The Aotearoa Reference collection is now available

NZ collection sign

Our NZ reference collection can now be requested. These items can be identified in the catalogue as held at the Offsite NZ Collection. We regret the time taken to make this large collection available. Our preparations were interrupted more than once by factors outside our control. We are still working through the process to stock-check all the books that were brought out of the Central Library. As soon as books are checked they will be made available on our online catalogue. If you have a particular request which you can’t find in the catalogue, please let us know, and we will make this a priority.

Please use this email address heritagequeries@wcc.govt.nz to make your request and one of our team will retrieve it for you. Don’t forget to let us know your library card number and which branch you would like to view the book at. You will receive two emails, one confirming the request, and the second when the book has arrived at the branch. This is a free request service.

Most books will be available for you to consult for three weeks at the library branch. If you don’t need the books for three weeks, just let the staff in the branch library know and they will return the book for you.

If you need to renew the item for a further 3 weeks, make a request through the same email heritagequeries@wcc.govt.nz and the library team will check if there is another customer waiting.

Book a Librarian – Tonoa He Kaitiaki Pukapuka

woman holding smartphone

Have a burning question that the library could help with? A specialist enquiry or research question? Our specialist librarians are brimming with knowledge and itching to share it. Now you can book a librarian to help you with any tricky question.

woman holding smartphone

The topics we can cover include:

  • researching your family history or local heritage
  • learning more about our online resources including our eLibrary
  • children’s and young adult book recommendations or exploration of our youth education options
  • information for your small business
  • identifying that elusive movie or music track
  • locating Māori information or whakapapa
  • our world language collection or learning English resources
  • any general topics or books e.g. non-fiction

Submit your enquiry via this booking form to book in a session with one of our experienced librarians. One of our team will be in touch to confirm your booking and set up a line of communication.

We’d love to hear from you!

Expand your holiday reading: Visit Te Pātaka on 8 December

Our Te Pātaka Collection and Distribution Centre houses Wellington Central Library’s collection, and for one day only you can visit, browse and borrow!

Photo of our Te Pataka warehouse team, waving hello

Looking for some special holiday reading? Want to delve into a topic more deeply? Or maybe you’re interested in finding the perfect gem?

We’ll be opening our Te Pātaka Collection Centre to the public for a pre-holiday exploration. You’ll be able to browse and borrow books from all parts of our off-site storage lending collection, including:

  • Fiction, including mysteries, sci-fi
  • Non-fiction – small and large books on all your favourite topics
  • Biographies
  • Large print
  • World languages
  • Graphic novels
  • Teen fiction, non-fiction and graphic novels
  • Children’s fiction, non-fiction and comics
  • Picture books

COVID guidelines

When visiting:

  • If you are aged 12 years, 3 months and over, you will be required to show your COVID Vaccine Pass (CVP)
  • Wear a mask if you are 12 years and over – unless you hold an exemption from the Ministry of Health Covid-19 website
  • Staff will also be wearing masks unless they are not required to for safety reasons
  • Scanning or signing in is a condition of entry for all Council facilities and venues. This applies to visitors, contractors and couriers entering our spaces
  • Please respect 2 metres social distancing – and follow the signs and guidance of our staff

Books will be issued for 6 weeks. We can’t wait to see you!

Spots are limited and visits are restricted to one hour, so bookings will be essential — book your slot below!

Details:

What? Te Pātaka Open Day

Date: Wednesday 8 December

Time: Four one hour slots available — 10-11am, 11am-12pm, 1-2pm, and 2-3pm

Location: Johnsonville (details on registration)

Book your spot now!

Visit our Central Library collection at Te Pātaka for some winter reading

The Te Pātaka Collection and Distribution Centre houses Wellington Central Library’s collection. This is a rare opportunity to visit, browse and borrow!

Details:

What? Te Pātaka Open Days

Date: Wednesday 14 July; Thursday 22 July — see topics per day below

Location: Johnsonville (details on registration)

Please remember to bring your library card

On the hunt for some crafting ideas? Missing all those classic graphic novels, DVDs or biographies? Or treat yourself to a swag of history, beliefs, cookery or photography books.

