Wellington City Libraries

Te Matapihi Ki Te Ao Nui

Search options

Teen Blog

Reading, Wellington, and whatever else – teenblog@wcl.govt.nz

Tag: eco fashion

Te Taiao Needs Our Help: Recycling Week 2021


Did you know that Aotearoa has a week dedicated to recycling? Of course we should be recycling all the time, but it’s good to have a reminder about what we can do to care for the taiao. Recycling Week runs from the 18th-24th of October, with each day being dedicated to challenges to encourage us to re-think our waste minimization and recycling behaviours. To get us inspired, here are some awesome recycling initiatives from around the world!

There are machines in Colombia where you can recycle your tin, glass and plastic bottles in exchange for public transit credits. Imagine paying for the bus with bottles! You could literally collect other people’s littering and profit from it. Then you’d be both a tidy kiwi, and a kiwi with a topped up Snapper card, Incredible!

Barcelona had a issues with cooking oil being poured down the drain and clogging the pipes (sound familiar?). City officials tackled this problem by giving away free “Olipots” for people to collect their used oil in, while also setting up collection spots for people to dispose of their oil around the city. The collected oils are then recycled into a biodiesel.

ReTuna Återbruksgalleria, in Sweden, is the world’s first recycling mall! Here, old items are given new life through repair and upcycling. Everything sold is recycled, reused or has been organically or sustainably produced. Visitors to the mall can also easily drop off donations, which are then sorted into what can be repaired and resold or donated to somewhere the item will be useful.

Scientists in South Korea have invented a t-shirt that could be used to charge your phone! Specifically, the fabric of the t-shirt generates electricity as it bends and flexes and “a person wearing a shirt tailored from the material only has to move around to power a small screen or other electronic devices” .  This process is possible through the utilising of Triboelectricity, electricity generated by friction. If you want to know more, click through to the article because this goes over my head very quickly. It has been a minute/decade since I did NCEA Physics. Most importantly, this invention would be very handy for long Pokémon GO missions (is Pokémon GO still relevant and cool? Please let it still be relevant and cool. I need this). 


Keen to take the next step in your recycling? Here’s a little book list to send you on your way. 🙂


My zero-waste kitchen : easy ways to eat waste free / O’Rourke-Jones, Ruth
“Looking to live sustainably without overhauling your life? My Zero-Waste Kitchen shows you how to put the three R’s – reduce, reuse, recycle – into practice in the kitchen.  (Adapted from Catalogue)


Make & mend : a guide to recycling clothes and fabrics / Peacock, Rebecca
“Welcome to Make & Mend! This book shows how, with a little knowledge and a little creativity, you can make a wide range of fantastic items from those old clothes and fabrics you can’t bear to throw away. Full of projects, from aprons to curtains, bags to jewellery, we show you how to turn a bag of scraps into wearable, beautiful and personalised items.” (Adapted from Catalogue)


Remade vintage jewelry : 35 step-by-step projects inspired by lost, found, and recycled treasures / Bush, *Co-Co Nichole
“Transform vintage finds and broken objects into pieces to treasure with Remade Vintage Jewelry.” (Catalogue)


A little bit crafty
“A little bit crafty is a nifty collection of 39 DIY ideas from creative types across Australia and New Zealand. With an emphasis on recycling, cheap and easy materials, and projects that can be done in an afternoon, it’s chock full of sweet, clever and slightly oddball crafts that’ll make you smile and keep your hands happy, too.” (Catalogue)


ReadyMade : how to make (almost) everything : a do-it-yourself primer / Berger, Shoshana
“For people who like to make stuff, who see the flicker of invention in everyday objects, this quirky ‘how-to’ volume contains design projects ranging from water-bottle lounge chairs and ladder shelving to shopping bag rugs and denim dog beds.” (Catalogue)


The upcycled T-shirt : 28 easy-to-make projects that save the planet – clothing, accessories, home decor & gifts / Montilone, Jenelle
“Did you know the average American throws away more than 68 pounds of clothing each year? Join the revolution to reduce your carbon footprint—one T-shirt at a time! Widely known for her recycling efforts, environmental crafter Jenelle Montilone will show you how to upcycle tees into fun and fanciful quilts, accessories, toys, and gifts for the whole family. (Adapted from Catalogue)


50 fantastic ideas for sustainability / O’Sullivan, June
“Teach children to reduce, reuse, recycle, repair and be respectful with 50 fun activities for encouraging environmental sustainability. From creating butterfly feeders with food scraps, to turning old kitchen equipment into beautiful planters or bringing broken crayons back to life, these original ideas encourage practitioners to see the potential for creativity and fun using and reusing everyday, easy-to-source items, some of which might have otherwise gone to waste. Enhance children’s creativity, cognitive development and motor skills through indoor and outdoor activities that are enjoyable, educational and environmentally friendly. (Adapted from Catalogue)

Fashion Friday

Become a conscious consumer with help from Dress [with] Sense! Getting a greener wardrobe is made super easy with advice from bloggers, activists, producers and models. And don’t be put off; it’s broken down into small steps which feel (and are) really achievable.

