Rest in peace Neville Gilmore, January 2021

With sadness Wellington City Libraries pays tribute to Neville Gilmore, Te Matehou, Te Atiawa, who, during his research for Wellington Tenths Trust (2001-2009), also gave so kindly and generously of his time and knowledge to our project, Ngā Tūpuna o te Whanganui-a-Tara (2001-2007).

Research team: Ngā Tūpuna o Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Lotofoa Fiu, Sandra Clarke, Neville, Ann)
Research team: Ngā Tūpuna o Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Lotofoa Fiu, Sandra Clarke, Neville, Ann Reweti)

It was a project that evolved from a kaupapa of breathing life into the written accounts of our Taranaki Whānui who migrated to this rohe from 1820s onward.

Tribunal research for Wai 145 was the basis for much of the 1840 colonisation and stories of the whenua, but a burning question for our library was, “Who were the people behind the names attached to this land?” On our approach to Wellington Tenths for assistance, Neville became “ the man” – who made clear to us, the myriad of whānau links interlocking and criss-crossing the landscape of Te Whanganui-a-Tara. As we became aware of the immensity of the work we’d undertaken we realised how vital was the input from Neville and the Wellington Tenths office to the production of our four books.

Several mana whanua at blessing of Nga Tupuna 2, including Mr Neville Gilmore
Wellington City Libraries : At the blessing of vol. 2

Through conversation with Neville, I came to realise the importance of not just the Minute Book succession records of the Māori Land Court but also the underlying “whakapapa” of the land as set out in the Land Block files, held also at the District Land Court offices.

There was a wealth of knowledge in Neville’s memory bank which he always delivered with enthusiasm and generosity and wisdom. In our later volumes we finally saw a light and asked Neville to contribute his own special stories – (see vol. 4) – Mata Pekainu Tumatuhiata, Komene Paipa, Te Kere Ngataierua, Hare Parata. There is his story of Te Rei Pukekura, husband of Mihi Korama Te Toru – Te Rei was related by marriage to Ngake and Patukawenga, Ropiha Moturoa and Hohepa Kopiri. He was the son of Te Moana Pounamu (Martina Ruta) and Tawhirikura who in turn was the daughter of Waireinga and Wahanga. Te Rei was also the brother of Haneta Toea.

Then there’s the description of Rawiri Motutere/Koheta : Rawiri was tall, athletic and ‘straight as a spear’ – He had a beautiful tāmoko which had a particular blue texture. He was very fair, that is, as white in the face as a Pakeha with red hair. When he went out he always wore a mata-huna (mask) to protect his fair skin from the sun. The tāmoko of the mask was an exact replica of that upon his face.

Wellington City Libraries : launch of vol. 3
Wellington City Libraries : launch of vol. 3

But Neville was also a huge influence in the wider published history of the rohe, including Pipitea. His own thesis: (MA – La Trobe, 1986) was ground-breaking : Kei Pipitea taku kainga : ko te Matehou te ingoa o taku iwi : The New Zealand Company Native Reserve Scheme and Pipitea, 1839-1888.

Some books are listed below, but he would also have contributed to many more as a researcher.

Ngā tūpuna o Te Whanganui-a-Tara. Volume 4 by Sandra Clarke
“This book, produced by Wellington City Libraries profiles another 29 Tupuna who migrated to Te Whanganui-a-Tara (the Great Harbour of Tara), or Port Nicholson, in a series of Heke during the 1820’s and 1830’s. These iwi were mainly Te Ati Awa, Ngati Tama and Ngati Ruanui. Tupuna featured include Ihikaera te Waikapoariki; Taare Tahua; Mata Pekainu Tumatuhiata; Hori Ngapaka; Hori Pipi; Te Teira Whatakore; Ihaka Te Rou; Te Poho-o-te-rangi; Arapera Rongouaroa; Teretiu Tuwhare; Karena Waitere; Ingo Takata; Hare Parata; Kereopa te Wharepouri; Mere Pararaki; Mohi Puketapu; and several more.”
Other volumes : vol 1, vol 2, vol 3.

Gilmore, Neville. The myth of the overlords : tenure in Te Whanganui-a-Tara, 1819-1847. [Wai 145, G3]

Gilmore, Neville and Liz Mellish. Cultural Report Lambton Harbour (held by the National Library).

Hailwood, Ritihia and Neville Gilmore, Wellington Tenths Trust. Wellington Tenths Trust GIS map book 2004

Johnston, Warwick (in collaboration with Neville Gilmore) detailing the history of the Hutt Valley, e.g. The history of Petone foreshore.

Moe mai ra e te rangatira
Moe mai ra I roto I te ngakau o te kaihanga
E kore rawa koe e warewaretia
Moe mai, moe mai ra

E te hunga mate, te hunga kua whetūrangitia
moe mai, moe mai, moe mai rā,
haere ki te huinga o te kahurangi,
ki Hawaiki nui, ki Hawaiki roa, ki Hawaiki pamamao,
haere, haere haere atu ra.