We’ll be opening our Te Pātaka Collection Centre to customers on two days during the school holidays. You’ll be able to browse and borrow books from our off-site storage collection. Some of the collection is on rolling stacks, so different areas of the collection will be more accessible at different times. If possible, choose the time slot which matches your interest as it will be easier for you to see that topic then. If the area you’re interested in isn’t listed below, you are still welcome and we will do our best to make it work.

Spots are limited and visits are restricted to one hour, so bookings will be essential — view and book session times and topics available below. We can’t wait to see you!

Times and topics

Teen only slot: 3pm, Thursday 22nd (but teens are of course welcome at any time).

Available at any session:

  • Fiction
  • Large print
  • Biography
  • Science and health
  • Graphic novels
  • Teen fiction and graphic novels
  • Children’s fiction and comics
  • Picture books

Wednesday 14 July — Topics and Time Slots

Time slots and topics available per time slot for Wednesday 14 July
2-3pm 3-4pm 4-5pm
  • Computing
  • Gardening
  • Photography
  • Travel
  • DVDs Movies
  • Popular CDs

Book for 2-3pm, 14 July

  • Self-help
  • Cooking
  • Music books
  • World Wars history
  • DVDs TV series
  • Classical CDs

Book for 3-4pm, 14 July

  • Economics and finance
  • Business and management
  • Film
  • NZ history
  • DVDs TV series
  • Magazines

Book for 4-5pm, 14 July

Thursday 22 July — Topics and Time Slots

Time slots and topics available per time slot for Thursday 22 July
10-11am 11am-12pm 12-1pm 3-4pm
  • Social issues
  • Art / photography
  • Sports and games
  • Cooking
  • DVDs TV series
  • Popular CDs

Book for 10-11am, 22 July

  • True Crime
  • Craft
  • Poetry
  • Art/architecture
  • DVDs Movies
  • Magazines

Book for 11am-12pm, 22 July

  • Languages
  • Cooking
  • Literature
  • Songbooks
  • DVDs Movies
  • Music Scores

Book for 12-1pm, 22 July

Teen only session.

Book for 3-4pm, 22 July

Browse all sessions on our Calendar

Kaiārahi Kohikohinga – Māori reference collection is now available

Our Māori reference collection, one of the country’s best collections of Māori books, can now be requested. These can be identified in the catalogue as held at the Offsite Maori Collection, with a location of heritagequeries@wcc.govt.nz.

Please use this email address heritagequeries@wcc.govt.nz to make your request and one of our team will retrieve it for you. Don’t forget to let us know your library card number and which branch you would like to view the book at. You will receive two emails, one confirming the request, and the second when the book has arrived at the branch. This is a free request service.

Most books will be available for you to consult for three weeks at the library branch. If you don’t need the books for three weeks, just let the staff in the branch library know and they will return the book for you.

If you need to renew the item for a further 3 weeks, make a request through the same email heritagequeries@wcc.govt.nz and the library team will check if there is another customer waiting.

Further details about the collection.

Browsing our collections from home : some tips

Too many results when you search the catalogue, and you’re not sure which book to reserve? How do you choose the best match for your interests? Here are some ideas for you to try.

  1. Use the advanced search link from catalogue.wcl.govt.nz/ which gives you more options to try or combine different types of search (eg title starts with …).
    Catalogue search…
  2. In the search results page, use the left hand menu to narrow down the results by location, what’s available to borrow today, format (such as book), subject (to exclude fiction, for example, if you’re interested in growing roses), or publication year (if you’re interested in newer items. You can select more than one of these filters.

    catalogue search showing filter options

  3. Swap to a flow view as shown in red above. This may be quicker to scan covers across the top of the screen.
  4. Once you’ve identified a possible item, click on the title link. Select the Related option from the left hand side, and for many books there are additional details such as contents pages, further descriptions from the publisher, author information, series information, together with reviews from readers or sources such as the Guardian or Publishers Weekly. If you’d like to add your own review to any book, there’s a link to do that directly from this page.
    catalogue page showing where to find reviews
  5. Ask one of our librarians working at the Off-site Storage (Te Pātaka) to select a few titles on your topic via this request form. These items will be delivered to the library branch you have chosen, and will work like a reserve : you will be notified when they arrive and have a week to pick them up. This request service is free, but other fees may apply (for example if DVDs are requested, the standard issue fee will apply, uncollected items will incur the expired reserves fee).
    Request form

One of our library team will be happy to show you how to use any of these options if you’d like more help.

