Making Space: Interview with Wellingtonian historian Elizabeth Cox

The hidden history of women and architecture in New Zealand is one that, until very recently, has been a story full of prejudice and bias. Pioneering women architects and women working in architecture in NZ were often undermined, overlooked and almost certainly underpaid.

However, the story of that history has now been brought vividly to life by Elizabeth Cox, senior historian at the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, who specialises in both women’s history and architectural matters.

The heavily illustrated and ground breaking Making Space: A history of women and architecture in New Zealand redresses that bias and covers these struggles of pioneering women architects of the past.

Elizabeth herself works as a senior historian at Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage, and also runs a consultancy business exploring the history of New Zealand’s heritage buildings. She has worked at both Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga and the National Trust (UK), as well as being a trustee of the Futuna Chapel in Wellington.

So, when the opportunity to talk to Elizabeth about Making Space: A history of women and architecture in New Zealand arose we took it. We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to Elizabeth for taking time out of her busy schedule and for such an insightful and informative interview.

This interview was done in conjunction with Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM and was conducted by Tanya Ashcroft. You can hear the full interview, as well as find Elizabeth’s books available to borrow, below.

 



A friend indeed : the saving of Old St Paul’s / Cox, Elizabeth
“Built in the 1860s, a century later the much loved Old St Paul’s Church in Mulgrave Street, Wellington, was in grave peril, at risk from possible demolition, dismemberment or removal from its site. A friend indeed : the saving of Old St Paul’s provides an account of the many Wellingtonians who raised their voices to save the church, including architects, historians, parishioners, and the Friends of Old St Paul’s.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Making space : a history of new zealand women in architecture
“Brilliant, hardworking and creative, women architects have made many significant contributions to the built environment, creativity and community of Aotearoa New Zealand. This groundbreaking book spans over a century, telling the story of women making space for themselves in a male-dominated profession while designing architectural, landscape and urban spaces.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Author interview: Darin Dance on his novel Whiskey Lima Golf

 

Whiskey Lima Golf is Darin Dance’s debut solo novel, but it’s not his first venture into writing. Having previously co-authored the Trinity Trilogy of books with fellow author Virginia Innes-Jones, Whiskey Lima Golf  is a bit of a change in direction for Darin (aka Ted Hughes); the co-written Trinity novels being satirical, romantic, murder mysteries while Whiskey Lima Golf, on the other hand, is a contemporary procedural spy novel set in Wellington.

The main protagonist Tāmati (Tom) is an Afghanistan veteran, sent home with physical and mental wounds, who quickly finds himself involved in a secret operation to identify foreign spies in Wellington. At the novel’s core is Tom’s relationships with his family, friends, loved ones and the various  interactions within and between these communities. The book draws extensively on Darin’s own past in the intelligence services.

When Darin agreed to be interviewed about Whiskey Lima Golf we were thrilled. We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to Darin for taking time out of his busy schedule and for such an insightful and informative interview.

This interview was done in conjunction with Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM. You can hear the full interview as well as find Darin’s books available to borrow, below:

 


Whiskey Lima Golf / Hughes, Ted (Ted D.)
Whiskey Lima Golf  is  a contemporary procedural spy novel, set in  Wellington. The main protagonist Tāmati (Tom)  is an  Afghanistan veteran sent  home with physical and mental wounds. Who quickly finds himself involved in a secret operation to identify foreign spies in Wellington.  At the novels core is Tom’s relationships with  his family,   friends and loved ones and the various  interactions within and between  these communities .” ( Adapted from Catalogue)

Sharks with lipstick / Ellison, Hinemura
“Freshly back from Europe with a new job, Samantha Svensson reconnects with her old friends while managing a new role within the Big Super Ministry – where everyone is busy playing their own internal political games. After the HR Director ends up dead on the same train that Sven was on, suspicions abound, not least from the chief investigating police officer, Charlie Rogers, who happens to be her ex and is still incredibly damned hot! With Wellington still reeling after a recent big earthquake, Sven must use all her canny resourcefulness to clear her name and identify the killer within their midst.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Snakes in suits / Ellison, Hinemura
“Freya returns to Wellington to restore her inheritance, ‘Portobello,’ an Art Deco building in Petone. Only to find dubious dealings with various Snakes in Suits, lawyers, bankers, the council and an unscrupulous property developer who will stop at nothing, even murder, to get what he wants – Portobello. Freya fights back with the help of her friend Zac – who just happens to be drop dead gorgeous. –Back cover.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Scorpions in stilettos / Ellison, Hinemura
“Caught in a compromising position, Clara AKA Flat White, the classy, conservative career girl of the Trinity Trio, struggles as her carefully constructed life comes crashing down around her. Juggling a complicated love life, a career with bullying managers, a domineering mother and her own demons from the past, may be just a little too much even for her. Can Clara recover and navigate her way back with the help of her friends ?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Interview: Musician Jack Woodbury

If I am mad, it is mercy! May the gods pity the man who in his callousness can remain sane to the hideous end!

H.P. Lovecraft, The Temple.

