Top 10 Children’s eBooks October 2016

So what were the most popular eBooks for October online readers?  Classics, modern and old feature in the Top 10,  British authors, J. K. Rowling, Tolkien and Kenneth Grahame are leading with their adventures taking their characters through dangerous encounters. Valuable friendships are the magic ingredient to these tales.  So keep your friends close people, who knows when adventure will knock on your door!

 

1. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K. Rowling

2. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, by J. K. Rowling

3. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J. K. Rowling

4. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by J. K. Rowling

5. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J. K. Rowling

6. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by J. K. Rowling

7. The Bungalow Mystery : Nancy Drew Mystery series, by Carolyn Keene

8. The Hobbit, by J. R. R. Tolkien

9. The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame

10. Rodrick Rules : Diary of a Wimpy Kid, by Jeff Kinney

 

Summer-time reading starts with a visit to your local Library! Try these new children’s fiction…

Looking forward to long hot summer days where you can relax with a book? Well, the weather is still a bit patchy at the moment, but you can always get in a bit of practice by trying these new fiction books.

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsA Most Magical Girl by Karen Foxlee

Annabel Grey is primed for a proper life as a young lady in Victorian England. But when her mother disappears, she’s put in the care of two eccentric aunts who thrust her into a decidedly un-ladylike life, full of potions and flying broomsticks. Swept up in an urgent quest, Annabel is pitted against another young witch, Kitty, to rescue the sacred Moreover Wand from the dangerous underworld that exists beneath London. The two girls outsmart trolls, find passage through a wall of faerie bones, and narrowly escape a dragon, but it doesn’t take long for Annabel to see that the most dangerous part is her decision to trust this wild, magical girl.

 

 

The Secret of Nightingale Wood by Lucy StrangeImage courtesy of Syndetics

1919. Mama is ill. Father has taken a job abroad. Nanny Jane is too busy to pay any attention to Henrietta and the things she sees – or thinks she sees – in the shadows of their new home, Hope House. All alone, with only stories for company, Henry discovers that Hope House is full of strange secrets: a forgotten attic, ghostly figures, mysterious firelight that flickers in the trees beyond the garden. One night she ventures into the darkness of Nightingale Wood. What she finds there will change her whole world…

 

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsAn Elephantasy by Maria Elena Walsh

What would you do if you woke up one morning and found a huge and lonely elephant at your door? An elephant with a letter hanging from its ear, saying: “My name is Dailan Kifki, and I beg you not to be alarmed at the fact that I’m an elephant…”? Well, you would probably adopt him too, wouldn’t you? But when Dailan Kifki falls ill and ends up at the top of a tree, only the fire brigade can get him down. Unfortunately, the fireman who arrives seems more interested in flying away with the elephant than bringing him back to earth.

 

 

Crimson Poison by Susan MooreImage courtesy of Syndetics

Nat Walker is the orphan heiress to her parents’ games empire. While the mystery behind their deaths remains unsolved, Nat must fend off the unwelcome and avaricious attentions of her aunt, who is keen to “adopt” her and her millions. When her guardian, Jamuka, is called back to Mongolia by a clan emergency, Nat discovers vital information about the poison that is killing his people. She decides to follow him, and in doing so, becomes drawn into the deadly game of revenge, corruption and world domination that is playing out against the snowy white Steppes.

 

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsMagic Feet by Sherryl Clark

“Soccer season is here! Ellyse can’t wait to pull on her boots and start dribbling. Unlike club cricket, where she’s the ONLY girl on the team, her best friends Charlie and Jazz also play soccer and it’s so much fun! But things don’t go according to plan right from the start. Ellyse finds herself the ONLY girl on her club team AGAIN and, to make matters worse, there’s a new player on the field – and he has attitude. *Sigh*. Ellyse decides to take charge. If she wants more girls on her team, why not start a soccer team at school? Problem solved… right? Wrong. Ellyse soon realises that there’s more involved in recreuiting new players than she ever imagined. Plus, there’s a bully to contend with… Has Ellyse bitten off more than she can chew this time around?”–Back cover.

Top 10 Children’s Fiction October 2016

Conundrums, convoluted doodles and confusion abound in this month’s favourite childrens fiction.

Puzzle books are high on the list where people pitch their skills of against skilled doodlers and designers creating cool adventures.  Detection and deceit are captivating our audience of young readers as they read through some of the great series found on our library shelves.  Great series that didn’t quite make the top 10 were Lincoln Peirce Big Nate and Thea Stilton (penned in her very own hand!)

Top 10:

1. Diary of a wimpy kid, by Jeff Kinney

2. Tom Gates Series, by Liz Pichon

3. Treehouse series, by Andy Griffiths

4. Puzzle Book series, by Susannah Leigh

5. Where’s Wally? by Martin Handford

6. Dork Diaries series, by Rachel Renee Russell

7. Dirty Bertie series, by Alan MacDonald

8. The BFG, by Road Dahl

9. The Secret Seven, by Enid Blyton

10. George’s marvellous medicine, by Road Dahl

Top 10 Children’s eBooks for August 2016

Harry Potter has taken over the eBook world! The new Harry Potter story has people fascinated with the way it’s been written – just like the play! It makes the book a surprisingly quick read.  Which means we’re racing through the reserve list here in the library. Good news for all the fans out there.

There are some great plays here in the library if you like the script form that Harry Potter and the Cursed Child was written in.  Have you been inspired to put on a play of any of your favourite stories? How did it go? Let us know in the comments.

 

1. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, by J.K.Rowling

2. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J.K. Rowling

3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by J.K. Rowling

4. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, by J.K. Rowling

5. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, by Jack Thorn, John Tiffany and J.K. Rowling

6. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J.K. Rowling

7. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, by J.K. Rowling

8. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by J.K. Rowling

9. The Hobbit, by J. R. R.Tolkien

10. The Jungle Book, by Rudyard Kiplong

Top 10 Children’s fiction for August 2016

New releases galore on the Children’s fiction front! There is a new Tom Gates adventure, catch up with Liz Pichon’s hero at your library. And what could be on the 78th storey of Andy and Terry’s treehouse? Any one else find this series a really good way to learn their 13 times tables?

 

1. Diary of a wimpy kid series, by Jeff Kinney

2. Tom Gates series, by Liz Pichon

3. Treehouse series, by Andy Griffiths

4. Dirty Bertie series, by Alan MacDonald

5. Dork Diaries, by Rachel Renée Russell

6. Where’s Wally? by Martin Handford

7. The Secret Seven series by Enid Blyton

8. The BFG, by Roald Dahl

9. Matilda, by Roald Dahl

10. The hidden oracle, by Rick Riordan

Top 10 Children’s eBooks July 2016

Travelling? Your library has your back! eBooks are available if you’re moving around the city, the country or around the world!

At the top of this month’s list are the tales of the well known wizarding school Hogwarts.  Four years ago a very dedicated lady built this incredible model out of Lego!  Check out the photos for the details inside and out.  But if you’re travelling and want to explore Hogwarts you could look through a virtual model.

 

Here’s your Top 10 list for July 2016

1. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by J. K. Rowling

2. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J. K. Rowling

3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by J. K. Rowling

4. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, by J. K. Rowling

5. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, by J. K. Rowling

6. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, by J. K. Rowling

7. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J. K. Rowling

8. The Hobbit, by J. R. R. Tolkein

9. Old School: Diary of a Wimpy Kid Series, by Jeff Kinney

10. The Jungle Book, by Rudyard Kipling

Top 10 Children’s Fiction for June 2016

Mid winter favourites reveal fans of some classic children’s authors. Enid Blyton and Roald Dahl are two very different authors creating very different worlds for their imaginary children and their readers.

The secret seven adventures were so popular that the translations inspired writers from other countries to develop the characters in their own stories.  Some of these were translated back into English some outlandish titles like… “The famous Five and the Z-Rays

1. Diary of a wimpy kid, by Jeff Kinney

2. Tom Gates series, by Liz Pichon

3. Storey Treehouse series, by Andy Griffiths

4. Where’s Wally? by Martin Handford

5. Dirty Bertie series, by Alan MacDonald

6. The Secret Seven, by Enid Blyton

7. Big Nate series, Lincoln Peirce

8. The hidden oracle, by Rick Riordan

9. Gangsta granny, by David Walliams

10. Matilda, by Roald Dahl

Just arrived at your local Library: 5 new children’s fiction

Return to Groosham GrangeImage courtesy of Syndetics by Anthony Horowitz

In the wickedly funny sequel to Groosham Grange by bestselling author Anthony Horowitz, someone is trying to destroy David Eliot’s school. A year ago, he’d have been happy to see the end of Groosham Grange and its ghoulish teachers. Now, he’s on course to win the Unholy Grail, a cup of magical power presented to the star pupil. But a series of suspicious mishaps sees the gap between David and new boy Vincent King narrow alarmingly. Someone, it seems, is trying to stop David winning – and, worse, threatening Groosham Grange itself!

 

 

The Misadventures of Max Crumbly, Locker HeroImage courtesy of Syndetics by Rachel Renee Russell

Max Crumbly is about to face the scariest place he’s ever been – South Ridge Middle school! Max has been home-schooled by his grandmother until now, and he’s begged his parents to finally let him start attending middle school. He’s starting to question that choice, though, with the Thomas Silver Problem. As in, the fact that Tommy keeps stuffing Max in his locker. If only Max could be like the hero in all the comics he likes to read – or the ones he draws – and magically escape the locker and defeat Tommy. Unfortunately, Max’s uncanny, almost superhuman ability to smell pizza from miles away won’t exactly save any lives or foil bad guys. But that doesn’t mean Max won’t do his best to be the hero his school needs!

 

 

Girl vs. boy band. The Right TrackImage courtesy of Syndetics by Harmony Jones

When three noisy, mischievous rising stars of a British boy band come to Los Angeles to make their first album, they stay in the home of a record producer and her seventh-grade daughter, a talented but painfully shy singer-songwriter, urged by her best friend to step into the spotlight.

 

 

 

The Harp and the RavenvineImage courtesy of Syndetics by Ted Sanders

Horace F. Andrews and his friend Chloe are Keepers of magical objects of extraordinary power. But as the presence of a new Keeper is made known, they are drawn into a struggle to find out who she is and where her loyalties lie. As Horace and Chloe adjust to their newfound talents – Horace can see the future and Chloe can walk through walls – a girl called April is drawn toward the Keeper stronghold, the Warren. She comes with a Tan’ji of her own, though it is damaged and there is no telling what will happen if it cannot be made whole again. Accompanied by a mysterious woman with a power of her own and the young boy leading them in the right direction, April is being pursued by a pack of sinister hunters.

 

 

CounterstrikeImage courtesy of Syndetics by Peter Jay Black

The Urban Outlaws face their biggest challenge yet. They have to break into the Facility and find the ultimate weapon – Medusa – before Hector does. But there are five levels of security to crack and a mystery room that has Jack sweating whenever he thinks about it. But the clock is ticking. Hector is determined to have the weapon and release doomsday, and it is down to the Urban Outlaws to stop him. Can Jack come up with a plan in time?

 

 

Top 10 Children’s fiction April 2016

If you know what it’s like to pick other people’s noses or survive tinned tongue at the dinner table it’s highly likely you’ve read one the David Walliam‘s books in April’s Top 10.

Grandpa’s great escape proves you’re never too old to adventure, take a look at the author reading the book right here.  And when it comes to the trials of Zoe and the safety of her pet Armitage… prepare to be slightly (or maybe a bit more) disgusted by the characters in Ratburger.

Have you ever had to rescue one of your pets from dire circumstances? Let us know your adventures in the comments.

 

Here’s your top 10:

1. Diary of a wimpy kid, by Jeff Kinney

2. Tom Gates. by Liz Pichon

3. Storey-treehouse series, by Andy Griffiths

4. Dirty Bertie series, by Alan MacDonald

5. Where’s Wally? by Martin Handford

6. Big Nate series, by Lincoln Peirce

7. Grandpa’s great escape, by David Walliams

8. Captain Underpants and the sensational saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot, by Dav Pilkey

9. Puppy love, by Rachel Renee Russell

10. Ratburger, by David Walliams

Top 10 Childrens comics March 2016

=^^= The feline world meets the animated in this month’s leader board, featuring Garfield and Chi’s Sweet Home. Garfield is famous for translating our needs for sleep-ins and delicious food, thanks to the talents of Jim Davis.  Davis grew up on a farm in Indiana, USA with 25 cats!. New Writers and other illustrators now help to keep the whole shebang rolling on.  Did you know that Garfield has a world record for being the most syndicated cartoon ever?!

1. Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz
2. Big Nate, by Lincoln Peirce
3. Pokémon, by Hidenori Kusaka
4. Garfield, by Jim Davis and Mark Evanier
5. Asterix, by Goscinny and Udzero
6. Adventure time, by Ryan North
7. Amulet, by Kazu Kibuishi
8. Chi’s sweet home, by Kanata Konmai
9. My little pony, by Ted Anderson
10. Uncle $crooge and Donald Duck, by Don Rosa