New CDs at Te Awe

I’m Mark, the Customer Specialist for Music & Film at Wellington City Library. Here is some of the new and material we have been buying for the Music collection at our CBD Te Awe branch.
My colleague Neil & I decided to do some quick reviews of some new titles. Our limit was a couple of lines only. Do we actually carefully appraise & select the latest new music releases for your listening pleasure? Or do we just buy every third item on the list and hope it works out? Do we actually know anything about new music? Can you encapsulate an entire album in just one line? Read on to find out…

Real low vibe : the complete Reprise recordings 1992-1998. / Mudhoney
Neil: One of Grunge rock’s pioneers, this compilation is from their major label period & features lots of rarities. The transition didn’t bear the financial rewards the label hoped for, though the albums themselves were quite good, and after a few years they returned to Sub-Pop
Mark: Round up of the Grunge pioneers 6 year major label career. They paved the way for later bands but never commercialized their sound enough to claim a mainstream audience.

 

Super blood wolf moon /Brix & The Extricated
Neil: The Extricated’s 3rd album moves further away from the long shadow of The Fall. Bass driven psychedelic modern garage. Surprising & rather good.
Mark: Ex-Fall members 3rd album sands off their rough edges for a more 90s Boston college rock sound of shimmering guitar pop/rock. Think Throwing Muses or early Blondie…

 

Yellow Magic Orchestra USA ; &, Yellow Magic Orchestra / Yellow Magic Orchestra
Neil: The hugely influential album from pioneering Japanese Electronic outfit YMO features a huge mash-up of dance music, video game samples & progressive rock tropes.
Mark: Allmusic describes Ryuichi Sakamoto’s synth-pop group as second only to Kraftwerk in influence. Creating new worlds of sound with emerging technologies. Kitchy today in some parts maybe, but pioneering in the late 70s…

 

Introducing… Aaron Frazer. / Frazer, Aaron
Neil: Smooth debut release from this golden voiced crooner. 70s soulful R&B with a funky late night grove. Obviously a labour of love for a style of music he’s a big fan of.
Mark: The drummer for retro-soul revivalists Durand Jones & the Indications. Smooth falsetto crooning recreates a warm 70s soul vibe.

 

Pow-wow. / Mallinder, Stephen
Neil: Re-release of the 80s album from half of the Cabaret Voltaire duo. Chunky danceable groves & rhythms. Still sounding fresh & new. Industrial, post-punk, funk, & electronica
Mark: 1982 solo debut from Cabaret Voltaire’s Stephen Mallinder. His next solo record would be in 2019. Wonky vocals drift in & out of Lo-Fi beats. Intriguing. Not sure if you can really dance to this though…

 

Born into this : the music of Rattle. Volume 2, Improvisation.
Neil: Rattle Records have been at the forefront of classical, Jazz and Experimental art music in NZ for 30 years now. This compilation is their 150th release with over 40 tracks spanning their entire catalogue. A testament to the vast influence & cultural significance of the label.
Mark: 40 tracks from 3-decades worth of Rattle recordings. Artistic improvisation via Taonga puoro, acoustic instruments, Jazz, electroacoustic soundscapes and beyond. Contains some of the most important pure NZ musical statements of the last few decades.

 

Girls go power pop!
Neil: Catchy, infectiously sing-along classics from the likes of the Go-Go’s & the Runaways, with some lesser known bands making up the compilation. Great fun, uplifting and solid road trip music.
Mark: Some usual suspects as well as some obscure gems in this choice Ace records comp of female Power Pop from the 80s and 90s. Plenty of crunchy guitar riffs and catchy choruses.

 

Greenfields : the Gibb brothers’ songbook. Vol. 1 / Gibb, Barry
Neil: The last outstanding Bee-Gee looks to his legacy and records an album of Country versions of Bee-Gees classics with a bunch of Country guests. Mixed results. For me the standout track was ‘Words’ with Dolly Parton.
Mark: The Bee-Gees catalogue through the Country Music looking glass. Better than you might think for the most part.. Shows that the bones of great songs can retain their essence no matter the colourings applied.

 

Spare ribs. / Sleaford Mods
Neil: Their 6th album is another rambunctious, caustic, socially aware quintessentially ‘British rapper’ outing. Quality control remains high. As good as previous albums.
Mark: More working class Rap-punk from the Sleaford Mods filled with a sense of paranoia & trapped claustrophobia. Recorded during Covid-19. Digs deep into the social & political ills of modern Britain.

 

 

Think of spring. / Ward, M
Neil: Beautiful, sad, melancholic renditions of Billie Holliday classics. Exquisitely executed.
Mark: A pervading sense of wistfulness shades the tracks which drift gently along. Perfect Sunday afternoon music.

 

 

Black majik terror / Stälker
Neil: Wgtn based speed metal trio deliver a very 80’s styled sound. Very reminiscent of Ronnie James Dio’s Holy Diver. One for fans of this type of Speed Metal.
Mark: Stalker return with more great 80’s inspired Metal fun. Like the soundtrack to an old Horror classic about fighting Aliens or Demons or something….

 

The king of Sudanese jazz. / Ahmed, Sharhabil
Neil: What a find! These recordings from the early 60’s are a joyous mix of all sorts of styles such as Jazz, Samba & Tango but all with it’s own musical identity. It’s infectiously groovy and better than the early Beatles albums!
Mark: Fascinating recording from the 1960s Sudan before a military coup brought in a strict Islamist government that repressed the arts. Fuses western music like Rock N Roll & Surf Rock, early R&B with Ethiopian jazz, Congolese music, and the sounds of South Sudan for something truly uniquely funky and original.

 

The lost songs : 48 unreleased recordings / Welch, Gillian
Neil: After the roof of her recording studio was ripped off in a Tornado, Gillian Welch decided to rescue these archival tracks from the following flood. Her trademark Southern gothic bluegrass Country & Western style is well served by this compilation.
Mark: Boots No. 1 from 2016 was a collection of outtakes from her 1996 debut. This lavish Box Set follow up was originally recorded in 2002 to fulfil a publishing contract. The tapes were excavated for release during Covid-19, and reveal a vein of consistently evocative and enigmatic song-writing vignettes that are sure please fans of her type of Hillbilly country-folk.

 

Transmissions : the music of Beverly Glenn-Copeland : collected songs + unreleased music. / Glenn-Copeland, Beverly
Neil: This compilation of tranquil chilled music traces the artists entire career. Much of the music was recorded in relative solitude. An eclectic and unique album, but difficult to describe.
Mark: Rediscovered after decades of obscurity due to a Japanese collector’s request for copies of his 1986 album ‘Keyboard Fantasies’, the transgender Black artist has gone on to be an influence on Blood Orange, Moses Sumney, and Caribou among others. Following a documentary in 2019 which took his story wider, ‘Transmissions’ is an attempt to gather works from across his career. Beautifully relaxing, hopeful & uplifting music.

