Ka nui te ranea o ngā pukapuka hou. An abundance of new books.

Being Together in Place

Ngā mihi o te ngahuru. We have an abundant and varied collection of new books for you in this whakairinga rangitaki (blog post) and there is something for everyone – from social comment to health, from poetry to history. Highlights include Urban Māori: The Second Great Migration which is a timely exploration of the twentieth century Māori migration from rural communities to cities and its impact on Māori identity, and The Moon on my Tongue a wonderful anthology of Māori poetry in English.

Syndetics book coverPou o ue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Ue is the companion book to Cyrus Hingston’s earlier Pou o Whakaue: Marae of Whakaue.  This new volume “…is a history of six marae of Rotorua: the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the hau kainga, and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the tupuna Uenukukopako (Ue) and Te Arawa whanui.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverUrban Māori : the second great migration / Bradford Haami for Te Whānau o Waipareira.
“The post-1945 migration to the cities by Māori transformed Aotearoa New Zealand forever. Exploring what being Māori means today, author Bradford Haami looks back to the experience of the first migrants, and traces the development of an urban Maori identity over the interceding years. Photos and personal korero intersperse a very readable text.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe moon on my tongue : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri, Robert Sullivan and Ben Styles.
“From both revered, established writers and exciting contemporary poets, the work in this anthology offers a broad picture of Māori poetry written in English. There are laments for koro (elders), hopes for mokopuna (grandchildren); celebrations of the land and anger at its abuse; retellings of myth and reclamations of history.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTātai whetū : seven Māori women poets in translation / edited by Maraea Rakuraku and Vana Manasiadis.This is the fourth volume in the Seraph Press Translation Series and is a beautiful little book that celebrates Māori writing and the Māori language. The featured poets include Anahera Gildea,  Kiri Piahana-Wong, Maraea Rakuraku, and Alice Te Punga Somerville. This bilingual collection features a poem each by seven Māori women writers, originally written in English, and a translation in the Māori language.

Syndetics book coverMaea te toi ora : Māori health transformations / Te Kani Kingi, Mason Durie, Hinemoa Elder, Rees Tapsell, Mark Lawrence, Simon Bennett.
“The six contributing authors in the collection include Simon Bennett, Mason Durie, and Rees Tapsell and are all well known in the mental health field. Each discusses aspects of Maori and indigenous health and the importance of culture to diagnosis, patient history, understanding causes, treatment and assessment of outcomes.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverBeing together in place : indigenous coexistence in a more than human world / Soren C. Larsen and Jay T. Johnson ; foreword by Daniel R. Wildcat.
Being Together in Place highlights the challenging, tentative, and provisional work of coexistence between Native and Non-Native peoples in relation to contested spaces such as wetlands, treaty grounds, fishing spots, recreation areas, cemeteries, heritage trails, and traditional village sites.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe New Zealand Wars / Philippa Werry.
“Describing the origins of the wars, where and when they were fought, who was involved, and who they affected, this book also examines war memorials, the work of the Waitangi Tribunal, how the wars have featured in New Zealand arts and how they are remembered today. The story is accessible and full of fascinating detail, eye-witness accounts, illustrations and little known facts, with lists of websites, resources and books for those who want to discover more.” (Adapted from the publisher description)

Syndetics book coverTe Ao Hou : the new world, 1820-1920 / Judith Binney with Vincent O’Malley and Alan Ward.
Te Ao Hou explores the history of Maori and Pakeha from about 1830. As the new world unfolded, Maori independence was hotly contested; Maori held as tightly as they could to their authority over the land, while the Crown sought to loosen it. War broke out and for Maori the consequences were devastating, and the recovery was long, framed by poverty, population decline and the economic depression of the late nineteenth century.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Ao Hurihuri : the changing world, 1920-2014 / Aroha Harris with Melissa Matutina Williams.
Te Ao Hurihuri shows Maori engaged in building and rebuilding their communities through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Maori held fiercely to iwi-specific connectedness, community organisation and te reo me ona tikanga. New kinds of Maori institutions released the dynamism of tangata whenua, but the struggle continued against a background of social and economic hardship that burdens so many Maori lives.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

He kohinga o te tau hou

Ngā mihi o te tau hou: amongst this varied collection of new books is a lovely new edition of Ani Mikaere’s The balance destroyed. The illustrations by Robyn Kahukiwa enhance the themes of Ani Mikaere’s thesis of twenty years ago – her research of mana wahine and ira wahine has more than stood the test of time.

Syndetics book coverFaith, politics and reconciliation : Catholicism and the politics of indigeneity / Dominic O’Sullivan.
“Were Catholics guilty of [aiding and abetting] the genocide of indigenous peoples during the colonization of Australia and New Zealand? … In order to answer these and other related questions over the role of the Roman Catholic Church in the colonization of Australia and New Zealand, Dominic O’Sullivan takes us on a theological, philosophical and political journey from the countries of Europe to the colonies of Australia and New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCities in New Zealand : preferences, patterns and possibilities / edited by Philippa Howden-Chapman, Lisa Early & Jennifer Ombler.
“This book outlines the latest thinking about the preferences people have for their urban life, the patterns of urban development in Aotearoa, and the possibilities for our cities in the future.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 7. Responding to the challenges: Māori and urban development by Andrew Waa, John Ryks, Biddy Libersey & Jonathan Kilgour.
p. 129. Unearthing urban Māori : 150+ years of tangata whenua participation in the development of Wellington city by Keriata Stuart.

