fine anyway. / Fakhr, Rogér
Mark: Part of Berlin label Habibi Funk’s series of reissues from Arabic-speaking parts of the world, ‘Fine anyway’ is another story of great music being relegated to obscurity due to the circumstances in which it was created. While Habibi Funk boss Jannis Stürtz was working on sourcing material for other projects, the name of Lebanese guitarist, singer/songwriter Rogér Fakhr kept coming up – followed by huge praise of his music and songwriting talents. Stürtz managed to contact Fakhr who sent him some tapes of music recorded in the late 1970s in Beirut, which included tracks from ‘Fine anyway’, which had been copied onto around 200 cassettes at the time. Initially reluctant to have his music re-released, Fakhr agreed a couple of years later to have 2 songs included in a compilation Solidarity With Beirut — to raise money for the Lebanese Red Cross in the wake of the tragic explosion in a Beirut port in 2020. After his tracks were included in that album, Fakhr came around to the idea of the full album being re-released, and it really is an amazing listen. A fantastic set of acoustic ballads and jangly chamber pop-rock that sounds like it was recorded in sunny California in the 60’s or 70’s. Shades of So-Cal pop & The Left Banke. A real gem.
Neil: Another album that for all intents and purposes isn’t a release, more a recovery of long-lost music. Back in the 1970’s when Lebanon was still a major cosmopolitan city Rogér Fakhr’s music and tapes circulated round the city’s chic cafes and bars. His smooth, mellow hippy inflected singer songwriter voice and songs could have made him a major artist somewhere else in the world. But it wasn’t to be, as very sadly history and events changed the course of that city and the trajectory of Rogér Fakhr’s career. These recordings show the exceptional song writing skills Roger had, and this release has definitely got a distinct Searching for Sugar Man vibe about it in many ways.

Archive series. Volume no. 5. / Iron & Wine
Mark: Recorded while Iron & Wine’s Sam Beam was a student at Florida State University in the late ’90s, this album is a prelude to his Sub-Pop label debut, The Creek Drank the Cradle. Sparse acoustic lo-fi musings, that offer a nascent portrait of the forthcoming success that Iron & Wine would have in reviving the folk genre for an indie audience. Iron & Wine’s musical palette would broaden with each album, but the simplicity of these early songs shines through.
Neil: The mellow alt country of Iron & Wine has very understandably a huge dedicated cult following. This very early collection of archival recordings sounds more like a lost early album than a collection of discarded outtakes. Even the earliest songs sound confident and fully formed, and reveal that Iron and Wines distinctive sound was there right from the onset.

Bright green field. / Squid (Musical group)
Mark: Squid are the next big UK Art-rock band. Post-punk indie with grooves from just about every other genre mixed in. Agitated lyrics about the dystopian nature of modern life set to jagged tunes that branch off in all sorts of musical directions. Pretty crazy. Worth checking out if you want something different to challenge you.
Neil: Angular music coupled with angry off kilter lyrics that illuminate the song writers’ discomfort with the modern World. In places it sounds slightly reminiscent of an early English pre-Eno Talking Heads. Seemingly unconcerned about creating a single musical identity, they use whatever style suits that particular track throwing in punk, krautrock, dub, jazz, and funk into this potent mix of an album.

Metaphysics. / Ibn Ali, Hasaan
Mark: Enigmatic Philadelphian Jazz musician said to have been the influence behind John Coltrane’s so-called sheets of sound style. One of only two albums to feature the pianist’s unique harmonically advanced polytonal compositions and playing style. Resurrected from a recently found tape copy, after the original master was destroyed in Atlantic Records infamous 1978 Warehouse fire. Truly amazing playing by any decades standards.
Neil: An album presumed missing for 56 years, after being lost in a fire, finally sees the light of day. Hasaan Ibn Ali played piano on a few ground-breaking albums by Jazz drummer Max Roach but has subsequently been viewed as a side note in jazz history. All that may be about to change as his sole recorded work as a band leader is about to see the light of say. It’s a slab of classic jazz from what some (misguided) regard as its golden age. It’s a major and important find, and is likely to force a major reassessment of his talent and role in the evolution of jazz.

