Top 10 Children’s Comics June 2017

So who doesn’t love an anthology! They take a heap of comics, join them up and place them carefully between a cover that creates one bumper book.  The Smurf Anthologies are great because you get to see a story through.  Also it looks like you’re reading a lot!

Did you know the original name for Smurfs was Les Schtroumpfs! Pierre Culliford, more famously known as Peyo came up with the name as a nonsense word.  Les Schtroumpfs were originally encountered in a Peyo comic Johan et Pirlouit” take a look at the these Peyo creations.  Of course you can always take more comics out of the library… Peyo is also the author of Benny Breakiron =)

  1. Big Nate, by Lincoln Peirce
  2. Tintin, by Hergé
  3. Pokémon, by Hidenori Kusaka
  4. Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz
  5. Adventure time, by Ryan North
  6. Amulet, by Kazu Kibuishi
  7. Garfield, by Jim Davis
  8. Chi’s sweet home, by Kanata Konami
  9. The Smurfs anthology, by Peyo
  10. Asterix, by Goscinny and Udzero

Top 10 Children’s fiction September 2016

It’s all about adventure this month! From the Classic authors Enid Blyton and Roald Dahl to the yet to be released latest Diary of a Wimpy kid, Double Down,  by Jeff Kinney. These children aren’t one’s to shy away when strange events come knocking at their door.

You don’t have to be kidnapped by giants or attend a magical school, some of these adventures happen in homes just like yours and to children just like you!

 

1. Diary of a wimpy kid, by Jeff Kinney

2. Tom Gates, by Liz Pichon

3. Storey treehouse series, by Andy Griffiths

4. Where’s Wally? by Martin Handford

5. Dork Diaries series, by Rachel Renee Russell

6. Dirty Bertie series, by Alan MacDonald

7. The BFG, by Roald Dahl

8. The Secret Seven, by Enid Blyton

9. Harry Potter and the philosopher’s stone, by J. K. Rowling

10. The enormous crocodile, by Roald Dahl

Kids’ Club Review by charlie: Villains

VillainsVillains, by Terry Deary

now this book is really really bloody it tells you about all the different things they did to torcher there prisoners and make it entertaning to see them be kill like bing pull apart by horse
loved this book

4 stars

Reviewed by charlie from Island Bay, 12 years old

A closer look at history: New non fiction

Usborne encyclopedia of ancient Egypt

Many books about ancient Egypt focus on Mummies and pyramids, which is a pity because, obviously, the history of an empire that lasted from  1096BCE to 30BCE is much richer than that.  This book encompasses over 1000 years of history, not only focusing on the great Pharaohs, but what everyday life was like for the poorer members of Egyptian society.  There are sections on everything from the Egyptian army to medicine to beauty care.  There are plenty of links to useful websites, as well as a few timelines; one lists the pharaohs in chronological order, the other gives a chronological look at Egyptology and how its changed over the centuries.  This is certainly one of the most through books on ancient Egypt we have in our collection, and a great book for school projects.

 

Stephen Biesty’s Cross-Sections: Castle

This book is a classic and for good reason. As a close look at castle life during the medieval period it’s yet to be bettered. The cross sections of the various parts of the castle are intricately detailed, with explanations of what’s happening in different parts of the drawing. They’re also quite funny; try to spot the sneaky spy and the castle inhabitants getting up to all sorts of things, many of them not exactly appropriate to the situation!  The book manages to be both very informative and extremely fun. As well as the cross sections there are plenty of things like the feudal system, clothing and warfare.  This is THE book to read if you’re at all interested in Medieval castles.

 

 

Deadly days in History

Terry Deary has been writing the Horrible History books for twenty years, and to his credit, they’re still as interesting and funny as they’ve ever been. Rather than focusing on one specific country, this is a look at the days in world history that have been particularly bloody.  True to his established pattern, he doesn’t just stick to Western History; he also looks at the Sepoy and Boxer rebellions, as well as the Battle of Isandlwana.  He also isn’t biased towards any particular group; everyone involved has their savagery discussed.  It’s a great book, even by Terry Deary’s high standards, and well worth reading if you like your history both balanced and gory.

 

 

 

Bones never lie: How Forensic science helps solve history’s mysteries

One of the strangest parts of learning about history is how evolving scientific techniques of the present help us better understand the mysteries of the past. Forensic science is used to solve modern day murders, but it also has its uses in working out just what happened. For example, did Napoleon die of natural causes or was he murdered? Did the Grand Duchess Anastasia survive the massacre of her family by Communists? This book works hard to debunk various theories and explains the science behind each of the conclusions.  But it also takes the time to look at each of the other theories in turn, and treats each one with equal weight.

 

 

Kids’ Club Review by jessie: Mercy Watson fights crime

Mercy Watson fights crimeMercy Watson fights crime, by Kate DiCamillo

Mercy Watson fights crime: I enjoyed this book because Mercy is funny. This book is about Mr.and Mrs Watson who have a pig called Mercy. One night Mercy hears a springing sound of a toaster. Mercy loves toast especially with a great deal of butter so she jumps out of bed and clomps down the stairs.  She sees a small man with a pointy nose she didn’t see toast and she couldn’t smell toast what was it? it was a thief. Leroy Ninker had always dreamt of being a cowboy but first he wanted to be a thief .Mercy was tired so she went to sleep in front of the door way just as Leroy leave. He was too late how could he get out? Just as he stepped she woke up. Leroy opened the door, Mercy ran around the backyard, the next door neighbour dialed the fire men, the animal pound and the police, they caught Leroy Ninker. Then Mrs Watson made toast with a great deal of butter to say thank you.

5 stars

Reviewed by jessie from Miramar, 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by jools: Gangsta granny

Gangsta granny, by David Walliams

I think it’s a really good book because it’s really funny.When you start to read the book you don’t want to stop reading it.
Gangsta granny has white hair, false teeth,she has used tissues and she’s an international jewel thief.

3 stars

Reviewed by jools from Khandallah, 9 years old

Kids’ Review by Nina

CHERUB Series: The Killing by Robert Muchamore

James Adams has been recruited on a mission with Dave. James has to make friends with Max Tarasov, the son of small-time crook, Leon Tarasov. As soon as James starts to dig up some leads he realises he needs information from an 18 year old boy. The only problem is the boy fell off a roof and died 13 months earlier. Follow James’ mission as he trys to reveal the mystery behind the robbery… 4 stars.
 
Review by Nina of Wadestown