Syndetics book coverKa hoki tāua ki te whare huri ai ē! / kaiētita Agnes McFarland rāua ko Taiarahia Black.
“This collection of essays, all in Te Reo Maori, explores histories, people and places of significance, and takes the reader into the oral arts, including haka, karakia, and waiata… Ka titiro atu koe ki tetahi mea, ki tetahi whenua, ki tetahi awa, ki tetahi kainga, ki tetahi tangata ka hokia mai ano aua whakaaro me nga ahuatanga i kite ai koe i te wa i a koe e tamariki ana. .. Kai roto i teneki pukapuka e kitea ai te wairua o te kupu, a tena kaiwhakairo i te kupu, whakaniko i te kupu ataahua o roto mai i te rohe o Mataatua.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverDancing with the King : the rise and fall of the King Country, 1864-1885 / Michael Belgrave.
“After the battle of Orakau in 1864 and the end of the war in the Waikato, Tawhiao, the second Maori King, and his supporters were forced into an armed isolation in the Rohe Potae, the King Country. For the next twenty years, the King Country operated as an independent state – a land governed by the Maori King where settlers and the Crown entered at risk of their lives.” (Syndetics summary)

Cover from Fishpond.co.nzTāngata Ngāi Tahu = People of Ngāi Tahu. Volume One / edited by Helen Brown and Takerei Norton.
“Mo tatou, a, mo ka uri a muri ake nei. For us and our children after us. Tangata Ngai Tahu remembers and celebrates the rich and diverse lives of the people of Ngai Tahu. Spanning time, geography and kaupapa, fifty biographies bring Ngai Tahu history into the present.” (fishpond.co.nz)

Syndetics book coverThe balance destroyed / Ani Mikaere ; with images by Robyn Kahukiwa.
Originally presented to the University of Waikato as a Master of Jurisprudence thesis.

Syndetics book coverWater rights for Ngai Tahu : A discussion paper
“In Water rights for Ngāi Tahu, Te Maire Tau considers the historical and political framework that has contributed to the current state of water rights in the Ngāi Tahu takiwā. He explores the customary, legal, and Treaty frameworks that feed into the debate regarding the ownership of water…” (back cover)

Syndetics book coverLeaders like you : New Zealand leaders share stories of courage, failure and commitment / copy, interviews & editing, Nick Sceats and Andrea Thompson ; portraits, Bonny Beattie.
Sceats, Nick and Andrea Thompson. Leaders like you : New Zealand leaders share stories of courage, failure and commitment. 2017.
p. 14. Bennett, Arihia. The power of listening.
p. 128 Dewes, Whaimutu. The evidential leader.
p. 156. Te Tau, Tui. Whe “why not?” leader.

Syndetics book coverThe history of Hawke’s Bay / Matthew Wright.
“Hawke’s Bay has a remarkable history, brief by world standards, yet filled with colour, pace and life. This illustrated history covers the broadest sweep of Hawke’s Bay’s past, telling the wider tale of people and their ideals… “(Syndetics summary)
p. 7. Land and people — Māui – arrival of Ngāti Kahungunu – Hawkes Bay during the ‘musket wars’
p. 27. Cowboy frontier – land sharks and proselytes – Donald Mclean’s land purchases – the war at Te Pakiakia –
p. 68. (The land of the shepherd kings) – race, war and politics.

Cover from Fishpond.co.nzSearches for tradition : essays on New Zealand music, past & present / edited by Michael Brown & Samantha Owens.
“In Douglas Lilburn’s famous address to the 1946 Cambridge Summer School of Music, the composer described his ‘search for tradition’ in the music of New Zealand and spelled out his hopes that a distinctive art music might yet emerge here.
p. 59. Alfred Hill’s ‘Māori songs : whose tradition?” by Melissa Cross
p. 125 Whāia te māramatanga : the search for enlightenment by Valance Smith
p. 139 Mai I te pō : the reclamation of taonga pōro as a living treasure by Awhina Tamarapa and Ariana Tikao
p. 223 Shaping traditions of vocality : the lyrical legacy of Kiri Te Kanawa by Jenny Wollerman

Syndetics book coverTelling the real story : genre and New Zealand literature / Erin Mercer.
“Telling the Real Story: Genre and New Zealand Literature interrogates the relationships between genre, realism and New Zealand literature…” (Syndetics summary)
p. 205. ‘Something that described the real New Zealand’ : Keri Hulme’s The Bone people and Witi Ihimaera’s The matriarch.

Syndetics book coverLinguist at work : festschrift for Janet Holmes / edited by Meredith Marra and Paul Warren.
“Throughout her 45-year career at Victoria University of Wellington, Professor Janet Holmes has operated at the cutting edge of sociolinguistics. She is recognised as a field leader, a pioneer for new approaches, and a warm and generous mentor…” (Syndetics summary)
P. 159. Audiences, referees and landscapes : understanding the use of Māori and English in New Zealand dual language picture books through a sociolinguistic lens by Nicola Daly.