…Keyboard fantasies… / Glenn-Copeland, Beverly
Mark: Slightly ‘New-Agey’ album recorded with just a Yamaha DX7 keyboard and a Roland TR-707 drum machine. Self-released as a cassette in 1986, it remained in obscurity for decades until it was rediscovered by Japanese music collectors during the 2010s. This led to multiple reissues of the album, and made the, now septuagenarian, artist an international touring star and subject of an award winning documentary, with younger artists such as Blood Orange, Moses Sumney, and Caribou claiming him as an influence. Lovely lilting, mellow music that can float in the background, or reveal hidden layers upon close listening.
Neil: A long deleted album given a rerelease. ‘Keyboard fantasies’ is regarded as a New Age masterpiece. And that pretty much defines whether you will like it or not.

New long leg. / Dry Cleaning (Musical group)
Mark: More London Art-rock fronted by Florence Shaw, whose rambling, mundane, spoken-word non sequitur’s are supported by the band’s melodic post punk of pulsing bass and catchy guitar lines. On paper the lyrics sound laughably pretentious, but it’s weirdly compelling to listen to; her deadpan sardonic tone reeling off bizarre lines about Antiques Roadshow, platform shoes & food that make no sense. Really good. Already making lists of the best albums of 2021 so far.
Neil: I really loved this album it sounded new and fresh and vital edgy. Managing to sound quirky and surreal both approachable and also experimental all at the same time. Another release I strongly suspect will be on lots of best of 2021 releases.

New DVDs for Te Awe

Here are some new DVDs added to the catalogue over June that are available at our CBD Te Awe Branch, and selected other locations. Also included are some of our On Order titles to give you a taste of what’s about to be released. Note: All ‘On Order’ titles are able to be reserved via the online catalogue.

New Material:
Promising young woman
Miss Virginia
The dry
The marksman.
It’s a sin.
Spread your wings.
Nomadland
Joanna Lumley’s trans-Siberian adventure.
Into the labyrinth.
Love, weddings & other disasters
Ammonite.
Sound of metal
Oliver Sacks : his own life
Intelligence. Season 1.
Eighth grade
Zack Snyder’s Justice League
Unforgotten. Series 4.
Nobody
Long story short.

On Order:
Six Minutes To Midnight
Only The Animals
Midsomer Murders: Season 21
His Dark Materials: Complete Season 2
French Exit
Flesh And Blood: (TV Mini-Series)
The Drowning
Triumph
Land
Defending Jacob: ; Season 1
Bram Stoker’s Van Helsing
Judas and the Black messiah
Come as you are.



























New CDs at Te Awe

I’m Mark, the Customer Specialist for Music & Film at Wellington City Libraries. Here is some of the new material we have been buying for the Music collection at our CBD Te Awe library. My colleague Neil & I decided to do some quick reviews of some new titles. Our limit was a couple of lines only. Do we actually carefully appraise & select the latest new music releases for your listening pleasure? Or do we just buy every third item on the list and hope it works out? Do we actually know anything about new music? Can you encapsulate an entire album in just one line? Read on to find out…
[Ed. Sadly we could not contain Neil’s exuberance to only one line for these reviews. We apologise in advance].

All bets are off. / Aphek, Tamar
Neil: Well I have to confess I don’t know much about the Israeli music scene, but if it’s all this good I need to seek more out. This is Tel- Aviv power pop trio Tamar Aphek’s debut album. It follows the grunge loud quiet format, think a modern Zeppelin or Nirvana but fronted by P. J. Harvey.
Mark: Rising star Aphek, a key figure in the Israeli underground scene, releases her debut album on the legendary Kill Rock Stars label. Fuses emotional, social & global concerns in a melange of crooning vocals, fuzzy indie rock, distorted basslines and Jazz riffs. Catchy.

