Te Vāiaho o te Gagana Tokelau 2021

Fakamālo atu kia te koutou uma! Welcome to Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau | Tokelau Language Week 2021. Tokelauan is spoken by around 1,600 people on the three atolls of Tokelau — Nukunonu, Fakaofo, and Atafu — and over 2,000 people in Aotearoa. Tokelauan people are an important part of our community here in Wellington, with over 4,000 people of Tokelauan descent living in the region — around half of the whole Tokelauan population in Aotearoa. (Source: 2018 Census)

This year, the theme for Te Vaiaho o te Gagana Tokelau is:

“Tokelau! Tapui tau gagana ma tau aganuku, i te manaola ma te lautupuola.” | “Tokelau! Preserve your language and culture, to enhance spiritual and physical wellbeing.”

Help us celebrate this special time for the community by learning more about Tokelau’s unique culture, language and history through the books and other resources below!


Books

Check out some of these books from our children’s section from and about Tokelau, and in Gagana Tokelau:

Tokelau heroes / Riley, David
“Tokelau Heroes tells the inspirational stories of achievers who have Tokelauan ancestry. It includes legends like Hina; historical figures such as Ihaia Puka; and contemporary heroes like Opetaia Foa’i. It’s written to inspire young Tokelauans, to encourage reading and promote literacy.” (Catalogue)

Illustrated history of the South Pacific / Stenson, Marcia
“The South Pacific is not only our geographic environment, it is also our cultural environment, and many New Zealanders trace their ancestry to Polynesian seafarers. This book is an introduction to the history of the South Pacific. A companion book to Illustrated History of New Zealand, also written by Marcia Stenson, it covers the following topics: geology and geography, the arrival of the first people to the Pacific, European exploration, war in the Pacific, political issues both historic and current.” (Catalogue)

Ko te aho mālie o Filipo = Filipo’s fun day / Swan, Epi
“Describes Filipo’s full-on day at ʻakoga kāmata.” (Catalogue)

Te faitauga o nā ika : ko he tala faka-Tokelau mai Niu Hila / Lemisio-Poasa, Nila
“Amanaki is taught the Tokelau way of counting fish by his uncle. Suggested level: primary, intermediate, junior secondary.” (Catalogue)

Ko te tokotoko o toku tupuna = Papa’s tokotoko / Sione, Emeli
“Alo, the eldest grandson, initially rejects, but in the end takes on his responsibility to be a support for his grandfather.” (Catalogue)

Valigā magō : Painting sharks / Baker, Vaitoa
“It’s painting day at school. Hale and his best friend Ioane choose to paint pictures of sharks.” (Catalogue)

Also, visit this link to find even more children’s books in Gagana Tokelau at your local library.


Virtual Storytime

Head on over to our YouTube channel where you can watch and listen to our librarian Lewis read a special story — Lightning Boy from Tokelau Heroes by David Riley, a modern retelling of a traditional Tokelauan legend. We would like to thank David for allowing us to share this beautiful story with you throughout Tokelau Language Week this year — fakafetai, David! Make sure to check out the Reading Warrior website to find more stories of the Pacific from David and his collaborators.



More Resources

Check out the following websites to find out more about the atolls of Tokelau and this beautiful country’s culture, language and history:

Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niuē 2021

Fakaalofa lahi atu ki a mutolu oti! Welcome to Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niuē | Niuē Language Week 2021. With over 30,000 people of Niuean descent living in New Zealand, the Niuean population is our fourth largest Pasifika community.

The theme for Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niuē this year is:

“Kia Tupuolaola e Moui he Tagata Niuē” | “May the Tagata Niuē thrive.”

Join us at Wellington City Libraries as we celebrate this special time by exploring Niuē’s unique culture and language through books and other resources below!


Books

Check out some of these books from our children’s section from and about Niuē, and in Vagahau Niuē:

The woman who was swallowed by a whale : a tale from Niue / Wilton, Briar
“The woman who was swallowed by a whale is a folktale ; Niue : rock of Polynesia is a short factual introduction to the country and culture.” (Catalogue)

Kuaka visits Niue / Peterson,Vanessa
“Uses a story format and the concept of bird migration to introduce places in Niue, food and customs.” (Catalogue)

Tales of Niue nukututaha : in Niuean and English / Feilo, Zora
“A collection of twelve stories in both English and Niuean set on the island if Niue, this is the author’s reinterpretation of myth, legend and storytelling from her native land. Each story is lavishly illustrated by Niuean artist Lange Taufelila.” (Catalogue)