Syndetics book coverPetroleum development and environmental conflict in Aotearoa New Zealand : Texas of the South Pacific / Terrence M. Loomis.
“Petroleum Development and Environmental Conflict in Aotearoa New Zealand: Texas of the South Pacific examines the dilemmas associated with economic growth through the expansion of resource extraction. … Terrence M. Loomis analyzes the circumstances under which environmental opposition to state policies to promote oil and gas development–in collaboration with the petroleum industry–, has lead to far-reaching changes in institutional relations between the state and civil society.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 163. Selling the East Coast.
p. 193. Community and indigenous responses to oil and gas development

Pukapuka hou: Kōanga, 2017 (New books: Spring 2017)

Wellington City Libraries now holds Cyrus Hingston’s Pou o Whakaue: marae of Whakaue, and we look forward to the arrival of his companion book, Pou o Ue. Rangi Matamua published Matariki the star of the year, and we welcome now the reo Māori edition, Matariki: te whetū tapu o te tau. Finally, some very interesting thoughts on kaupapa Māori by a collection of of our favourite authors and scholars.

Pou o Whakaue : marae of Whakaue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Whakaue is a history of eight marae of Whakaue – the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the tangata whenua and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the ancestor Whakaue and Te Arawa whanui.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCritical conversations in kaupapa Māori / edited by Te Kawehau Hoskins and Alison Jones.
“Kaupapa Māori theory and methodology developed over twenty years ago and have since become influential in social research, practice and policy areas. The collection contains chapters by Brad Coombes, Garrick Cooper, Mason Durie, Carl Mika, Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal, Graham Hingangaroa Smith, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Alice Te Punga Somerville, Georgina Stewart and Tamasailau Suaalii-Sauni, along with the collection editors.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverMatariki : te whetū tapu o te tau / Rangi Matamua.
“In midwinter, Matariki rises in the pre-dawn sky, and its observation is celebrated with incantations on hilltops at dawn, balls, exhibitions, dinners and a vast number of events. The Matariki tradition has been re-established, and its regeneration coincides with a growing interest in Māori astronomy. Still, there remain some unanswered questions about how Matariki was traditionally observed. What is Matariki? Why did Māori observe Matariki? How did Māori traditionally celebrate Matariki? When and how should Matariki be celebrated? This book seeks answers to these questions and explores what Matariki was in a traditional sense so it can be understood and clebrated in our modern society.” (Back cover)

Image from VUPInternational indigenous rights in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Andrew Erueti.
“Over the past four decades, international indigenous rights have become a prominent aspect of international law and are now enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Yet, while endorsed by Aotearoa New Zealand in 2010, little remains known about how these standards came about, how the international movement that created them was established, and the implications of these standards on national reforms already protecting Māori rights. International Indigenous Rights in Aotearoa New Zealand seeks to answer these questions.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJuridical encounters : Māori and the colonial courts, 1840-1852 / Shaunnagh Dorsett
“From 1840 to 1852, the Crown Colony period, the British attempted to impose their own law on New Zealand. In theory Maori, as subjects of the Queen, were to be ruled by British law. But in fact, outside the small, isolated, British settlements, most Maori and many settlers lived according to tikanga … Shaunnagh Dorsett examines the shape that exceptional laws took in New Zealand, the ways they influenced institutional design and the engagement of Maori with those new institutions, particularly through the lowest courts in the land.” (Syndetics summary)

By their fruits you will know them : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church. Volume 2 / edited by Selwyn Katene.
“This book follows ‘Turning the Hearts of the Children’, exploring why so many Māori in the 1880s were inspired to question the mainstream churches and flock to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormon church.” (Book jacket)

Syndetics book coverHuia short stories. 12 : contemporary Māori fiction.
“Here are the best short stories and novel extracts from the Pikihuia Awards for Māori writers 2017 as judged by Whiti Hereaka, Paula Morris, Poia Rewi amd Rawinia Higgins. The book contains the stories from the finalists for Best Short Story written in English, Best Short Story written in te reo Māori and Best Novel Extract categories.” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverThese two hands : a memoir / Renée.
“Renee Paule lives in Otaki and teaches her Your Life, Your Story and her Poem a Week workshops there. This is just one version of her life, her story, told in patches, like a quilt.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe fuse box : essays on writing from Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters / edited by Emily Perkins and Chris Price.
“From Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters, The Fuse Box offers writing strategies and guidance on keeping the faith from some of our best writers. Starting with the instigating spark, through to currents and connections, these essays shine a light on the creative process. They explore what to write about and how to get started, how to keep the flow going over time, freedom and constraint, how your writing might meet the world, and how to make the most of accidents. Poets, dramatists, novelists and writing teachers open up to reveal their wiring in essays that are strikingly honest, political and playful.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 91. The story that matters by Tina Makereti.
p. 204. Patricia Grace : an interview with Briar Grace-Smith

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand between the wars / edited by Rachael Bell.
“If World War One was the crucible that forged an independent New Zealand identity, then the two decades following are surely the years in which the foundation for the new nation was laid. In shedding the last vestiges of colonial society in exchange for the trappings of a modern democratic nation, the 1920s and 1930s in New Zealand set a blueprint for state intervention and assistance that remained unchallenged for the next 50 years.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Once were muttonbirders: Ngāti Kuia’s flight to retain its Tītī harvesting rights by Peter Meihana.

Anō, toitū te whenua: New Māori books

Our latest list of new Māori material includes an interesting fictionalised account of the Battle of Ōrākau, in both Te Reo and English by Witi Ihimaera. Pūkaki, a book about the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor has now been translated into te reo. A research publication on indigenous aspects of business and management include an overview of the environmental failures of the MV Rena written by Ella Henry.