Neil Young archives. Vol. II, 1972-1976. / Young, Neil
Neil: In the early to mid 70’s Young’s prodigious creativity was at a peak it was such that he could shelve for decades fabulous albums like the only just released Homegrown. This box set of rarities, out takes, alternative versions and unreleased tracks is a fitting demonstration of just how on fire creatively he was at this period. In short, a must listen if you are a Neil Young fan.
Mark: 10-CD box set follows 2009’s The Archives Vol. 1 1963–1972, and covers a three-and-a-half-year release period from 1972–1976. 131 tracks. 63 previously unreleased, including alternate & live versions, with only 12 songs never been released in any form before. Is this value for money if you’re a Neil Young fan? Don’t worry, we bought it so you didn’t have to…

Little oblivions. / Baker, Julien
Neil: Julien Baker’s third album features for the first time a full band so it is a big departure from the acoustic alt folk roots of her previous two outings. However, the brutal personal honesty of her lyrics is still there, making this universally lauded album both a captivating and unsettling listen.
Mark: After critical breakout Matador album, 2017’s Turn Out the Lights, Baker builds a larger musical palette around her lacerating narratives of self recrimination, substance abuse, and faith.

As the love continues. / Mogwai (Musical group)
Neil: The mighty Mogwai release their tenth album and score their first UK number one album in the process. The traditional trademark slow build up to a mountainous wall of sound, starting with and tempered by sad melancholic harmony is very much in presence in this new work. Which feels like they are building on past structures and forms rather than diving into new worlds.
Mark: More atmospheric noodling. If that’s your thing you’ll enjoy this.

Collapsed in sunbeams. / Parks, Arlo
Neil: A cool, chilled, and accomplished debut by the twenty-year-old London poet Arlo Parks. Perhaps just a little bit too radio friendly for my tastes, but seemingly Michelle Obama is a big fan, so who am I to judge.
Mark: Debut studio album by British singer-songwriter Arlo Parks. ‘Next Big Thing’ status. Catchy beats, positive messages. Lily Allen meets Corine Bailey Rae.

The raw & the cooked. / Fine Young Cannibals
Neil: Rerelease of one of the eighties defining classic pop albums, packed with hits galore and memorable catchy tunes. It proved to be their last album (they only made two) but they had already left their mark on eighties pop history.
Mark: Deluxe reissues of the only 2 albums (1st album here) from the iconic Birmingham band that were huge in the 80s. 29 bonus tracks for the first album (including B-sides, remixes, BBC sessions and more) and 22 extra tracks for The Raw & The Cooked. Nice sets if you were fans of their funky soul tinged rock, and the unique voice of Roland Gift.

Flow state. / Sultana, Tash
Neil: 23-Year-old Melbourne based former busker Tash Sultana is the perfect example of the term overnight success, after posting a performance on you tube, she gained 10000 followers overnight. This is her R&B flavoured, radio friendly obviously highly commercial debut album. She plays all the instruments and sings all the vocals on the release.
Mark: Debut album from Australian singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist-guitar whizz. More Neo soul/RnB-ish, but she threads in enough guitar workouts to satisfy Rock fans. A myriad of styles & genres sometimes collide. A prelude of what was to follow on 2021’s Terra Firma [On Order].

Not your muse. / Celeste
Neil: Smokey atmospheric vocals are all over the heavily played artists debut album. (She’s done Christmas adverts and sport break music links) But within and behind the commercial gloss and glitz there sounds to be a great artist with real depth and heart at work. A soul singer who has the potential to be more than just a mainstream star.
Mark: British-Jamaican Celeste is a 2019 Rising Star Brit Award & BBC Sound Of 2020 winner. Another Neo-soul debut album. Perhaps too obvious with its influences in places, but has its share of stand out tracks like ‘Tonight, Tonight’ & ‘Stop this Flame’ that draw you in, and hint at something stronger at play.

