Black Seeds

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From AudioCulture

Formed in 1998, The Black Seeds are a globally successful reggae, funk, dub and rock crossover band from Wellington. The band line-up comprises Barnaby Weir (vocals, guitar), Daniel Weetman (vocals, percussion), Tim Jaray (bass), Jarney Murphy (drums), Mike Fabulous (guitar, percussion) and Nigel Patterson (keyboards), supported by a rotating roster of session musicians. Past members of The Black Seeds have included Bret McKenzie, Shannon Williams, Rich Christie and Andrew Christiansen. (By Martyn Pepperell) Read moreProfile from Audioculture, available under a Attribution Noncommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence

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  • View on NZ On Screen Making Music - The Black Seeds

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music ; Arts/Culture ; Short Film

    "Wellington funk, soul, reggae act The Black Seeds manage to cram themselves into a single shot for this episode from a series made for secondary school music students. Bookended by stripped back performances of 'Keep on Pushing' and 'Going Back Home', they explain the development of these songs from their origins as bass grooves. Mike Fabulous has cautionary words for aspiring songwriters about the dangers of overcomplicated song structures while Barnaby Weir reassuringly suggests that virtuosity is not an absolute prerequisite for being in the band.    " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen The Black Seeds

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "The Black Seeds are key flagbearers for the downbeat Wellington sound, thanks to the unique fusion of dub, reggae and funk they're been pushing out since 1998. Led by singer Barnaby Weir (Fly My Pretties), the Wellington collective's line-up has included keyboardist Bret McKenzie (Flight of the Conchords) and drummer Rich Christie. Dub-pop tunes like 'Keep on Pushing' and 'Something So True' have helped The Black Seeds become favourites on the local summer tour circuit, and they've taken their southern soul on several international tours. En route, two of their five studio albums have topped the New Zealand charts." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Making Music

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Series ; Music ; Arts/Culture ; Short Film

    "This series, made for use as a teaching resource in secondary schools by the NZ Music Industry Commission, was produced and directed by songwriter and NZ music champion Arthur Baysting. It features more than 40 leading acts (including Don McGlashan, the Black Seeds, Nesian Mystik, Chris Knox and Fat Freddy's Drop) talking directly to the next generation of musicians about their music and careers. They offer intimate performances of classic songs and heartfelt advice on subjects including songwriting, recording techniques, technology and the music industry.   " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Sometimes Enough

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Dub ; Reggae ; Music Video

    "Wellington’s Black Seeds serve up another dose of their brand of funky roots reggae on this, their debut single from third album Into The Dojo. Director Jason Naran’s video is based on a concept by former Black Seeds member Bret McKenzie (who cameos briefly on Kitchen Cam 1). The result re-imagines the concept of social networking, with a cast of online fans grooving to the music. The video was judged Best Roots winner at the 2006 Juice TV Awards." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Hey Son

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Dub ; Music Video

    "Don’t mess with the Black Seeds. The band members run amok in a Government office when they are wrongly accused of civil disobedience. Heads get photocopied, computers get beaten up, and chaos rules in this funny clip made by director James Barr. Look out for Bret McKenzie, of Flight of the Conchords fame, who was a member of the band at the time.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen So True

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Dub ; Reggae ; Music Video

    "The laidback pop-reggae of double platinum album On the Sun was a noughties Kiwi summer soundtrack, and this golden hour-hued affair is a video to match. A Seedy trio (Barnaby Weir, Bret McKenzie, Daniel Weetman) head on holiday to the Coromandel for a smorgasbord of baches, pohutukawa rope swings, mussels on the barbie, and cricket on the beach. There's a nod to the sponsor's product as McKenzie pulls the Holden into the Tararu Store for a Fruju pitstop: one of the future Oscar-winner's earliest paid acting gigs was in an ice-block commercial." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Keep On Pushing

