Win Tickets to Verb Wellington! – finished 05/11/2020

**UPDATE: this competition finished on 05 November 2020″**

The Wonderful Verb festival starts in just a few days’ time–and what a fabulous line up the Verb team have put together for us this year! To give you a flavour of what’s on offer, we’ve listed just a few of the many events that have caught our fancy. And to celebrate this literary cornucopia, we’ve got some Verb Wellington tickets to give away!

To go into the draw, simply tell us which Verb event excites you the most this year and why.

All answers need to be sent via enquiries@wcl.govt.nz. Winners will be picked on Thursday, 5 November and digital tickets will be sent out via email. Good luck!

Below are just a few of the events we are really excited about. For full details of all Verb events click here.


Sprigs: Brannavan Gnanalingam

We’re looking forward to a lively conversation between Wellington author Brannavan Gnanalingam and comedian James Nokise at Verb Festival 2020. They will be covering some of the huge and essential topics that come up in Brannavan’s brilliant new novel, Sprigs. (Click here for event details.)

Sprigs / Gnanalingam, Brannavan
“It is Saturday afternoon and two boys’ schools are locked in battle for college rugby supremacy. Priya – a fifteen year old who barely belongs – watches from the sidelines. Then it is Saturday night and the team is partying. Priya’s friends have evaporated and she isn’t sure what to do. In the weeks after ‘the incident’ life seems to go on. But when whispers turn to confrontation, the institutions of wealth and privilege circle the wagons.” (Adapted from catalogue Catalogue)


Finding Adventure with Jonathan King

Film maker and comics writer Jonathan King is running a workshop to help you create your adventure story! Limited places so get in quick for this Verb Festival event. (Click here for event details.)


Movement & Poetry with Rata Gordon

Get your body and brain moving in this creative writing workshop with poet Rata Gordon! (Click here for event details.)

Second person / Gordon, Rata
“The only thing to bring this frozen world to life is an imagination. Who has one? Do I? Let me check. Rata Gordon’s first poetry collection is both graceful and restless, sorrowful and witty. In poems about childhood, travelling, the body and the earth, Gordon describes the freedom and disorientation we find in unfamilar places, and the way that our longings and imaginings animate our lives.” (Adapted from Catalogue)


Not that I’d Kiss a Girl: Lil O’Brien

Emily Writes is going to talk with writer Lil O’Brien about her brilliant memoir of her coming out journey: funny, frank and refreshing! (Click here for event details.)


Spontaneous Storytelling Workshop for Families

Bring the whānau young and old for this interactive storytelling workshop with Derek & Michi! (Click here for event details.)


Dara McAnulty: Diary of a Young Naturalist

Calling all young nature lovers! At the age of 16 Dara McAnulty is an international nature writing superstar. Join Dara for a digital conversation about this life as a writer, conservationist and teenager with Asperger’s. (Click here for event details.)

Diary of a young naturalist / McAnulty, Dara
“An astonishing, evocative exploration of the natural world and all its wonders, by 15-year-old conservationist and rising literary star Dara McAnulty Diary of a Young Naturalistchronicles the turning of 15-year-old Dara McAnulty’s world. From spring and through a year in his home patch in Northern Ireland, Dara spent the seasons writing. These vivid, evocative and moving diary entries about his connection to wildlife and the way he sees the world are raw in their telling.'” (Adapted from Catalogue)


Wild at Heart: Miriam Lancewood

Miriam’s Lancewood’s wild life is adventurous and inspiring. Join Susie Ferguson (RNZ) and Miriam for an hour of entertaining stories of living in the wilderness of Aotearoa. (Click here for event details.)

Wild at heart / Lancewood, Miriam
“Gripping sequel to the international bestseller Woman in the Wilderness, Miriam Lancewood’s story of the quest for a simple life, unfettered by society’s norms.” (Catalogue)

 

 


Hiakai: Monque Fiso

Come and hear Chef Monique Fiso talk about her stunning new book, Hiakai, celebrating kai Māori, at Verb Festival 2020! (Click here for event details.)

