Sing Songs

comment+

About this artist...

Decade(s) active:

,


From our shelves:

Albums by this artist


From DigitalNZ:

  • Sing

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Variety ; Music ; Television

    "Sing featured Kiwi entertainers performing popular songs and musical standards, accompanied by a bevy of dancers. The performers included Craig Scott, Ray Woolf, Angela Ayers, Chic Littlewood and musical comic relief Laurie Dee. The hair was big and the collars large, while songs tended towards the middle of the road — for example 'Love is All Around', Tom Jones and Glen Campbell." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Freedom to Sing

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Dub ; Soul ; Music Video

    "In April 2011, singer Tiki Taane was handcuffed, arrested and spent a night in the cells after performing a number by American rappers NWA as police visited his performance at Tauranga’s Illuminati club. The charges were later dropped and Taane remained resolutely unapologetic. This defiant song, recorded a month later at the same venue, is his musical response to the ordeal. Armed only with an acoustic guitar — the protest singer’s weapon of choice — he asserts his refusal to be silenced while firing a broadside at police, the media and politicians." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • Sing Special - 12 November 1975

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Variety ; Television

    "This end of season Sing special from 1975 takes place mostly in the Wild West. After some song and dance numbers and comedy, we meet two small-time crooks: Lone Wolf (Ray Woolf) and Crazy D (Laurie Dee). A musical showdown at the saloon ensues — featuring a Tom Jones medley — before a bungled bank robbery brings down the burglars. The performers include Craig Scott, Chic Littlewood, Angela Ayers and George Tumahai (who shows Woolf how to hongi). The show also contains a rare clip from A Going Concern, an early NZ soap of which no known episodes survive." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Making Music - Moana Maniapoto

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music ; Arts/Culture ; Short Film

    "Singer Moana Maniapoto discusses her evolution as a Māori musician in this episode from a series for high school music students. After first singing in public on the marae and learning to harmonise at school, she paid her way through university by singing in nightclubs. She describes her epiphany in a Detroit church as she realised that she needed to sing Māori songs rather than keep trying to emulate American soul and r'n'b divas. An acoustic performance of 'Hine Te Iwaiwa' (from her Toru album) is followed by a demonstration of traditional instruments. " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen It Was Raining

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Alternative ; Music Video

    "The Verlaines sing and play while sitting on a picnic rug under a tree, with assorted friends and family (and a dog) as fellow picnickers. Meanwhile mystic mask-wearing woodland creatures lurk behind the idyll. Cheap but certainly not without charms (there's even a feathery one hanging off the guitar). Check out a young Shayne Carter lounging under the tree fuschia." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Youthful

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Music Video

    "A teenage Anika Moa attracted the attention of Atlantic Records on the strength of this song, becoming the first Kiwi to sign to a major international label before having released an album at home. Directed by Paul Casserly, the music video places the camera above Moa as she sings about objectification in a house that, even by Kiwi standards, needs a heating upgrade. At the 2002 NZ Music Awards ‘Youthful’ won Moa Songwriter of the Year. In a 2005 Homegrown episode, Moa recalled feeling shy making her first music video. “Everyone thought I looked like Beth Heke."" (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Maybe Tomorrow

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Folk ; Music Video

    "'Maybe Tomorrow' was the song that opened the door for Goldenhorse. Released in February 2003, the single's mixture of the bittersweet, the nostalgic and the supremely catchy helped make it NZ radio's most played local song that year; it was also a finalist for a Silver Scroll songwriting award. In the video, Kirsten Morrell sings of past and future, sorrow and possible celebration, alongside grainy home movie style images of the band at the beach, and at the mike (possibly in someone's living room). A less popular alternative video for the song featured Morrell singing in the kitchen. " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Mother Goose

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "In the pre-Flying Nun era, Mother Goose was the most successful band to emerge from Dunedin. Their mad-cap image and on-stage antics blended mid-1970s rock'n'roll theatricality with a nursery sensibility built around characters that included a sailor, a bumble-bee, a ballerina and a nappy-clad baby. Their biggest hit, the novelty song 'Baked Beans', threatened to overwhelm their more serious music and a career which ran to three albums, extensive touring in Australia and the USA and an APRA Silver Scroll for their 1981 single 'I Can't Sing Very Well'.    " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Greenstone

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Indie ; Music Video

    "Released as the follow-up to Emma Paki’s acclaimed debut (‘System Virtue’) this song was produced by Neil Finn. It made it to five on the local charts. Prolific music video director Kerry Brown (Four Seasons in One Day, AEIOU) helms the redemption story. Paki — in full-colour and fern headdress — sings about the power of pounamu, while actor Cliff Curtis (Once Were Warriors, Fear the Living Dead) plays a roadie adrift in the city in black and white. When things go awry on K Road outside McDonalds, Curtis heads to the bush for spiritual succour from Paki in a waterfall." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen This is Your Life - Malvina Major

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music ; PopularFactual ; Popular Factual ; Television

    "Host Paul Holmes puts the life of opera star Dame Malvina Major in the spotlight and discovers her origins in a large Waikato family whose first love was country music. Guests include John Rowles and Dame Kiri Te Kanawa (a fellow pupil of their often terrifying teacher, “the tiny force behind the biggest voices”, Dame Sister Mary Leo). Major’s triumphs are revisited, as is her decision to give up her international career to farm with her husband in Taranaki. A good sport throughout, she even manages a yodel for a ukulele-led family sing-along." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Why Does Love Do this to Me?