Hidari ude no yume. / Sakamoto, Ryūichi
Neil: This is a welcome re-release of the unedited Japanese version of this album that varies dramatically from the Western release. Also contains an instrumental version with the vocals stripped out. A thoroughly engaging album from one of the giants of Japanese music forging ahead and pointing towards future masterpieces.
Mark: Original Japanese edition of Sakamoto’s ‘Left Handed Dream’ released outside of Japan for the first time. Minimalist Electronica masterpiece. Still ahead of its time…

 

 

Deutsche elektronische musik. 4, Experimental German rock and electronic music 1971-83.
Neil: The 4th instalment of the series that documents the creative furnace that was the German music scene in the 70’s & 80’s.
Mark: More German experimental rock. An endless autobahn of electronic, progressive, & ambient torture…

 

 

Rollins in Holland : the 1967 studio & live recordings featuring Ruud Jacobs & Han Bennink. / Rollins, Sonny
Neil: A piece of Jazz history given a welcome 21st century official release.
Mark: Some unearthed Rollins featuring some studio & live tracks from European gigs with a pick-up band. The studio cuts showcase a surprisingly sympathetic degree of musical attunement. The live cuts show some great interaction but the sound is of lesser quality.

 

McCartney III. / McCartney, Paul
Neil: What can you say about a new Paul McCartney album? My best shot is: If you’ve enjoyed his previous solo outing then you’ll probably enjoy this too…
Mark: All McCartney all the time in yet another lockdown album. Aims to recreate the strengths of the similar Chaos and Creation in the Backyard but falls short on the songs. Worth checking out if you’re a fan of the lo-fi musings of McCartney & McCartney 11.

 

Plastic bouquet / Kacy & Clayton
Neil: In this Kiwi-Canadian collaboration Kacy & Clayton and Marlon Williams carefully craft a largely solemn collection of tracks that infuse country-folk, rockabilly & blues in unexpected ways and forms. Yet it all sounds & feels very natural & effortless like they have worked together for years.
Mark: Folky Canadian Saskatchewan cousins meet NZs Marlon Williams. A meeting of kindred spirits melds folky pop & Americana narratives. Pleasant but slight.

 

 

Pwr up. / AC/DC
Neil: Who would have though that after Brian Johnston had to pull out of the Rock Or Bust tour due to medial reasons that AC/DC would ever release a new album. Yet this is as good as their hey-day, firing on all cylinders. A full blooded rock out. Just goes to show you can never tell.
Mark: Surely one comeback that no one saw coming. Yet this is definitely not a ‘Money Shot’ as the album is chock full of punchy, catchy songs. AC/DC doing what they do best. A worthy addition to their legacy of rock…

 

 

 

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New DVDs for Te Awe

Some new DVDs added to the catalogue over December/January that are available at our CBD Te Awe Branch, and selected other locations. Also included are a few of our On Order titles to give you a taste of what’s about to be released. Note: All ‘On Order’ titles are able to be reserved via the online catalogue.

New material:
The pale horse
The secret garden
My brilliant friend. the story of a new name / Series 2 :
Of love & lies
Underwater
Taken. Season one.
I used to go here
Never look away
Who you think I am
Baby done
Savage.
Greenland
Dirt music.
London kills. Series 2.
Penance.

On Order:
Echo In The Canyon
The Mystery Of Henri Pick
The Trouble With Maggie Cole 
Stargirl: Complete Season 1
Roadkill: (TV Mini-series) 
The Bee Gees: How Can You Mend A Broken Heart
Tesla 
Us: (TV Mini-Series) 
Hope Gap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Staff Picks – The Best of 2020: DVDs

COVID-19 impacted on the Movie & TV industry quite heavily in 2020 with many films and shows delayed, or when released, only via online streaming platforms and not on a physical format. All of this affected the Library DVD collection to some degree, however there will still a lot of quality releases that we enjoyed over the course of the year, and here are some of our favourites.

Kath’s Picks:
This town
So this film was promoted as a comedy, which it sort of is… but it’s dark. Really dark. I did laugh, but more often I found myself drawing a sharp breath and thinking “Oh no!” Written, directed and starring David White, this recent New Zealand film is the story of Sean (White), a man with a troubled past searching for love. He meets Casey (Alice May Connolly), a sweet local girl and they fall for one another. But the spanner in the works of their romance is ex-cop Pam (Robyn Malcolm) who is determined to put Sean behind bars for a crime he has already been acquitted of. There is something sweet and gentle about Sean and Casey’s relationship that I found endearing, even if they are both a bit on the gormless side. It has a really good solid twist at the end that I never saw coming.

My spy
Look it’s never going to win any Oscars and it’s the common trope of “tough guy softened by cute kid”, but it was sweet, heart-warming and fun to watch. Starring Dave Bautista (Guardians of the Galaxy) as JJ, a hard nosed CIA operative and Chloe Coleman as Sophie, the cute and smart kid who blackmails him into teaching her to be tough and cool to beat the bullies at school. Turns out that Chloe isn’t quite as vulnerable as she thinks and JJ isn’t the tough guy he tries to project to the world. It’s funny and endearing, and a great movie for the whole family.

Gus’s Pick:
Tenet
Christopher Nolan’s latest heady blockbuster had to clear a lot of hurdles to reach screens this year, namely the worldwide pandemic, and once viewers were finally able to watch the film safely, it was met not with relief but with an exasperation not seen since the release of Nolan’s earlier film Inception. Part Primer and part Bond movie, Tenet follows a secret agent who uncovers the mysterious TENET organisation, whose members can harness the “inversion” of time and undo potential catastrophes before they happen. The appeal of the backwards time gimmick is at turns both delightful and frustrating, as bullets returning into guns and car chases conducted entirely in reverse eventually grow into whole battles conducted backwards and forwards in time that leave you more confused than entertained. But if you’re willing to roll with its admittedly cool premise (and maybe consult a few message boards), you’ll find TENET to be another action-packed high-concept romp from one of cinema’s most engaging populist auteurs.

Neil J.’s Picks:
The gentlemen/
Ritchie back on form doing what Ritchie does best snappy, sharp and twisty a film that rattles along!

 

 

 

Bill & Ted face the music
Surprisingly faithful to the originals fun, funny, goofy with a great heart.

 

 

 

Color out of space
Nic Cage goes Bonkers as only Nic Cage can in this Lovecraftian horror. Totally OTT pulpy B movie in feel, look out for the Llamas!!!!! (if you like try Mandy, which is Cage out there where the buses don’t run).

