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Albums by this artist


From DigitalNZ:

  • View on NZ On Screen Fatcat & Fishface

    Source: NZ On Screen

    "Since their 1997 debut Horrible Sounds for Children Fatcat & Fishface have produced a self-proclaimed ‘outlaw’ oeuvre of music for kids (and adults), that delights in not always looking at the bright side of life — along the way championing New Zealand birds, shipwrecks and rambunctious sprogs. Inspired by the humour of Milligan, Dahl and the Old Testament (!), the music from the mysterious duo has won a Tui Award, and earned praise from the doyen of NZ children's storytelling, Margaret Mahy. The Listener described it as sounding like, “Tom Waits’ toy cupboard”." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Stop, Drop & Roll

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Hip Hop ; Music Video

    "Prolific music video director Sophie Findlay offers a humourous take on all those army film and TV shows (Full Metal Jacket, Tigerland et al) with the bad-arse drill sergeant and badgered recruits. Commanding Officer Mareko barks orders to the beat to his troops, The Deceptikonz." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • Heatwave - L&P

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Promotional ; Commercial

    "This classic soft drink advert saw a supergroup of 80s Kiwi music talent cooling off in a steamy L&P factory. The industrial-strength line-up — When the Cats Away’s Margaret Urlich and a blink or you'll miss her Annie Crummer; Ardijah’s Ryan and Betty-Anne Monga; Erana Clark, Peter Morgan, and DD Smash drummer Peter Warren — belt out a 60s Motown song (produced here by Murray Grindlay) in the heat. Fane Flaws plays a supervisor loosened up by “the thirst quencher”. ‘Heatwave’ was a hit single in late 1987, with the group named ‘80 in the Shade’. The ad was named the year's best." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • My Old Man's an All Black - performed by Howard Morrison & Billy T James

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music ; Comedy ; Television

    "'My Old Man’s an All Black' was a big hit for the Howard Morrison Quartet in 1960. The song subverted 'My Old Man's a Dustman' to mock an apartheid South African decree banning Māori players from the touring All Blacks. In this 1990 performance, Morrison and Billy T James (months after heart surgery) update the song’s lyrics for a more recent controversy: the dropping of popular All Black captain Wayne 'Buck' Shelford. Howard ribs rugby’s supposed amateurism, and Billy T explains why Buck isn’t packing down in the scrum. The final haka includes an unexpected guest..." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Kevan Moore: The man behind the music shows…

    Source: NZ On Screen

    "Kevan Moore was a driving force behind many of our early TV music shows such as C’Mon, Happen Inn and Freeride. He also produced popular shows Night Sky, Frost Over New Zealand, and magazine show Town and Around. Having helped launch South Pacific Television and become its Head of Production, Moore left broadcasting to set up his own production company. In this ScreenTalk, Moore talks about: Getting a free television set to ‘monitor’ TV programmes The intricacies of early live-to-air continuity announcing Using expert Peter Read to host the popular show Night Sky Pre-recording Town and Around “as live” — and his thoughts on why the show was so important  How the music show C’Mon helped develop talent and technique Working with incredibly talented broadcaster Peter Sinclair The rough and lively style of 70s music show Free Ride  How a producer offended David Frost, the famous host of Frost Over New Zealand How educators ultimately scuttled the show It’s Academic Having had the opportunity to meet fascinating people over his career" (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Flyby

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Animation ; Kids ; Music Video

    "The Listener described the children’s music of Fatcat & Fishface as being “like Tom Waits’ toy cupboard”; aptly this dirty ditty’s subject is not typical fairytale fodder. ‘Flyby’ buzzes into the kitchen to honour the humble house fly, where — all together now — “she was … looking for a place to lay her maggots.” The stop motion music video tribute to the fly is animated lovingly by Robin Nathan and Greg Schmetzer. The song is from the album Horrible Songs for Children, which won Best New Artist for Older Children at the 1999 Children's Music Web Awards (USA)." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Bat Fly

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Animation ; Kids ; Music Video