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Rock ; Music Video

    "This infectious song about the heartache of love took Jordan Luck roughly five minutes to write, in an east London squat. It was the band's first release in their new career after a brief name change to Ampllfier, then a shortening to The Exponents. Despite its unlikely origins and subject matter, it has become an enduring NZ sports stadium sing-along (rivalling Dave Dobbyn's 'Loyal' for unofficial national anthem status). The song's simplicity is matched by director Kerry Brown's video, which allows the band to do what they do best, in scenic spots including Waiotapu hot springs." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen I'll Say Goodbye (Even Though I'm Blue)

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Music Video

    "A young, blonde and big-haired (it was the early 80s) Jordan Luck and his fellow band members hang out in Auckland's old Leopard Tavern for this sing-along classic. Model Debra Mains — star of a number of DD Smash videos of the time — smoulders as the spurning lover. A rest-home of elderly extras join in for the famous chorus. The dial phone looks positively pre-industrial. The song was voted number 89 in the APRA Top 100 New Zealand songs of all time; the Dance Exponents' debut studio album Prayers Be Answered stayed in the charts for a year.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Prince Tui Teka - 1983 Variety Show

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music ; Television

    "Kicking off with a cover of his hero Elvis Presley's 'That's Alright,' the late Prince Tui Teka delivers a classic performance in this TVNZ-filmed variety show (one of three specials). A classy Bernie Allen-led band and the Yandall Sisters back-up on the smoky Vegas-inspired set. Tui sings his hit 'E Ipo' with wife Missy, and they pay tribute to the song’s Māori lyricist Ngoi (‘Poi-E’) Pewhairangi. The songs are peppered with warmth, humour and poi action (led by a young Pita Sharples), as Tui Teka confirms his reputation as one of Aotearoa's great entertainers." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Talk Talk - Season Three, Episode Seven

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Sport ; Arts/Culture ; Television

    "In this Talk Talk episode, Finlay Macdonald interviews one of his former teachers, All Blacks' coach Graham Henry. Forgoing discussing rugby intricacies such as the dark arts of scrummaging, the talk is about Henry's background in education and how it has influenced his coaching career. Filmed prior to World Cup 2011 glory, Henry muses on the pressure to win, dealing with stress, and high public/media expectation. Musical guest Dave Dobbyn performs 'Howling at the Moon' — chosen by Henry because "he sings 'Loyal'" — and explains his relationship with that song." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Arithmetic

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Music Video

    "The clip for this single off Brooke Fraser’s seven time platinum selling album debut What to do with Daylight works from a simple concept. Accompanied by a string quartet, Fraser sings sweetly from behind a grand piano in an empty studio. Most distinctive however is the clip's liberal use of fairy lights, which cover the studio wall, the piano and the string quartet. This abundance didn’t go unnoticed: children's show Studio 2 gave Arithmetic the (satirical) award for “most use of fairy lights in a video clip”. The song reached number eight on the New Zealand Singles Chart." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen For Today

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Music Video

    "Nick Sampson wrote Netherworld Dancing Toys' big hit 'For Today' during a summer spent working at a Taranaki freezing works. His love song has become a classic — aided in no small part by Annie Crummer's soaring vocal. The TVNZ video, directed by Radio With Pictures producer Brent Hansen, places the band in a studio (where Crummer sings with Kim Willoughby in a precursor to their time in When the Cat's Away) and on the Cook Strait ferry (where the shoot was nearly derailed when lunch in a Picton pub almost led to the band missing the return sailing)." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • Ngoi Ngoi - performed by Patea Maori Club

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Te Reo ; Music ; Māori ; Television

    "Appearing on magazine show New Zealand Today in 1992, the Patea Māori Club perform their single 'Ngoi Ngoi', which appeared on the same album as their legendary hit 'Poi E'. The video sees the group performing on stage while maestro Dalvanius Prime sings backup, while holding his dog. Prime is strikingly dressed in purple and sporting a fairly unique pair of sunglasses. The song honours Ngoi Pēwhairangi — who was instrumental in helping Dalvanius learn about Māoritanga and wrote lyrics for both 'Poi E' and Prince Tui Teka's earlier hit 'E Ipo'. She passed away in 1985." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Blue Day

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Electronic ; Music Video

    ""Things are not always the way they should be", sings Steve Gilpin in 'Blue Day', from Mi-Sex's 1984 album Where Do They Go. Reaching number 24 in Australia and 36 in NZ, it was their last charting single before the band broke up; it's also on the APRA Top 100 NZ Songs list at number 54. The band plays on a darkened studio set, a strong neon-blue visual style complementing the soft, haunting keyboard intro. Artificial light suggests the day outside; pushed up jacket sleeves and genie pants are an unmistakable reminder of mid-80s fashion." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen We Built Our Own Oppressors

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Punk ; Alternative ; Rock ; Music Video

    "In the best traditions of the Beatles, U2 and Head Like a Hole, Die! Die! Die! takes to a rooftop in New York for this video made by London-based director and editor Rohan Thomas. They sing of an urban nightmare of burning roads and bridges, places to avoid and not being able to return home – but the song's title takes full responsibility. The clip was the result of a guerilla shoot with a generator in 2009 that had them moved on from a series of prospective locations until they happened on an unguarded rooftop – to the surprise of nearby office workers." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Lyin' in the Sand

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "'Lyin' in the Sand' closed Hello Sailor's self-titled debut album in 1977, the song's languid South Seas vibe providing respite after 'Gutter Black' and various guitars. Inspired by a spontaneous South Pacific parody from vocalist Graham Brazier one night, it was written by guitarist Harry Lyon after observing how Takapuna's smart set took their beach for granted. TVNZ filmed the band playing live in a Christchurch studio in 1978, just before the band set off to try to make it in LA. Lyon sings, so Brazier is absent; drummer Ricky Ball's hula confirms that the band’s tongue was in its chic." (NZ On Screen summary)

 

have your say

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. Subscribe to these comments.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>


«
»