 

 

The booksellers.
A documentary about booksellers what could be more perfect!! Engaging, comfy and entertaining.

 

 

 

The invisible man
The umpteenth remake of the HG Wells novel (my fav is the 1933 James Whale version starring Claude Rains) but this version is pretty good too for very different reasons. This time it is as a modern day edge of the seat horror thriller.

 

 

Farmageddon : a Shaun the Sheep movie
A really well made family movie where the love and care of the animators can be seen in every frame right down to their fingerprints on the clay, a sweet and adorable film.

 

 

The personal history of David Copperfield ,
Quirky, offbeat, historical comedy. Fabulous comic performances all round, a film bursting with warmth and humanity. At the polar opposite of Iannucci’s previous film outing the hugely enjoyable The Death of Stalin, in which the humour is as pitch black as it comes.

 

 

Shinji’s Picks:
Sorry we missed you.
A compelling portrait of courier driver Ricky, who wants to be self-employed, and his family. Their struggle highlights the injustice that ‘working poor’ people are facing today, particularly in the gig economy. It might make you feel depressed, but like its brilliant predecessor I, Daniel Blake, Ken Loach’s masterful direction makes it a powerful yet warm, sensitive drama. A stellar work.

 

Pain and glory.
Pedro Almodovar usually entertains us with unpredictable, twisted plots, but this semi-autobiographical film is rather low-key by his standard. His most trusted actor Antonio Banderas superbly plays a successful old filmmaker who looks back on his life and career. It’s about love and memory, and depicted in a very personal, almost confessional way. The 70-year-old Almodovar probably had to make this film to finish up the chapter he has been in to move on. Deeply affecting.

Portrait of a lady on fire
A slow burning period drama by the new French auteur Celine Sciamma (Tomboy, Girlhood) about two women; a noble bride-to-be and an artist who is commissioned to paint her portrait. It’s a subtly nuanced love story of these women but deep emotions lie underneath, which come out at the moving ending scene. Brilliantly performed by two leading actors, it’s a gracefully crafted, captivating work. Sublime.

 

Monos
Set in an astonishing looking mountainous landscape, it follows a group of teenage soldiers and an American female hostage, who is captured by their ‘organisation’. This slightly bizarre tale – somewhere between Lord of the Flies and Apocalypse Now – is all about survival. The film left us with more questions than answers, but it’s a vigorous, uncompromised work by the Colombian filmmaker Alejandro Landes. Impressive.

 

Queen & Slim.
Their first date was a rather forgettable one. A young black man and woman, Slim and Queen, just wanted to go home but when the white policeman stopped their car, everything changed. A Thelma & Louise like runaway saga begins from there but it has a serious ‘Black Lives Matter’ spin. The debut director Melina Matsoukas, who has made fine music videos for the likes of Beyonce and Rihanna, offers a dark but sharp, stylish drama with a great soundtrack. Brilliant.

For Sama.
Watching multi-award-winning documentary ‘For Sama’ is not easy. It’s a report from a war zone; the city of Aleppo, Syria. The city is under siege, Russian planes come and bomb. Eight out of the nine hospitals in East Aleppo had been destroyed. From the one hospital left, a student journalist turned filmmaker, Waad Al-Kateab shows us the devastating but most intimate, insightful realities of war. She married a doctor and became a mother during the battle of Aleppo (2012-2016). The film is dedicated for her daughter ‘Sama’ and is also a love letter to the city and its people. Incredibly touching.

Monty’s Picks:
Watchmen
Hugely enjoyable, unpredictable romp through the Watchmen comic-book universe that only occasionally borrows from the Alan Moore comics. The alternative earth of Watchmen is slightly removed from the United States now, but the fascist society, hidden and obvious racism reflected within the plot point towards the awfulness of Trump’s America. Despite the larger agenda, the human story portrayed across generations is beautifully told and amazingly acted especially by Regina King, Louis Gossett Jr and Jeremy Irons.

The dead don’t die
Jim Jarmusch has made a Zombie film finally – what took him so long?? Full of knowing in-joke asides, laid back performances, laconic dialogue and deliberate pacing, this may not be for everyone but will satisfy Jarmusch completists, and anyone wanting to see Bill Murray and Adam Driver driving together forever.

 

 

Des
David Tennant is very believable as mild mannered yet unpredictable serial killer Dennis Nilsen in this UK production of the famous murder case from the 1980’s. Des transcends other police procedurals by reversing the whodunnit tradition – we know who-did-it in the first half hour and the effective tension in the rest of the series results from how he’ll be convicted, and what toll it will take on the police, the media and those around the oblivious, destructive serial killer.

 

Wellington paranormal. Season 2.
New Zealand’s premier horror-comedy set in Wellington featuring a secret police squad dealing with everyday kiwi-monsters. Familiar, brilliant and occasionally unnerving.

 

 

Mark’s Picks:
Homecoming. Season one.
TV series based on the popular Podcast starring Julia Roberts & directed by Mr Robot’s Sam Esmail. Playing out both in the past & the present, Roberts is a social worker at the Homecoming Transitional Support Center, a live-in facility run by the mysterious Geist Group that helps soldiers transition to civilian life; and also 4 years later a waitress with little memory of her previous life and job. Just what happened at Homecoming is slowly teased out in this slow moving, enigmatic & engaging drama.

Billions. Season four.
Former enemies Bobby Axelrod (Damian Lewis) Chuck Rhoades (Paul Giamatti) and Wendy Rhoades (Maggie Siff), the chief counselor to each, come together to form an uneasy alliance aimed at the eradication of all their rivals. Horrible rich people doing rich people things to each other. There’s no one to really like anymore as everyone is just as corrupt and vicious as everyone else, but that’s probably the point. An indictment of 21st century capitalism and the nexus of finance, power and the law.

Unhinged
Russell Crowe packs on the pounds and channels his inner angry Nic Cage self, as an angry white man who decides to hand out a lesson in manners. Bonkers B-movie fun!

 

 

Mr. Robot. the final season. Season_4.0 :
How to end a show that saw itself as a diatribe against modern capitalism & the power of corporations, a cold thriller focusing on ‘hacks’ the way that other prestige shows & movies take on ‘heists’; yet also at certain points a dreamy weird non-linear Twin Peaks of Tech, full of surreal characters & labyrinthine plotlines that often don’t seem to work, or even make sense. After a somewhat ponderous 3rd season creator Sam Esmail manages to pull everything (including protagonist Elliot’s multiple personalities) together, by making the focus of the last season the characters need to step away from the world of their screens and connect face to face emotionally with one another and with themselves. At times a frustrating show, even as it was fascinating, the final episodes managed to provide a cohesion & closure to the epic 4 season narrative.

