Wellington Heads

comment+

About this artist...

Decade(s) active:


From our shelves:

Albums by this artist


From DigitalNZ:

  • View on NZ On Screen Head Like A Hole

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Outrageous Wellington rockers Head Like a Hole (aka HLAH) formed in 1990, taking their name from a Nine Inch Nails song, and sharing management and a record label with Shihad in their early years. Masters of excess, they quickly made a name for themselves with their unhinged live performances (not to mention a casual attitude to clothes on stage). HLAH split in 1998 in a state of disarray, but after reforming for the 2009 Homegrown festival, began releasing further albums." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Faster Hooves

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Alternative ; Rock ; Music Video

    "Released ahead of their second album Flik Y’Self Off Y’Self, the promo for 'Faster Hooves' showed that while Head Like A Hole had distilled the industrial-thrash of their grimy origins into a hookier, more polished sound, the band had lost none of their piss-taking humour. With the rocky outcrops of Wellington's Island Bay filling in for the Wild West, singer Nigel Beazley teeters precariously on a helpless donkey in pursuit of villainous drummer Mark 'Hideebeast' Hamill. Meanwhile the rest of band hang on nooses next to a boiling campfire pot of Wattie's finest." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen I'm on Fire

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "This ambitious video for Wellington rockers Head Like a Hole's beloved cowpunk Bruce Springsteen cover was shot by Wellington commercials company Flying Fish — at vastly more expense than the low budget home recording which supplies the soundtrack. There's more than just a cursory nod to U2's LA rooftop video for 'Where The Streets Have No Name' (including supposed radio coverage from Channel Z) but HLAH get a helicopter and a higher building — and, unlike U2's guerrilla effort, the apparent blessing of the city fathers (with Mayor Mark Blumsky on site)." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • Viewfinder - 12 April 1984

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Magazine ; Young Adults ; Television

    "In April 1984 Poi-E was atop the NZ music charts, with ‘Jo the breakdancer’ starring in the song's music video. So it's apt that this edition of the TVNZ youth show looks at “the craze currently sweeping New Zealand — breakdancing”. In her first presenting gig, future MTV host Phillipa Dann heads to Mangere to bop and head-spin. Elsewhere in this season opener, David Hindley reports on a School Certificate controversy, and why young drivers are dying on country roads. Co-presenting back in Viewfinder’s Dunedin studio is Uelese Petaia (star of movie Sons for the Return Home)." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Fat Freddy's Drop - Based on a True Story

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Documentary ; Music ; Television

    "This documentary follows the "seven headed soul monster direct from the shores of Wellington" — Fat Freddys Drop — as they rumble their dub-rich sound through Europe like a Houghton Bay roller. Touring to showcase album Based on a True Story, it features rehearsals and performances, eating Italian kai moana, playing concrete ping pong in Berlin, and (in the fifth clip) a jam with Cliff Curtis. Radio 1 DJ Zane Lowe lauds the 'fullas' and Mu explains whanau to German journos. True Story sold 120,000+ copies and dominated the 2005 New Zealand Music Awards.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen The Pā Boys

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Drama ; Te Reo ; Music ; Māori ; Film

    ""It is about 'life, death and fu*king good music'" runs the tagline to this movie, which follows a Wellington band playing East Coast and Northland pubs, as they head for Cape Reinga. On the road to Te Rerenga Wairua the boys go on a roots journey that is both musical (the cast includes singer Francis Kora, with songs by Trinity Roots' Warren Maxwell) and personal (mateship, whānau, whakapapa). The debut from writer/director Himiona Grace was co-produced by Ainsley Gardiner (Boy) and Mina Mathieson (Warbrick). It was released in NZ cinemas in February 2014." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Flesh D-Vice

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Flesh D-Vice emerged out of the early 80s Wellington punk/skinhead scene although vocalist Gerald Dwyer preferred to describe their sound as "hard edged rock'n'roll". They released three albums imbued with comic book horror imagery, and also left their mark in Dwyer's enthusiastic patronage of his city's music. He started a label, promoted gigs and, as Flesh D-Vice wound down in the early 90s, managed new local bands Shihad and Head Like a Hole. Dwyer died in 1996 and Shihad recorded a version of the Flesh D-Vice anthem 'Flaming Soul' in his honour." (NZ On Screen summary)

 

have your say

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. Subscribe to these comments.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>



»