Syndetics book coverSleeps standing : a story of the Battle of Orākau / Witi Ihimaera ; with Hēmi Kelly.
“Both fiction and fact, this fascinating book is a kaleidoscopic exploration of the Battle of Orakau …The battle marked the end of the Land Wars in the Waikato and resulted in vast tracts of land being confiscated for European settlement … It is estimated that, at the height of the battle, 1700 immensely superior troops, well-armed and amply resourced, laid siege to the hastily constructed pa at Orakau. The defenders were heavily outnumbered with few supplies or weapons but, when told to submit, they replied- ‘E hoa, ka whawhai tonu matou, ake, ake, ake!’ ‘Friend, I shall fight against you for ever, for ever!'” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverExtinguishing title : Maori land rights, people, and perspective in post-colonial New Zealand / Stella Coram.
“Without question, British ‘settlement’ of the new colony created a demand for Māori land and, to facilitate the sale of the land, the “Crown set about transferring customary land into individual title… My concern is that another injustice is being created since rights to title, required of Māori by the Crown in order to retain their land, are being summarily dismissed.” (Preface, pp. xiii-xiv)

Syndetics book coverTura and the fairies ; and, The overworlds and Tu : from Maori legendary lore / by Johannes Andersen.
“This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous aspirations and rights : the case for responsible business and management / edited by Amy Klemm Verbos, Ella Henry and Ana Maria Peredo.
Indigenous Aspirations and Rights takes an Indigenous perspective in examining the intersection of business with Indigenous peoples’ rights, in light of the UN Global Compact and the PRME. Indigenous rights include, but are not limited to, human, cultural, educational, employment, participatory development, economic, and social rights, rights to land and natural resources, and impacts on identity, institutions, and relations. This book illustrates three main aspects of business practices in relation to Indigenous peoples: learning from failure, unresolved issues and on-going challenges, and developing models for success.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPūkaki : te hokinga mai o te auahitūroa / Paul Tapsell ; whakamāoritanga nā Scotty te Manahau Morrison.
“First published in English in 2000, Paul Tapsell’s award-winning work brilliantly captured the life and transformations of Pūkaki the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor depicted on the New Zealand 20-cent coin. Now a superb translation by Scotty Morrison (also of Ngāti Whakaue descent) makes this illustrated work available entirely in Te Reo Māori.” (Syndetics summary)

Point of order, Mr Speaker? : modern Māori political leaders / edited by Selwyn and Rāhui Katene.
“Eight current or former Māori politicians from different political parties recount their leadership experiences and describe the significant events in their journeys from their early lives to Parliament. Paula Bennett, Te Ururoa Flavell, Hone Harawira, Tau Henare, Shane Jones, Nanaia Mahuta, Hekia Parata and Metiria Turei give readers a unique glimpse into their personal and public lives. They share their aspirations, lessons learned and knowledge gained while making meaningful contributions to Māori development.” (Syndetics summary)

He kōanga tangata tahi

Exploration, heritage and kōrero nehe – these are topics amongst the new books for He Kohikohinga Māori, Mahuru, 2017.

Syndetics book coverLaunching Marsden’s mission : the beginnings of the Church Missionary Society in New Zealand, viewed from New South Wales / eds. Peter G. Bolt & David B. Pettett.
“In 1794 the Rev Samuel Marsden became the second Chaplain to the Colony of New South Wales. Both Marsden and the first Chaplain, the Rev Richard Johnson, came to the Colony under the sponsorship of the Church of England Evangelicals. They had high hopes that New South Wales would be the base from which the ‘everlasting gospel’ would sound forth to achieve the salvation of the ‘poor benighted heathens’ of the South Seas. To this end Marsden began the mission to New Zealand on Christmas Day, 1814… This book is a celebration of that mission and Marsden’s preparations for it.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTears of Rangi : experiments across worlds / Anne Salmond.
“Six centuries ago Polynesian explorers, who inhabited a cosmos in which islands sailed across the sea and stars across the sky, arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand where they rapidly adapted to new plants, animals, landscapes and climatic conditions. In this, her most ambitious book to date, Dame Anne Salmond looks at New Zealand as a site of cosmo-diversity, a place where multiple worlds engage and collide. Like our ancestors, Anne Salmond suggests, we too may have a chance to experiment across worlds.” (Syndetics summary)

Tuai : a traveller in two worlds / Alison Jones & Kuni Kaa Jenkins.
“A thrilling biographical narrative of a young Bay of Islands leader who grew up in the Māori world of the early nineteenth century – and crossed the globe to encounter England in the midst of the industrial revolution. This is a story about the Māori discovery of England. These voyages between worlds represented risk and opportunity: Tuai chose opportunity, and the rest is history.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverTruth and beauty : verse biography in Canada, Australia and New Zealand / edited by Anna Jackson, Helen Rickerby, and Angelina Sbroma.
Truth and Beauty turns critical attention to an exciting genre that lies at the intersection of biography and poetry, narrative and lyric, history and the confessional. With essays on influential verse biographers Margaret Atwood, Dorothy Porter, Michael Ondaatje, Jennifer Maiden and Anne Carson along with newer practitioners including Chris Orsman, Jordie Albiston, Robert Sullivan, Tusiata Avia and Amy Brown, this collection looks at the inevitable tensions that arise between historical fact and the work of imagination – and the competing and complementary claims of truth and beauty.” (Syndetics summary)

Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki / edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker.