Unfathomed waters is a new album by Peter Liley and Jack Woodbury, inspired by the short story ‘The Temple‘, by H. P. Lovecraft.

It is an ambitious  collaborative work that aims to explore the story’s themes of awe, isolation, fear, longing  and lurking horror in a musical context. To achieve this, Jack and Peter employ electroacoustic noise, ambient textures, saxophone, and choral vocals in an ambitious tapestry of sound.

Both musicians are Wellington-based: Peter Liley is a Wellington-based composer and performer, and Jack Woodbury is a composer and audio engineer based in Wellington whose work has been presented in the USA, UK, Australia, as well as at home in New Zealand.

We were thrilled when Jack took time out from his very busy schedule to talk to us about Unfathomed Waters and all things musical, and extend our heartfelt thanks to Jack.

This interview was done in conjunction with Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM.

For more information on Jack Woodbury, visit jackwoodbury.com.

For information on Unfathomed Waters, visit Rattle Records.

Unfathomed Waters is due to be played in full by Radio NZ later this year as part of a Halloween special.

You can hear the full interview, as well as reserve a copy of Unfathomed Waters below:


Unfathomed waters / Liley, Peter
“A dark and intense musical soundscape with lighter ambient pieces that draws inspiration from H.P. Lovecraft’s short story The Temple.” ( Adapted from Catalogue)

The thing on the doorstep and other weird stories / Lovecraft, H. P.
“Part of a new six-volume series of the best in classic horror, selected by award-winning director Guillermo del Toro.  The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories Howard Phillips Lovecraft’s unique contribution to American literature was a melding of traditional supernaturalism with the genre of science fiction that emerged in the early 1920s. The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories brings together a dozen of the master’s tales-from his early short stories “Under the Pyramids”,  “The Music of Erich Zann”, “The Dunwich Horror,” “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward,” and “The Temple.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Author Interview: Jennifer Lane

Jennifer Lane’s debut novel, All Our Secrets, established her as an author to keep a close eye on; quickly gaining rave reviews, the book went on to win the much-coveted Best First Novel Award at the Ngaio Marsh Awards in 2018. The novel,  set in small-town Australia in the 1980s, seethes with religious tensions and serial murders and is vividly told from the viewpoint of 11-year-old Gracie Barrett.

Since then, Jennifer has been working on her second novel Miracle which has just been released.

Once again, small-town Australian features as the book’s location – this time, the mystery centres around events at a crematorium. The book’s central teenage character “Miracle”  is a fabulous creation; funny and totally believable and who also has a colourful family  in tow. The resulting novel is great fun – a fabulous combination of believable small-town intrigue and boasts a twisty-turny plot; a combination that makes for a compelling and enjoyable read for both young adults and adults alike.

When Jennifer agreed to be interviewed about her new novel Miracle, we were thrilled. We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to Jennifer for taking time out of her busy schedule and for such an insightful and informative interview.

This interview was done in conjunction with Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM and was conducted by Tanya Ashcroft. You can hear the full interview, as well as find Jennifer’s books available to borrow, below

Miracle / Lane, Jennifer
“Born in the middle of Australia’s biggest-ever earthquake, Miracle is fourteen when her world crumbles. Thanks to her dad’s new job at Compassionate Cremations — which falls under suspicion for Boorunga’s spate of sudden deaths — the entire town turns against their family. Miracle is tormented by her classmates, even by Oli, the boy she can’t get out of her head. She fears for her agoraphobic mother, and for her angelic, quake-damaged brother, Julian. When Oli plays a cruel trick on Miracle, he sets off a chain of devastating events. Then her dad is arrested for a brutal attack. Miracle takes the full weight on her shoulders. How can she convince the town of her dad’s innocence?” ( Adapted from Catalogue)

All our secrets / Lane, Jennifer
“A girl called Gracie. A small town called Coongahoola with the dark Bagooli River running through it. The Bleeders – hundreds of ‘Believers’ who set up on the banks of the river, who start to buy up the town and win souls. The River Children – born in the aftermath of the infamous River Picnic. They begin to go missing, one after another. Gracie Barrett is the naively savvy spokesperson for her chaotic family (promiscuous dad, angry mum, twins Lucky and Grub, Elijah the River Child and fervent, prayerful Grandma Bett), for the kids who are taken, for the lurking fear that locks down the town and puts everyone under suspicion. Gracie is funny and kind, bullied and anguished, and her life spirals out of control when she discovers she knows what no one else does: who is responsible for the missing children. Coongahoola is where hope and fear collide, where tender adolescence is confronted by death, where kindness is a glimmer of light in the dark.”(Adapted from Catalogue)

Tripping the light fantastic: Nick Bollinger interview Pt. 1

Nick Bollinger is on record as saying  his life  changed at the age of five, when he heard the Beatles’ recording of ‘Twist and Shout’. He went on to become a bass player and a member of many bands, such as Rough Justice, Ducks, Pelicans,  and Living Daylights as well as  Wellington’s iconic Windy City Strugglers.