The artist and the whale = Fifine pulotu mo e tafuā : a Niue legend / Riley, David
“Mataginifale is a Niue superhero with a difference. She isn’t known for her super powers, but for her super creativity. One day she had an argument with a whale that tested her thinking skills too”” (Catalogue)

Show day / MacGregor, Jill
“Livisia, who lives in the village of Alofi South on the island of Niue, describes how her village hosts Show Day, a day of celebrations for the whole island. Includes some Niuean words and a glossary. In picture book format.” (Catalogue)

We are the rock! / Riley, David
“In We are the Rock, contemporary Niueans, historical and legendary figures tell their stories of focus, expression and achievement. They are Niuean tāoga (treasure) and include: * Dr Vili Nosa – the first Niuean awarded a Phd* Tutina Pasene – business woman and fashion designer* Sully Paea – youth worker* Pero Cameron – basketballer* John Pule – artist and writer* Frank Bunce – All Black* Stephanie Tauevihi – actress and singer* Che Fu – rapper/ singer* Fao and Huanaki – discoverers of Niue* Leveimatagi and Leveifualolo – legendary explorers.” (Catalogue)

Niuean for kids / Jahri Jah Jah
“Learn to speak words and phrases in Niuean. This book packs in many common words and phrases., including greetings, colours, numbers, body parts, animals and farewells. It is a great resource for anybody wanting to learn some basic words in Niuean. Suitable for ages 1+.” (Catalogue)

Illustrated history of the South Pacific / Stenson, Marcia
“The South Pacific is not only our geographic environment, it is also our cultural environment, and many New Zealanders trace their ancestry to Polynesian seafarers. This book is an introduction to the history of the South Pacific. A companion book to Illustrated History of New Zealand, also written by Marcia Stenson, it covers the following topics: geology and geography, the arrival of the first people to the Pacific, European exploration, war in the Pacific, political issues both historic and current.” (Catalogue)


Also, visit this link to find hundreds of children’s books in Vagahau Niuē at your local library.


Virtual Storytime

Head on over to our YouTube channel where you can watch and listen to our librarian Lewis read a special bilingual story — Fifine pulotu mo e tofuā | The artist and the whale by David Riley — in English and Vagahau Niuē. We would like to thank David for allowing us to share this beautiful story with you throughout Niuē Language Week this year — fakaaue lahi, David! Make sure to check out the Reading Warrior website to find more stories of the Pacific from David and his collaborators.



More Resources

Check out the following websites to find out more about Niuē and its culture, language and history:

Vaiaso o te ‘Gana Tuvalu 2021

Talofa koutou! Welcome to Vaiaso o te ‘Gana Tuvalu | Tuvalu Language Week 2021. There are around 5,000 people of Tuvaluan descent currently living in Aotearoa, and around 500 of these people live in Wellington City.

The theme for Vaiaso o te ‘Gana Tuvalu this year is:

“Fakaakoigina tou iloga kae tukeli ke magoi mote ataeao” | “Embracing our culture for a more secure, vibrant future.”

Join us at the library or from home as we celebrate this special time by embracing Tuvalu’s unique language and culture by exploring some of the books and other resources below!


Books

Check out some of these books from the children’s collection in the Tuvaluan language or about Tuvalu:

Samoa & Tuvalu / Guile, Melanie

A comprehensive introduction to the life, history, and people of Samoa and Tuvalu for middle and upper primary students, including information about Tuvaluan land, people, food, customs and traditions, music, and lifestyle.

Illustrated history of the South Pacific / Stenson, Marcia

“The South Pacific is not only our geographic environment, it is also our cultural environment, and many New Zealanders trace their ancestry to Polynesian seafarers. This book is an introduction to the history of the South Pacific. A companion book to Illustrated History of New Zealand, also written by Marcia Stenson, it covers the following topics: geology and geography, the arrival of the first people to the Pacific, European exploration, war in the Pacific, political issues both historic and current.” (Catalogue)

The gifts of Pai and Vau = Meaalofa a Pai mo Vau / Riley, David
“Pai and Vau are Nanumea superheroes who created beautiful things in our world. One day a stranger named Tefolaha came to their island. “This is now my island,” he declared and challenged them to a contest. What kind of contest did he dream up? What would Pai and Vau do if they lost?” (Catalogue) Note: this book is bilingual with text in English and the Nanumean language of Tuvalu

What plants need : a poem from Tuvalu / Molu, Easter

An early reader picture book featuring a beautiful poem from a Tuvaluan author, about the lifecycle of plants from seed to flower. Perfect for very young readers of English.

Ko te kimoa ma te feke : ko te tala mai Tuvalu / Ielemia, Temukisa

A short, fun, and traditional story from Tuvalu all about rats and octopuses! This version of the book is in Tokelauan, but we also have it in Cook Islands Māori and Gagana Sāmoa.


