Hogsnort Rupert

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About this artist...

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From AudioCulture

There was no middle ground with Hogsnort Rupert, people either loved them or they hated them. But the Wellington pseudo skiffle pop band’s No.1 hit ‘Pretty Girl’ ensured everybody knew them. It outdid The Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel to become the highest-selling single in New Zealand for 1970. It sold more than 55,000 copies, spent three weeks in the top spot, won the band the Loxene Golden Disc group award, was released in Great Britain, declared a hit pick in both Melody Maker and New Musical Express and Top Of The Pops requested a copy of the film clip. Centred around songwriter Dave Luther and affable frontman Alec Wishart, Hogsnort Rupert followed up with two albums produced by Peter Dawkins on HMV and toured New Zealand as part of promoter Joe Brown’s stable but had called it a day less than a year after ‘Pretty Girl’. Read moreProfile from Audioculture, available under a Attribution Noncommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence

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From DigitalNZ:

  • View on NZ On Screen Hogsnort Rupert

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "Hogsnort Rupert's Original Flagon Band was founded in 1969 around English expats Alec Wishart and Dave Luther, who met at a Wellington football club and started singing skiffle songs at after match functions. They made the final of talent show New Facesbefore shortening their name and having a run of three hit singles in 1970 - 'Aubrey', 'Gretel' and chart topper 'Pretty Girl'. They continued to play and record intermittently. In 1983 Dave Luther had a number one hit with Dave and the Dynamos' 'Life Begins at 40'." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Pretty Girl

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Folk ; Music Video

    "Captured on a single camera, Wellington band Hogsnort Rupert perform their number one hit 'Pretty Girl'. That their performance is interspersed with Christmas footage rather than anything more appropriate to its subject matter suggests that this clip was made for an end-of-year show acknowledging the song's status as New Zealand's biggest-selling single in 1970. It also won that year's Loxene Golden Disc Award. And, of course, it offers a chance for viewers to see the late Alec Wishart performing his immortal line "Come on, my lover. Give us a kiss."" (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Dave and the Dynamos

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "One hit wonders, Dave and the Dynamos were an offshoot of folk pop act Hogsnort Rupert (of 'Pretty Girl' fame). Their origins were in a Hogsnort Rupert live skit featuring a band of aging rockers performing a Dave Luther composition called 'Life Begins at 40'. Audience requests encouraged Jordan to release the song as a single. It spent three weeks at number one in 1983 and stayed in the Top 40 for 22 weeks. When a follow-up 'Can't Spell Rhythm' took a year to emerge, momentum was lost and Dave and the Dynamos were reabsorbed into Hogsnort Rupert." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Life Begins at 40

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Rock ; Music Video

    "A tongue in cheek paean to the joys of middle age, this jaunty, amiable rocker was an unlikely hit in the more electro-pop oriented early 80s. Written by Dave Luther, from folk pop group Hogsnort Rupert, it was the 12th biggest selling single in NZ in 1983. The all-singing, all-dancing music video, like so many of the era, was an Avalon studios television production. Less typically, by the standards of the day, it practically amounts to a major production with multiple sets and a cast of dozens while the band hams it up for all they are worth." (NZ On Screen summary)

 

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