Pauline’s Pick:
This town

 

 

 

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Staff Picks – The Best of 2020: CDs

Even with the impact of COVID-19, and perhaps due to it in many ways, 2020 was a bumper year for music releases. Here is a round-up of some of our favourite new releases and reissues from last year.

Shinji’s Pick’s:
Untitled (Black is). / Sault
London based trio Sault released two impressive albums in 2020; ‘Untitled (Black is)’ and ‘Untitled (Rise), and both are in response to the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement. Inheriting great sprits of black music ‘Black is’ seems to be a modern day version of Marvin Gaye’s ‘What’s Going On’ (1971) or Sly and the Family Stone’s ‘There’s a Riot Goin’ On’ (1971), and akin to D’angelo’s ‘Black Messiah’ (2014). Although the world hasn’t changed much, this is an exceptional musical achievement drawing from soul, funk, afrobeat and gospel.

Some kind of peace. / Ólafur Arnalds
The new album by the Icelandic multi-instrumentalist and composer Olafur Arnalds takes us on a beautiful, sophisticated musical journey. Collaborating with the likes of Bonobo and Josin, it’s probably his most personal, introspective album to date. From minimal compositions, he creates immaculately crafted and rich music, somewhere between electronica and ambient, and brings us the cool air as well as the warmth. Exquisite.

Share the wealth / Cline, Nels
He is now often described as a Wilco’s Nels Cline, but it’s not quite right for the old fans, who have followed him since when he played freaky music in L.A. The Nels Cline Singers has been his staple project and this new album offers more brilliant, forward-thinking music. Collecting from a two-day recording of spontaneous sessions by the new sextet, this jam-feel music displays sonically intriguing, with ‘Bitches Brew’-like moments, intense yet sophisticated jazz and beyond world. Marvelous.

Best of box-sets
Raw like sushi. / Cherry, Neneh
Neneh Cherry’s debut in 1989 became a groundbreaking album blending hip-hop, R&B, pop and dance, but it was her fearless, avant-garde mojo that took the world by storm. Thirty years down the line, it surprisingly survived well and still sounds hip and funky. This 3 CD-set includes rare mixes of tracks offering a timeless coolness. Dance with her.

 

Throw down your heart : the complete Africa sessions / Fleck, Béla
Banjo maestro Bela Fleck, who plays from traditional bluegrass to jazz to Bach, took a journey to four African countries to explore the roots of banjo. Some of the collaborations with local musicians have been released on various mediums, and this box-set compiles all these materials with a new recording with kora master Toumani Diabate. Fleck’s musical curiosity and down-to-earth approach seem endless and it’s showcased in the DVD of the of the award-winning documentary of this trip, which completes this box-set. All in all, it offers a rich, delightful musical experience.

Summerteeth [deluxe]. / Wilco
Between the breakthrough album ‘Being There’ and the acclaimed ‘Yankee Hotel Foxtrot’, the 1999 album ‘Summerteeth’ records an intriguing phase of becoming the successful cross-genre rock group from the alternative country band, and remains one of their best albums. This four-CD set contains a superbly remastered original album, unreleased outtakes and demos, and the live show on two CDs. It’s a great document of the dawn of this supergroup and sounds still very much fresh.

The landmark album in the 80s ‘Sign O the Times’ documents one of the highest points of Prince’s career. Following the earlier reissues of ‘1999’ and ‘Purple Rain’, this masterpiece comes back as an amazing box-set containing 8 CDs with a DVD. 63 of the 92 tracks in 8 CDs are previously unreleased including 45 studio recordings from 1979 to 1987. The quality of these recordings is simply fantastic and unmistakably Prince. The DVDs features the rare footage of Miles Davis on stage with Prince. This is as good as the deluxe reissue gets.

Archives. Volume 1, The early years (1963-1967). / Mitchell, Joni
Joni Mitchell has been slowly recovering from a brain aneurysm which she had in 2015 and is still not able to make new music. However, this is a great present for fans. Collecting her performances before the 1968 debut ‘Songs to a Seagull’, which most of us have never heard, it shows a fascinating insight into the early career of this legendary singer-songwriter. It’s very interesting to learn that some of her well-known songs such as ‘The Circle Game’ and ‘Both Sides Now’ were already written at this very early stage. It’s a great start for the long-awaited archive series.

Mark’s Picks:
The new abnormal / Strokes
The Strokes return after 7 years with one of those great albums that rewards after repeated listens; revealing a new level of emotional maturity and shifting musical contours, playing off their previous trademark style while adding in new elements. Diverging from the shorter pop ‘verse/chorus/verse’ construct of previous albums, the songs stretch out for longer and it takes a few listens before all the inherent melodies sink in. Julian Casablancas’ lyrics are more political and mature, befitting someone now in their 40s, the songs more brooding and reflective. The band sounds more together and focused than on the last couple of albums, and you once again marvel at the level of musicianship they provide to underpin Casablancas’ vocals, culminating in the epic closing track ‘Ode To The Mets’ which ranks as one of their best tracks ever.

The kingdom. / Bush
Supposedly inspired by being the only Rock band playing at a bunch of Metal Festivals, ‘The Kingdom’ is a surprisingly heavy return to form for the English post grunge-rockers. Frontman Gavin Rossdale brings ex-Helmet guitarist Chris Traynor up in the mix for a twin near-metal attack that showcases an album of hugely catchy riffs and soaring vocals, anchored by some of his best song-writing in years. If you enjoyed the pummelling track ‘Bullet Holes’, that played out over the credits of John Wick 3, then you’ll enjoy the sound of this follow-up album.

To drink the rainbow : an anthology 1988-2019. / Tikaram, Tanita
The German-born English singer of Fijian & Malaysian descent released her first album (produced by ex-Zombie Rod Argent) aged only 19 and had a ‘hit’ of sorts with the moody & enigmatic track ‘Twist in My Sobriety’. Her debut album sold four million copies worldwide but she never seemed interested in commercial success and her career since then has been a winding journey thorough various musical muses including baroque-pop, chamber-folk, Latin-jazz, duets with Nick Lowe & Grant Lee Phillips and more – with often periods of long retirement in between albums. At the centre of her musical journey is her wonderfully husky & unique voice. This ‘offbeat’ anthology focuses on the later part of her career, cleverly curated by music writer and broadcaster Peter Paphides for his Needle Mythology label, and places the focus on the high level of song-writing sustained across a 30 year career of musical evolution and discovery.