Women of influence: recent beliefs arrivals

One of the strengths of the modern era is the celebration of diverse voices. These voices have always been present, but may have been lost in the crowd, or over-looked for a variety of reasons. This list contains several additions to our collection which begin to explore these different perspectives – from the first biography of the woman who raised Buddha, to the Muslim Princess who became a British spy during World War Two.

Te Hāhi Mihinare = the Māori Anglican Church, by Hirini Kaa.
Anglicanism arrived in New Zealand with the first English missionaries in 1814 but was spread widely by Māori evangelists. They profoundly influenced some key iwi, who adapted and made it their own. The ways in which Mihinare (Māori Anglicans) engaged with the settler Church in New Zealand and created their own unique church is an important narrative in NZ church history. This ground-breaking addition explores the birth, development and challenges in the ongoing life of Te Hāhi Mihinare.

The woman who raised the Buddha : the extraordinary life of Mahāprajāpatī, by Wendy Garling
“In this first full biography of Mahaprajapati, The Woman Who Raised the Buddha presents her life story, with attention to her early years as sister, queen, matriarch, and mother, as well as her later years as a nun. Drawing from story fragments and canonical records, Wendy Garling reveals just how exceptional Mahaprajapati’s role was as leader of the first generation of Buddhist women, helping the Buddha establish an equal community of lay and monastic women and men.” (Catalogue)

Warriors, witches, women : mythology’s fiercest females, by Kate Hodges.
Explore 50 of mythology’s fiercest females in this modern retelling of great legends – from feminist fairies to bloodsucking temptresses, half-human harpies and protective Vodou goddesses. Meet Circe, The righteous Furies, fun-loving Ame-no-Uzume, the fateful Morai sisters. Fire your imagination and be empowered by this great anthology of notorious, demonised and overlooked women.(drawn from the Catalogue)

Women of the Vatican : female power in a male world, by Lynda Telford.
Telford explores the lives of women who have had personal and unofficial influence at the Vatican over the centuries. The women discussed in this book include mistresses as well leaders such as Catherine de Medici, Empresses Maria Teresa of Austria and Catherine of Russia. This makes some controversial claims, but it explores the Catholic Church’s sometimes overlooked different power bases.

Affirming : a memoir of faith, sexuality, and staying in the church, by Sally Gary.
“In this deeply personal memoir, Sally traces the experiences, conversations, and scriptural reading that culminated in her seeing her sexuality as something that made sense within the context of her faith–not outside of it or in opposition to it. … Sally’s story–one of heritage, learning, courage, and love–is written especially for the generations of LGBTQ Christians after her who are questioning whether they can stay part of the church they call home.” (Catalogue)

Amazing Muslims who changed the world, by Burhana.
Meet just some of the amazing Muslim men and women who have changed our world – from pirate queens, nurses, warriors, scientists, actors, and mathematicians, to courageous ordinary men and women doing extraordinary things. Who was the first scientist to prove theories about how light travels, hundreds of years before Isaac Newton? Who was the Indian Princess who became a British spy during WWII? (drawn from the Catalogue)

Faith after doubt : why your beliefs stopped working and what to do about it, by Brian D. McLaren.
McLaren, a former pastor and now an author, speaker, and activist shows how old assumptions are being challenged in nearly every area of human life, not just theology and spirituality. He proposes a four-stage model of faith development – Simplicity, Complexity, Perplexity, and Harmony – and offers a path forward that can help sincere and thoughtful people leave behind unnecessary baggage and intensify their commitment to what matters most.” (drawn from the Catalogue)

The book of queer prophets : 24 writers on sexuality and religion
As the title suggests, this is a thoughtful exploration of faith in the modern era: How does it feel to be excluded from a religious community because of your sexuality? Why do some people still believe being LGBT is a sin? Jeanette Winterson tackles religious dogma, Amrou Al-Kadhi writes about trying to make it as a Muslim drag queen in London, John Bell writes about his decision to come out later in life, and Kate Bottley explains her journey to becoming an LGBT ally.