Syndetics book coverDress [with] sense / Christina Dean, Hannah Lane, Sofia Tarneberg (Redress) ; illustrated by Charlotte Trounce.
“As part of a growing global awareness of the importance of eco-conscious living, both for the planet and as a means of promoting fair labor practices, more people than ever before are seeking to dress in an environmentally friendly way. On a broader scale, initiatives to promote a more sustainable approach to fashion have made headlines and grown like never before, from the release of the high-profile documentary The True Cost to the launch of the worldwide “Fashion Revolution” campaign.This timely book is organized into four chapters–Buy, Wear, Care, and Dispose–each containing a short introduction with essential information followed by practical tips and illustrated case studies to help you make the first step toward a more sustainable wardrobe. A detailed reference section recommends not only the best ethical fashion labels and collections but also eco-friendly fabrics, standards, and certifications; cleaning methods; renting, swapping, and recycling initiatives; and much more.” (Syndetics summary)

Fashion Friday

Home sewers; get in! This book celebrates the ethics and charms of the homemade garment.

Syndetics book coverFolk fashion : understanding homemade clothes / Amy Twigger Holroyd.
“Amy Twigger Holroyd draws on ideas of fashion, culture and craft to explore makers’ lived experiences of creating and wearing homemade clothes in a society dominated by shop-bought garments. Using the innovative metaphor of fashion as common land, Folk Fashion investigates the complex relationship between making, well-being and sustainability. Twigger Holroyd combines her own experience as a designer and knitter with first-hand accounts from folk fashion makers to explore this fascinating, yet under-examined, area of contemporary fashion culture.” (adapted from syndetics summary)

Fashion Friday

goy1

Good news for good fashion! Brand new app Good On You launched this week, and is a shiny new app which rates fashion brands on their “impact on people, the planet and animals”. The results are all easy to read and, most importantly, easy to access when you’re out shopping. It also groups all brands with a Good or Great rating in the same place (so if you’re wanting some new kicks for example, you can easily see which brands to go for), and there are even some discounts and specials to be had. Huzzah!!

goy2

The app also enables you to hassle get in contact with brands that could be doing better. Australia and New Zealand are the first countries to get the app, with more international releases planned for the near future. It’s available for Apple and android, so get to it!

 

 

Fashion Friday

wc

If your over-flowing wardrobe is making you feel guilty, read this book (even if it’s not making you feel guilty, you should read this book). Aussie fashion writer Clare Press explores the real cost of our modern-day addiction to cheap clothing and I have to tell you, it’s pretty morbid. But the solution to the problem lies with us, as shoppers, and this book is the perfect way to kick-start some smarter (and kinder) shopping habits. The tone of this book is really great as well and will immediately draw you in. Read it.

Syndetics book coverWardrobe crisis : how we went from Sunday best to fast fashion / Clare Press.
“”Who makes your clothes? This used to be an easy question to answer: it was the seamstress next door, or the tailor on the high street or you made them yourself. Today we rarely know the origins of the clothes hanging in our closets. The local shoemaker, dressmaker and milliner are long gone, replaced by a globalised fashion industry worth $1.5 trillion a year. In Wardrobe Crisis , fashion journalist Clare Press explores the history and ethics behind what we wear. Putting her insider status to good use, Press examines the entire fashion ecosystem, from sweatshops to haute couture, unearthing the roots of today’s buy-and-discard culture. She traces the origins of icons like Chanel, Dior and Hermes; charts the rise and fall of the department store; and follows the thread that led us from Marie Antoinette to Carrie Bradshaw. Wardrobe Crisis is a witty and persuasive argument for a fashion revolution that will empower you to feel good about your wardrobe again.”” (Syndetics summary)

 

#whomademyclothes?

This week is Fashion Revolution Week; which commemorates the 24th of April 2013 when  1,134 people were killed and over 2,500 were injured when the Rana Plaza complex collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Fashion Revolution Week and their #whomademyclothes? campaign is setting out to “change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes and accessories” by insisting on greater transparency within the fashion industry and asking brands to reveal where their clothing is made and by who. There are different ways you can help contribute to this, and following is a selection of our latest and greatest books on ethical fashion. Read on and conquer!

Syndetics book coverMagnifeco : your head-to-toe guide to ethical fashion and non-toxic beauty / Kate Black.
“In the wake of the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh–the worst garment industry accident in recorded history–the phrase “fashion disaster” acquired a new and much more sinister meaning. Commentators suggested that the tragedy was completely predictable in a sector with a shocking track record of rampant environmental damage, use of toxic chemicals, and chronic human rights abuse. Now the industry is undergoing a shift, and many of us are questioning our buying habits. The rise of socially and environmentally responsible retailers like Patagonia and The Body Shop has led to dramatic changes in the eco and ethical fashion landscape. Magnifeco is the Fast Food Nation of the fashion world–your guide to making a difference too.” (adapted from syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverA teen guide to eco-fashion / Liz Gogerly.
“This series features stylish books that give school-age readers realistic and practical advice on how they can live an eco-conscious life, right now. That action can be taken by themselves, with their family, or as part of a school or community group.” (Syndetics summary)

 

 

Syndetics book coverWear no evil : how to change the world with your wardrobe / Greta Eagan.
“Have you ever wondered, “How can I inherently do good while looking good?” Wear No Evil has the answer, and is the timely handbook for navigating both fashion and ethics. Featuring the Integrity Index (a simplified way of identifying the ethics behind any piece of fashion) and an easy to use rating system, you’ll learn to shop anywhere while building your personal style and supporting your values- all without sacrifice. Part 1 presents the hard-hitting facts on why the fashion industry and our shopping habits need a reboot. Part 2 moves you into a closet-cleansing exercise to assess your current wardrobe for eco-friendliness and how to shop green. Part 3 showcases eco-fashion makeovers and a directory of natural beauty recommendations for face, body, hair, nails, and makeup. Wear No Evil gives new meaning–and the best answers–to an age-old question: “What should I wear today?”” (adapted from syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverOverdressed : the shockingly high cost of cheap fashion / Elizabeth L. Cline.
“Fast fashion and disposable clothing have become our new norms. Elizabeth Cline argues that this rapid cycle of consumption isn’t just erasing our sense of style and causing massive harm to the environment and human rights-it’s also bad for our souls. Cline looks at the impact here and abroad of America’s drastic increase in inexpensive clothing imports, visiting cheap-chic factories in Bangladesh and China and exploring the problems caused by all those castoffs we donate to the Salvation Army. She also shows how consumers can vote with their dollars to grow the sustainable clothing industry, reign in the conventional apparel market, and wear their clothes with pride.” (adapted from syndetics summary)

Library of dreams!

wardrobe
Image: apairandasparediy.com

Yes, it’s true. There is now a library where you can borrow CLOTHES!!

At Lena Fashion Library in Amsterdam, you can subscribe and borrow clothing just as the same as you would books, starting from just $30NZD a month. It is stocked with a full range of designer and vintage items, and I think I would actually die of happiness.

The library was founded by fashionistas who felt we live in an “over-consuming society” and wanted to provide an alternative to cheap and nasty fast fashion, as well as all the social and environmental issues created by our insatiable desire for more and more clothing. There are all different membership levels depending on how much shopping borrowing you intend to do, and if you borrow an item you really love, you are even able to purchase it outright. eeeeeeee!!!

Time for WCL to branch out, perhaps?

NZ Eco Fashion Week

eco
Image used with permission from Denise at NZ Eco Fashion Week

Have you heard of it? I hadn’t either tbh, but this year’s NZ Eco Fashion Week is happening in June in Lower Hutt, and is set to go OFF!

Having started out in 2013, Eco Fashion Week has grown in popularity and has attracted attention from around the globe.

The event focuses on bringing “ethical products to the forefront of fashion” and has a full four-day schedule with two runway shows, styling events, and exclusive movie screening and pop-up shops. Local designers include Dane Dagger,  Recreate and Heke Design, who ethically manufacture their pieces on Waiheke Island.

The full line up of designers and events is expected to be announced in early May, so stay tuned!

Here we have a new eco fashion book to keep you going in the meantime…

Syndetics book coverA teen guide to eco-fashion / Liz Gogerly.
This book is loaded with sweet tips to help you go green, whether you want to go all out or start small. Most importantly, it also has lots of ideas for making your wardrobe a little more eco friendly!