Let me be good to you : the Atlantic & Stax recordings (1960-1968). / Thomas, Carla
Great round-up of most of the albums of this under-rated singer, who was known as the Queen of Memphis Soul. This box covers the history of Stax records from down-home soul duets with with her father Rufus Thomas or label mate Otis Redding, to melancholy ‘Girl Group’ stringed ballads, to the later more elegant shimmering Pop and R&B cuts. Plenty of classic soul is served up over the course of these 4 discs on this set, which includes a nice booklet outlining her musical upbringing & career, as well as a nice natural sound to the remastering.

Joseph’s Picks:
To love is to live. / Beth, Jehnny
Warm and cold, inviting and austere, Jehnny Beth channels enormous energy in this incredible and experimental release.

 

 

 

Inner song. / Owens, Kelly Lee
Restful, meditative and sometimes danceable! Featuring a very beautiful guest appearance from John Cale.

 

 

 

Gus’s Picks:
Tenet : original motion picture soundtrack
TENET marks the first time since Batman Begins that Christopher Nolan has worked with a composer other than Hans Zimmer. With some big shoes to fill and facing the unique challenge of scoring a film during a global pandemic, Ludwig Goransson more than ably commits himself to the task. Clearly revelling in TENET’s premise of characters who can weaponise the reversal of time, Goransson has created a compellingly bizarre score to match it, where sections of the score play both backwards and forwards over each other, producing some compellingly spooky soundscapes. Buoyed by methodical guitar licks and pulsing electronic beats, the score feels both otherworldly methodical and achingly human; in the latter case sometimes literally, as certain tracks include samples of Christopher Nolan’s breathing and the Autotuned cooing of rapper Travis Scott.

Plus:
The slow rush. / Tame Impala
Song machine. Season one, Strange timez. / Gorillaz
It is what it is. / Thundercat
Jump rope gazers / Beths
The new abnormal / Strokes
Unfollow the rules. / Wainwright, Rufus
Friend ship / Phoenix Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neil P.’s Picks:
Dreamboat. / Luluc
By the fire. / Moore, Thurston
Good songs for bad people. / Drab City
Nayda! / Bab L’ Bluz
Harry. / Dead Famous People
Free humans. / Hen Ogledd
Nightcap at wits’ end. / Garcia Peoples
The true story of Bananagun. / Bananagun
Chastity Belt. / Chastity Belt
Don’t let get you down. / Wajatta
Mettavolution live. / Rodrigo y Gabriela
Messianic. / Dark Divinity
Mordechai. / Khruangbin
Summerlong. / Rose City Band
High risk behaviour / Chats
5 years behind. / Thick
It is what it is. / Thundercat
The ghost of Freddie Cesar / Kingi, Troy
Protean threat / Oh Sees
There is no other… / Campbell, Isobel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dani’s Picks:
Sorry you couldn’t make it. / Swamp Dogg
Fetch the bolt cutters. / Apple, Fiona
Old flowers. / Andrews, Courtney Marie
The balladeer. / McKenna, Lori
Reb Fountain. / Fountain, Reb
The ghost of Freddie Cesar / Kingi, Troy
Cuttin’ grass : the Butcher Shoppe sessions. / Simpson, Sturgill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shane’s Picks:
Inner song. / Owens, Kelly Lee
Good songs for bad people. / Drab City
I disagree. / Poppy
Even in exile. / Bradfield, James Dean

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monty’s Picks:
Live at the Powerstation. / Avantdale Bowling Club[VINYL]
Out of my province. / Reid, Nadia[VINYL]
Color theory. / Soccer Mommy
Gold record. / Callahan, Bill
Greatest hits : my sister thanks you and I thank you. / White Stripes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…….

New Music at Te Awe

I’m Mark, the Customer Specialist for Music & Film at Wellington City Library. Here is some of the new and material we have been buying for the Music collection at our CBD Te Awe branch.
My colleague Neil & I decided to do a quick one line review of these titles. Do we actually carefully appraise & select the latest new music releases for your listening pleasure? Or do we just buy every third item on the list and hope it works out? Do we actually know anything about new music? Does our Council have any Style? Read on to find out…

Foothills / Bats (Musical group)
Neil: Melodic chilled Kiwi-Americana. Perfect to relax to watching the sun go down with a cold beer on the deck.
Mark: More jangle-pop goodness. The line-up’s longevity & connection create a familial musical landscape where they can traverse any emotion with melodic and emotional authenticity.

Hey U X. / Benee
Neil: Gen z Tik tok star Benee follows up her “Supalonely” smash hit with a surprisingly honest and thoughtful teen angst album.
Mark: Her voice & style recall Lorde, Clairo or Billie Eilish, but it’s to her lyrical skills that turn this into a fun & engagingly cohesive reflection of Gen Z life & themes in 2020.

My echo. / Veirs, Laura
Neil: My Echo is Laura Veirs’ 11th album a deeply, personal outing about the disintegration of her marriage.
Mark: Quality songs emerging out of emotional discontent. Not as depressing or insular as it sounds. Honestly.

Shadow of fear. / Cabaret Voltaire
Neil: Fits in very well with Cabaret Voltaire’s (now just Richard H Kirk) back catalogue, both the very early old scratchy experimental material and the more smooth funky dance works of the 80’s. Old fans will be very happy.
Mark: First album in 26 years. Old school tricks meet new sounds with a cyberpunk vibe. Plays like the soundtrack to a William Gibson novel.

The symbol remains. / Blue Öyster Cult
Neil: Another (one of several) blasts from the past. Founder members Donald Roeser and Eric Bloom are now 72 and 75, but this doesn’t stop them delivering a classic rock epic that is sure to please previous followers. Go, go Godzilla.
Mark: First album in 19 years. A journey through solidly catchy hard rock, metal & pop anthems, with riffs and energy that much younger bands would kill for.

Empty body. / Spook The Horses
Neil: Loud, experimental post metal at its best and a marked departure from their previous outings. If you are into this particular style of music an exceptional piece of work.
Mark: One of Wgtn’s strongest bands return with a bold piece of re-invention. Powerful vocals dip in and out of heavy instrumental tracks full of controlled dissonance. Brooding & intense.

Swirling. / Sun Ra Arkestra
Neil: Another album many years in the making, with Ra himself gone to a different plane. His long time collaborator and friend 96 year old Marshall Belford Allen takes over the helm. Brilliant stuff that really captures the chaotic genius of the outfit when Ra was around. “The Future is now”.
Mark: First album in 20 years. This month’s theme obviously…Always too atonal & weird for straight ahead Jazz-ers, the music of Sun Ra found a second life with the rise of Afrofuturism. The influential space-age Jams now anchor the centre of so many music & cultural strands.

Whatever it is. / Hello Forever
Neil: Psychedelic sun-drenches California vibes for the 21st century. Self confessed influences of the Beach Boys and The Mamas & Papas.
Mark: A tribute to a bygone time of sunshine, harmonies, & positive vibes. Gorgeous multi-layered harmonies and positive messages.