After working as a postie and training as a teacher, Nick’s musical obsession found full fruition as a record reviewer and rock journalist. Contributing to the likes of  New Zealand Listener, Mojo, Rhythms, International Arts Manager, Rip It Up, The New Zealand Herald and many other national and international publications.

Since 2001 he has presented the music review programme The Sampler for New Zealand’s National Radio.

Nick was also the curator for Sound Design, Kiwi Style an exhibition of New Zealand record cover design, which toured the country from 2002 to 2004.

Nick has  written several books including  his fabulous coming of age musical memoir Goneville, How to Listen to Pop Music and 100 Essential New Zealand Albums and just released is  Jumping Sundays his wonderful  new book about  the counter culture scene in New Zealand in the 1960’s and 70’s. The book is a major historical work about that time that is also a thoroughly  enjoyable read.

When Nick agreed to be interviewed by us about Jumping Sunday , and the counter cultural scene in Aotearoa in the 60’s and 70’s, we leapt  at the opportunity. The resulting interview (which we have had to split into two parts) is wide-ranging, covering the major seismic changes in culture and society at the time at almost every level.

BLERTA perform their children’s show, image copyrighted.
Hamish Horsley Collection, Sarjeant Gallery

And as such some adult themes are covered such as sex, drugs and rock n roll !

Our  heartfelt thanks to Nick for taking time out of his busy schedule and for such a fabulous, fascinating, and informative interview. Keep your eyes peeled for the second exclusive bonus content video coming soon .

 

Jumping Sundays : The Rise and Fall of the Counterculture in Aotearoa New Zealand / Bollinger, Nick
“Award-winning writer Nick Bollinger’s deep history of the transformation of New Zealand life wrought by the counterculture in the 1960s and ’70s.” (Adapted from Catalogue) Also available as an eBook.

 

 

Goneville : a memoir / Bollinger, Nick
“Goneville is at once a coming-of-age memoir and an intimate look at the evolving music scene in 1970s New Zealand. It show how this music intersected – sometimes violently – with the prevailing culture, in which real men played rugby, not rock. Nick Bollinger draws on his own experiences and also seeks out key figures and unsung heroes to reflect on the hard, often thankless and occasionally joyous life of the career musician.” (Adapted from Catalogue) Also available as an eBook.

100 essential New Zealand albums / Bollinger, Nick
“Compiled by one of New Zealand’s most popular music columnists, this listing will delight pop music fans everywhere. The choices included cover a broad range and present an eclectic taste. Each entry is accompanied by some of the most entertaining writing about music and musicians, ranging from personal accounts of youthful encounters with music legends as well as passionate responses to renowned albums. Guaranteed to surprise and intrigue, this reference is a must-have for all music lovers.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

 

How to listen to pop music / Bollinger, Nick
“This comprehensive and illuminating guide explores the entire spectrum of pop music, from Beatlemania and the long-playing record to Eminem and the iPod.” (Adapted from Catalogue) Also available as an eBook.

Author interview: Cristina Sanders

Bestselling author of Jerningham, Cristina Sanders has a new historical fiction novel just out called Mrs Jewell and the Wreck of the General Grant.

When a three masted sailing ship hits the cliffs of the Auckland Islands in 1866, only fourteen men and one woman survive . They struggle to live on this remote, freezing island and initially view the woman as a burden they could do without.

Cristina Sanders photo copyright Anna Ward

The novel is a vivid imagining of the story behind the enduring mystery of this early New Zealand shipwreck; a tale full of intrigue, mystery and gold. The story is based on historical fact, there have been numerous unsuccessful expeditions to find the wreck site location of the General Grant.

We were thrilled when Christina took time out from her very busy schedule to discuss Mrs Jewell and the Wreck of the General Grant, and we wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to her. For more information visit  Cuba press.

This interview was done in conjunction with Caffeine and Aspirin, the arts and entertainment review show on Radioactive FM. It was conducted by host Tanya Ashcroft. You can hear the interview, as well as find a selection of Cristina Sanders work that is available to borrow, below.

 

Mrs Jewell and the wreck of the General Grant. / Sanders, Cristina

” When a three masted sailing ship hits the cliffs of the Auckland Islands in 1866 only fourteen men and one woman survives . They struggle to survive on this remote, exposed, and freezing island and initially view the woman as a burden they could do without .” ( Adapted from Catalogue)

Jerningham / Sanders, Cristina
“Edward Jerningham Wakefield was the wild-child of the Wakefield family that set up the New Zealand Company to bring the first settlers to this country. His story is told through the eyes of bookkeeper Arthur Lugg, who is tasked by Colonel William Wakefield to keep tabs on his brilliant but unstable nephew. As trouble brews between settlers, government, missionaries and Māori over land and souls and rights, Jerningham is at the heart of it, blurring the line between friendship and exploitation and spinning the hapless Lugg in his wake. Alive with historical detail, Jerningham tells a vivid story of Wellington’s colonial beginnings and of a charismatic young man’s rise and inevitable fall.” (Catalogue)