Shihad

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About this artist...

Also known as:

Pacifier

Decade(s) active:

We say:

Formed in 1988 by high school chums Tom Larkin and Jon Toogood, Shihad began playing in their home town of Wellington, New Zealand, rapidly becoming one of the cities most popular acts.

It’s often been said that you can’t please everyone in this world, but over the last 22 years, Shihad have pleased a great many. Over that time, Shihad have chalked up quite a few enviable milestones:

They’ve toured the world, supported their musical heroes AC/DC, had three #1 albums and hold the record for the most Top40 Single Chart appearances for a New Zealand artist.

You can’t talk about Shihad without mentioning their electrifying live shows. Deservedly reputed as one of the most vital, experienced and energetic live acts around, they recently performed their seminal albums Killjoy and The General Electric in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. The reviews were rapturous and applause thunderous.

While they once changed their name, they’ve never changed their lineup and have proven by example that they are by far one of the most determined and enduring names of our time.

Ah yes, Shihad have remained undeterred by the pitfalls of living and breathing rock ‘n roll. As it was from the very beginning, the music is both their livelihood and their lifeblood and is positively infused with their unwavering enthusiasm and excitement of the process.

So it’s only apt that their eighth studio album would be called Ignite.
Released September 2010, Ignite is a fitting tribute to all that has gone and is yet to come.

As the band celebrate this satisfying stage of their career, they show no signs of cooling off, experiencing yet another worthy high with the signing of a deal with Roadrunner Records in Australia.

Last edited: 23.03.16

From AudioCulture

Shihad began as a bunch of high school kids in love with American speed metal and became New Zealand's most celebrated hard rock band. Their long career has not been without crises. Early triumphs were overshadowed by the drug-related death of their manager and mentor Gerald Dwyer, while their name - adapted from the Islamic word jihad - almost spelt the group's demise when the War On Terror broke out, just as the group were poised for a major launch in the USA. Yet they have prevailed - and all without a single membership change in 22 years. (By Nick Bollinger) Read moreProfile from Audioculture, available under a Attribution Noncommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence

Elsewhere online:


From our shelves:

Albums by this artist


From the Blog:


From DigitalNZ:

  • View on NZ On Screen Shihad

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Shihad have provided a guitar-driven soundtrack for a car-surfing, black jeans-garbed generation since 1988, without a single change in band membership. Led by Jon Toogood, Shihad's raw, no-holds-barred rock has produced hit albums The General Electric (1999), Pacifier (2002) and Beautiful Machine (2008), iconic singles (eg 'Home Again') and a committed Australasian fanbase. Evolutions into post-grunge and electro-punk, and a brief name-change (Pacifier) have not betrayed their metal roots, typified in legendary live performances. The band's story is told in 2012 documentary Shihad - Beautiful Machine." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Shihad - Beautiful Machine

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Documentary ; Music ; Film

    "This theatrically released documentary charts 23 years of highs and lows for one of NZ's most enduring rock bands — complete with personal dramas, early tragedy, adoring local audiences, album sales of 250,000, attempts to crack the United States, and that agonising name change. Seeking an audience beyond the faithful, award-winning director Sam Peacocke expanded the story's scope to feature the band's family and friends as much as the music. NZ Herald entertainment writer Scott Kara called the result "a cracker", and "a must-see for fans of the band".  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Homegrown Profiles: Shihad

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Documentary ; Music ; Television

    "This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles looks at the long career of NZ heavy rock's favourite sons Shihad. Singer Jon Toogood talks frankly about the band's highs and lows, from forming at Wellington High School to the release of Love is the New Hate in 2005 (when this doco was made). In a sometimes brutally honest self-appraisal, Toogood talks about the band's success in Australia being tempered with too much drug-taking and too much ego, their ill-fated name change, and the great American dream that didn't quite work out as planned. " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Pacifier

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "This slickly art-directed music video makes a big nod to cult movie A Clockwork Orange, with the band delivering great performances in the Korova Milk Bar and en route to mayhem. Lead singer Jon Toogood bears an uncanny likeness to psychopath Alex (played by Malcolm McDowell in the 1971 film) in the Jolyon Watkins-directed clip. An interesting piece of trivia for the Kiwi Clockwork connections' file: an artwork from NZ artist Ted Bullmore appeared on the wall of Mr Alexander's home in the inspirational film." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Derail