No need to argue [deluxe] / Cranberries (Musical group)
Neil: Not my favourite band at all…
Mark: Ignore Neil. The Cranberries are awesome. Great second album brimming with the song-writing confidence of a successful debut. Only 17 million copies worldwide. Nice reissue that rounds up B-sides, demos & some live tracks.

Archives. Volume 1, The early years (1963-1967). / Mitchell, Joni
Neil: Bob Dylan, nah. Neil Young, maybe. Joni Mitchell, now your talking. The beginnings of the finest songwriter North America (Canada to be precise) has ever produced, rarities galore a genius gearing up to true greatness.
Mark: Not a fan. If all the ‘Jazz people’ on her albums had actually made Jazz albums instead…And surely Bryan Adams is really the finest songwriter to ever come out of Canada.

Idiot prayer : Nick Cave alone at Alexander Palace. / Cave, Nick
Neil: Nick Cave, a solo piano in an empty Alexander palace playing songs old and new and even one cover (T-Rex). Spellbinding stuff and a must for any Cave fan.
Mark: Raw and powerful. A soothing tonic for 2020.

Pieces of you. / Jewel
Neil: 25th anniversary release of the singer songwriter Jewel’s debut album . When it was initially released it sold less than 3000 copies and was largely ignored by critics and the buying public, though it did have a few A list musician supporters. But the album would eventually sell over 12 million copies in the US alone.
Mark: A singer whose unique beguiling voice and personal songs were almost completely out of step with the prevailing musical currents of the time. A fascinating essay & multi-disc look at how actual music label support, gruelling touring, & the support of Bob Dylan & Neil Young created one of the biggest selling debut albums of all time.

Layla and other assorted love songs. / Derek and the Dominos
Neil: Another re-issue. Surprisingly unpopular with critics and fans initially, but went on to platinum status quickly and is now regarded as one of Eric Claptons favourite moments. Personally I prefer Cream hammering it out!
Mark: I think Clapton’s best moments can be found on Edge of Darkness, but this classic album has plenty of iconic moments.

Let me be good to you : the Atlantic & Stax recordings (1960-1968). / Thomas, Carla
Neil: A welcome compilation of the much under-rated honey-voiced Carla Thomas, one of the Wiggin Casino favourites!
Mark: The Queen of Stax records, her career sadly ended with the demise of the label. This fantastic set rounds up all her albums bar one. Fantastic voice and the deep grooves of the best Stax musicians. What more could a Soul-fan ask for?

Summerteeth [deluxe]. / Wilco
Neil: Alt-country fave’s Wilco move away from their country roots in this lush textured highly successful album.
Mark: Psychedelic hued, Big Star tinged Power-Pop that still ranks as one of their best albums. The endless studio tinkering and musical layers hid a drug fuelled uncertainty that surfaced in some dark & unsettling lyrics lending the album a deeper resonance that still enthralls.

The lost Berlin tapes / Fitzgerald, Ella
Neil: It’s difficult to say anything about Ella Fitzgerald that hasn’t been said. This legend ‘s reputation will not be diminished by this new release.
Mark: Recorded a couple of years after her legendary 1960 concert album Mack the Knife, this set of tapes was lost in Verve label owner Norman Granz’s private tape archive for over 50 years! It’s Ella. We don’t need to say anymore really…

Hey clockface. / Costello, Elvis
Neil: One of the best albums of 2020.
Mark: Just when you’ve decided to finally give up on him forever, he shows he can still draw on the energy and signwriting mojo of his younger self to take you through a cleverly diverse musical journey of moods and styles that’s still distinctly EC.

The raging wrath of the Easter Bunny demo. / Mr. Bungle
Neil: Re-hash of their original cassette demo. Hear them at their nascent beginning.
Mark: 2020 re-recording which sees original members and friends re-create the lo-fi trash metal of their original debut. Bungle Grind on…

Crooked piece of time : the Atlantic & Asylum albums (1971-1980). / Prine, John
Neil: Bob Dylan said that “Prine’s stuff is pure Proustian existentialism, and who are we to disagree.
Mark: Remastered versions of the first seven studio albums of his career, recorded with Atlantic Records and Asylum Records. Considered an American Treasure who influenced evyone from Dylan to Wilco.

Long hot summers : the story of The Style Council. / Style Council
Neil: So what did Paul Weller do when he left the Jam? Well he formed the soulful more op orientated Style Council, an eighties take of the classic Motown/American soul RnB sound of the fifties.
Mark: Smooth Jams…

New DVDs at Te Awe

Here are some new movies & TV Shows recently added to our collection and available at our CBD Te Awe Library and selected Branch locations.

Laurel Canyon
Mulan
Treadstone. Season one
The crown. The complete third season
Where’d you go, Bernadette
Military wives (Television)
Westworld. Season three, The new world
Between two worlds. Season one
Monos
Radioactive
Cosmos : possible worlds
Inspector Montalbano. Volume 11




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The full Central Library CD collection is now available to borrow!

It has been a huge job to relocate all our Central Library collections to a new home at Te Pātaka, our new collection and Distribution Centre located in Johnsonville. However we are very happy to announce that the Central Library CD collection is available to be borrowed again in its entirety. Items can be reserved via our online catalogues from Te Pātaka to be collected from any of our other Branch Libraries.
We have decided to remove any fees for reserving items from Te Pātaka. However we have introduced a $2 charge per item if people do not pick up their reserved items within 7 working days of being notified they are available for pick up. This is to help keep the items in the collection circulating for everyone to access.

We have also curated a core collection of ‘Essential Listening’ titles from our large Central AV collection, many of which are unavailable on streaming services in New Zealand. All our ‘Essential Listening’ titles are taken from 1001 albums you must hear before you die & Nick Bollinger’s 100 essential New Zealand albums. They are also tagged on our catalogue. Just type in Essential Listening as a search and you can check them out from home, your device, or on our online catalogues in the library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some pictures of just some of the CD shelves out at Te Pātaka to give you an idea of the scope of what’s available. We will be posting some videos of us amongst the collection soon, as we start to highlight some genres and titles for you!

Staff Picks CDs & DVDs

Staff Picks are back, with a completely random selection of new & old material that Library Staff have been watching & viewing recently!


