The Personal and Political (and Giant Alien Robots) with New Graphic Novels

April’s selection of new material begins with Memorabilia, an homage to graphic novels by Italian comic creator Sergio Ponchione. In Black Hammer: Age of Doom Part 1, a group of superheroes are marooned in a creepy rural enclaveAlso for the artists, the gritty reality of a life in animation is explored in the graphic memoir of Natalie Nourigat, and artistic nostril-gazing meanders into the selection with Flem from Belgian/Canadian comic creator Rebecca Rosen.

The Flutter Collection also has gender-jumping Lily faced with the foibles of life. Hobo Mom also sees a family strain around the idea of gender roles. We round off the selection with Sturm’s Off Season, where political tensions literally tear lives apart.

But wait… wasn’t there a giant alien robot? Well yes, it’s a bit hard to miss. And you don’t need to miss out on any of these titles, as reserves are currently free! Have fun!

Memorabilia / Ponchione, Sergio
“This is a fantastical graphic novel fan letter to some of the greatest American comic book creators. This book collects five individual stories illuminating the art and lives of the all-time great comic book artists Steve Ditko, Jack Kirby, Wallace Wood, Will Eisner, and Richard Corben. Ponchione blends biographical details about each artist with the characters and worlds they created, mixing fact with fiction as a testament to the remarkable imaginations of these masterful comics-makers.” (Catalogue)

The Flutter collection / Wood, Jennie
“Fifteen-year-old Lily shape-shifts into a boy to get the girl, and chaos ensues when she pretends to be someone she’s not. Lily learns that life as a boy is just as difficult, and that she can’t just run away from her problems. With her loved ones in danger, she returns to St. Charles to live as Jesse and protect them. But knowing what she’s capable of, can Lily be content as a popular high school varsity quarterback? Then, Lily gets stuck in a body while shape-shifting, but not just any body, it’s her mother’s! Forced to see the world through the eyes of her estranged mother, Lily must accept that she’ll never life a “normal life” in order to fulfill her true destiny.” (Catalogue)

Black Hammer [3]. Part I, Age of doom / Lemire, Jeff
“Picking up immediately where we left off–Lucy Weber has become the new Black Hammer and right as she’s about to reveal to our heroes how they got stuck on the farm and can escape she vanishes. Now our new Black Hammer finds herself trapped in a gritty world filled with punk rock detectives, emo gods, anthropomorphic humans, absurdist heroes, and many more weirdos, in mad world in which there is no escape Collects Black Hammer: Age of Doom #1-5. ” (Catalogue)

 Hobo mom / Forsman, Charles and Max de Radiguès. 
“Two cartoonists, Forsman and de Radiguès team up to tell the story of a prodigal mother’s return. A cross Atlantic collaboration, Hobo Mom was drawn simultaneously to tell the story of Tom, who lives a simple life with his pre-teen daughter, Sissy. Her mother, Natasha, who left to hop trains and has become a vagrant, shows up on the doorstep of the family she abandoned years ago. There, Natasha finds an upset husband (who is still deeply in love with her), and a little girl yearning for a mother. Can someone who covets independence settle down?” (Catalogue)

Gigantic / Remender, Rick
“Who is this invader demolishing San Francisco? Why is he being attacked by strange alien beings? And why is he so Gigantic? It was a beautiful spring day in downtown San Francisco before a gigantic armored alien appeared from out of nowhere and began smashing things all to hell. A twist on The Truman Show, Gigantic focuses on a brainwashed alien superhero deposited on Earth to be the spotlight of an intrusive, around-the-clock television program being filmed without his knowledge.” (Catalogue)

Off season / Sturm, James
“How could this happen? The question of 2016 becomes deeply personal in James Sturm’s riveting graphic novel Off Season, which charts one couple’s divisive separation during Bernie Sanders’s loss to Hillary Clinton, Clinton’s loss to Donald Trump, and the disorienting months that followed. We see a father navigating life as a single parent and coping with the disintegration of a life-defining relationship.” (Catalogue)

I moved to Los Angeles to work in animation / Nourigat, Natalie
When artist Tally Nourigat left her life in Portland to move to Los Angeles and pursue a job in animation, she realized that despite her research, nothing truly prepared her for the wild world that awaited in the studios of Southern California. From grinding on storyboard test after storyboard test to getting a job at a major studio to searching for an apartment in ‘the Valley’ this autobiographical how-to graphic novel explores the highest highs and lowest lows of pursuing a dream in animation. Brushed with a dose of humor and illustrated advice about salaries, studio culture, and everything in between, I Moved to Los Angeles to Work in Animation is the unique insider experience you won’t find anywhere else.” (Catalogue)

Flem / Rosen, Rebecca
“Fictional biography of a disturbed performance artist Julia Marten’s a mess: she’s running out of inheritance money, failing out of art school, and haunted by the ghost of her depressed mother. And then there’s the compulsive nose-picking thing… When Julia meets a group of radical feminist performance artists in a Brussels squat, she is convinced by their political perspective and enchanted by their counter-cultural lifestyle. But has she found her tribe… or lost her mind?” (Catalogue)

 

 

Celebrate Wellington Pride – Queer Fiction 2019

New Zealand Queer fiction lost a significant voice with the death of Peter Wells in February 2019. Both in film and writing Wells explored, exposed and celebrated the variety of queer experience from a New Zealand perspective. To celebrate the upcoming two weeks of Pride celebrations in Wellington you can find a swathe of queer fiction at the Central Library.