Hiakai = Modern Maori cuisine / Fiso, Monique
“Monique Fiso is a modern-day food warrior, taking Maori cuisine to the world. After years overseas in Michelin-star restaurants, Monique returned to Aotearoa to begin Hiakai, an innovative pop-up venture that’s now a revered, award-winning restaurant in Wellington. This book is Monique’s personal journey of self-discovery, it tells the story of kai Maori, provides foraging and usage notes, an illustrated ingredient directory, and over 30 breathtaking recipes that give this ancient knowledge new life. Hiakai offers up food to behold, to savour, to celebrate.” (Adapted from Catalogue)


Rules for entry

  1. This competition is open to all Wellington City Libraries’ adult members.
  2. Only one entry per person will be accepted.
  3. Entries close on Thursday 5 November 2020. Only entries received before this date will be considered.
  4. Wellington City Libraries will make reasonable attempts to contact the winner. Another winner will be drawn if contact cannot be made.
  5. Judges’ decisions are final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  6. Libraries’ staff are not permitted to enter this competition.

Verb Wellington 2019: Librarians’ Choice!

When it began life in 2014, Verb Wellington (then LitCrawl) featured 15 literary events across a single night in November. Six years on, things have changed! This highlight of the capital’s creative calendar runs for a full four days, with writers from Aotearoa and around the world packing into shops, bars, libraries, galleries and more to listen to–and take part in–a range of exciting literary events.

To help you navigate these authorial riches, we’ve put together a librarians’ choice of Verb Wellington events. And if you need to do some reading before heading along, never fear–we’ve got links to the books associated with each event as well! So whether you like discovering the luxurious yet desolate apartments of post-recession Iceland or Tinakori Road in the ’60s–or anything else!–Verb Wellington has got you covered. (And for bonus reading, check out our curated list of Verb Wellington eBooks here!)

Monty’s Pick:

Going to Custard: High Tea with Danielle Hawkins and Catherine Robertson.

The pair of best-selling Aotearoa writers sit down and tuck in to talk about how they draw upon life to spin into stories for their beautifully Kiwi pages.

When it all went to custard / Hawkins, Danielle
“The news of Jenny’s husband’s infidelity comes as a nasty shock to the part-time building control officer and full-time mother – even though, to her surprise, her first reaction is relief. What really hurts is her children’s unhappiness at the break-up, and the growing realisation that she may lose the family farm. This is the story of the year after Jenny’s old life falls apart; of family and farming, pet lambs and geriatric dogs, choko-bearing tenants and Springsteen-esque neighbours. And of getting a second chance.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What you wish for / Robertson, Catherine
“Dr Ashwin Ghadavi, the newly imported GP, is trying hard to fit into Gabriel’s Bay. His challenges include the immoveable force of his office manager, Mac, the ambiguities of the Kiwi idiom and his unrequited attraction to Mac’s daughter, Emma. Having returned home, Emma is on a mission to right eco wrongs, and her targets include local farmer Vic Halsworth, who’s already neck deep in the proverbial and, to make matters worse, seems to be having visions of moose.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Fiona’s Pick:

Val McDermid: Queen of Crime with Val McDermid and Noelle McCarthy.

Val joins RNZ’s Noelle McCarthy for a discussion about her latest books: the beautiful My Scotland, an ode to the Scotland in her stories and what those places mean to her, and the rather more bloody, How the Dead Speak.