Punisher. / Bridgers, Phoebe
When I reminisce about the apocalyptic hellscape that has been 2020, this album makes a fitting soundtrack. Flitting between jubilant and despondent, edgy and soft, this is a sophisticated offering which will appeal to those who spent their adolescence in the grip of emo pop rock, but who now prefer a bit more nuance. (Cassie)

Ghosts of West Virginia / Earle, Steve
Singer/Songwriter/Activist Steve Earle is involved in a project concerning a coal mining explosion that killed 29 miners. He wrote the music for this public theatre project in conjunction with documentary playwrights, who interviewed the families of the dead and the few survivors. He has a distinctive voice and writes powerful lyrics. Also includes 3 songs not in the play, but of a similar theme. I particularly liked Black Lung. (Greg)

The shocking Miss Emerald. / Emerald, Caro
Dutch chanteuse Caro Emerald’s Retro, Big Band singing style will get your toes tapping and your mood uplifted! These jazzy pop songs may be the Perfect hot (Hopefully) summer) soundtrack. (David)

Baduizm. / Badu, Erykah
I’ve been doing a deep dive into the murky waters of the music of my adolescence lately. There are so many classic records in the 90s and any deep drive into this decade brings you to the glory that is Erykah Badu’s “Baduizm”. Released in 1997, this record was Badu’s debut album that crowned her the high priestess of neo-soul. This record is uniquely Badu, mixing the singing style of Billie Holiday with soul, R&B, jazz and hip-hop. It’s songs of heartbreak speak of higher issues than a first listen can provide so is worth a good listen. (Dani)

England is a garden. / Cornershop
I hadn’t listened to the band for many years, but Cornershop came back into my life right after my family and I moved to New Zealand in late 2019. Those days were joyous, yet at the same time some of the most tiring moments that I have ever lived through, immigrating to a new country and getting adjusted to a very different way of life. Cornershop squeezed its way back in during all of this, when they announced a new album coming out in March 2020 titled “England Is A Garden”. In the time of Covid-19, I can’t think of a better band and album to spend lots of my time with. From start to finish, “England Is A Garden” is a gem to listen to, but it also makes you feel good things. You think about your place in the world as you listen to the album, you realise just how wonderful and special it is to be alive, no matter what is going on all around you. Certain music connects you to things happening, while at the same time providing an escape, and “England Is A Garden” is a perfect example of this. (Justin)

The kingdom. / Bush
Supposedly inspired by being the only Rock band playing at a bunch of Metal Festivals, ‘The Kingdom’ is a surprisingly heavy return to form for the English post grunge-rockers. Frontman Gavin Rossdale brings ex-Helmet guitarist Chris Traynor up in the mix for a twin near-metal attack that showcases an album of hugely catchy riffs and soaring vocals, anchored by some of his best song-writing in years. If you enjoyed the pummelling track ‘Bullet Holes’, that played out over the credits of John Wick 3, then you’ll enjoy the sound of this follow-up album. (Mark)

American head / Flaming Lips
The Flaming Lips are a bit wacky, an acquired taste, sort of cosmic, ethereal, spacey and this latest is no different to previous albums like Yoshimi battles the pink robots. So that’s good because they offer a mix of light and heavy sounds filled with simple melodies and complex noises. The lyrics on this album can teeter on the simplistic, but there are a lot of lovely harmonies and rhythms with eclectic patterns. So, something both soothing and slightly offbeat at the same time, which is great! (Martin)

The new abnormal / Strokes
The Strokes return after 7 years with one of those great albums that rewards after repeated listens; revealing a new level of emotional maturity and shifting musical contours, that play off their previous trademark style while adding in new elements. Diverging from the shorter pop ‘verse/chorus/verse’ construct of previous albums, the songs stretch out for longer and it takes a few listens before all the inherent melodies sink in. Julian Casablancas’ lyrics are more political and mature, befitting someone now in their 40s, the songs more brooding and reflective. The band sounds more together and focused than on the last couple of albums, and you once again marvel at the level of musicianship they provide to underpin Casablancas’ vocals, culminating in the epic closing track ‘Ode To The Mets’ which ranks as one of their best tracks ever. (Mark)

Endeavour. Complete series seven.
This is a great series and has kept us captivated since season 1. This latest series is set in the ’70’s and takes me back to the fashions and foibles of my childhood. Another set of Oxford murders to solve as well as an intriguing new relationship for Endeavour Morse keeps you guessing. (Raewyn)

Mystery Men. 
Oh the 90’s, what a time for movies! Possibly one of the most 90’s movies ever made (it’s soundtrack even has Smash Mouth’s All Star), this ridiculous tale of ridiculous superheroes is lots of silly fun. All the usual names are there, Ben Stiller, Hank Azaria, Paul Reubens, Janeane Garofalo but you also get bonus Tom Waits (a mad scientist who builds non-lethal weapons, like the Blame Thrower) and Eddie Izzard (one of the villainous Disco Boys henchmen). Not to mention that the villain is named Cassanova Frankenstein. Yes, you read that correctly, Cassanova Frankenstein. It’s camp, it’s silly, Hank Azaria throws forks at people and there’s an invisible boy who can only be invisible when nobody is looking. It’s just lots of fun. (Kath)

This town
So this film was promoted as a comedy, which it sort of is… but it’s dark. Really dark. I did laugh, but more often I found myself drawing a sharp breath and thinking “Oh no!” Written, directed and starring David White, this recent New Zealand film is the story of Sean (White), a man with a troubled past searching for love. He meets Casey (Alice May Connolly), a sweet local girl and they fall for one another. But the spanner in the works of their romance is ex-cop Pam (Robyn Malcolm) who is determined to put Sean behind bars for a crime he has already been acquitted of. There is something sweet and gentle about Sean and Casey’s relationship that I found endearing, even if they are both a bit on the gormless side. It has a really good solid twist at the end that I never saw coming. (Kath)

Velvet goldmine
If you’re a fan of 70’s glam rock, like Bowie, Marc Bolan, Lou Reed, Iggy Pop etc, this film is a fictional story made up of a lot of glam rock legends… that might be true, or they might not. Christian Bale plays a young English journalist Arthur Stuart (the biggest flaw of the movie – I found him terrible and his English accent even worse) chasing the story of what happened to glam rock superstar Brian Slade (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) whose career failed after he faked is own assassination on stage. Interviewing the people closest to Slade, like his ex-wife Mandy (Toni Collette, brilliantly doing her best Angie Bowie impersonation) and reported ex-lover American glam rocker Curt Wild (Ewan MacGregor, who steals the movie in every scene he appears) finds himself disappearing down a rabbit-hole of sex, drugs and rock n roll which never quite brings him any closer to Slade’s whereabouts. Don’t let Christian Bale’s performance put you off, the rest of the cast more than make up for it. Fantastic costuming and make-up, the soundtrack is glam rock heaven and it’s one of the iconic alternative films from the late 90’s. (Kath)