Hope in times of fear : the resurrection and the meaning of Easter, by Timothy Keller
The different Resurrection accounts of Jesus in the Gospels agree that Jesus’ female followers were the first to visit the empty tomb. Yet none of his most loyal and steadfast followers recognised him at first. Nothing had prepared even his disciples for that moment when they met the resurrected Jesus. All physically saw him and yet did not truly see him. It was only when Jesus invited them to see who he truly was that their eyes were open. Read about the meaning of Easter as the central message of the Christian faith.

Neighbours Day Aotearoa is just around the corner

Neighbours Day Aotearoa 2021 runs from March 20-March 30th this year, and the theme is The Great Plant Swap to support neighbourhoods to growing stronger together. We’ve lined up an inspiring list of books to spark your creative ideas, from help with your own garden plants to ideas for activities. Share a plate with your neighbours and also grow connections on this Neighbours Day. Or, it’s never too late to plant something now to share later.


The sharing solution : how to save money, simplify your life & build community, by Janelle Orsi.
Sharing is the answer! This book is packed with heaps of ideas to connect with your neighbours :
Meals and food, through bulk buying clubs, meal-sharing arrangements, community gardens, neighbourhood fruit harvests, household goods, a book club, tools and toys to appliances and exercise equipment, car-pooling, caregiving for pets, children, older family members, or relatives with disabilities…. the list could go on. The ultimate beauty of sharing is that it’s a solution we create for ourselves.

Day walks of Greater Wellington, by Marios Gavalas.
Consider sharing transport to go on walks together. This book is a really helpful guide to over 70 walks (with approx times and grades) divided into 5 regional sections – across Otaki, Wellington city, the eastern bays, Wainuiomata Valley and the Hutt Valley. Illustrated with maps and plenty of photographs, this is a handy tool to choose the right path for the day.

The everything plant-based meal prep cookbook : 200 easy, make-ahead recipes featuring plant-based ingredients, by Diane Smith
“Enjoy hundreds of delicious plant-based recipes to mix and match with your meal prepping, like: Tropical Spinach Smoothie, sheet Pan Ratatoville with Creamy Polenta, Cauliflower-Sweet Potato Mash, Pan-Seared Artichoke Hearts with Spinach and Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Loaded Tahini-Spiced Potato Skins, Chocolate-Orange Zucchini Cake, and tasty meals for every part of the day!” (Adapted from the Catalogue)

The LEGO neighborhood book : build your own town! by Brian Lyles.
Pool your LEGO resources to build on a much larger scale! Try your hand at creating your own neighborhood in miniature. Add buildings, shops, and then design the interiors by filling your buildings with furniture and light fixtures, as well as the finishing touches to your models with plants, traffic lights, scaffolding, and park benches.

Modern potluck : beautiful food to share, by Kristin Donnelly.
This updates the potluck concept into a new generation, These 100 make-ahead recipes are perfect for a crowd and navigate carnivore, gluten-free, dairy-free, vegetarian, and vegan preferences gracefully. With beautiful color photographs and lots of practical information such as how to pack foods to travel, Modern Potluck is the ultimate book for gathering friends and family around an abundant, delicious meal.

Root, nurture, grow : the essential guide to propagating and sharing houseplants, by Caro Langton,
The handbook is a practical guide with step by step instructions on how to make the most of your favourite houseplants through simple, propagation techniques. There are also welcome techniques projects including homemade rooting mediums, seed-bombs, and a self-watering plant pot. Share your plants with neighbours by making beautiful gifts and displays.

The thrifty pantry : budget-saver family favourites from under $2.50 per serve This cookbook is for the thrifty minded, with 100 recipes using common staple ingredients. Each recipe is helpfully costed out, this tailor made for cooking on a budget or at short notice. Chapters are organised into cost per serve plus there’s a handy recipe key for gluten free, vegetarian and freeze-ahead meals.