Virtual Storytime

Head on over to our YouTube channel where you can watch and listen to Lewis from Johnsonville and Tawa Libraries read a special bilingual story — Meaalofa a Pai mo Vau by David Riley — in English and the Nanumean language of Tuvalu. We would like to thank David for allowing us to share this beautiful story with you throughout Tuvalu Language Week this year — fakafetai, David! Make sure to check out http://readingwarrior.com/ to find more stories of the Pacific from David and his collaborators.



More Resources

Check out the following websites to find out more about Tuvalu and its culture, language and history:

Let loose your inner pirate with Talk Like a Pirate Day!

Ahoy there crew! This Sunday be Talk Like a Pirate Day. This special day comes but once a year on the 19th of September and when it comes around there’s only one thing for you to do: talk like a pirate, of course!

So shiver yer timbers, batten down the hatches, and prepare to prattle properly piratical!

If you need to brush up on yer Pirate-speak, look no further than Mango Languages! Mango Languages contains a veritable A-Y of languages for you to learn. From Arabic to Yiddish, there are over 70 language courses for you to choose from, and one of those languages is Pirate!

The Mango Languages Pirate course will teach you how to talk like the most swashing of bucklers. They give you all sorts of interesting grammar tips and tricks, like this one right here:

Text in image reads: Grammar Note. Make sure to add extra Rs onto lots of words when speaking like a pirate. This will happen a lot at the end of words ending in a vowel, like here where "to" turns to "ter". Just remember, a pirate's favourite letter is ARRR!Each lesson starts with an example sentence in English, and you are shown how to translate it into Pirate. Here’s one of the sentences you can learn:

Screenshot of two sentences. The first sentence in English reads "Great, my friend! You're a fine pirate!" The second sentence in Pirate reads "Arr, me heartie! A fine gentleman o' fortune be ya!"

They’ve even colour-coded the sentence so you can see which part of the sentence in English becomes which part of the sentence in Pirate-talk. You’ll be talking like a pirate in no time!

Just sign in with your library card barcode number and your 4-digit pin, and ye’ll be off and away!


The language options available on a self-check machineIf you’ve visited one of our libraries and issued your books on a self-check machine, you may have already discovered the language options. After you’ve first touched the screen, a whole lot of little circles with flags inside them appear down in the bottom left hand corner. Do you see that skull and crossbones there? One of the languages on our self-check machines is Pirate!

If you haven’t discovered this feature before, then this Sunday is the perfect time to try it out for the first time. It will make issuing your books so much more fun. You’ll be treated to all the classic library self-check phrases, but with that piratical twist.

The options screen on our self-check machines, but in Pirate. The options are "Borrowin' status", "View reserved stuff", "Check out yer books", and "Unlock yer Dvds"

If you’re worried that you won’t be able properly follow the steps to issue your items with the machine spouting another language, don’t fret. Pirate as a language has certain similarities with English, and our machines still have the normal symbols to guide you on your issuing voyage. As always, when you’re finished issuing your books don’t forget to abandon ship!


If you’re feeling sleepy after a hard day of sailing, scrubbing the decks, and speaking in your best pirate voice, then why not relax with a bedtime story! We have Margaret Mahy’s The Great Piratical Rumbustification, expertly read by our own splendid scallywag Stephen, available on our Facebook page. We have quite a few bedtime stories available, so check out our Bedtime Story playlist!

If you’d rather read your own book, then we have a few other pirate-themed reads to recommend.

If you feel like reading a fantastically silly picture book about an unusual babysitter and his two charges, you might enjoy:

Pirate stew / Gaiman, Neil
“Pirate stew! Pirate stew! Pirate stew for me and you! Pirate stew! Pirate stew! Eat it and you won’t be blue. You can be a pirate too!” (Catalogue)

Maybe you’re after a short chapter book about a crew of scurvy pirates who find themselves faced with the most terrifying of creature – a baby!

Nappy the pirate baby / MacDonald, Alan
“Stinky McFlea, Irish Stew, Long Johns, Nitty Nora and Captain Spratt are pirates aboard the Salty Herring. They love nothing more than lazing about on deck and sailing the high seas – until one day, a strange wailing noise changes everything. There’s a stowaway baby on board the ship, and the crew have decided to raise him like a proper pirate. But are they really up to the task of looking after a baby? And where exactly did Nappy come from?” (Catalogue)

This is a dyslexia-friendly book.