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Dub ; Music Video

    "Made by off-duty Lord of the Rings crew and directed by James Barr, this video won The Knack Award at the 2001 Flying Fish Music Awards, and was a Handle the Jandal award-winner the same year. Shot in black and white, the clip is visually strong, but contains lots of shots of the band falling from buildings, so don’t watch it if you suffer from vertigo. And please don’t try this at home! Onetime band member Bret McKenzie (Flight of the Conchords) turns up in the final stages, with an emergency bucket.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Age Pryor

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Age Pryor is a Wellington-based multi-instrumentalist known for his association with creative collective Fly My Pretties, and for his own solo work. Pryor's recordings include collaborations with Wellington musical luminaries from Fat Freddys Drop, Trinity Roots, The Black Seeds and Wellington International Ukelele Orchestra. His musical style blends folk, groove, funk, rock and reggae." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen The Living Room - Series One, Episode One

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Magazine ; Arts/Culture ; Television

    "The debut episode in this TV series profiling creative Kiwi culture is presented by Wellington band The Black Seeds and features a look at the making of their manic music video Hey Son (when Conchord Bret McKenzie was still a member). There’s an early profile of Auckland graffiti and streetwear artist Misery (complete with cycle interview and an appearance from fellow artist Elliot 'Askew' O'Donnell), London based Ta Moko artist Te Rangitu Netana talks about life away from home and tattooing Robbie Williams, and there’s a piece about skateboarding mag Manual." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen The Living Room - Series One (excerpts)

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Documentary ; Magazine ; Arts/Culture ; Lifestyle ; Television

    "A magazine show with an edge, The Living Room did for arts television production what Radio With Pictures did for NZ music — it ripped open the venetian blinds, rearranged the plastic-covered cushions, and shone the sun on Aotearoa’s homegrown creative culture. Often letting the subjects film and present their own stories, it was produced for three series by Wellington’s Sticky Pictures, who also made follow-up arts showcase The Gravy. These excerpts from the first series show a calvacade of local talent, including an early Flight of the Conchords screen outing." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen The Video Kid

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "The Video Kid was one of many outlets for the musical talents of Bret McKenzie, who has done time in pop-reggae outfit The Black Seeds, the Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra and, as half of slightly successful folk-parody duo Flight of the Conchords. The Video Kid released his Prototype, his only album to date, in 2004. Described as folk-electronica-meets-synth-over-satire, it received a nomination at that year's b.Net Awards for Best Downbeat Release.  " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Fly My Pretties

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Fly My Pretties is a musical collaboration put together by Barnaby Weir of the Black Seeds. The all-star outfit - who come together for live performances - has included members of the Phoenix Foundation, Fat Freddys Drop and Paselode. The group began as a one-off project - a sellout multimedia show performed, filmed and recorded over four nights at Bats Theatre in Wellington in 2004, which was released as a live album and DVD. The one-off nature of the project has expanded nationwide to equally well-received shows.     " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen 50Hz

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "The Wellington studio whiz behind 50Hz, Jeremy Geor, stamped his mark on the country's dance scene in 1997 with the cinematic beats and breaks of debut album Cyclehum. Self-released it was the first full length drum and base release to roll out under the long white cloud. It was judged by industry insiders in Rip It Up as one of Top 100 New Zealand albums of all time. After a five-year hiatus, 50Hz re-emerged with Carbon (Released on Loop Recordings), which featured an impressive list of guest artists, including Ladi6 and the Black Seeds' Barnaby Weir." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Dawnskate-88

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: R&B ; Hip Hop ; Indie ; Music Video

    "Flight of the Conchords star and onetime Black Seeds musician Bret McKenzie clearly digs Wellington. In this video for solo project The Video Kid, he goes early morning skateboarding through the capital city. The downbeat groove of the folk-electronica number is a perfect match for a glorious 'on a good day' dawn, as the sun rises over Mt Matthews and the crew cruise down Wellington's Alexandra Road and along Mt Victoria's town belt. Later in the golden light they claim a deserted golden mile (Lambton Quay) for the skaters. " (NZ On Screen summary)

 

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