Practical guides: New books on health

Take a peek at some of these new books on health that have arrived in our collection!

For more new books on health and other topics, go to https://www.wcl.govt.nz/whatsnew/

The big book of the human body “The human body is truly an amazing thing. Capable of awe- inspiring feats of speed and agility, while being mind-blowing in complexity, our bodies are unmatched by any other species on Earth. In The Big Book of the Human Body, we explore our amazing anatomy in fine detail before delving into the intricacies of the complex processes, functions and systems that keep us going. For instance, did you know you really have 16 senses? We also explain the weirdest and most wonderful bodily phenomena, from blushing to hiccuping, cramps to jaundice. We will tour the human body from skull to metatarsal, using anatomical illustrations, amazing photography and authoritative explanations to teach you more. This book will help you understand the wonder that is the human body and in no time you will begin to see yourself in a whole new light!” (Catalogue)

The complete family guide to dementia : everything you need to know to help your parent and yourself / Harrison, Thomas F.“If you are facing the unique challenges of caring for a parent with dementia, you are not alone. What do you do when your loved one so plainly needs assistance, but is confused, angry, or resistant to your help? Where can you find the vital information you need, when you need it? Journalist Thomas Harrison and leading geriatric psychiatrist Brent Forester show that you don’t have to be a medical expert to be a good care provider in this authoritative guide. They explain the basics of dementia and offer effective strategies for coping with the medical, emotional, and financial toll.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Coward : why we get anxious and what we can do about it / Clare, Tim“Tim Clare has suffered from anxiety and panic attacks for over a decade. At their worst, his attacks would see him curled on the floor, screaming to his wife for help. When they became more than he and his family could manage, Tim made a promise to himself – he would try everything he could to get better, every method and medicine. In Coward, Tim Clare explores all the possible treatments for anxiety, from SSRIs to hypnosis, running to extreme diets. He interviews experts and becomes a guinea pig, testing their methods on himself. At the end of a year of many ups and downs, Tim discovers what helps him (and what doesn’t), and what might help others. Most of all, he comes to rethink anxiety and encourages all of us to do the same.” (Catalogue)

Dad’s guide to pregnancy / Coulson, Justin“A practical, hands-on guide for all dads-to-be. Being a dad has changed so much since you were born that you’d be forgiven for feeling a bit lost! This useful guide is filled with all the info that fathers-to-be need, covering the logistical, physical and emotional aspects of your journey into parenthood. Find out how you can get involved and support your partner!” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Managing IBS / Das, Lisa“Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex and frustrating condition that is not yet fully understood but affects an astounding ten per cent of the global population. The troubling conundrum is that the most common IBS symptoms are also manifestations of several other gastrointestinal disorders, and IBS is also closely associated with many physical and mental health conditions. Unfortunately, IBS patients don’t often get the right advice or the support they need. In Managing IBS, Dr Lisa Das, UK-leading gastroenterologist and IBS specialist, offers practical, empowering and evidence-based advice on how to manage and treat the condition successfully” (Catalogue)

Move more at your desk : increase your energy at work & reduce back, shoulder & neck pain / Bradley, Kerrie-Anne“Outlines simple exercises to counter physical issues caused by sitting still for too long, with movements that can be done easily throughout the day to improve sitting posture, strength, and flexibility.” (Catalogue)

On agoraphobia / Caveney, Graham“If we’re talking agoraphobia, we’re talking books. I slip between their covers, lose myself in the turn of one page, re-discover myself on the next. Reading is a game of hide-and-seek. Narrative and neurosis, uneasy bedfellows sleeping top to toe. When Graham Caveney was in his early twenties he began to suffer from what was eventually diagnosed as agoraphobia. What followed were decades of managing his condition and learning to live within the narrow limits it imposed on his life: no motorways, no dual carriageways, no shopping centres, limited time outdoors.” ( Adapted from Catalogue)

On mental illness “This is a guide to coping with a wide variety of mental unwellness, from the very mild to the severe. It explains how and why we become mentally ill, how we can explain our experiences to friends and family, and how we can reframe our view of ourselves and our future in order to thrive. With a humane, encouraging tone, the book teaches us to dismantle stigmas around mental health, arguing that no one should suffer alone. By normalizing mental illness and seeking out shared experiences and supportive friendships, we feel less alone on our journeys. Written with kindness, knowledge and sympathy, and drawing upon the experience of The School of Life therapists, this book is an essential tool to help us on the way to our recovery” (Catalogue)