If you prefer to read comics and like adventurous and heart-warming stories, check out:

Tell no tales : pirates of the southern seas / Maggs, Sam
“Anne Bonny had it all – her own ship, a pirate crew, and a fearsome reputation – but a new enemy has her on the run and it’ll take all of Anne’s courage to stay afloat. The night before a major heist, Anne has an unsettling dream, and come morning, the robbery is thwarted by Woodes Rogers, a zealot who has sworn to eliminate piracy. With no plan to escape, Anne must persuade her crew to seek the meaning of her dream – or perish. A graphic novel about belonging, belief, and how far we’re willing to go to protect the ones we love.”–Publisher’s website.” (Catalogue)

Also available as an eBook.

If a picture book by a fantastic New Zealand author about an accountant and his (formerly) piratical mother, then look no further than:

The man whose mother was a pirate / Mahy, Margaret
“Sam has an ordinary life – but his mother used to be a pirate! One day at breakfast, they decide to go to sea and an amazing adventure begins.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

What’s not to like about a brave girl journeying to the icy Arctic to rescue her sister from a terrifying pirate captain?

The ice sea pirates / Nilsson, Frida
“Captain Whitehead wants children, the smaller the better. They say he has a diamond mine, and to be taken there is the worst thing that can happen to a child. Miki has been kidnapped and nothing will stop Siri from saving her little sister… –Adapted from back cover.” (Catalogue)

Also available as an eBook.

How about a piratical classic?

Treasure Island / Stevenson, Robert Louis
“Join Jim Hawkins as he sails the high seas aboard the Hispaniola in search of lost treasure…”-Back cover.” (Catalogue)

Also available as an audiobook, eAudiobook, eBook, and a comic.

 

New Books in Vietnamese!

Read this post in Vietnamese!

How wonderful! Wellington City Libraries has added more Vietnamese books for Vietnamese loving readers. The new collection is most suitable for children under 14 years old. Junior readers will have a chance to explore the world through stories, such as the series “Những người bạn ngộ nghĩnh,” the series “Chăm sóc hành tinh của chúng mình,” and much more. Some of the books are bilingual (English and Vietnamese), while others are entirely in Vietnamese. To get books from the collection, please search “Vietnamese language readers” and place a reserve on the item you would like to borrow, which you can collect from your nearest branch. Talk to one of our friendly library staff for more instructions.

Below are some titles for you to check out:

Chúng mình cùng dọn dẹp! / Series Những Người Bạn Ngộ Nghĩnh, by Aya Watanabe

An interesting story between friends: Meet Cabbage, Pumpkin, Sweetcorn and Capsicum, who transform the task of tidying up into an exciting game.

Cho tớ xin lỗi nhé! / Series Những Người Bạn Ngộ Nghĩnh, by Aya Watanabe

A cute story about friends who learn how to say sorry and enjoy playing games together.

Xử lý các loại rác thải / by Empar and Núria Jiménez

Did you know the amount of waste your family generates in a year could fill a whole truck? Where does the waste come from? What can we do to reduce it? There are some great recycle activities available at the back of the book. Bonus!

Thứ tuyệt hảo nhất trần đời / by Ashley Spires

“One day, the girl has a wonderful idea. She is going to make the most magnificent thing!”

Mẹ ơi, con tặng mẹ này! / by Sasaki Mio

Pokko left mummy’s hands to go with the teacher at Kindy. It was a long day and Pokko missed mummy a lot. When Mummy came to pick him up, they were both so happy to see each other. Pokko even has a secret present for mummy…

Ông tớ / Song ngữ, tác giả Marta Altés

What could be more wonderful when you have a Grandpa for a best friend, who plays and explores the world with you? You both support each other when needed.

More Vietnamese books are on their way, so don’t hesitate to get one out now!

Sách Tiếng Việt mới về!

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Thật tuyệt vời! Thư viện Wellington vừa bổ sung thêm nhiều sách mới dành riêng cho các em thiếu nhi thích đọc và học tiếng Việt. Đa số sách dành cho độ tuổi mầm non và tiểu học, giúp các em thêm hiểu biết qua những mẩu chuyện vui, như bộ sưu tập “Những Người Bạn Ngộ Nghĩnh”, hay “Chăm Sóc Hành Tinh Của Chúng Mình”, và nhiều truyện khác nữa. Một số sách là song ngữ Anh – Việt. Độc giả có thể tìm kiếm bằng cách gõ từ khóa “Vietnamese language readers” trên trag web của thư viện để đặt mượn tại chi nhánh gần nhất thuộc thư viện Wellington, hoặc đến chi nhánh gần nhất để được hướng dẫn cách mượn sách.