That’s life. / Nelson, Willie
Neil: This album is Willie’s second album that features him covering Frank Sinatra songs. It’s a difficult feat to pull off without sounding like a bad Frank Sinatra copy or murdering the songs by losing their uniqueness, but by doing the tracks in his own inimitable style he effortlessly succeeds in making them his own. Interesting fact: Willie Nelson used to cheer up a downbeat Johnny Cash by phoning him up late at night and telling him dirty jokes.
Mark: If you liked 2018’s My Way, this is more of the same. Willie sings Sinatra. His way.

The RCA albums 1977-1985, with bonus tracks. / King, Evelyn “Champagne”
Neil: A Box set of the disco diva Queen Evelyn “Champagne” King’s RCA albums. A lot in there, with some classic disco glitterball tracks amongst them.
Mark: One of Allmusic’s Best of 2020 Archival releases. Chronicles her long run with RCA Victor highlighted by 20 charting singles and a trio of Top Ten R&B LPs through 1986. At the forefront of the evolution of post-disco soul/R&B, she worked with upcoming producers using new synth technologies & sounds that would shape the sound of 1980’s soul-Pop.

Power corruption and lies. / New Order
Neil: New Order’s second album is often regarded by fans as one of their finest. It still has tracks that definitely have Joy Division elements to them such as Ultraviolence and synth atmospheres that could easily have fitted into closer but it also has the beginnings of their new musical direction and Bernard Sumner is still trying to find his own lyric writing voice. That all said it is a brilliant album that shows the green dance shoots taht found their total reinvention in albums like the Studio 54 inspired Technique. This new release features loads of previously rare or unreleased live and other material.
Mark: Seminal dance-rock album given the Super-Deluxe treatment. Another entry from Allmusic’s Best of 2020 Archival releases. The remastered album is the first one made from the original master tapes. Unreleased tracks, a Peel session & an impressive amount of video content.

Good woman / Staves
Neil: Know as an innovative folk trio, The Staves further push the boundaries of that particular genre further out in this new release so much so that it would be difficult to still call them folk artists. Their beautiful overlocking harmonies remain, and the lyrics reveal a newly found deeper emotional honesty and rawness. A band moving towards something very new.
Mark: First original album in 6 years for England-based sisters. More soft rock than folk at this point, as lovely unison harmonies surround Laurel Canyon pop sounds that focus on rising above the emotional travails of life.

Just dropped in (to see what condition my rendition was in) / Jones, Sharon
Neil: The album sounds just like a work released by some Motown Era label, but this is actually an album of modern song covers from artists like Prince and Janet Jackson the trick is they are done by the sadly deceased soul Singer. The analogue production gives them authentic sounding 60 grit and a crackle and Sharon’s years of club singing give her the musical chops to pull it off.
Mark: Points for the clever title. A great posthumous collection of the late soul singer’s cover songs. She had that rare ability of all great singers to stamp their own personality on a song, no matter how iconic the original performance.

Magic. / Oneohtrix Point Never
Neil: Splicing, looping, sampling Daniel Lopatin’s latest album employs all his trademark tricks, just when you think a track is settling down it moves on to something else endlessly shifting and moving to great effect. An experimental album constructed from fragments and a perfect introduction to his work.
Mark: I don’t even understand the Pitchfork review about this album, let alone the music itself. Like someone working their way through a radio dial…

Time outtakes / Brubeck, Dave
Neil: ‘Time Out’ is one of the most popular, instantly recognizable, and iconic jazz albums of all time. ‘Time outtakes’ gives fans a fascinating look behind the scenes as the album slowly evolves from rough ideas and jams to slowly become the masterpiece it is.
Mark: An album of previously unheard recordings from the sessions of one of Jazz’s most iconic albums, 1959’s Time Out. Five alternate versions, and two tracks that didn’t make the final album, show the band trying to carve out the direction they wanted to go as they grapple with the rhythmic complexities of the tunes. A fascinating listen for Jazz fans.