Prostrate cancer : the misunderstood male killer / Sharpe, Graham“1 in 8 UK males will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, more than 130 new cases are discovered each day and, on average, one man dies from the disease every 45 minutes. Despite these statistics, and the fact that there are getting on for half a million men living with, or in remission from, prostate cancer in the UK, the condition is rarely discussed publicly and most men ignore the warning signs. Graham Sharpe wants to help change that. Faced with a sudden and unexpected diagnosis, Graham managed – just – to overcome a desire to punch the medic charged with the task of telling him he had prostate cancer but who was keener to answer his mobile phone, and set about trying to catalogue what he went through en route to acquiring the condition and how he dealt with the grinding process of his treatment, despite having no idea of the ultimate outcome.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The real food table : 100 easy and delicious mostly gluten-free, grain-free, and dairy-free recipes for every day / Beacom, Jessica“As busy moms, authors Jessica Beacom and Stacie Hassing know how challenging it can be to get dinner on the table on a busy weeknight, much less a meal that helps you feel better inside and out by accommodating food allergies, sensitivities and fighting inflammation. Enjoy healthy and delicious food every night of the week with these 100+ approachable comfort food recipes perfect for any budget or dietary restriction.” (Catalogue)

You can have a better period : a practical guide to calmer and less painful periods / Brothers, Le’Nise“You Can Have A Better Period is a straight-talking resource to help women understand their menstrual cycles and finally get answers to questions such as: “why am I so moody right before my period?,” “are periods supposed to be so painful?,” “why is my period so heavy?,” “is it normal to get headaches right before my period?” Le’Nise Brothers takes us through each phase of our cycle, including a clear programme of nutrition and lifestyle changes. The book explains which supplements work and the key stress management habits we can implement, to bring long-lasting and sustainable changes to our hormonal balance and menstrual health” (Catalogue)

New Biographies and Memoirs

From a rugby player fighting dementia to a wild woman of history, the working class kids to one of the most iconic women of our times, we have some fantastic new biographies and memoirs in our collection this month.

Unforgettable : rugby, dementia and the fight of my life / Thompson, Steve“Unforgettable is at once a powerful, affecting sports memoir from a true giant of rugby, and a raw call to arms to safeguard the sports we love and all those who play them.” (Catalogue)