Dưới đây là một số sách truyện cho độc giả tham khảo và lựa chọn:

Chúng mình cùng dọn dẹp! / Tuyển tập Những Người Bạn Ngộ Nghĩnh của tác giả Aya Watanabe

Một câu chuyện thú vị giữa các bạn rau, củ, quả: Bắp Cải, Bắp Ngô, Bí Ngô và Ớt Chuông đã biến công việc dọn dẹp tưởng chừng như nhàm chán lại trở thành một trò chơi thật thú vị!

Cho tớ xin lỗi nhé! / Tuyển tập Những Người Bạn Ngộ Nghĩnh của tác giả Aya Watanabe

Bạn có biết Củ Cải, Ngó Sen, Cà Tím và Ớt Chuông đã biết nói lời xin lỗi để cng chơi với nhau như thế nào không?

Xử lý các loại rác thải / Tác giả Empar và Núria Jiménez, tuyển tập Chăm Sóc Hành Tinh Của Chúng Mình

Bạn có biết, lượng rác thải gia đình mình tạo ra trong một năm có thể chất đầy một chiếc xe tải? Rác thải tới từ đâu? Chúng mình có thể làm gì để hạn chế rác thải? Còn nữa, cuối sách có một vài hoạt động tái chế thú vị để các bạn thực hành theo.

Thứ tuyệt hảo nhất trần đời / Song ngữ, tác giả Ashley Spires

“Ngày nọ, cô bé nảy ra một ý. Cô sẽ chế tạo thứ tuyệt hảo nhất trần đời!”

Mẹ ơi, con tặng mẹ này! / Tác giả Sasaki Mio

Pokko rời vòng tay mẹ đến với cô giáo tại trường mầm non, cả một ngày dài Pokko thật nhớ mẹ, và khi mẹ đến đón, hai mẹ con thật hạnh phúc, nhất là khi cậu bé còn làm mẹ bất ngờ….

Ông tớ / Song ngữ, tác giả Marta Altés

Còn gì tuyệt vời hơn khi có một người ông cùng chơi, cùng khám phá thế giới với mình, và khi hai ông cháu cùng chăm sóc, giúp đỡ nhau nào.

Còn nhiều sách truyện tiếng Việt khác đang có sẵn và sắp về thêm tại thư viện Wellington, mời độc giả cùng đón đọc và khám phá nhé.

New books in French!

Read this post in French!

New children’s books in French have arrived! We are excited to announce the arrival of a flood of new French books for all our French-speaking families. All branches have some, but you will find larger collections at Karori, Johnsonville, Kilbirnie, and Newtown Libraries.

Don’t forget that you can also order these French books through the online catalogue by searching for “French language readers” or “Children 448.6“.

Here are a few must-haves to whet your appetite:

L’Âne Trotro à la plage / Guettier, Bénédicte

A new adventure of the cutest little donkey. Well, when it comes to cute little donkeys, let’s not forget Ariol and his gallery of colourful friends. But Trotro is on holiday at the sea with his friends Lili and Nana. Watch out for splashes! The beach is so much fun!

Je m’habille et … je te croque / Guettier, Bénédicte

« – Wolf, are you there yet? -I’m putting on my socks! » A little book to love getting dressed (with a bit of fear) …

Les carnets de Cerise. Tome 1, Le zoo pétrifié / Chamblain, Joris

Cerise is 10 ½ years old and dreams of becoming a novelist, like her neighbour Mrs Desjardins. She spends most of her time observing people. This old man, for example, is probably hiding a strange secret, but what is it? With her two best friends, Erica and Line, they follow the trail…

T’choupi déménage / Courtin, Thierry

Tchoupi moves into a new house… but it’s empty. He is a bit worried. But soon he gets his own space and a friendly face.

Bizarre mais vrai! Les dinosaures : 300 faits extrasaure-dinaires à dévorer

Dinosaur bones have been found on every continent including Antarctica – do you know why? The nostrils of the brachiosaurus were not on its nose – do you know where? Find these fun facts about your dino friends in this dictionary.

La belle lisse poire du prince de Motordu / Pef

The young Prince of Motordu lives in a beautiful castle/hat. He plays cards/pies every night in the big danger/dining-room. Puns are everywhere in this untranslatable story to be laughed at together!

So don’t wait and stock up on good books for the winter. More books for our other language communities will follow soon.

Nouveaux livres en français!

Read this post in English!

Ils sont arrivés!

Nous sommes ravis de vous annoncer l’arrivée d’une avalanche de nouveaux livres en français pour toutes nos familles francophones.

Toutes les branches en ont reçu mais vous en trouverez davantage à Karori, Johnsonville, Kilbirnie, et Newtown.