    "The Listener called the kids music of Fatcat & Fishface “like Tom Waits’ toy cupboard. The perfect antidote to Barney”. This ditty (from 2004’s Pretty Ugly album) came from a collaboration with the Department of Conservation and bypasses the cuddly usual suspects — kiwi etc — to celebrate the unlikely charms of the bat fly. The blind, flightless fly lives symbiotically on the native short-tailed bat: “So what if I like guano … I like it for a snack / There’s nothing like guano … from a bat!” The stop motion animation by Carlos Wedde is suitably Tim Burton-esque." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Happity

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Animation ; Kids ; Music Video

    "The Listener described the child-friendly music of Fatcat & Fishface as sounding “like Tom Waits’ toy cupboard.” ‘Happity’ (from album Meanie) is a bogan twist on Cinderella, with an uncoordinated rabbit from Palmerston North — “the fumbliest, stubbliest bunny of all / His feet are too big and his teeth are too small” — feeling dateless before the Manawatu ball. Made with stop motion animation, the video was directed by Derek Sonic Thunders, who gained notoriety for his video ‘Songs About Drinkin’ and Dyin', in which Action Man and Barbie do unmentionable things." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Nightclub

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Animation ; Kids ; Music Video

    "This song from the mysterious duo Fatcat & Fishface is from the Birdbrain album, praised by the Sunday Star Times as “the best children's record of 2009, and as witty as it is educational.” A collaboration with the Department of Conservation, the song gets down with the manu (birds) to reimagine the inhabitants of the NZ native bush at night as personalities dancing in a nightclub — from prowling with ruru/morepork to jiving with kiwi (“getting down on the ground”) and a boogying DJ kākāpō (“boom, boom!”). Nightclub was animated by Stephen and Ruth Templer." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Wreck of the Diddley

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Animation ; Kids ; Music Video

    "Since 1997 mysterious duo Fatcat & Fishface have produced a self-proclaimed ‘outlaw’ oeuvre of music for kids (and adults), that delights in not always looking at the bright side of life — as well as championing New Zealand birds, shipwrecks and rambunctious kids. In 2007 they commissioned Stephen and Ruth Templer to animate this unruly Socratic shanty from the Pretty Ugly album. The resulting film, with skull and crossbones aplenty, screened at the 2007 NZ Film Festival and in Korea, Melbourne and London. The Templers later animated F&F songs Nightclub and Hair." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Money Worries

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Hip Hop ; Music Video

    "Although this track from teen hip hoppers Otis Frizzell (MC OJ) and Mark Williams (Slave) is very much a collaboration of Auckland talents, the video sees them on the streets of Wellington - plus the railway station and massive wharf building Shed 21, before it was turned into apartments. Co-written by the pair with (and produced by) Mark Tierney and Paul Casserly from Strawpeople, it features a screaming chorus from Mikey Havoc, then lead singer of Push Push. An early video to be funded by NZ On Air, the hyperactive promo was directed by Matt Palmer (Breathe)." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Stan Walker

    Source: NZ On Screen

    "R&B singer and TV personality Stan Walker (Tūhoe/Ngāti Tūwharetoa) was born in Melbourne but raised in New Zealand. After moving back across the Tasman, he won Australian Idol in 2009 and launched a music career which has included a chart-topping album (From The Inside Out) and single (‘Black Box’), plus multiple NZ Music Awards. In 2013, Walker he helped judge the first series of X Factor NZ and made his film debut as star of box office hit Mt Zion  — playing a potato picker with dreams of supporting Bob Marley. 2014 saw the release of ensemble te reo single 'Aotearoa'." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Mareko

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "South Auckland rapper Mareko is of Samoan descent, and began his music career as a member of the Deceptikonz, an Auckland rap crew. The group had a big year in 2001, receiving nominations for several New Zealand music awards. Mareko then released a solo album, White Sunday, in 2003, which peaked at number four in the New Zealand charts. Two singles from the album also hit the charts that year: 'Here to Stay' (number four) and 'Stop Drop & Roll' (number six, and credited to Mareko featuring Deceptikonz)." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Cushla Dillon: Accidental acting and award-winning editing…