Rest in peace Neville Gilmore, January 2021

With sadness Wellington City Libraries pays tribute to Neville Gilmore, Te Matehou, Te Atiawa, who, during his research for Wellington Tenths Trust (2001-2009), also gave so kindly and generously of his time and knowledge to our project, Ngā Tūpuna o te Whanganui-a-Tara (2001-2007).

Research team: Ngā Tūpuna o Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Lotofoa Fiu, Sandra Clarke, Neville, Ann)
Research team: Ngā Tūpuna o Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Lotofoa Fiu, Sandra Clarke, Neville, Ann Reweti)

It was a project that evolved from a kaupapa of breathing life into the written accounts of our Taranaki Whānui who migrated to this rohe from 1820s onward.

Tribunal research for Wai 145 was the basis for much of the 1840 colonisation and stories of the whenua, but a burning question for our library was, “Who were the people behind the names attached to this land?” On our approach to Wellington Tenths for assistance, Neville became “ the man” – who made clear to us, the myriad of whānau links interlocking and criss-crossing the landscape of Te Whanganui-a-Tara. As we became aware of the immensity of the work we’d undertaken we realised how vital was the input from Neville and the Wellington Tenths office to the production of our four books.

Several mana whanua at blessing of Nga Tupuna 2, including Mr Neville Gilmore
Wellington City Libraries : At the blessing of vol. 2

Through conversation with Neville, I came to realise the importance of not just the Minute Book succession records of the Māori Land Court but also the underlying “whakapapa” of the land as set out in the Land Block files, held also at the District Land Court offices.

There was a wealth of knowledge in Neville’s memory bank which he always delivered with enthusiasm and generosity and wisdom. In our later volumes we finally saw a light and asked Neville to contribute his own special stories – (see vol. 4) – Mata Pekainu Tumatuhiata, Komene Paipa, Te Kere Ngataierua, Hare Parata. There is his story of Te Rei Pukekura, husband of Mihi Korama Te Toru – Te Rei was related by marriage to Ngake and Patukawenga, Ropiha Moturoa and Hohepa Kopiri. He was the son of Te Moana Pounamu (Martina Ruta) and Tawhirikura who in turn was the daughter of Waireinga and Wahanga. Te Rei was also the brother of Haneta Toea.

Then there’s the description of Rawiri Motutere/Koheta : Rawiri was tall, athletic and ‘straight as a spear’ – He had a beautiful tāmoko which had a particular blue texture. He was very fair, that is, as white in the face as a Pakeha with red hair. When he went out he always wore a mata-huna (mask) to protect his fair skin from the sun. The tāmoko of the mask was an exact replica of that upon his face.

Wellington City Libraries : launch of vol. 3
Wellington City Libraries : launch of vol. 3

But Neville was also a huge influence in the wider published history of the rohe, including Pipitea. His own thesis: (MA – La Trobe, 1986) was ground-breaking : Kei Pipitea taku kainga : ko te Matehou te ingoa o taku iwi : The New Zealand Company Native Reserve Scheme and Pipitea, 1839-1888.

Some books are listed below, but he would also have contributed to many more as a researcher.

Ngā tūpuna o Te Whanganui-a-Tara. Volume 4 by Sandra Clarke
“This book, produced by Wellington City Libraries profiles another 29 Tupuna who migrated to Te Whanganui-a-Tara (the Great Harbour of Tara), or Port Nicholson, in a series of Heke during the 1820’s and 1830’s. These iwi were mainly Te Ati Awa, Ngati Tama and Ngati Ruanui. Tupuna featured include Ihikaera te Waikapoariki; Taare Tahua; Mata Pekainu Tumatuhiata; Hori Ngapaka; Hori Pipi; Te Teira Whatakore; Ihaka Te Rou; Te Poho-o-te-rangi; Arapera Rongouaroa; Teretiu Tuwhare; Karena Waitere; Ingo Takata; Hare Parata; Kereopa te Wharepouri; Mere Pararaki; Mohi Puketapu; and several more.”
Other volumes : vol 1, vol 2, vol 3.