N’oubliez pas que vous pouvez aussi commander ces ouvrages en français via le catalogue en ligne en tapant ”French language readers” ou, via la recherche avancée en sélectionnant “call number” et en tapant “Children 448.6” dans la barre de recherche.

Voici quelques incontournables pour vous mettre l’eau à la bouche:

L’Âne Trotro à la plage / Guettier, Bénédicte

Une nouvelle aventure du plus mignon des petits ânes. Bon, en matière de mignons petits ânes, n’oublions pas Ariol et sa galerie de copains haute en couleur. Mais Trotro, lui, est en vacances à la mer avec ses amies Lili et Nana. Gare aux éclaboussures ! La plage, c’est trop trop rigolo !

Je m’habille et … je te croque / Guettier, Bénédicte

« – Loup y es-tu ? – Je mets mes chaussettes ! » Un petit livre pour adorer s’habiller (en se faisant un peu peur) …

Les carnets de Cerise. Tome 1, Le zoo pétrifié / Chamblain, Joris

Cerise a 10 ans et demi et rêve de devenir romancière, comme sa voisine Madame Desjardins. Elle passe le plus clair de son temps à observer les gens.  Ce vieux monsieur, par exemple, cache sûrement un drôle de secret, mais lequel ? Avec ses deux meilleures a amies, Erica et Line, elles remontent la piste…

T’choupi déménage / Courtin, Thierry

Tchoupi s’installe dans une nouvelle maison… vide. Il est un peu inquiet. Mais bientôt il se fait une vraie chambre a lui toute douillette et un nouveau copain super chouette.

Bizarre mais vrai! Les dinosaures : 300 faits extrasaure-dinaires à dévorer

On a trouvé des os de dinosaures sur tous les continents y compris en Antarctique, sais-tu pourquoi ? Les narines du brachiosaure n’étaient pas sur son nez, sais-tu ou alors ? Retrouve ces faits rigolos sur tes amis les dinos dans ce dico.

La belle lisse poire du prince de Motordu / Pef

Le jeune prince de Motordu habite un magnifique chapeau. Il y joue aux tartes tous les soirs dans la grande salle a dangers. Des jeux de mots dans tous les sens pour cette histoire à se tordre de rire ! A lire sans faute des aujourd’hui, pas deux nains !

Alors n’attendez pas et faites le plein de bons bouquins pour l’hiver. D’autres livres pour nos autres communautés linguistiques suivront bientôt.

New Zealand Sign Language Week 2021

This week is officially New Zealand Sign Language Week! NZSL Week 2021 is being held from 10th – 16th May, and is a wonderful opportunity for the sign language community in Aotearoa to showcase their language — and for people who don’t know NZSL to learn more about it! Check out this video welcoming you to the library in NZSL, to see some of the ways in which NZSL is used in the community:

Events

To help mark the occasion, there are a number of events happening around the country in celebration of New Zealand Sign Language and the NZSL-speaking community — including some in our own backyard! On Friday 14 May, starting at 5.00pm, the Wellington Deaf Society are hosting a special New Zealand Sign Language Evening for the whole community! The event includes nibbles, prizes, giveaways, kids’ face painting, and a whole range of activities for adults and kids, including free NZSL lessons from 5.00pm! This special event is taking place at the Waiora Hub at Alex Moore Park, 17 Bannister Avenue, Johnsonville. Find out more at the Wellington Deaf Society’s website, and get in touch with them if you would like to take part in a free NZSL class with your friends.

Resources

If you can’t make it along to this wonderful community event, Wellington City Libraries has some resources to help get you started in learning NZSL. Why not check out some of the following books and DVDs to get your NZSL journey on the road:

Children’s visual communication dictionary : New Zealand Sign Language – Māori – English = Te reo Rotarota, he papakupu mā te hunga tamariki.
“Translations of New Zealand Sign Language words in English and Māori, with English descriptions of how to sign the words. Suggested level: primary, intermediate.” (Catalogue)

Animals / Chapman, Jenny
“Introduces signs and words for common animals that a baby might meet. Includes tips for teaching your baby to sign.” (Catalogue)

Te rā tuatahi o Hope = Hope’s first day / Chapman, Jenny
“Join Hope on her first day of school and learn everyday phrases in our three languages — Back cover.” (Catalogue)

Kiri and the emergency / Cahill, Margaret
“Uses a picture book format, with a story about a Nana falling from a ladder, to demonstrate pre-schoolers making sensible choices during an emergency situation. Includes notes and activities on safety education and key first aid messages. Accompanied by a supporting DVD which presents The emergency song resource, Te waiata Aituā, New Zealand sign language and a behind the scenes look at how this resource was made.” (Catalogue)

You can also search for New Zealand Sign Language on our catalogue to find more resources to help you learn!

Learn Online

Lastly, there are many places you can go online to learn more about New Zealand Sign Language.

The library has to a special database called Bridget Williams Books – New Zealand Sign Language Collection, that you can access for free with your library card. One of the amazing resources you can find there is Rachel McKee’s New Zealand Sign Language: A Reference Grammar. You might need to get an adult to help you with some of the words, but this book is chocka-block full of lessons, videos, and illustrations to show you how NZSL works. Ka rawe!

Here are some more great online resources you can use:

  • Many Answers has a page on New Zealand Sign Language, which has lots of suggestions for places you can go to learn about its history and practice.
  • Learn about the history of NZSL by reading the article on Te Ara: The Encyclopaedia of New Zealand
  • Head to LearnNZSL and watch video tutorials on how to use NZSL in everyday situations! If you don’t finish your lesson, you can always return to it later.
  • The New Zealand Sign Language Dictionary online has thousands of entries teaching you the basic vocabulary of NZSL, with plenty of pictures, videos and examples to help you learn.
  • Sign Ninja is an awesome online game that sneakily teaches you all kinds of things about NZSL, from its history to how it is used today! Plus, it’s super fun to play.

So what are you waiting for? Now is the perfect time to start learning about this official language of our country!

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious : How Do We Get New Words?

File:People talking.png - Wikimedia CommonsEver wondered about the sounds that come out of your mouth and how amazing it is that the people around you can actually understand those weird and wonderful noises? How do you know what to say and how do new words come into everyday use? Commonly used words or phrases are like anything that’s trending – the more people use it, the more normalised it will become. In this techno-age you’re probably using words and phrases that your grandparents (and definitely your great-grandparents!) would have never heard of. Think “wi-fi”, “smartphone”, “internet”. Or the words and phrases you use now meant wildly different things in the past. For example, if you say “she’s sick” to your grandad, he’d probably be concerned that the person you’re talking about was “feeling poorly” and would not realise that what you’re really saying is “she’s awesome”, lol (yes, another newbie in the language department).

524 Hello In Different Languages Illustrations, Royalty-Free Vector Graphics & Clip Art - iStockThere are approximately 7000 different languages spoken throughout the world, with the top 5 (by total number of speakers) being English, Mandarin, Chinese, Hindi, Spanish and French. Of those 7000 nearly half are in danger of extinction this century. These endangered languages are often indigenous languages that are being taken over by a more dominant language, eg. English. Here in Aotearoa te reo Māori was made an official language in 1987 and Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (The Māori Language Commission) was established to ensure that te reo grows and thrives.

Dictionary.com updates definitions, adds new words explaining COVID-19 outbreak

Image courtesy of dictionary.com

Each year, the major dictionaries publish lists of new and most commonly used words, and it’s no surprise to anyone that 2020’s word of the year was pandemic, followed closely by coronavirus and lockdown. The word pandemic has been around for a long time and is built on two words from ancient Greek – pan, meaning “all”, and demos, “people”. Coronavirus simply wasn’t part of most people’s vocabulary until 2020 – now we all know what it means! Like pandemic, lockdown was already reasonably familiar. But  it has taken on a new meaning in 2020 – confinement to the home in order to stop the spread of the virus – which means it will for ever be linked with disease control.

And if you’re still keen for more new words added to the dictionary in 2020, check out the following:


File:William Shakespeare sq.jpg - Wikimedia CommonsThe famous playwright William Shakespeare (think”Romeo and Juliet”, “Hamlet”, “Macbeth”) who died in 1616, so a rather long time ago, would simply make up words if he felt they were needed in his plays! And to this day we still use a huge number of his words in everyday language (over 1,700 of them). Words like “critic”, “elbow”, “lonely” all came from Shakespeare’s imagination. Shakespeare obviously like words starting with “un” because he created nearly 300 starting with this prefix. Here are just a few that popped into his, and now our, writing: “unaware”, “uncomfortable”, “undress”, “unreal”.

So, what is the longest word in the English language? Is it Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious and is that even a word? It turns out that it only comes in at 5th place with Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis at 45 letters long, taking first place!

If visualiation is more your thing, maybe you could have a play around with some free word clouds. Word clouds create a pictorial representation of word frequency in a text.  The larger the word in  the picture the more common the word was in the written document. Here’s this blog post as a word cloud:


Wellington City Libraries have heaps of books and resources that focus on language and the written word – everything from cracking good reads to brain teasers. So don’t procrastinate! Immerse yourself in the verbiage!

Frindle / Clements, Andrew
Everyone knows that Mrs. Granger, the language arts teacher, has X-ray vision, and nobody gets away with anything in her classroom. To make matters worse, she’s also a fanatic about the dictionary, which is hopelessly boring to Nick. But when Nick learns an interesting tidbit about words and where they come from, it inspires his greatest plan yet: to invent a new word. From now on, a pen is no longer a pen — it’s a frindle. It doesn’t take long for frindle to take root, and soon the excitement spreads well beyond his school and town. His parents and Mrs. Granger would like Nick to put an end to all this nonsense. But frindle doesn’t belong to Nick anymore. All he can do now is sit back and watch what happens.
This quirky, imaginative tale about creative thought and the power of words will have readers inventing their own words. Brian Selznick’s black-and-white illustrations enhance the humor in this unforgettable story. (Catalogue)

Jabberwocky / Carroll, Lewis
The award-winning first book in the Visions in Poetry series explores Lewis Carroll’s celebrated nonsense poem. An illustrated version of the classic nonsense poem from “Through the Looking Glass. The most celebrated nonsense poem in the English language, Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky” has delighted readers of all ages since it was first published in Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, in 1872. Stephane Jorisch’s stunningly inventive art adds a vibrant, surprising dimension to an already unforgettable poem. (Adapted from Catalogue)

Wordplay : a Toon book / Brunetti, Ivan
Calling all bookworms! Go “outside,” “elsewhere,” and down the “rabbit hole” with this hilarious introduction to compound words. Young readers will fall in love with the English language as they watch star cartoonist Ivan Brunetti put his sly spin on vocabulary. The lesson here? Even “homework” is fun when you let yourself play with the words.

The 5 minute brain workout for kids : 365 amazing, fabulous, and fun word puzzles / Chamberlain, Kim
Our brains are an amazing organ! And just like our bodies, our brain functions best when it’s put to work. So get ready to give your brain a full workout each day with The Five-Minute Brain Workout for Kids! Inside, you’ll find 365 word puzzles and games to keep your mind active and in great shape! Have fun with your family and friends as you learn about acronyms, anagrams, definitions, parts of speech, rhyming words, syllables, word structure, and more with these fun puzzles. From Alphabet Teasers and Mini Word Sudoku puzzles, to Speed Words and Word Store games, even doing one puzzle a day will help you to learn new words, spell better, problem solve with ease, and have better concentration.
Oxford first rhyming dictionary / Foster, John
“The Oxford First Rhyming Dictionary has over 1000 rhyming words to help young children with writing rhymes and poems, and expand vocabulary. Have fun in the sun, drink lemonade in the shade and be inspired to write about pirates, kings and magic rings in the Oxford First Rhyming Dictionary. The dictionary contains a clear and simple alphabetical list of over 1,000 words that rhyme along with rhyming sounds, and an index to make finding words simple. John Foster’s lively poems accompany the rhyming sounds, and every page features bright and colourful illustrations. Children can expand their vocabulary, practice phonic sounds to help with spelling, and being to write their own rhymes.
Access even more downloadable rhyming games, puzzles, activities and much more at: www.oxforddictionaries.com/schools


Everyday words in Māori
This is a bright and busy book that will give Maori language learners of all ages hours of enjoyment. A pronunciation guide and an alphabetical Maori/English list of all the words in the book are included.

Oxford Roald Dahl dictionary
A dictionary of real and invented words used by the world’s best storyteller. The Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary reveals what they mean, where they came from and how he used them in his stories. It will inspire you to choose and use each word brilliantly in your own writing – whether it’s a real word, a Roald Dahl word or your own made-up one! This is not an ordinary dictionary. After all, you wouldn’t expect an Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary to be ordinary, would you? Lots of dictionaries tell you what an “alligator” is, or how to spell “balloon” but they won’t explain the difference between a “ringbeller” and a “trogglehumper,” or say why witches need “gruntles’ eggs” or suggest a word for the shape of a “Knid.” All the words that Roald Dahl invented are here, like “biffsquiggled” and “whizzpopping,” to remind you what means what. You’ll also find out where words came from, rhyming words, synonyms and lots of alternative words for words that are overused.

How to talk to your computer / Simon, Seymour
Have you ever wondered how to get a computer to do something First you need to speak in a way it can understand! Read and find out all about how to talk to your computer in this updated edition with brand-new illustrations and simple engaging text that introduces conditions, loops, and functions. How to Talk to Your Computer comes packed with visual aids like charts, sidebars, an infographic, and a computer-less coding activity!