Rangimarie Turuki Rose Pere

We were saddened to hear of the passing of Dr. Rangimarie Turuki Rose Pere, of Tūhoe, Ngāti Ruapani and Ngāti Kahungunu, on Sunday, December 13th at home in Waikaremoana, New Zealand. Dr Rose Pere, also known by many as Whaea Rose, was renowned for her spiritual teachings and ancient wisdom. “She was different and she dared to be different and she dared everyone around her to be different.”

Her spirituality, and mātauranga stretched the boundaries of Te Ao Marama. Her colourful turban-clad head would be seen weaving its way across many an academic campus or marae as she began yet another spellbinding session on the practical applications of her beliefs and peace-making, mind-blowing wisdom.

She was the Young Maori Woman of the Year in 1972, awarded the New Zealand 1990 Commemoration medal C.M. and became a Commander of the British Empire receiving her C.B.E. in 1996. She worked within education across all age groups from pre-school to tertiary level, focusing on building the strength and identity of indigenous learners. In a statement, her whānau said she was loved across Aotearoa and the globe. “Her life was distinguished by extraordinary service to many people in both Aotearoa, New Zealand and the many corners of the world. She touched many lives and hearts.”

Read more about her life and teachings:

Te wheke : a celebration of infinite wisdom, by Rangimarie Pere

Vision Aotearoa = Kaupapa New Zealand : Marie Bell, Vicki Buck, Eddie Durie, Mason Durie, Michael Fay, … Tipene O’Regan, Rangimarie Rose Pere, Ken Piddington, Irihapeti
“Twenty New Zealanders talk to Roslie Capper and Amy Brown about their vision for Aotearoa New Zealand. They are Maori and Pakeha; some are business people, public servants, writers, clergy; all are change-seekers. The interviews are edited by Witi Ihimaera.” (Book Jacket)

Women and education in Aotearoa.
“This collection of essays on the contemporary educational experience of girls and women has been welcomed by teachers and students.” Includes Te wheke: whaia te maātauranga me te aroha, by Rangimarie Rose Pere.

He Matapuna = A source : some Maori perspectives. Includes “Taku taha Māori : my Māoriness, by Rangimarie Rose

Also : Te tohuna kura waka : shares the source of ancient Māori healing wisdom in Aotearoa, New Zealand, by Charlotte Mildon. (2017)

Mātauranga wahine, by Charlotte Mildon (Tōku Anō Ao Māori My Very Own World, Occasional paper Series no. 2).

Puna wairere : essays, by the New Zealand Planning Council. [1990] Includes Tangata whenua, by Rangimarie Rose Pere.

The sacred plant medicine of Aotearoa. Volume 1, by Franchelle Ofsoske-Wyber. (2019)

Dr. Rangimarie Turuki Rose Pere’s presentation at IDEC 2015 about Education from a Maori perspective.

Dr Rose Pere, spiritual leader and academic dies (Radio NZ obituary)

Me te aroha tino nui atu ki te whānau pani
Nā mātou, ngā kaimahi whare pukapuka ki Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui

Thank you Classic Catalogue

After many years of faithful service, the Classic and EasyFind catalogues will no longer be available after 19 September. Our suppliers will no longer offer this product, and have been concentrating all their efforts on our main new catalogue.

If you have previously created lists of links or tags, these can be copied and pasted to save in another document. We also recommend that if you have compiled links to individual items in the EasyFind catalogue, that you take the opportunity to change those links to point to our new Catalogue.

You can still search, browse, place reserves etc. Our new catalogue also offers several features which were not available previously such as a mobile version, ability to keep a history of your loans, more reviews and reading suggestions, and easier ways to create your own lists, tags and reviews.

Please ask staff if you would like more information on how to use our current catalogue.

Uncollected Reserves Charge

From Monday 3 August, people will be charged $2 for any reserved item which is uncollected at the end of the 7 days hold period. Please help us keep waiting lists for popular items to a manageable level by picking up reserves promptly.

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Book a Librarian – Tonoa He Kaitiaki Pukapuka

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Need some help getting started or a tricky question? Ask one of our expert librarians. They will help you find answers or learn more about our library services.

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Learn more about

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Check the table below, see what times suit you, and get in touch via this booking form to book in a session with one of our experienced librarians.

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Asking Big Questions : new beliefs books

Humanity has pondered the meaning of life since the beginning of time. This selection of recent arrivals ruminates on the big questions, beliefs and doubts as well as offering a variety of answers, including new books from best-selling authors Richard Dawkins and John Bevere. Remember that reserves are free, so it you want to borrow a copy of one of these titles, there is no charge to bring it to your preferred branch.