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "From Shihad’s first album Churn, the video for 'Derail' is a dark and unsettling affair, recasting everyday Kiwi pursuits in a tense, almost disturbing manner. It’s directed by ex-Supergroover Joe Fisher (now known as Joe Lonie), who marries their dissonant riffs and twisted time signatures to black and white footage of horse racing and punters at the track.  Added to the kiwiana gothic mix is some serious looking gumboot tossing, churches and religious imagery: cows and power pylons, golf, bumper boats, roller coasters and dodgems." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Bitter

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    ""There's just some things that I want to tell you" yells Jon Toogood on this track, as he addresses a bitter ex-lover he is very thankful to have got away from. The song is driven by drums, whose beats per minute are matched by the high speed editing of this video. The slices of live footage concentrate mostly on a long-haired Toogood, and a very large audience at the Big Day Out. A number of crowd surfers are among them. The single is from Shihad's second album Killjoy (1995) — their first to go gold in New Zealand." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen My Mind's Sedate

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "Reuben Sutherland directs a hair-raising tour through Shihad's wretched laboratory in this music video. Frenetically paced and skillfully edited, the clip adheres to the feverish temperament of the song, while layered graphics add a sinister and unsettling sci fi edge. Good talent are a director's dream, but in this case — worst nightmare, as Jon Toogood breaks the mold and nails his gritty performance as a demented pharmacist bent way out of shape." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Home Again

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "The video for the song that has become totemic for exiles from Courtenay Place and Coastlands Mall (and expats in general) is a memorable one. With primary colours accentuated and the energy levels of Shihad turned up to match, it makes for busy viewing as the band members bustle within the (single) frame. The concept is cheesy, but it's good cheesy, and the time and motion tomfoolery is surely handled, with developing Polaroid photos to show the trickery is all 'in camera' ie. for real. Directed by Mark Hartley, it won Best Video at the 1998 NZ Music Awards.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Beautiful Machine

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "The title track of Shihad’s seventh studio album sees the band moving beyond the harder edged rock of much of their previous work and embracing new technologies (with a decidedly electro introduction) while lyrically questioning the degree to which humanity has lived up to its potential. Director Sam Peacocke places the band in the wilderness of a damp, fog filled, tussock marsh of blacks, greys and dark greens while a man (an apple short of Margritte’s ‘Son of Man’) and woman rise up and run towards each other: irresistibly drawn to human connection." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Deb's Night Out

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "‘Deb’s Night Out’ was a single from Shihad’s breakout second album Killjoy (1995). Director Chris Mauger’s video bypasses a literal take on the lyrics’ relationship paranoia for a deadpan depiction of cross-generational spirit. A young, sullen Jon Toogood is stuck in his denim jacket in the backseat with a couple of wine-guzzling oldies, en route to a suburban hall shin-dig. There the band gets down for some country and limbo dancing, the family-fun visuals contrasting with the song’s grinding guitar. Mauger’s stylistic touches include a canapé-cam." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen All the Young Fascists

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "Director Mark Albiston (Six Dollar Fifty Man) crafts a frenetic clip for a politically-charged song, belted out by the iconic Kiwi rockers with the allegorical assistance of a praying mantis.   "Praying mantids are fun to work with, remarkably photogenic and not scared of anything! I worked with Aaron Beck who shot most of the mantis stuff in his bedroom with flashing background lights on DV camera with standard 35mm lens stuck on backwards to the front element. The mantis stuff on the mic was shot on location with the band on 16mm." Mark Albiston - Feb 09" (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Homegrown Profiles

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Series ; Documentary ; Music ; Television

    "Homegrown Profiles was a spin-off from music channel C4's local music series Homegrown. Screened in 2005, the new interview-based show featured episodes devoted to the Finn Brothers, Dave Dobbyn, Bic Runga, Anika Moa, Shihad and Che Fu. The hour-long programmes featured one master interview, intercut with music videos and other performance material— all held together with a well-scripted narration by researcher/interviewer/director Jane Yee.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Flesh D-Vice

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Flesh D-Vice emerged out of the early 80s Wellington punk/skinhead scene although vocalist Gerald Dwyer preferred to describe their sound as "hard edged rock'n'roll". They released three albums imbued with comic book horror imagery, and also left their mark in Dwyer's enthusiastic patronage of his city's music. He started a label, promoted gigs and, as Flesh D-Vice wound down in the early 90s, managed new local bands Shihad and Head Like a Hole. Dwyer died in 1996 and Shihad recorded a version of the Flesh D-Vice anthem 'Flaming Soul' in his honour." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Crazy? Yes! Dumb? No!