Syndetics book coverHistory, heritage, and colonialism : historical consciousness, Britishness, and cultural identity in New Zealand, 1870-1940 / Kynan Gentry.
History, heritage and colonialism offers an internationally relevant examination of the nexus between empire and colonial identity, by exploring the politics of history-making and interest in preserving the material remnants of the past in late nineteenth and early twentieth century colonial society… Offering important insights for societies negotiating the legacy of a colonial past in a global present, this book will be of particular value to all those concerned with museum, heritage, and tourism studies, and imperial history, at undergraduate and postgraduate level, as well as among scholars in these fields. It will also be of interest to a wider public interested in heritage and the history of museums.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHe reo wāhine : Māori women’s voices from the nineteenth century / Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla.
“During the nineteenth century, Maori women produced letters and memoirs, wrote off to newspapers and commissioners, appeared before commissions of enquiry, gave evidence in court cases, and went to the Native Land Court to assert their rights. He Reo Wahine is a bold new introduction to the experience of Maori women in colonial New Zealand through Maori women’s own words.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAnimism : respecting the living world / Graham Harvey.
“Animism’ is now an important term for describing ways in which some people understand and engage respectfully with the larger-than-human world. Its central theme is our relationship with our other-than-human neighbours, such as animals, plants, rocks, and kettles, rooted in the understanding that the term ‘person’ includes more than humans. Graham Harvey explores the animist cultures of Native Americans, Maori, Aboriginal Australians and eco-Pagans, introducing their diversity and considering the linguistic, performative, ecological and activist implications of these different animisms.” (Syndetics summary)

Ngā pepeha o te takere nui / Anaha Hiini.
“Here is a collection of pepehā for marae in the rohe of Te Arawa waka.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori at home : an everyday guide to learning the Māori language / Scotty and Stacey Morrison.
“An introduction to the Maori language… covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household- whether you’re practising sport, getting ready for school, celebrating a birthday, preparing a shopping list or relaxing at the beach, Maori at home gives you the words and phrases – and confidence – you need.” (Syndetics summary)

New Zealand geographic; September-October 2017
p. 26. Star struck by Leonie Hayden. The story of aerospace engineer: Mana Vautier (Te Arawa and Ngāti Kahungunu)
p. 46. When worlds collide by Leonie Hayden. The story of Ihumātao, on the shores of Manukau Harbour : Auckland’s oldest settlement now designated special housing area.

Kia mau ki te tūmanako, te whakapono me te aroha

First on the list of Māori material this year, is a lovely collection of whakataukī – pearls of wisdom – grouped under six “virtues” mātauranga/wisdom ; māia/courage ; atawhai/compassion ; ngākau tapatahi/integrity ; whakahautanga/self-mastery ; and whakapono/belief. The whakataukī in the heading of this blog is listed under “tūmanako” – and translates as: Hold fast to hope, faith and love.

Syndetics book coverMauri ora : wisdom from the Māori world / Peter Alsop & Te Rau Kupenga.
“Pearls of wisdom contained in proverbs – whakatauk-I – have been gifted from generation to generation as an intrinsic part of the M-aori world. As powerful metaphors, they combine analogy and cultural history in the most economical of words. Short and insightful, they surprise, engendering reflection, learning and personal growth. Mauri Ora links whakatauk-I to key personal virtues idealised across cultures and generations. The virtues – wisdom, courage, compassion, integrity, self-mastery and belief – stem from the science of positive psychology; the study of how to live a better life.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGottfried Lindauer’s New Zealand : the Māori portraits / edited by Ngahiraka Mason and Zara Stanhope.
“From the 1870s to the early twentieth century, the Bohemian immigrant artist Gottfried Lindauer travelled to marae and rural towns around New Zealand and – commissioned by Maori and Pakeha – captured in paint the images of key Maori figures. For Maori then and now, the faces of tipuna are full of mana and life. Now this definitive work collects those portraits for New Zealanders. The book presents 67 major portraits and 8 genre paintings alongside detailed accounts of the subject and work, with essays by leading scholars that take us inside Lindauer and his world.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTakatāpui : a place of standing / [edited by] Jordon Harris.
“Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Māori (takatāpui) tell their stories and reflect on the journey from exclusion and prejudice to taking their rightful place in Aotearoa. Illustrated with stunning colour photographs, Takatāpui features introductions by Witi Ihimaera, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku and the late Henare Te Ua.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe toki me te whao : the story and use of Māori tools / Clive Fugill.
“It is over a century since the last major book on Māori carving tools. Clive Fugill, Master Carver at the NZ Māori Arts & Crafts Institute, tells the mythical, traditional and modern stories of the making and use of carving tools, including the adze (toki) and the chisel (whao) with detailed drawings and photos.” (Syndetics summary)