Cuba : music and revolution : culture clash in Havana, Cuba : experiments in Latin music 1975-85. Vol. 1
Neil: The hot bed of radical, musical invention that was the Cuban music scene in this period is fully on show in this compilation. Western genres and styles are taken mutated, fused, and melded into the already vibrant Cuban scene creating unique and new sounds. You can hear the long tail echoes of this explosion all over the place.
Mark: Compiled by DJ Gilles Peterson and Soul Jazz Records founder Stuart Baker, this compilation tracks the history of Cuban music post the pre-revolutionary Buena Vista Social Club, proving a wealth of innovative and adventurous music was still being made under a repressive regime.

For the first time. / Black Country, New Road
Neil: Jagged, angular post punk debut album with nods to prog rock drumming and Jewish Klezmer music. Coupled with mercurial vocals and lyrics, it all makes for a marmite album if I ever heard one. Check it out to see what side you are on.
Mark: The genre bending (post-punk, free jazz, klezmer, math rock) 7-piece band have already been hailed as delivering one of the best albums of 2021. Only 6 tracks, but those tracks are full of genre shifts, instrumental breaks, opaque lyrics and adventurous exploration that defies expectations. Maybe not to everyone’s taste but, as the reviews say, ‘undeniably original’ which these days is a achievement itself.

Isles. / Bicep
Neil: Lush, lavish, melodic dance floor electronica with solid beats from Northern Ireland. The album pulls off that Holy grail of dance music that only a few acts like Aphex Twin can do, by being simultaneously interesting on and off the dance floor.
Mark: Northern Irish DJs keeping the dancefloor alive during Lockdown. The beats have enough edge to escape fading into a background playlist.

Love is the king. / Tweedy, Jeff
Neil: During lockdown with his family the Wilco frontman used his sons Sammy and Spencer as musical cohorts to him help create this mellow country infused album with loneliness and longing as its driver. It also celebrates human connectedness and solace in Jeff’s personal musical snapshot of our times.
Mark: More tedium from Tweedy. If you like Wilco’s post-Jay Bennett albums then probably you’ll like Tweedy’s solo efforts.

OK human. / Weezer
Neil: The fourteenth album by the American rockers is a quirky 38-piece orchestra pandemic fallout album with numerous references musical and otherwise to things like Pet Sounds, Serge Gainsbourg and even George Orwell’s 1984. Despite the heavy orchestration and shining through it, the album is undeniably and unmistakably a Weezer release.
Mark: Guitar strings are swapped for Classical ones as Rivers Cuomo gives us his unique take on living in the Covid era. Many bands choose to put strings to old songs rather than new ones, but the uplifting nature of these songs suits the change of musical pace. Moody, yet catchy at the same time.

On all fours. / Goat Girl
Neil: Swirling psychedelic guitars, accompanied by shimmering electronics coupled with angry lyrics deliberately obscured by mock cheerfulness. Make goat Girl’s album an intentionally strange, off kilter listen with discordant lyrics to match often contrasted by sweet vocal deliveries. I rather enjoyed it.
Mark: Post-punk London quartet. The follow-up to their acclaimed 2018 self-titled debut sees a more mature politicized bent that digs into topics like climate change, toxic culture, identity, and mental health, all underpinned by some great playing & confident layered vocals. As relevant and interesting as the more acclaimed punk of Fontaines D.C.

New York. / Reed, Lou
Neil: A reissue of Lou Reed’s 1989 album, described as a protest album with the background being Reagan’s America and the HIV/ AIDs epidemic but unsurprisingly this is very much a protest album on Reeds own terms. The music is bleak and the lyrics often nihilistic about futility, fear, and darkness but there is no doubt that his legendary song writing skills are used to their full effect.
Mark: Regarded as the pinnacle of his solo career, this Deluxe edition 3CD+DVD+LP package features a 2020 remaster, a live version of the entire album, and another disc non-album tracks & ‘Rough Mixes’ of tracks from the album. The DVD includes The New York Album a concert video that was originally released in 1990 on VHS and Laserdisc but has never been available on DVD. Sadly many of the themes on this album still resonate within today’s American landscape.