Gilmore, Neville. The myth of the overlords : tenure in Te Whanganui-a-Tara, 1819-1847. [Wai 145, G3]

Gilmore, Neville and Liz Mellish. Cultural Report Lambton Harbour (held by the National Library).

Hailwood, Ritihia and Neville Gilmore, Wellington Tenths Trust. Wellington Tenths Trust GIS map book 2004

Johnston, Warwick (in collaboration with Neville Gilmore) detailing the history of the Hutt Valley, e.g. The history of Petone foreshore.

Moe mai ra e te rangatira
Moe mai ra I roto I te ngakau o te kaihanga
E kore rawa koe e warewaretia
Moe mai, moe mai ra

E te hunga mate, te hunga kua whetūrangitia
moe mai, moe mai, moe mai rā,
haere ki te huinga o te kahurangi,
ki Hawaiki nui, ki Hawaiki roa, ki Hawaiki pamamao,
haere, haere haere atu ra.

Rangimarie Turuki Rose Pere

We were saddened to hear of the passing of Dr. Rangimarie Turuki Rose Pere, of Tūhoe, Ngāti Ruapani and Ngāti Kahungunu, on Sunday, December 13th at home in Waikaremoana, New Zealand. Dr Rose Pere, also known by many as Whaea Rose, was renowned for her spiritual teachings and ancient wisdom. “She was different and she dared to be different and she dared everyone around her to be different.”

Her spirituality, and mātauranga stretched the boundaries of Te Ao Marama. Her colourful turban-clad head would be seen weaving its way across many an academic campus or marae as she began yet another spellbinding session on the practical applications of her beliefs and peace-making, mind-blowing wisdom.

She was the Young Maori Woman of the Year in 1972, awarded the New Zealand 1990 Commemoration medal C.M. and became a Commander of the British Empire receiving her C.B.E. in 1996. She worked within education across all age groups from pre-school to tertiary level, focusing on building the strength and identity of indigenous learners. In a statement, her whānau said she was loved across Aotearoa and the globe. “Her life was distinguished by extraordinary service to many people in both Aotearoa, New Zealand and the many corners of the world. She touched many lives and hearts.”

Read more about her life and teachings:

Te wheke : a celebration of infinite wisdom, by Rangimarie Pere

Vision Aotearoa = Kaupapa New Zealand : Marie Bell, Vicki Buck, Eddie Durie, Mason Durie, Michael Fay, … Tipene O’Regan, Rangimarie Rose Pere, Ken Piddington, Irihapeti
“Twenty New Zealanders talk to Roslie Capper and Amy Brown about their vision for Aotearoa New Zealand. They are Maori and Pakeha; some are business people, public servants, writers, clergy; all are change-seekers. The interviews are edited by Witi Ihimaera.” (Book Jacket)

Women and education in Aotearoa.
“This collection of essays on the contemporary educational experience of girls and women has been welcomed by teachers and students.” Includes Te wheke: whaia te maātauranga me te aroha, by Rangimarie Rose Pere.

He Matapuna = A source : some Maori perspectives. Includes “Taku taha Māori : my Māoriness, by Rangimarie Rose

Also : Te tohuna kura waka : shares the source of ancient Māori healing wisdom in Aotearoa, New Zealand, by Charlotte Mildon. (2017)

Mātauranga wahine, by Charlotte Mildon (Tōku Anō Ao Māori My Very Own World, Occasional paper Series no. 2).

Puna wairere : essays, by the New Zealand Planning Council. [1990] Includes Tangata whenua, by Rangimarie Rose Pere.

The sacred plant medicine of Aotearoa. Volume 1, by Franchelle Ofsoske-Wyber. (2019)

Dr. Rangimarie Turuki Rose Pere’s presentation at IDEC 2015 about Education from a Maori perspective.

Dr Rose Pere, spiritual leader and academic dies (Radio NZ obituary)

Me te aroha tino nui atu ki te whānau pani
Nā mātou, ngā kaimahi whare pukapuka ki Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui