New Accessibility Features on Libby

Person with headphones that form an exclamation mark. Text: Libby supports screen readers

Some changes have been made to the Libby app to improve eLibrary access for everyone. These new features improve accessibility by creating more customisation options, improving screen reader and voice control compatibility and changing the presentation of menus.

Here at Wellington City Library we are very excited for these changes given the upcoming retirement of the Overdrive app.

Continue reading “New Accessibility Features on Libby”

Important update regarding Libby and the OverDrive app

Borrow eBooks, audiobooks & magazines. Libby, the library reading app from OverDrive

Change is coming to OverDrive’s apps in 2022 — with the retirement of the original OverDrive App and its full replacement with the Libby App.

The original OverDrive App will be removed from all App Stores (Google, Microsoft and Apple) in February 2022, but current users will be able to continue using it throughout the year until it is retired completely later in 2022.

We know many users of the original OverDrive app use it for its accessibility features compared to Libby, and we’re happy to report that throughout 2021, OverDrive’s primary focus has been on improving accessibility in Libby. You can read on their website about accessibility improvements for Libby as of December 2021, as well as more improvements coming in January 2022.

We’re in the process of updating our website to support the coming changes, and we will continue to do our best to support your use of OverDrive and Libby throughout this time period. If you have any issues or concerns with either app, please make sure to get in touch:

Email us — enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

The Aotearoa Reference collection is now available

NZ collection sign

Our NZ reference collection can now be requested. These items can be identified in the catalogue as held at the Offsite NZ Collection. We regret the time taken to make this large collection available. Our preparations were interrupted more than once by factors outside our control. We are still working through the process to stock-check all the books that were brought out of the Central Library. As soon as books are checked they will be made available on our online catalogue. If you have a particular request which you can’t find in the catalogue, please let us know, and we will make this a priority.

Please use this email address heritagequeries@wcc.govt.nz to make your request and one of our team will retrieve it for you. Don’t forget to let us know your library card number and which branch you would like to view the book at. You will receive two emails, one confirming the request, and the second when the book has arrived at the branch. This is a free request service.

Most books will be available for you to consult for three weeks at the library branch. If you don’t need the books for three weeks, just let the staff in the branch library know and they will return the book for you.

If you need to renew the item for a further 3 weeks, make a request through the same email heritagequeries@wcc.govt.nz and the library team will check if there is another customer waiting.

Visiting the library under Orange settings

All libraries in the Wellington City Libraries’ network remain open under Orange settings of the COVID-19 Protection Framework, with COVID Vaccine Pass and contact tracing.

To keep everyone safe please:

  • wear a mask unless you have an exemption
  • have your vaccine pass ready for scanning
  • scan or sign in on arrival
  • follow any guidance from our staff or signs.

Please check our Libraries event calendar for when programming and events will resume – Event Calendar.

The Hive Makerspace at Johnsonville Library in Waitohi is open by appointment only – book your space at thehive@wcc.govt.nz.

All library members can continue to access a huge range of online resources via our eLibrary – this includes eBooks, magazines, movies, and online courses.

Answers to frequently asked questions about library services under Orange settings can be found on our COVID faqs.

COVID faqs

If you have any queries, please contact Wellington City Libraries by calling 04 801 4040 during office hours or email us at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz. Alternatively, you can message us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

Email us at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Book Club “Always Available” eBooks

Kia ora koutou — Jonny from Wellington City Library here. We know that a lot of you are reading or listening to books using Overdrive or Libby, but sometimes it can be frustrating dealing with wait times for popular titles. That’s why I’m here to talk about “The Book Club”. Have a watch (or read) below!

The Book Club is a curated selection of over 200 titles that are always available. We’re talking eBook AND eAudiobooks, fiction AND non fiction, from around the world AND right here in Aotearoa. Big name authors too, winners of local and international awards as well as some in te reo maori and international languages. They’re always available — which is especially helpful right now, and in the future, if you can’t get to the library for whatever reason.

To see this collection, head to either Libby or Overdrive on the eLibrary page. On overdrive you’ll find The Book Club under “Collections”, in Libby they’re called Unlimited Book Club Loans (go to ‘More guides’, then ‘The Book Club’). They’re also available on their respective apps.

Remember, if you have any questions about any of our services, you can fill out our online support form, or reach us on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram), or email enquiries@wcl.govt.nz. Ka kite!

COVID-19 Update : Libraries at Level 1

covid19 logo

COVID-19 logoWellington will move to COVID Alert Level 1 from 11:59pm, 29 June 2021.

We ask everyone to continue recording your visits to our branches using the QR codes.

With libraries returning to Level 1 tomorrow, our events and programmes for kids, teens and families resume. Please check the Libraries’ event calendar for details of what’s on.

If you have any questions please contact Wellington City Libraries by calling 04 801 4040 during office hours or email enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Read more about our libraries at Level 1

Browsing our collections from home : some tips

Too many results when you search the catalogue, and you’re not sure which book to reserve? How do you choose the best match for your interests? Here are some ideas for you to try.

  1. Use the advanced search link from catalogue.wcl.govt.nz/ which gives you more options to try or combine different types of search (eg title starts with …).
    Catalogue search…
  2. In the search results page, use the left hand menu to narrow down the results by location, what’s available to borrow today, format (such as book), subject (to exclude fiction, for example, if you’re interested in growing roses), or publication year (if you’re interested in newer items. You can select more than one of these filters.

    catalogue search showing filter options

  3. Swap to a flow view as shown in red above. This may be quicker to scan covers across the top of the screen.
  4. Once you’ve identified a possible item, click on the title link. Select the Related option from the left hand side, and for many books there are additional details such as contents pages, further descriptions from the publisher, author information, series information, together with reviews from readers or sources such as the Guardian or Publishers Weekly. If you’d like to add your own review to any book, there’s a link to do that directly from this page.
    catalogue page showing where to find reviews
  5. Ask one of our librarians working at the Off-site Storage (Te Pātaka) to select a few titles on your topic via this request form. These items will be delivered to the library branch you have chosen, and will work like a reserve : you will be notified when they arrive and have a week to pick them up. This request service is free, but other fees may apply (for example if DVDs are requested, the standard issue fee will apply, uncollected items will incur the expired reserves fee).
    Request form

One of our library team will be happy to show you how to use any of these options if you’d like more help.

Read and listen to te reo Māori stories with Lingogo

Lingogo is an app that lets you read and listen to Māori stories, and it’s free to access through your library membership! It’s great for both beginner and intermediate learners of te reo Māori, and every story has native speaker audio attached for those who prefer to listen.

Leading research shows that reading and listening for pleasure is hands-down the most efficient way to acquire a new language, so download the app to enjoy great stories and immerse yourself in te reo Māori!

To get started:

  1. Download the Lingogo app to your Apple or Android phone or tablet from the Google Play Store (Lingogo) or Apple App Store (Lingogo)
  2. Choose ‘Wellington Libraries’ and enter your library barcode number to log in and access the Lingogo collection
  3. Once logged in with your library barcode number, browse and explore beginner and intermediate-level stories in te reo Māori.
  4. Tap sentences for the English translation and tap the headphones icon to hear the sentences read aloud in te reo Māori.
  5. For an eAudiobook experience, read the story to the end and tap the ‘Extra for experts’ button to listen to the full story in te reo Māori.

Dyslexia-friendly books for young people

Wellington City Libraries actively collects dyslexia-friendly books for young people. Many of our branches maintain special displays to make them as easy as possible to find.

We asked our Children & Youth Services Coordinator, Stephen Clothier, for information on this collection — read on for dyslexia-friendly book information from Stephen…

Stephen Clothier There is a rapidly-growing publishing scene internationally for books published in formats friendlier to young people with dyslexia, with publishers like Barrington Stoke and DB Australia publishing exclusively in this area.

What is a dyslexia-friendly book? Dyslexia-friendly books typically have some or all of the following features:

  • Non-white paper
  • Sans-serif font (some books use specially-designed dyslexia-friendly fonts that work by reducing the symmetry between commonly mistaken letter pairs: b/d, p/q, n/u)
  • 1.5 line spacing
  • Variable line lengths
  • Uncluttered page design for maximum clarity

Many of our branches maintain special displays of dyslexia-friendly books to make them as easy as possible to find, but you can also find them for yourself on our catalogue.

Try the following searches — and remember that you can reserve these books to be collected at the library branch of your choice:

For Kids:

For Teens:

Some recent titles

Here is a selection of great dyslexia-friendly titles recently added to our collection:

A bad day for Jayden / Bradman, Tony
“Mum won’t get out of bed. His best friend has dumped him. And school work is just too difficult. Jayden wants to do the right thing – but how can he when it feels like the world is conspiring against him? Everything is going wrong, and when a supply teacher turns up to take his class, Jayden’s sure things will keep on getting worse. But Mrs Wilson is not quite the teacher Jayden expected … can she help turn his bad day around?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Anna Gain and the same sixty seconds / Bass, Guy
“Ever-punctual Anna Gain is never late, and she’s certainly never late for the school bus. Every day she catches it in perfect time. But not today. After a series of absurd events cause Anna to miss the bus, she’s transported one minute back in time – only to be stuck re-living the same sixty seconds again … and again … and again … Is fate trying to teach Anna a lesson? And will she ever escape?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Clever cakes / Rosen, Michael
“It pays to be able to think on your feet, especially if you’re about to be eaten alive or cheated out of a valuable prize! And in these hilarious comical adventures by storytelling legend Michael Rosen, two clever kids are more than a match for a hungry grizzly bear and a bored and arrogant king! Read along as two super-smart kids triumph in these perfectly packaged fairy tales with a twist…” (Catalogue)

The slippery schemes of Sushi Man / Barlow, Steve
“Take on the role of a shape-shifting MEGAHERO in this fully interactive, wacky, choose-your-own-destiny adventure story. You and your mega-computer sidekick, PAL, must save the world from Sushi Man and his own sidekick, Wasabi Boy. This evil duo has started poisoning and controlling the population. Can you possibly morph into the right shapes to take down this out-of-control pair of baddies? (Adapted from Catalogue)

Animal farm / Orwell, George
“Orwell’s powerful, unnerving and timeless allegory of oppression and rebellion, brought to life for a new age of readers in a stunning dyslexia-friendly edition.” (Catalogue)

Central Library design principles agreed

Wellington City Council has adopted four principles that will guide the design for modernising the Central Library building within the remediation plans.

This includes extending the floor space and working with other organisations to offer people a broader range of services and innovative ways to engage with the collections.

“Wellingtonians were very clear when we consulted last year that we need a highly resilient central library building. Strengthening gives us the opportunity to hugely improve the library’s relationship to Te Ngākau Civic Square and surrounding streets, and to completely rethink its interior,” says Mayor Andy Foster.

“Future proofing the library, providing more space for people, and introducing new services and technology were also overwhelmingly supported by Wellingtonians.

“Today we adopted design principles that will guide the reshaping of the interior library space. These principles will provide much wanted technologies and ways to access the collection, along with new spaces and services for existing and new library users. I am particularly excited to confirm integration of Capital E, our City Archives and City Service Centre into the library, and that it will be an inclusive and more accessible building than before.

“I have no doubt that our Central Library, Te Matapihi, will rapidly become an even more treasured place for all Wellingtonians.”

“We also agreed to a modest (880sq metre) extension to the Level 3 and 4 office space that sits above the library proper. This extension will be net positive in terms of revenue to Council and make the existing office space more useable. We also agreed to making the building a 5-star green building which includes the consideration of a rooftop garden space in the design.”

At today’s meeting the Mayor put forward an amendment for officers to investigate the feasibility of including a Literary Hub within the Central Library which was adopted. This proposal was spoken to in the Public Participation part of the meeting by Claire Mabey of Verb Wellington, and Juliet Blyth of ReadNZ, who spoke on behalf of Te Ha, ReadNZ, Booksellers, Publisher’s Association and Verb Wellington.

The Council’s Libraries Portfolio Lead, Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons, says working with partners, including Mana Whenua, Capital E, the Council’s Service Centre and Wellington City Archives will uncover the potential for people to connect with the collections and spaces, and offer a broader range of services in innovative ways.

“As well as returning the aspects of the library people value such as spaces to study, connect and read the collection, we are investigating how we may provide new programmes, such as makerspaces. We are working through how this may look, which we plan to share in the coming months.

“One principle which starts today is calling the Central Library by its gifted name Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui, which already sits above its entrances. This name, gifted by Te Taura Whiri o te reo Māori (Māori Language Commission) when the building originally opened, reflects the Library’s purpose ‘to open windows on the wide world’.

“Our libraries strive to be places where everyone is welcome and have opportunities to view the world in different ways, and for knowledge to be passed on.”

The design principles were developed through early engagement with Mana Whenua, key stakeholders, and potential partners, and our library teams. They also align to the draft design principles for Te Ngākau Civic Precinct. These were adopted, along with a few amendments, by the Council last Thursday.

The options to extend levels three and four will now be included in the detailed design process which is currently underway. We will share more information on the process and a further detailed Design and Service Level Brief in the coming month.

Background
The Central Library building was closed in March 2019 following an engineering assessment saying the way the floor was designed presented a high level of potential failure in a significant earthquake The Council moved quickly to set up an interim CBD library service at three new branches.
The Council then worked through a process with its consultant engineers to establish the range of options to remediate the Central Library building. Three schemes were scoped that offered low, mid, and high levels of resilience.

Following a Special Consultative Procedure in 2020, Council resolved to progress Option C, high-level remediation through base isolation, to the Long-term Plan (LTP) which is now open for public consultation. In the LTP the public is being asked for their views on how to fund the $187.4m library remediation project, and when the project should take place.

The preferred option includes the Council agreeing to temporarily breach its debt limit of 225% to ensure the library can be refurbished in the original timeframe and remain in public ownership.
The debt level will remain at 225%, and the Council has agreed to accept the breach in the first three years of this plan. This breach will be mitigated by any capital underspend being used for the library project rather than on new projects. Our debt level will be back below the limit by year 4 – 2024/25.

The other two options are to:

  • delay the project for up to three years until it can be funded within the Council’s current debt limit, or,
  • fund the project by increasing rates further.

More information about the options can be found on pages 42 and 43 of the consultation document.

More detail can be found in the Council meeting agenda for Thursday 15 April.

RBDigital Magazines have moved to Overdrive/Libby (24 February)

RBDigital Magazines coming to Libby

On 24 February, our RBdigital magazines moved to Libby/Overdrive. This change massively increases the number of magazines available, from 130 to several thousand.

What is different? What is the same?

  • The user experience is similar to borrowing an ebook
  • Magazines can be issued for 21 days, then will automatically be returned from your account with the option to renew issues before they go
  • Magazines issues are continuously available — it should be easy for you to borrow again as needed
  • Up to 3 years of back issues are available to borrow for some titles
  • Auto check out of new issues is no longer available
  • You will no longer get email alerts when new issues are available

The RBdigital platform will remain for a short time, and then be discontinued. This change is a vendor-driven change.

FAQs about the change from Overdrive

Lynda.com is LinkedIn Learning from Monday 15 February

Do you use Lynda.com through the library? From 9pm Monday 15 February, Lynda.com is upgrading to become LinkedIn Learning for Libraries, with all the content you love, plus more!

What changes can I expect?

  • All of your favourite courses will still be available
  • Users will have access to a library of over 16,000 courses in 7 different languages (English, French, German, Japanese, Spanish, Mandarin, and Portuguese)
  • An updated, easier to use interface
  • Your course history will move with you — it’s tied to your library card number

Why is the change happening?

LinkedIn acquired Lynda.com in 2015, and has slowly been transitioning the service and its feature to their own platform and brand.

Will there be an outage for the migration?

Yes, Lynda.com will be unavailable from 9pm Monday 15 February, and the changeover may take several hours.

Do I need to have a LinkedIn account to use LinkedIn Learning for Libraries?

No, you’ll still only need your library card number and PIN.

**UPDATE**  Access to LinkedIn Learning should be back to normal. If you are still having problems accessing it please contact us on enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

COVID-19 Update – Libraries at Level 2

COVID-19 logo“Under Alert level 2 all libraries will remain open for normal hours, with a few changes to keep everyone safe and able to use our spaces,” says Laurinda Thomas, Libraries and Community Spaces Manager. “This includes encouraging everyone to follow the social distancing, use hand sanitiser and wear masks.”

Continue reading “COVID-19 Update – Libraries at Level 2”

Share your views on the future of the Central Library

Monday 27 July marks the start of a six-week public consultation to gather Wellingtonians’ views on restoring the Central Library service in the heart of the city.

“We know how frustrating the closure of the Central Library building is, which is why we sped up the decision-making as quickly as the Local Government Act allowed us to,” says Mayor Andy Foster.

“We are looking forward to hearing Wellingtonians views and we also want to bring life back to Te Ngākau Civic Precinct.”“The building itself is deemed unsafe for people to be in, and there are several ways to remedy this, which also creates new possibilities in how we create the space to meet the changing needs of our growing modern city.”

“The Central Library has been treasured by generations of Wellingtonians as a special place in the heart of our city,” said Libraries Portfolio holder Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons.
“I encourage all Wellingtonians, young and old to have a say about the future of the Library. We need to hear your questions, your views and your aspirations for our Central Library so we can make a good decision that will be well supported by residents.”

“The Statement of Proposal outlines five options for retaining a Central Library service in Te Ngākau Civic Precinct,” says Councillor Iona Pannett, Portfolio Leader for Resilient Buildings. “Three remediate the existing building to a low, mid, or high level and two more suggest building a new library on either the existing site or another site within Te Ngākau Civic Precinct.”

“It also discusses other options which have been discarded, as they were not practicable. We are keen to understand what options you prefer, and the factors behind your decision, or whether you prefer another option.”

Sign up at https://www.letstalk.wellington.govt.nz/central-library to stay-up-to-date with the latest news, find out when events are happening near you and read the Statement of Proposal on the Future of Central Library Consultation. Paper copies of both documents will be available at all library branches from Monday 27 July.

Everyone is invited to complete a submission form between Monday 27 July and 5pm, Monday 7 September. The public are also welcome to make their submission in person to the Strategy and Policy Committee on Wednesday 22 September. To do this, select this option in your submission form.

Central Library fiction available to reserve

“We are excited to announce our Wellington City Libraries customers can begin reserving fiction books online from the Central Library collection through our new Collection and Distribution Centre (CDC),” says Laurinda Thomas, Libraries and Community Spaces Manager.

“Once items are reserved through the catalogue they will be delivered to the library branch the customer has chosen. This should take between one to three working days. Our teams will continue to help people find items and place reserves for them where they need it.”

“People can reserve titles from the fiction collection for adult readers at catalogue.wcl.govt.nz. We will add the young adults and children’s fiction over the coming weeks, followed by the non-fiction titles. After that, we’ll work through the reference collections and how we can make these accessible. We’ll keep customers updated as more parts of the collection become available.”

“It’s been mammoth job to find a space with the right climatic conditions and strength to house the more than 350,000 items which remained at the Central Library after taking out the 60,000 items that are available at our three interim CBD libraries. While we opened two of the interim branches last year – Arapaki Manners Library and He Matapihi Library – our plans to open the third library and the CDC in May were delayed by the Covid-19 lockdown. So we are excited the collection is now accessible, and we are opening Te Awe Library at 9:30am, Tuesday 14 July. We’d very much like to thank our customers for their patience and support over the past fifteen months.”

How library customers can reserve items:

In the New Catalogue (catalogue.wcl.govt.nz), look for items held at the “Off-site Storage” location, and select Place Reserve as you do for other items:

The Collection and Distribution Centre in Johnsonville and the library teams based there, manage the distribution of the thousands of new and current library items which are borrowed from, or returned to our 14 library branches every day. The Centre is closed to the public.

Book Club eBooks now ready to read on Libby

I once facilitated a book group every month on a Friday afternoon at the wonderfully diverse Newtown library involving 8 book-loving, library users. We would discuss the ideas, plots, characters, sense of place and theme of each book like this would be our last, usually over coffee, tea and scones.

Now, that sense of communal engagement can continue on a larger scale with our first collection of always available digital Book Club titles through the eBook and audio-book reading app Libby.

Libby Book Club

We have hundreds of titles to choose from across adult fiction, Aotearoa, nonfiction, kids and teen audiences for discovery by book groups, for community reads, and fiery or friendly discussion. Expect thought-provoking reads across genres like mystery, science fiction, classic literature, poetry and award-winning fiction but also best-selling popular biographies, science and business nonfiction.

Here’s a quick selectors pick of 10 of some of the always available titles ready to read now:

  1. The Luminaries by Eleanor Cotton
  2. The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu
  3. The Bitterroots by C J Box
  4. When They Call You a Terrorist by Patrisse Khan-Cullors
  5. Hera Lindsay Bird by Hera Lindsay Bird
  6. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes by Caitlin Doughty
  7. Te Koparapara: An Introduction the the Maori World 
  8. Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
  9. Monster series by Michael Grant
  10. Mophead by Selina Tusitala Marsh

For even more options try our carefully chosen selection of over 370 classic novels by Jane Austen, Agatha Christie, Leo Tolstoy, Charles Dickens – an entire pantheon of always available literary classics.

For more information on how to get started with the Libby app, go to our eLibrary page or contact us here for further helpful assistance.

Ancestry database now available at home

Staying at home may mean you are doing some of those things that have been sitting on your ‘To Do’  list for a long time.  If one of those tasks has been to sort through old family photos and papers and that gets you thinking that it’s time to research your family history but sadly the library is closed, then we have great news for you!

With kind permission from the people at Ancestry and Proquest, Wellington City Libraries’ cardholders will be able to access this amazing family history database from their own homes.  Usually, Ancestry is only available using our Library subscription from a library computer, but from now until the 30th April you will be able to have the same free access we can usually provide at the library in the comfort of your own home bubble.

**Update: home access to Ancestry has been extended until 31 December 2020!**

Ancestry

Ancestry Library is a research database for genealogists and family history enthusiasts aiding you to trace your family history, with records from the US, UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand.

That includes historical births, deaths and marriages and electoral rolls.

To access the free library Ancestry database go here and login with your card details.  If you don’t have a library card yet you can register online to become a library member.

There are also lots of helpful links and advice on our genealogy page here  and our heritage page here.

Have fun but a word of warning – starting family research and the thrill of the hunt can be quite addictive, so be careful you don’t get lost chasing leads down too many rabbit holes!!

All library branches are closed temporarily

“To help reduce the spread of Coronavirus, we have closed all Wellington City Libraries branches temporarily from Sunday 22 March,” says Laurinda Thomas, Libraries and Community Spaces Manager. “This follows an announcement from the Mayor for Wellington, Andy Foster earlier today.”

Library customers can access a range of online resources at wcl.govt.nz/elibrary. This includes online storytimes, eBooks, newspapers, movies, and online courses.

Explore our eLibrary

All due dates have been extended to 4 May. We will waive any overdues related to the closures. Please keep items at home until our libraries re-open.

Answers to more frequently asked questions can be found on our COVID-19 FAQs page.

If you have any further questions please contact us by email enquiries@wcl.govt.nz, or by messaging us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

Central Library’s collection is on the move

The Central Library collection is getting ready for its new home in the Johnsonville Collection and Distribution Centre.  A mix of approximately 400,000 books, CDs, DVDs, magazines, newspapers and other reference materials will be carefully packed in order, moved and re-shelved over the coming eight weeks.

“We are pleased to be in the final stages of making the much-loved collection available once again, and we thank our customers for their ongoing support,” says Laurinda Thomas, Wellington City Libraries and Community Spaces Manager.

“The Centre in Johnsonville provides both the climatic conditions, space and transport routes needed to manage the collection safely over the long term, until decisions can be made about the future central library services.”

“Although we move thousands of items around our 14 branches every day, this will jump substantially when people are able to order from the CDC. So we are finalising the ordering process and timings so people know what to expect. Towards late April we will advise customers how to order items, and the timings for when they can pick them up from the branch of their choice.”

Over 12,500 items are available in two of the three planned CBD libraries, which opened in May and October last year. Arapaki Library in Manners Street provides a mix of fiction, non-fiction and popular children’s titles. He Mataphi Library within the National Library has over 5,000 items with an Aotearoa and Māori focus.

The third and largest of the three CBD libraries, Te Awe will open in May. Te Awe will provide spaces where people can read, study or collaborate. There is also a dedicated space for a children’s collection, parents’ room and the popular Baby Rock ‘n’ Rhyme sessions.

People will be able to access around 31,000 items which have been tailored to represent the diverse range of subjects which Central Library customers have requested or reserved.

Council staff will be providing advice to the Council on Wednesday 25 March on options for future central library services and the external engineering assessments on the Central Library building. We will share the papers on the Wellington City Council website on 19 March.

Wellington City Libraries’ rare book collection is now housed at the Wellington City Archives at 28 Barker Street.

More information:
Timeline for Wellington Central Library Replacement Services