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Alternative ; Flying Nun ; Indie ; Music Video

    "In this award-winner from the 2007 NZ Music Awards, an intuitive wolf (actually a siberian husky) guides a teen on a dreamlike close encounter with suburbia, where men and women wrestle with poultry, their bowels, and each other. Director Sam Peacocke (Manurewa, Shihad - Beautiful Machine) keeps things cool in the fluorescent half-light. His attention to detail — the heroine's left pupil is bigger than her right — and quirky Blue Riding Hood-in-the-burbs concept enhance the song. " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Lull

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Rock ; Music Video

    "Shot near Anawhata Beach, west of Auckland, this clip from award-winning music video director Sam Peacocke (Manurewa, Shihad - Beautiful Machine) offers shades of classic Vincent Ward film Vigil, thanks to its images of moody rural landscapes, and kids watching bleak relationships go bad. Blindspott perform the track against foreboding macrocarpas which have a life of their own. The clip was judged Best Rock Video in the 2007 Vodafone Juice TV Awards." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Havoc at the Big Day Out

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music ; Young Adults ; Television

    "This special 1999 edition of the youth show travels to downunder's summer music festival du jour: The Big Day Out. Mikey Havoc and Jeremy 'Newsboy' Wells slip, slop, slap and survey the "punters, munters, sights and sounds" at Mt Smart Stadium. They meet musical acts of the era, including Korn, Marilyn Manson and Fatboy Slim, and local heroes Shihad. Newsboy interviews "Nelson College old girl, grunge super bride and Big Day Out recidivist" Courtney Love, who gives him the glad eye (apparently) and he reads her a viewer question from "Doug Myers of Remuera"." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Cushla Dillon: Accidental acting and award-winning editing…

    Source: NZ On Screen

    "Cushla Dillon was a newbie editor when she worked on the TV series and film Topless Women Talk about Their Lives. Dillon won an NZ Film editing award for her work on the movie, then went on to cut an impressive list of documentaries, shorts and feature films. Notable documentaries she has worked on include The Price of Peace and The Confessions of Prisoner T. Dillon’s feature credits include Orphans & Kingdoms, The Price of Milk and Snakeskin (which she edited with Marcus D'Arcy).  In this ScreenTalk, Dillon talks about: Getting an unexpected acting role on short film Peach How her lack of experience was almost an advantage when editing Topless Women Talk about Their Lives Her admiration for the cast of feature film When Love Comes How music helped her find the magic at the heart of Harry Sinclair’s The Price of Milk Budget pressures on film After the Waterfall The importance of making a compelling argument for Teina Pora in documentary The Confessions of Prisoner T Finding the unusual "balance of power" between the characters in the movie Orphans & Kingdoms The deeper meaning in music documentary Shihad - Beautiful Machine This video was first uploaded on 16 May 2016, and is available on YouTube to embed and distribute via this Creative Commons licence." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Nothing to Lose

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Rock ; Music Video

    "This brooding collaboration with Ladi6 from Shihad frontman Jon Toogood's other project The Adults, is yet another departure from his hard rocking day job (although guitarist Shayne Carter briefly raises the temperature). Director Sam Peacocke's split screen video was shot at legendary Auckland studio The Lab (where The Adults recorded their debut album). Ladi6 anchors one side with a typically soulful performance while Toogood (uncharacteristically playing bass), Carter, Gary Sullivan and engineer Nick Roughan are all serious intent beside her." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Head Like A Hole

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Outrageous Wellington rockers Head Like a Hole (aka HLAH) formed in 1990, taking their name from a Nine Inch Nails song, and sharing management and a record label with Shihad in their early years. Masters of excess, they quickly made a name for themselves with their unhinged live performances (not to mention a casual attitude to clothes on stage). HLAH split in 1998 in a state of disarray, but after reforming for the 2009 Homegrown festival, began releasing further albums." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Autozamm

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Autozamm are one of a handful of Kiwi bands that have dominated airplay on local drive-time hard rock radio. Since the release of their first EP A Shade of Brown in 2004, followed by 2005 album As For Now! the boys from Wellington have toured relentlessly building a reputation as a compulsive live act (winning support slots for Silverchair, Shihad and INXS). Sophomore effort Drama Queen spawned the single 'Closer to Home', which reached number two on the NZ Airplay Chart and became an Autozamm anthem.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

 

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