What, why, how : answers to your questions about Buddhism, meditation, and living mindfully, by Henepola Gunaratana.
How can I fit meditation into my busy life? How should I understand karma and rebirth? Is enlightenment even possible for me? Imagine that you could sit down with one of Buddhism’s most accomplished and plainspoken teachers–and imagine that he patiently agreed to answer any question you had about meditation, living mindfully, and key Buddhist concepts What, Why, How condenses into one volume a half-century of Bhante G.’s wise answers to common questions about the Buddha’s core teachings on meditation and spiritual practice. (drawn from the Catalogue)

Unbelievers : an emotional history of doubt, by Alec Ryrie.
“Unbelievers shows how, long before philosophers started to make the case for atheism, powerful cultural currents were challenging traditional faith. These tugged in different ways not only on celebrated thinkers such as Machiavelli, Montaigne, Hobbes, and Pascal, but on men and women at every level of society whose voices we hear through their diaries, letters, and court records. …As the Reformation eroded time-honoured certainties, Protestant radicals defended their faith by redefining it in terms of ethics. In the process they set in motion secularizing forces that soon became transformational. Unbelievers tells a powerful emotional history of doubt with potent lessons for our own angry and anxious age.” (drawn from the publisher’s description)

When kids ask hard questions : faith-filled responses for tough topics
When your children ask the hard questions, are you prepared to respond? Progressive Christian parents and pastors offer advice on responding to today’s tough topics, including bodies, gender, racism, divorce, death, grief, faith, loss, suicide, violence etc. The range and complexity of issues which kids are grapple with today can be overwhelming. A diverse group of young parents, pastors, and experts provide pathways to help you support the kids in your care with reflective and respectful conversations.

Tao : the watercourse way, by Alan Watts.
The Chinese philosophy of Tao is the way of man’s cooperation with the natural course of the natural world. This book includes an introduction to the Chinese culture that forms the basis of Tao before focusing on its interpretations by key thinkers such as Lao-Tzu, author of the Tao Te Ching. It then promotes the idea of following a life lived according to the natural world – allowing time to quiet our minds and observe the world rather than imposing ourselves on it.

God, where are you?! : finding strength & purpose in your wilderness, John Bevere.
“Do you feel lost in a difficult season, wondering, “God, where are you? ” … Contrary to what many may think, getting through this season isn’t just a matter of waiting on God. You have a part to play in navigating through it. A big one. And if you don’t want to waste time wandering in circles, it’s important to learn what that is.” This will help you navigate your dry or difficult seasons and step into all that God has for you. (drawn from the Catalogue)

Outgrowing God : a beginner’s guide, by Richard Dawkins.
Do we need God in order to explain the universe? Do we need God in order to be good? These are some of the most controversial and profound questions we ponder. Popular author Dawkins draws on philosophy and comparative religion as well as science to interrogate the hypocrisies of religion and explain to readers how life emerged without a Creator. The first part of the book, Goodbye God, reviews the shortcomings of the Bible as a guide to ethics, while the second part, Evolution and beyond, is more on Dawkins’ field is an evolutionary biologist and ethologist.

Atheist overreach : what atheism can’t deliver, by Christian Smith,
Smith takes a look at the evidence for atheism and reviews some claims about morality, science, and human nature. Can a morality promoting benevolence towards all and universal human rights not be grounded in some religious system; does modern science disprove the existence of God; and is there anything innately spiritual about human beings. “He does not argue that atheism is necessarily wrong, but rather that its advocates are advancing crucial claims that are neither rationally defensible nor realistic. Their committed worldview feeds unhelpful arguments and contributes to the increasing polarization of today’s political landscape. …This book provides readers with the information they need to participate more knowledgably in debates about atheism and what it means for our society.” (drawn from the Catalogue)

The lost art of Scripture and other books on beliefs

Popular author Karen Armstrong’s latest reflection on ways of reading world Scriptures combines with a mixed bag of topics such as angels, cults, a biography on St Patrick, and a new angle on Selfies.

When one religion isn’t enough : the lives of spiritually fluid people, by Duane Bidwell.
“Contrary to popular assumptions, many people regularly cross religious boundaries. Complicated legacies of colonialism may be part of their family story, and they may consider themselves both Christian and Hindu, or Buddhist, or Yoruban, or one of the many other religions native to colonized lands. Bidwell explores how people people can engage radically opposed truth claims, and what this growing population tells us about change within our communities.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Zealot : a book about cults, by Jo Thornely, Jo
Whatever the reason people join cults, once people are in, it’s usually very difficult for them to leave. Cults have ways of making their followers prove their loyalty, and in return they get a chance to feel secure within the cult’s embrace, with an added bonus of being utterly terrified of the outside world. From the tragic Jonestown to the Waco Branch Davidians, this book is a wide-sweeping look at cults around the world.” (Catalogue)