Thief, convict, pirate, wife : the many histories of Charlotte Badger / Ashton, Jennifer“Charlotte Badger is a woman around whom many stories have been woven: the thief sentenced to death in England and then transported to New South Wales; the pirate who joined a mutiny to take a ship to the Bay of Islands; the first white woman resident in Aotearoa; the wife of a rangatira, and many more. The author shows how history and historical figures like Charlotte Badger are made and remade over time by journalists and historians, painters and playwrights. Thief, Convict, Pirate, Wife is the fascinating story of a remarkable, curious, ordinary woman and her place in history.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The all of it : a bogan rhapsody / Bell, Cadance“Seven years ago, Ben was loveless, overweight, in debt and living in his parents’ rumpus room, trying to find a way to quietly die. Days passed by in a haze of marijuana smoke and self-loathing. Then, one day, Ben decided not to die. He decided to change everything – starting with the Ben bit. Becoming Cadance would be more than a gender transition. It would be a transition in every way. It would mean leaving behind a rural Mudgee childhood filled with Frogger, hot chips, Godliness and a forbidden love of Sarah Parker’s My Little Pony; and the violence, drugs and secrecy that plagued her twenties. Choosing to live was just the beginning; what mattered was how she existed. She was going to experience the all of it.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Corrections in ink : a memoir / Blakinger, Keri“An elite, competitive figure skater growing up, Keri Blakinger poured herself into the sport, even competing at nationals. But when her skating partnership ended abruptly, her world shattered. With all the intensity she saved for the ice, she dove into self-destruction. From her first taste of heroin, the next nine years would be a blur-living on the streets, digging for a vein, selling drugs and sex, eventually plunging off a bridge when it all became too much, all while trying to hold herself together enough to finish her degree at Cornell. Then, on a cold day during Keri’s senior year, the police stopped her. Caught with a Tupperware container full of heroin, she was arrested and ushered into a holding cell, a county jail, and finally into state prison. There, in the cruel “upside down,” Keri witnessed callous conditions and encountered women from all walks of life-women who would change Keri forever.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Muddy people : a Muslim coming of age / El Sayed, Sara“A quick, clever, warm-hearted debut about growing up in an Egyptian-Muslim family. Sara is growing up in a family with a lot of rules. Her mother tells her she’s not allowed to wear a bikini, her father tells her she’s not allowed to drink alcohol, and her grandmother tells her to never trust a man with her money. After leaving Egypt when Sara was only six years old, her family slowly learns how to navigate the social dynamics of their new home. Sara feels out of place in her new school. Her father refuses to buy his coworkers a ginger beer, thinking it contains alcohol. Her mother refuses to wear a hijab, even if it would help them connect with other local Muslims. And Sara learns what it feels like to have a crush on a boy, that some classmates are better friends than others, and that her parents are loving, but flawed people who don’t always know what’s best for her, despite being her strongest defenders.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Coconut / Olajide, Florence“1963, North London. Nan fosters one-year-old Florence Ọlájídé and calls her ‘Ann.’ Florence adores her foster mother more than anything but Nan, and the children around her, all have White skin and she can’t help but feel different. Then, four years later, after a weekend visit to her birth parents, Florence never returns to Nan. Two months after, sandwiched between her mother and father plus her three siblings, six-year-old Florence steps off a ship in Lagos to the fierce heat of the African sun. Swapping the lovely, comfortable bed in her room at Nan’s for a mat on the floor of the living room in her new home, Florence finds herself struggling to adjust. She wants to embrace her cultural heritage but doesn’t speak Yoruba and knows nothing of the customs. Clashes with her grandmother, Mama, the matriarch of the family, result in frequent beatings. Torn between her early childhood experiences and the expectations of her African culture, she begins to question who she is. Nigerian, British, both?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Annie’s boy / Todd, Gary“Annie’s Boy is a coming-of-age story as seen through the eyes of a boy and his mum living in Scotland in the 1970s and 80s where fear, violence and struggle was an everyday part of life. It is a story of hope and quiet courage and perseverance that will take you on an emotional roller coaster that spans over fifteen years of their lives and what they did to survive. Gary and his mother lived in fear at the intimidation and violence that came from his father. At the age of ten, he agreed to testify against his father in court to try and stop the ordeal from continuing. The book is also a look at the tough and gritty life of Dundee during the period.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

The gift of a radio : my childhood and other trainwrecks / Webb, Justin“Justin Webb’s memoir of his 1970s upbringing is as much a portrait of a strange decade in our history as of his own dysfunctional childhood. Justin Webb’s childhood was far from ordinary. Between his mother’s un-diagnosed psychological problems, and his step-father’s untreated ones, life at home was dysfunctional at best. But with gun-wielding school masters and sub-standard living conditions, Quaker boarding school wasn’t much better. And the backdrop to this coming of age story? Britain in the 1970s. Led Zeppelin, Janis Joplin and Free. Strikes, inflation and IRA bombings. A time in which attitudes towards mental illness, parenting and masculinity were worlds apart from the attitudes we have today. A society that believed itself to be close to the edge of breakdown.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Yoko Ono : an artful life / Brackett, Donald“For more than sixty years, Yoko Ono has fascinated us as one of the world’s most innovative, radical artists. From a childhood of both extraordinary privilege and extreme deprivation in war-time Japan, she adopted an outsider’s persona and moved to America where, after a spell at Sarah Lawrence College, she made a place for herself in bohemian arts circles. She was already twice divorced and established as a performance artist in the Fluxus movement and in Tokyo’s avant-garde scene before her fortuitous meeting with the Beatles’ John Lennon at a London Gallery in 1966. Their intense yet fraught relationship, reputed to have blown-up the Beatles, made headlines around the world, as did their famous bed-ins in protest of the Vietnam war, and their majestic, Grammy-winning musical collaborations. Through it all, and for decades after Lennon’s tragic death, she remained defiantly herself. Yoko Ono: An Artful Life charts her journey of personal turmoil, artistic evolution, and activism, and at last tells her iconic story on her own terms.” (Catalogue)

To see what else is new in our collection, go to what’s new & popular (wcl.govt.nz)