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Songbooks at Te Awe

Calling all musicians and aficionados of musical theatre! Did you know that we have a collection of Songbooks at our newest Central City branch, Te Awe Library on Brandon Street?

Before Central closed, it was home to a large collection of Songbooks and music Scores. These are all now available to reserve from our warehouse. But if you would like to browse some Songbooks in person, you can find them upstairs at Te Awe, nestled amongst the CD collection, and next to the music magazines. There is a great selection of songs held there including, rock, pop, standards, musicals, folk, and movie songs, with instructions for piano, vocal and guitar.

You can find our Te Awe branch just off Lambton Quay at 29 Brandon Street, or you can enter from Panama Street. In addition to the Songbooks and CDs upstairs, you will find young adult books, non-fiction and Māori books, DVDs and Blu-ray. On the ground floor there are magazines, a children’s area, adult fiction, large print, audiobooks, bestsellers, and a café! So take a look today!

New Music at Te Awe

I’m Mark, the Customer Specialist for Music & Film at Wellington City Library. Here is some of the new and material we have been buying for the Music collection at our CBD Te Awe branch.
My colleague Neil & I decided to do a quick one line review of these titles. Do we actually carefully appraise & select the latest new music releases for your listening pleasure? Or do we just buy every third item on the list and hope it works out? Do we actually know anything about new music? Or are we just too old and think ‘Be-a-ba-dooby-do…’ is something Sinatra used to croon? Read on to find out….

Pleased to meet me / Replacements
Neil: Welcome re-release of The Replacements album. A band that could have been as big as REM, but internal tensions prevented them from achieving this.
Mark: Pioneers of the whole Alt-rock ‘left of the dial’ genre, PTME deftly weaves in a wider array of genres and musical touches into their signature sound to great effect.

 

The seeds of love. / Tears For Fears
Neil: The Beatles of the 1980s – or so they wished. Even the cover emulates Sgt. Pepper. That said their anthemic tunes are currently getting a re-appraisal.
Mark: More musicians than machines was their aim with the wider scope & personnel of this polished album. However the seeds of breakup were sown during its sessions and it would be 10 years before they would record together again.

 

Fall to pieces. / Tricky
Neil: Tricky’s darkest album in years revolves around the death of his daughter. Intense, bleak and perhaps the best thing he has ever released.
Mark: Personal loss has sadly been the inspiration for great art and music, and this is no exception. Emotionally cathartic, but not an easy listen.

 

In memory of my feelings / Davies, Catherine Anne
Neil: Electronica artist The Anchoress shifts names & styles and collaborates with ex-Suede guitarist Bernard Butler to deliver a glam-pop album that moves effortlessly between the delicate and the swaggering.
Mark: Welsh musician/songwriter Catherine Anne Davies & Bernard Butler collab. Inexplicitly shelved for 4 years. Sounds like: If Chrissie Hynde fronted Suede. 2020 thanks you for your gift.

 

Androgynous Mary. / Girl Friday
Neil: Girl Friday’s debut album is a hook laden 80s inspired jangly pop. Fans of The Beths would really love this.
Mark: Cool LA female quartet featuring Wgtn singer-songwriter Vera Ellen. Lo-Fi guitars & melodies produce a charming album full of catchy tunes.

 

 

Fake it flowers. / Beabadoobee
Neil: Slacker tinged post punk reinvented by the Pavement obsessed Beabadoobee. Catchy singalong tunes that could have been in Scott Pilgrim the movie.
Mark: Next big thing Tik-Tok/Instgram sensation. Clever, relatable lyrics for young women or another warmed over 90s homage? Check it out to find out. Maybe with your daughter. If you both like Snail Mail. Or Soccer Mommy. Or Jay Som.