He iti kahurangi / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Particles are often a source of difficulty to Maori language learners, but using these correctly is essential in order to create a Maori spirit and flavour within the sentence, so that it sounds sweet to the Maori ear, and to follow nga tikanga o Te Reo Maori. Tohunga wetereo Heni Jacob explains the usage of the following pumuri and pumua: ahua, ake, anahe/anake, ano, ata, atu, haere, hanga, hangehange, harukiruki, hawerewere, he, hengahenga, hitarari, hitenga, hoake, hoatu, hoki, ia, iho, kaha, katoa, kau, ke, kehokeho, kenekene/keneuri, kere, kerekere, kino, kita, kitakita, koa, koia, kutikuti, mai, maioio, makehua, makuare/makuware, manunu, marie, matua, morukaruka/moruka, mea ake, na, nawenawe, nei, noa, nge, ngero/ngerongero, ngihangiha, ora, oreore, oti, pai, paku, panuku, patere, pea, penu, petapeta, piropiro, pohapoha, pu, puahoaho, puku, ra, ranei, rawa, rere, rikiriki, rirerire, riro, rukaruka, rukiruki, rukuruku, tahi, taiahoaho, tangetange, tangotango, tata, tere, tiahoaho, tika, tino, tokitoki, tonu, tuauriuri, uriuri, wawe, whaka-, whakaharahara, whakarere, whaioio.” (Syndetics summary)

Tikanga Māori : living by Māori values / Hirini Moko Mead.
“This is an authoritative and accessible introduction to tikanga Maori for people wanting to understand the correct Maori ways of doing things. It covers the ways that tikanga guides relationships between people, people’s relationship with the natural environment, spiritual areas, and health, and it proposes guidelines to test appropriate tikanga Maori responses to new situations and challenges in contemporary life.” (Syndetics summary)

Toitū̄ te whare / kaiētita Agnes McFarland rāua ko Taiarahia Black.
“A collection of articles exploring the role and significance of whare tipuna and marae as sources of traditional and ancestral knowledge, and of the richness of te reo Maori language and literature.
“Ko te kaupapa o te whare tipuna me te marae, he pupuri i nga korero tuku iho a te iwi mai ano i nga tipuna. He wahi hai wananga tahi i nga kaupapa. Ki te kore o tatau whare tipuna me o tatau marae ka ngaro atu tetahi wahi nui tonu o tatau, te iwi Maori. No reira, me kaha tonu tatau ki te whakapakari i a tatau ano, kia mohio pai ai tatau ki nga tikanga i runga i o tatau marae hai huarahi whakatairanga i to tatau reo rangatira. Ki te mau te reo ki roto i o tatau whare tipuna, ki te mau hoki ki te marae ka mau ki nga wahi katoa. Ko te tino putake o tenei pukapuka a Toitu te Whare he titiro atu ki nga papareanga o muri mai kia hangaia he pataka korero ma ratau, he whakatutu atu i nga heru herehere i nga ihoiho o tuawhakarere hai whakatipu whakaaro ma ratau.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWayfinding leadership : ground-breaking wisdom for developing leaders / Chellie Spiller, PhD, Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, John Panoho.
“This book presents a new way of leading by looking to traditional waka navigators or wayfinders for the skills and behaviours needed in modern leaders. It takes readers on a journey into wayfinding and leading, discussing principles of wayfinding philosophy, giving examples of how these have been applied in businesses and communities, and providing action points for readers to practise and reflect on the skills they are learning.” (Syndetics summary)

New treaty, new tradition : reconciling New Zealand and Māori law / Carwyn Jones.
“Provides a timely examination of how the resolution of land claims in New Zealand has affected Mori law and the challenges faced by indigenous peoples as they attempt to exercise self-determination in a post colonial world. Combinind analysis with Mori storytelling, Jones’s nuanced reflections on the claims process show how Western legal thought has shaped treaty negotiations.” (Syndetics summary)

Maiea te tupua : whānau accounts of Waikato-Maniapoto World War One veterans and one conscriptee : commemorating 100 years of World War One / produced by Pūrekireki Marae with the support from Te Pua Wānanga ̄ki te Ao of the University of Waikato, the Waikato Raupatu Lands Trust, the Maniapotō Māori Trust Board, Trust Waikato and Te Puni Kōkiri.
Accounts by family members of: Te Rauangaanga Mahuta, Kohatu Hari Hemara Wahanui, Tuheka Taonui Hetet, Te Rehe Amohanga, Rotohiko Michael Jones, Joseph Ormsby, William Takoro Kohi.

Syndetics book coverIndigenous homelessness : perspectives from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand / edited by Evelyn J. Peters, Julia Christensen.
“Being homeless in one’s homeland is a colonial legacy for many Indigenous people in settler societies. The construction of Commonwealth nation-states from colonial settler societies depended on the dispossession of Indigenous peoples from their lands. Essays … argue that effective policy and support programs aimed at relieving Indigenous homelessness must be rooted in Indigenous conceptions of home, land, and kinship, and cannot ignore the context of systemic inequality, institutionalization, landlessness, among other things, that stem from a history of colonialism…” (Syndetics summary)

Journal articles:

AlterNative ; vol. 12, issue 4 (2016)
p. 341 Te Mata Ira : faces of the gene : developing a cultural foundation for biobanking and genomic research involving Māori by Maui Hudson […et al.]
p. 356 Ngā reanga o ngā Tapuhi : generations of Māori nurses by Leonie Walker, Jell Clendon, Leanne Manson & Kerri Nuku.
p. 369 A cause for nervousness : the proposed Māori land reforms in New Zealand by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 380 E Hine : talking about Māori teen pregnancy with government groups by Anna Adcock, Beverley Lawton & Fiona Cram
p. 396 Indigenous positioning in health research : the importance of kaupapa Māori theory-informed practice by Elana Curtis.