The lost art of Scripture : rescuing the sacred texts, by Karen Armstrong.
“Today we see the Quran being used by some to justify war and terrorism, the Torah to deny Palestinians the right to live in the Land of Israel, and the Bible to condemn homosexuality and contraception. For hundreds of years these texts were instead viewed as spiritual tools- scripture was a means for the individual to connect with the divine, and to experience a higher level of consciousness. Holy texts were seen as fluid and adaptable, rather than a set of binding archaic rules or a ‘truth’ that has to be ‘believed’. (Adapted from Catalogue)

Sacred misinterpretation : reaching across the Christian-Muslim divide, by Martin Accad.
“Theological issues are crucial to how Christians and Muslims understand and perceive each other. In Sacred Misinterpretation Martin Accad guides readers through key theological questions that fuel conflict and misunderstanding between Muslims and Christians. A sure-footed guide, he weaves personal stories together with deep discussion of theological beliefs. Accad identifies trends, recognizes historical realities, and brings to light significant points of contention that often lead to break-down in Christian-Muslim dialogue. He also outlines positive and creative trends that could lead to a more hopeful future. “(Catalogue)

Selfies : searching for the image of God in a digital age, Craig Detweiler.
“How can we seek God and care for each other in digital spaces? Craig Detweiler, a nationally known writer and speaker and an avid social media user, examines the selfie phenomenon, placing selfies within the long history of self-portraits in art, literature, and photography. He shows how self-portraits change our perspective of ourselves and each other in family dynamics, education, and discipleship. Challenging us to push past unhealthy obsessions with beauty, wealth, and fame, Detweiler helps us to develop a thoughtful, biblical perspective on selfies and social media and to put ourselves in proper relation to God and each other.” (Catalogue)

The House of Islam : a global history, by Ed Husain.
“Today, Islam is to many in the West an alien force, with Muslims held in suspicion. … The House of Islam thoughtfully explores the events and issues that have come from and contributed to the broadening gulf between Islam and the West, from the United States’ overthrow of Iran’s first democratically elected leader to the emergence of ISIS, from the declaration of a fatwa on Salman Rushdie to the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo. Husain leads us clearly and carefully through the nuances of Islam and its people, taking us back to basics to contend that the Muslim world need not be a stranger to the West, nor our enemy, but our peaceable allies.” (Catalogue)

Angels : a visible and invisible history, by Peter Stanford.
“What exactly are angels, and why have so many in different times and contexts around the globe believed in them? This is a thought-provoking and entertaining twenty-first century look at what was once referred to as ‘angelology’, which searches out the origins of angels in religious thought, history, psychology and wider culture, and asks why, in an age of disbelief, they remain more compelling and comforting for many than God. (Catalogue)

Confronting Christianity : 12 hard questions for the world’s largest religion, by Rebecca McLaughlin, Rebecca
“This book explores 12 hard questions that seem to undermine the Christian faith: the existence of suffering, the reality of judgment, the authority of Scripture, the success of science, and more. Drawing on state-of-the-art academic research, personal stories, and deep scriptural excavation, this book argues that–when looked at more closely–what first seemed like roadblocks to faith actually become signposts.” (Catalogue)

Saint Patrick retold : the legend and history of Ireland’s patron saint, by Roy Flechner.
” Saint Patrick was, by his own admission, a controversial figure. Convicted in a trial by his elders in Britain and hounded by rumors that he settled in Ireland for financial gain, the man who was to become Ireland’s patron saint battled against great odds before succeeding as a missionary. Saint Patrick Retold draws on recent research to offer a fresh assessment of Patrick’s travails and achievements. This is the first biography in nearly fifty years to explore Patrick’s career against the background of historical events in late antique Britain and Ireland.” (Catalogue)

Keep in touch with correct contact details

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Occasionally we have important news to share with all customers and we want to make sure you get these messages. For example, early in 2019 we will be changing the way that customers access your library card (to renew or reserve), and login to online services (such as eLibrary resources such as PressReader, or Lynda.com) to be in step with other modern libraries.

Catalogue changes coming soon

Our Classic Catalogue, which has been our mainstay since 2002, will shortly be retired. It was no longer being developed. Our new Catalogue, introduced in mid December is produced by the same company The Library Corporation and offers more features.

New catalogue home screen
It’s smartphone-friendly and presents a lot more information to help you choose what you want to borrow. It still has all the main searches – by title, author, or subject, but it’s easier to see if the book (or DVD etc) is available in the library. Once you’re logged in, you can save your favourite searches, share results on Facebook, or even opt in to save your borrowing history.

Similarly, Kids’ Cat has been replaced with a new version, and the previous version will also be shortly retired.

Please speak with a library staff member if you would like to find out more about the new catalogues and how they work.