My Scotland / McDermid, Val
“In My Scotland, number one bestselling author Val McDermid takes readers to the landscapes where she has lived all her life, and the places where her stories and characters reside. Accompanied by over 100 stunning photographs, this remarkable book uncovers Val’s own Scotland in all its glory – from the iconic Isle of Skye to the majestic streets of Edinburgh; from the undiscovered hideaways of the Highlands to the wild and untamed Jura.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

How the dead speak / McDermid, Val
“After an explosive case that forced Tony Hill and Carol Jordan to reassess everything they thought they knew about right and wrong, both are dealing with the fallout in their own separate ways. While Tony must pay the price for his actions, Carol is conducting investigations into suspected miscarriages of justice. But when a shocking discovery is made on a construction site, Tony and Carol are brought into each other’s orbit once again…” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Cathy’s Pick:

Lit-Sync For Your Life 2019 curated by Chris Tse.

Six of Wellington’s most dynamic and fearless drag performers will shablam the house down in a literary drag show celebrating New Zealand books and writers.

He’s so MASC / Tse, Chris
He’s So MASC confronts a contemporary world of self-loathing poets and compulsive liars, of youth and sexual identity, and of the author as character–pop star, actor, hitman, and much more. These are poems that delve into worlds of hyper-masculine romanticism and dancing alone in night clubs. With it’s many modes and influences, He’s So MASC is an acerbic, acid-bright, yet unapologetically sentimental and personal reflection on what it means to perform and dissect identity.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

How to be dead in a year of snakes / Tse, Chris
“In 1905, white supremacist Lionel Terry murdered the Cantonese gold prospector Joe Kum Yung to draw attention to his crusade to rid New Zealand of Chinese and other east Asian immigrants. Author Chris Tse uses this story–and its reenactment for a documentary a hundred years later–to reflect on the experiences of Chinese migrants of the period, their wishes and hopes, their estrangement and alienation, their ghostly reverberation through a white-majority culture.” (Adapted from the Catalogue)

Neil’s Pick:

For the Love of the Library with Laurinda Thomas, Bee Trudgeon, Jackson Nieuwland and Elizabeth Knox.

Three librarians discuss, with Elizabeth Knox, what they value most about their work, their workplace and how they see the libraries of the future for Aotearoa.

The absolute book / Knox, Elizabeth
“Taryn Cornick believes that the past is behind her – her sister’s death by violence, and her own ill-concieved revenge. She has chosen to live a life more professional than personal. She has written a book about the things that threaten libraries – insects, damp, light, fire, carelessness and uncaring. The book is a success, but not all of the attention it brings her is good. There are questions about a fire in the library at Princes Gate, her grandparents’ house, and about an ancient scroll box known as the Firestarter.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Wake / Knox, Elizabeth
“One sunny spring morning the Tasman Bay settlement of Kahukura is overwhelmed by a mysterious mass insanity. A handful of survivors find themselves cut off from the world, and surrounded by the dead. As they try to take care of one another, and survive in ever more difficult circumstances, it becomes apparent that this isn’t the first time that this has happened, and that they aren’t all survivors and victims—two of them are something quite other.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Paul’s Pick:

Growing up Wāhine Māori with Nadine Anne Hura, Patricia Grace and Tayi Tibble.

Nadine Anne Hura talks with one of our greatest writers Patricia Grace, and powerhouse of poetry, Tayi Tibble, about the ways that being a Māori woman has influenced their written worlds.

Chappy / Grace, Patricia
“Uprooted from his privileged European life and sent to New Zealand to sort himself out, 21-year-old Daniel pieces together the history of his Maori family. As his relatives revisit their past, Daniel learns of a remarkable love story between his Maori grandmother Oriwia and his Japanese grandfather Chappy. The more Daniel hears about his deceased grandfather, the more intriguing and elusive Chappy becomes.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Poūkahangatus / Tibble, Tayi
“This collection speaks about beauty, activism, power and popular culture with compelling guile, a darkness, a deep understanding and sensuality. It dives through noir, whakama and kitsch and emerges dripping with colour and liquor. There’s whakapapa, funk (in all its connotations) and fetishisation. The poems map colonisation of many kinds through intergenerational, indigenous domesticity, sex, image and disjunction.” (Adapted from Catalogue)