He waka eke noa

I te marama nei : he whakamātau hinengaro, he mana whakairo hinengaro, he mana motuhake, he wai māori, i te ao hurihuri : indigenous issues of psychology, intellectual property rights, water rights, in the evolving world.

Syndetics book coverThe Māori meeting house : introducing the whare whakairo / Damian Skinner.
“This all-new guide to the whare whakairo, or decorated Maori meeting house, covers every aspect of these treasures–their history and evolution, structure and art forms, and symbolism and cultural significance. With more than a hundred intriguing historical and contemporary photographs, and containing dozens of diagrams and a helpful glossary, the book clearly illustrates the parts, and the arts, of the whare whakairo with reference to numerous meeting houses from all over Aotearoa New Zealand and the world… The Maori Meeting House makes an important contribution to contemporary discussions about indigenous art history and taonga Maori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania… The Cook voyage collection at the MAA is among the four or five most important in the world, containing over 200 of the 2000-odd objects with Cook voyage provenance that are dispersed throughout the world. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous notions of ownership and libraries, archives and museums / edited by Camille Callison, Loriene Roy and Gretchen Alice LeCheminant.
“Forms of indigenous knowledges and cultural expressions are found in libraries, archives or museums. Often the “legal” copyright is not held by the indigenous people’s groups, who believe that the true expression of their culture can only be sustained and remain dynamic in its proper cultural context. The aim is to respect these ways of knowing while appreciating the cultural memory institutions’ attempts to transmit them to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTupuna awa : people and politics of the Waikato River / Marama Muru-Lanning.
“‘We have always owned the water . . . we have never ceded our mana over the river to anyone’, King Tuheitia Paki asserted in 2012. Prime Minister John Key disagreed: ‘King Tuheitia’s claim that Maori have always owned New Zealand’s water is just plain wrong’. So who does own the water in New Zealand – if anyone – and why does it matter? By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power between Maori and the state.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Te manu kai i te mātauranga : indigenous psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand / Waikaremoana Waitoki & Michelle Levy, editors.
Contents: Foreword: Ka awatea / Michelle Levy & Waikaremoana Waitoki — Introduction: My name is Ripeka / Waikaremoana Waitoki — Chapter 1: Kaupapa Māori psychologies / Michelle Levy — Chapter 2: A ripple of intimacy with creation : the stone bird of sorrow / Virginia Tamanui — Chapter 3: Whanaungatanga : asking who you are; not, what you are / Maynard Gilgen and Māmari Stephens — Chapter 4: Te toka tū moana : resilience, love and hope / Ainsleigh Cribb-Su’a & Hilda Te Pania-Hemopo — Chapter 5: Healing whānau violence : a love story / Erana Cooper & Sharon Rickard — Chapter 6: Re : “I just want to heal my family” / Lisa Cherrington — Chapter 7: Ngā rākau a te pākehā : Matiu’s story / Simon Bennett — Chapter 8: A new moon : talking story with Ripeka to support the healing of soul wounds / Melissa Taitimu — Chapter 9: Wairuatanga / Hukarere Valentine — Chapter 10: ‘Haerenga ki waiora’ : my experience of inpatient mental health services / Julie Wharewera-Mika — Chapter 11: Māori and neuropsychological assessment / Margaret Dudley — Chapter 12: He wāhine āwhina : a healing narrative of end of life care / Tess Moeke-Maxwell — Chapter 13: A partnered approach to psychological assessment : he ritenga whaimōhio / Sonja Macfarlane — Chapter 14: Kaihau waiū : attributes gained through mother’s milk : the importance of our very first relationship / Tania Cargo — Chapter 15: He kākano mai I rangiātea / Bridgette Masters-Awatere — Chapter 16: Ngā kete mātauranga : a curriculum for an indigenous psychology / Waikaremoana Waitoki.

Syndetics book coverThe Great War for New Zealand : Waikato 1800-2000 / Vincent O’Malley.
“A monumental new account of the defining conflict in New Zealand history. It was war in the Waikato in 1863-64 that shaped the nation in all kinds of ways: setting back Māori and Pākehā relations by several generations and allowing the government to begin to assert the kind of real control over the country that had eluded it since 1840. Spanning nearly two centuries from first contact through to settlement and apology, Vincent O’Malley focuses on the human impact of the war, its origins and aftermath. Based on many years of research and illustrated throughout, The Great War for New Zealand is a groundbreaking book written in the conviction that a nation needs to own its history.” (Publisher information)

E ngā uri whakatupu : weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa / authors, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Kahutoi Mere Te Kanawa, Rangituatahi Te Kanawa, Barbara Pareatai Moke.
“Describes the Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato exhibition, ‘E nga uri whakatupu, Weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa’, which ran from 29th June 2014 to 28th July 2015 and was the most significant collection of Maori korowai and weaving ever shown in Aotearoa New Zealand. Includes a waiata composed by Dame Rangimarie Hetet.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe land is our history : indigeneity, law, and the settler state / Miranda Johnson.
The Land Is Our History tells the story of indigenous legal activism at a critical political and cultural juncture in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. In the late 1960s, indigenous activists protested assimilation policies and the usurpation of their lands as a new mining boom took off, radically threatening their collective identities. Often excluded from legal recourse in the past, indigenous leaders took their claims to court with remarkable results… Miranda Johnson examines how indigenous peoples advocated for themselves in courts and commissions of inquiry between the early 1970s to the mid-1990s, chronicling an extraordinary and overlooked history in which virtually disenfranchised peoples forced powerful settler democracies to reckon with their demands. … Fracturing national myths and making new stories of origin necessary, indigenous peoples’ claims challenged settler societies to rethink their sense of belonging.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Making a “Partnerhsip between races” : Māori activism and the Treaty of Waitangi.
Chap. 6. The Pacific way. (Aspects of the Whanganui river claim)