 

Free love. / Sylvan Esso
Neil: Carefully crafted pop-electronica from Sylvan Esso.
Mark: Singer from folk trio Mountain Man. Diverse shades of four on the floor, and blips and bleeps.

 

 

Songs and instrumentals. / Lenker, Adrianne
Neil: Touching personal songs in a classic folk singer-songwriter style. Gentle & mellow.
Mark: Big Thief singer. Charming & gentle acoustic improvisations recorded during lockdown.

 

 

The Harry Smith B-sides.
Neil: Part of the legendary series of American folk recordings by Harry Smith. Done at a time when these folk songs were on the verge of being lost forever. American folk music’s DNA.
Mark: The literal flip sides to each of the recordings present on the original Anthology of American Folk Music.

 

Lovey. / Lemonheads
Neil: Another album from the vaults from the Boston ex-Punk band who went mainstream.
Mark: Reissue of their first album on Atlantic. The older punk style of The Lemonheads collides with the new directions of Evan Dando. Pre-cursor to the upcoming pop-fame of It’s a Shame about Ray.

 

 

Morrison Hotel. / Doors (Musical group)
Neil: After the overproduced Soft Parade the Doors returned to their core hard driving blues style. Contains an hour of unreleased sessions.
Mark: Yawn. Yet another Doors reissue. You can check out of the Morrison Hotel. But you can never leave…

 

 

Space funk : afro futurist electro funk in space 1976-84.
Neil: This compilation of rare Afro-futurist funk is infectious, joyous, groovy, cool and occasionally cheesy. Wonderful stuff!
Mark: Imagine The Car Wash by Rose Royce with lyrics about space & robots…

 

 

Wildflowers & all the rest. / Petty, Tom
Neil: Petty fans will welcome this reissue of the project he was working on before he died.
Mark: Critically acclaimed high water mark of his solo career finally gets a release after being derailed by lawsuits. The extra tracks (originally intended for a double album release) are as good as those on the original album.

 

Free humans. / Hen Ogledd
Neil: Sci-Fi sounds of another type, Quirky low-fi folk-indie-pop that embraces the end of the world.
Mark: Indie-Pop helmed by Richard Dawson. Social commentary as a sci-fi journey.

 

 

Palo Alto / Monk, Thelonious
Neil: This live recording of jazz legend Thelonious Monk done by the janitor at Palo Alto High school is an unearthed gem.
Mark: Legendary lost Monk concert with amazing sound. Thankfully now released after a dispute with his estate was settled.

 

 

Friend ship / Phoenix Foundation
Neil: Their distinctive vocal and guitar styles are at the front of their latest release. As good as anything else they’ve previously done.
Mark: 1-800 Are you allright? Yes, now that the Phoenix Foundation are back. Collabs with Nada Ried & Hollie Fullbrook add another layer to this intelligent & fun return.

 

 

Sign “O” the times [deluxe]. / Prince
Neil: An extensive box set of Prince at his creative and innovative peak. Much of the additional material is as good as the original album. A must listen for any prince fan
Mark: Is an 8CD box set for one album too much? Not when it’s Price at his peak. From the 63 previously unreleased tracks you could easily compile another album as good as anything he ever released.

Movie Nights are back in CBD and they are on Tuesdays

Movie Nights are back in the central city! Our newest library Te Awe in Brandon Street offers much-missed movie nights in the CBD every Tuesday night starting at 5:45 pm. Te Awe Library (meaning White Feathers) features a lovely open area for various events and the movies will be shown there.

In July and August, we will be selecting movies from our ‘Essential Film Viewing’ list, which is based on the reference book 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die, so you must come to see them! No booking needed but please be seated by 5:45 pm.

Wadestown Library also continues to offer Thursday Movie Nights. Please contact them for further information on their screening.

Other branch libraries at Karori, Newtown, Johnsonville and Tawa also show movies.