    Source: NZ On Screen

    "Cushla Dillon was a newbie editor when she worked on the TV series and film Topless Women Talk about Their Lives. Dillon won an NZ Film editing award for her work on the movie, then went on to cut an impressive list of documentaries, shorts and feature films. Notable documentaries she has worked on include The Price of Peace and The Confessions of Prisoner T. Dillon’s feature credits include Orphans & Kingdoms, The Price of Milk and Snakeskin (which she edited with Marcus D'Arcy).  In this ScreenTalk, Dillon talks about: Getting an unexpected acting role on short film Peach How her lack of experience was almost an advantage when editing Topless Women Talk about Their Lives Her admiration for the cast of feature film When Love Comes How music helped her find the magic at the heart of Harry Sinclair’s The Price of Milk Budget pressures on film After the Waterfall The importance of making a compelling argument for Teina Pora in documentary The Confessions of Prisoner T Finding the unusual "balance of power" between the characters in the movie Orphans & Kingdoms The deeper meaning in music documentary Shihad - Beautiful Machine" (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Rhombus

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Formed by producers Simon Rycroft, Imon Star and Thomas Voyce, Wellington act Rhombus billed itself as “Aotearoa's premier dub & bass electronic soul, funk, hip-hop band”. Their 2002 debut album Bass Player featured guest MCs and vocalists including  Tiki Taane and Raashi Malik, and tracks produced while Voyce was based in Japan. They also won fans with 'Clav Dub', a music video which paid homage to classic movie Goodbye Pork Pie. Two more Rhombus albums have followed, plus a collection of remixes." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Ice TV

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Series ; Magazine ; Young Adults ; Television

    "Ice TV was a popular TV3 youth show that ran for six years from 1995 - 2000. It launched the careers of hosts Jon Bridges, Nathan Rarere and Petra Bagust. Irreverent, fast-paced, and always imbued with a (mostly) family friendly sense of fun, the show consisted of a series of skits, music, satire, gags and interviews, and a trademark sign-off where L&P bottles were subjected to various stresses." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Black Widow

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: R&B ; Music Video

    "A very slick-looking music video, featuring scantily-clad pole dancers and starring TV presenter and nightclub operator Brooke Howard-Smith. Hip hop star Dei Hamo is guest vocalist. " (NZ On Screen summary)

  • It's Only Wednesday

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Chat show ; Television

    "Hosted by television all-rounder Neil Roberts, It’s Only Wednesday was a short-lived TVNZ chat show in the late 80s. It was characterised by Roberts’ energy as host, and performances by Grant Chilcott’s swing band Wentworth-Brewster & Co. The It's Only Wednesday format saw guests staying on after their interviews, leading to some eclectic company sharing the couch. The guests included former Prime Minister Robert Muldoon, and pop group When the Cat’s Away." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Shazam! - 26 Nov 1985 (feat. Russell Crowe)

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music ; Television

    "On this mid-80s youth music show, a fresh faced Russell Crowe is the star turn in his early persona as Russ le Roq (the name change to avoid comparisons with his famous cricketing cousins Martin and Jeff). With a hint of an Elvis sneer, Crowe performs 'What's The Difference' with his band Roman Antix, and is interviewed by presenter Phillipa Dann. Lounge jazz act Wentworth Brewster & Co and Hamilton funk rockers Echoes also feature; and Pat and Margaret Urlich from Peking Man talk about their latest single 'Room That Echoes' and its distinctive video." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • True Colours - First Episode

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Magazine ; Music ; Television

    "Born of a dispute between TVNZ and record companies over video payments, True Colours tended to feature New Zealand bands in a studio setting, plus the occasional video. This first episode sets the template. Former Radio with Pictures host Dick Driver and Phillipa Dann (from pop show Shazam!) introduce a magazine-style show of live music, news and interviews. Ardijah open proceedings here, with their mix of polynesian R&B and funk. Later Tim Finn gets the interview treatment. The dispute was eventually settled and True Colours ended after seven episodes." (NZ On Screen summary)

 

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