Toiapiapi : He huinga o ngā kura pūoro a te Māori = a collection of Māori musical treasures / Hirini Melbourne ; with an introduction by Richard Nunns.
“This 25th anniversary edition contains notes on traditional Maori instruments and lyrics. In Maori and English. Accompanied with a CD and includes an introduction from Richard Nunns. Originally published in 1991”–Publisher information.

Decolonisation in Aotearoa : education, research and practice / edited by Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan.“This book examines decolonisation and Māori education in Aotearoa New Zealand in ways that seek to challenge, unsettle and provoke for change. Editors Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan have drawn together leading Māori writers and intellectuals on topics that are at the heart of a decolonising education agenda, from tribal education initiatives to media issues, food sovereignty, wellbeing, Christianity, tikanga and more.”–Back cover.
Writers: Ranginui Walker, Moana Jackson, Ani Mikaere, Sarah-Jane Tiakiwai, Jenny Lee-Morgan, Takawai Murphy, Veronica Tawhai, Leonie Pihama, Mera Lee-Penehira, Āneta Hinemihi Rāwiri, Naomi Simmonds, Kirsten Gabel, Jo Smith, Jessica Hutchings, Ngahuia Murphy, Debbie Broughton.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand’s rivers : an environmental history / Catherine Knight.
“‘New Zealand s Rivers: An environmental history’ explores the relationship between New Zealanders and their rivers, explaining how they have arrived at a crisis point, where fresh water has become their most contested resource and many rivers are too polluted to swim in. Environmental historian Catherine Knight reveals that the tension between exploitation and enjoyment of rivers is not new. Rivers were treasured by Maori as food baskets and revered as the dwelling places of supernatural creatures. But following European settlement, they became drains for mining, industrial waste and sewage, and were harnessed to generate power and to irrigate farmland. Over time, the utilitarian view of rivers has been increasingly questioned by those who value rivers for recreation as well as for ecological, spiritual and cultural reasons. Today, the sustainable use of rivers is the subject of intense debate. Thoroughly researched and richly illustrated, ‘New Zealand s Rivers’ is an accessible and compelling read for all New Zealanders, including anglers, kayakers, farmers, environmental practitioners, policy-makers, students and anyone with an interest in our environment and history.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 2. Māori and awa.
Chap. 11. Asserting mana over rivers.

Syndetics book coverCultural safety in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Dianne Wepa.
“In this second edition of Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand, editor Dianne Wepa presents a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives adopted by experienced educators who are active in cultural safety education. Thoroughly revised to incorporate the latest methods and research, this edition reflects updates in government policies and nursing practices, and features new chapters on ethical considerations when working cross-culturally, as well as the legislative requirements of the Nursing Council of New Zealand. Each chapter includes key terms and concepts, practice examples providing content from healthcare workers’ everyday experiences, reflective questions to encourage the assimilation of ideas into practice, and references to allow further exploration of the issues discussed. Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand will equip students, tutors, managers, policy analysts and others involved in the delivery of healthcare with the tools to acknowledge the importance of cultural difference in achieving health and well-being in diverse communities.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 5 Towards cultural safety by Irihapeti Ramsden.
p. 65 Culture and ethnicity : what is the question? by Dianne Wepa.
p. 79 Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi 1840 : its influence on health practice by Denise Wilson and Riripeti Haretuku.
p. 177 Midwifery practice by Katarina Jean Te Huia (including: traditional Māori birthing ; colonisation of Māori birth practices ; the situation today)
p. 235 Māori health : Māori- and whānau-centred practice by Denise Wilson and Huhana Hickey.
p. 252 Nursing and working with disability by Huhana Hickey (includes Māori/indigenous disability identity).

Journal of Pacific archaeology ; vol. 7, no. 2 (2016)
P. 26. Finding meaning and identitiy in New Zealand buildings archaeology : the example of “Parihaka” house, Dunedin by Peter Petchey & Sean Brosnahan.
p. 43. TheTawhiao cottage and the archaeology of race and ethnicity by Matthew Campbell.
p. 59. The source, composition and typology of ‘limestone’ adzes from eastern North Island, New Zealand by Phillip R. Moore & Campbell S. Nelson.
p. 59. Ecological consequences of pre-contact harvesting of Bay of Island fish and shellfish, and other marine taxa, based on midden evidence by John D. Booth.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 50, no. 2 (October, 2016)
p. 44. The New Zealand Government’s niupepa and their demise by Lachy Paterson.
p. 68. The politics of history and Waikato-Tainui’s raupatu treaty settlement by Martin Fisher.

Journal of New Zealand literature ; no. 34.1 (2016)
p. 143. Bones rolling under a river : poetry, history and politics in Bill Sewell’s The ballad of fifty-one and Robert Sullivan’s Cassino : city of martyrs/Citta Matire by Airini Beautrais.
p. 207. The Urewera notebook by Katherine Mansfield ; edited by Anna Plumridge / reviewed by Janet Wilson.