Our queer fiction selection features classics through to new material across time and place by LGBTQI+ authors, and works including characters with a queer viewpoint. Explore lives, orientations, identities and experiences outside the binary. 

In addition to library print material there is an online lending collection through OverDrive LGBTIQ+ Reads for a great range of reading and listening material.

Willa & Hesper / Feltman, Amy
“Willa’s darkness enters Hesper’s light late one night in Brooklyn. Theirs is a whirlwind romance until Willa starts to know Hesper too well, to crawl into her hidden spaces, and Hesper shuts her out. Told from alternating perspectives, and ending in the shadow of Trump’s presidency, Willa & Hesper is a deeply moving, cerebral, and timely debut” (adapted from Catalogue)

Call me by your name / Aciman, André
“Andre Aciman’s Call Me by Your Name is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blossoms between an adolescent boy and a summer guest at his parents’ cliff side mansion on the Italian Riviera. Each is unprepared for the consequences of their attraction, when, during the restless summer weeks, unrelenting currents of obsession, fascination, and desire intensify their passion and test the charged ground between them. Recklessly, the two verge toward the one thing both fear they may never truly find again: total intimacy. It is an instant classic and one of the great love stories of our time.” (Catalogue)

The Beatrix gates : PM Press outspoken authors / Pollack, Rachel
“A queer cult favorite, The Beatrix Gates is a colorful mix of science fiction, magic realism, memoir, and myth exploring themes of spirituality and transformation. Courage and cowardice contend in a literary odyssey unlike any other.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Annabel / Winter, Kathleen
“Kathleen Winter’s stunning debut novel, a #1 national bestseller, is a beautifully sensitive story of family, identity, and the yearning to belong. A child born in 1968 in Labrador, Canada, seems to be both boy and girl-a secret kept by the midwife and the parents, who opt to raise him as Wayne. Eventually, Wayne must acknowledge his second self, a girl he privately calls Annabel.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Boy overboard / Wells, Peter
“An achingly insightful coming-of-age novel about discovering sexuality and selfhood. Jamie is eleven, on the threshold of discovery. But he can’t find the map that will explain where he fits in or who he is. His parents are away and he is staying with family friends. The sea is rising towards high tide, and he is a boy overboard.” (adapted from Catalogue)

The price of salt / Highsmith, Patricia
“Therese, a struggling young sales clerk, and Carol, a homemaker in the midst of a bitter divorce, abandon their oppressive daily routines for the freedom of the open road, where their love can blossom. But their newly discovered bliss is shattered when Carol is forced to choose between her child and her lover. Erotic, eloquent, and suspenseful, this story offers an honest look at the necessity of being true to one’s nature.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Disobedience / Alderman, Naomi
“In suburban north-west London the Orthodox Jewish community of Hendon quietly conducts its daily life. When a beloved rabbi dies, his passing brings his wayward daughter home. For the past ten years Ronit has been living the life of a modern New York woman; returning home, she’s looking forward to catching up with old friends, perhaps settling old scores. But it soon becomes clear that Hendon and Ronit don’t fit.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Our young man : a novel / White, Edmund
Our Young Man follows the life of a gorgeous Frenchman, Guy, as he goes from the industrial city of Clermont-Ferrand to the top of the modeling profession in New York City’s fashion world, becoming the darling of Fire Island’s gay community. Surveying the full spectrum of gay amorous life through the disco era and into the age of AIDS, Edmund White (who worked at Vogue for ten years) explores the power of physical beauty to fascinate, to enslave, and to deceive with sparkling wit and pathos.” (adapted from Catalogue)

The house of impossible beauties / Cassara, Joseph
The House of Impossible Beauties follows a cast of gay and transgender club kids navigating the Harlem ball scene and the Christopher Street Piers as they flee their traumatic pasts and band together to form the city ‘s first all-Latino House. Told in a voice that brims with wit, rage, tenderness and fierce yearning. The House of Impossible Beauties is a tragic story of love, family and the resilience of the human spirit.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Bingo love / Franklin, Tee
“When Hazel Johnson and Mari McCray met at church bingo in 1963, it was love at first sight. Forced apart by their families and society, Hazel and Mari both married young men and had families. Decades later, now in their mid-60s, Hazel and Mari reunite again at a church bingo hall. Realizing their love for each other is still alive, what these grandmothers do next takes absolute strength and courage.” (Amazon.com)

My brother’s husband. Volume 1 / Tagame, Gengoroh
“Yaichi is a work-at-home suburban dad in contemporary Tokyo; formerly married to Natsuki, father to their young daughter, Kana. Their lives suddenly change with the arrival at their doorstep of a hulking, affable Canadian named Mike Flanagan, who declares himself the widower of Yaichi’s estranged gay twin, Ryoji. Mike is on a quest to explore Ryoji’s past, and the family reluctantly but dutifully takes him in. What follows is an unprecedented and heartbreaking look at the state of a largely still-closeted Japanese gay culture: how it’s been affected by the West, and how the next generation can change the preconceptions about it and prejudices against it. (Please note: This book is a traditional work of manga, and reads back to front and right to left.)” (Catalogue)

Wandering son. Volume one / Shimura, Takako
“Shuichi and his friend Yoshino have a secret: Shuichi is a boy who wants to be a girl, and Yoshino is a girl who wants to be a boy. A sensitive masterpiece from Japan’s most prominent creator of LGBT manga. Wandering Son is a sophisticated work of literary manga translated with rare skill and sensitivity by veteran translator and comics scholar Matt Thorn.” (Catalogue)