The Lost Aviator A Beamafilm Documentary (Australia)
Against his families wishes Documentary maker Andrew Lancaster unveils his pioneer aviator’s uncle’s life of adventure, obsessive love and involvement in a sensational murder trial. An intriguing story with a curiously moving and haunting ending. (David)

Queens of mystery. [Series 1]
Newly promoted Detective Sergeant Matilda Stone investigates offbeat murders in a quaint English Village. Her 3 crime-writing aunts lend her their expertise, as well as unwanted dating advice. They may solve the murders, but the unexplained disappearance of Matilda’s mother 25 years ago will be harder to crack “a quality production- Very well written and acted. The whole family enjoyed it”. (Roseanne)

Neil P’s Picks:
As the WCL CD Cataloguer, these are some of my favourite new CDs…
Andy Bell – The view from halfway down
Thurston Moore – By the fire
Drab City – Good songs for bad people
Dead Famous People – Harry
Magik Markers – 2020
Heliocentrics – Telemetric sounds
Hen Ogledd – Free humans
Garcia Peoples – Nightcap at wits’ end
Fenne Lily – Breach

Shinji’s Picks:
DVD’s:
Queen and Slim
Sorry We Missed You
The End of the Golden Weather
For Sama
Homecoming (TV show)

CD’s:
Blue Nile – High[Bonus Disc]
Sault – Untitled (Black is)
Bela Fleck – Throw Down Your Heart
Julianna Barwick – Healing Is a Miracle
Aaron Parks – Little Big II: dreams of a mechanical man


New DVDs at Te Awe

Here are some new movies & TV Shows recently added to our collection and available at our CBD Te Awe Library and selected Branch locations.

Why didn’t they ask Evans?
This town
Doctor Who [2005]. The complete twelfth series.
The hunting. Season one.
Pain and glory.
Partners in crime. The complete collection.
The high note
Yellowstone. Season 1.
A million little things. The complete first season.
Love Sarah
Watchmen
El camino : a Breaking bad movie

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New Music at Te Awe

I’m Mark, the Customer Specialist for Music & Film at Wellington City Library. Here is some of the new and material we have been buying for the Music collection at our CBD Te Awe branch.
My colleague Neil & I decided to do a quick one line review of these titles. Do we actually carefully appraise & select the latest new music releases for your listening pleasure? Or do we just buy every third item on the list and hope it works out? Do we actually know anything about new music? Or are we just too old and think ‘Be-a-ba-dooby-do…’ is something Sinatra used to croon? Read on to find out….

Pleased to meet me / Replacements
Neil: Welcome re-release of The Replacements album. A band that could have been as big as REM, but internal tensions prevented them from achieving this.
Mark: Pioneers of the whole Alt-rock ‘left of the dial’ genre, PTME deftly weaves in a wider array of genres and musical touches into their signature sound to great effect.

 

The seeds of love. / Tears For Fears
Neil: The Beatles of the 1980s – or so they wished. Even the cover emulates Sgt. Pepper. That said their anthemic tunes are currently getting a re-appraisal.
Mark: More musicians than machines was their aim with the wider scope & personnel of this polished album. However the seeds of breakup were sown during its sessions and it would be 10 years before they would record together again.

 

Fall to pieces. / Tricky
Neil: Tricky’s darkest album in years revolves around the death of his daughter. Intense, bleak and perhaps the best thing he has ever released.
Mark: Personal loss has sadly been the inspiration for great art and music, and this is no exception. Emotionally cathartic, but not an easy listen.

 

In memory of my feelings / Davies, Catherine Anne
Neil: Electronica artist The Anchoress shifts names & styles and collaborates with ex-Suede guitarist Bernard Butler to deliver a glam-pop album that moves effortlessly between the delicate and the swaggering.
Mark: Welsh musician/songwriter Catherine Anne Davies & Bernard Butler collab. Inexplicitly shelved for 4 years. Sounds like: If Chrissie Hynde fronted Suede. 2020 thanks you for your gift.

 

Androgynous Mary. / Girl Friday
Neil: Girl Friday’s debut album is a hook laden 80s inspired jangly pop. Fans of The Beths would really love this.
Mark: Cool LA female quartet featuring Wgtn singer-songwriter Vera Ellen. Lo-Fi guitars & melodies produce a charming album full of catchy tunes.

 

 

Fake it flowers. / Beabadoobee
Neil: Slacker tinged post punk reinvented by the Pavement obsessed Beabadoobee. Catchy singalong tunes that could have been in Scott Pilgrim the movie.
Mark: Next big thing Tik-Tok/Instgram sensation. Clever, relatable lyrics for young women or another warmed over 90s homage? Check it out to find out. Maybe with your daughter. If you both like Snail Mail. Or Soccer Mommy. Or Jay Som.

 

Free love. / Sylvan Esso
Neil: Carefully crafted pop-electronica from Sylvan Esso.
Mark: Singer from folk trio Mountain Man. Diverse shades of four on the floor, and blips and bleeps.

 

 

Songs and instrumentals. / Lenker, Adrianne
Neil: Touching personal songs in a classic folk singer-songwriter style. Gentle & mellow.
Mark: Big Thief singer. Charming & gentle acoustic improvisations recorded during lockdown.

 

 

The Harry Smith B-sides.
Neil: Part of the legendary series of American folk recordings by Harry Smith. Done at a time when these folk songs were on the verge of being lost forever. American folk music’s DNA.
Mark: The literal flip sides to each of the recordings present on the original Anthology of American Folk Music.

 

Lovey. / Lemonheads
Neil: Another album from the vaults from the Boston ex-Punk band who went mainstream.
Mark: Reissue of their first album on Atlantic. The older punk style of The Lemonheads collides with the new directions of Evan Dando. Pre-cursor to the upcoming pop-fame of It’s a Shame about Ray.

 

 

Morrison Hotel. / Doors (Musical group)
Neil: After the overproduced Soft Parade the Doors returned to their core hard driving blues style. Contains an hour of unreleased sessions.
Mark: Yawn. Yet another Doors reissue. You can check out of the Morrison Hotel. But you can never leave…

 

 

Space funk : afro futurist electro funk in space 1976-84.
Neil: This compilation of rare Afro-futurist funk is infectious, joyous, groovy, cool and occasionally cheesy. Wonderful stuff!
Mark: Imagine The Car Wash by Rose Royce with lyrics about space & robots…

 

 

Wildflowers & all the rest. / Petty, Tom
Neil: Petty fans will welcome this reissue of the project he was working on before he died.
Mark: Critically acclaimed high water mark of his solo career finally gets a release after being derailed by lawsuits. The extra tracks (originally intended for a double album release) are as good as those on the original album.

 

Free humans. / Hen Ogledd
Neil: Sci-Fi sounds of another type, Quirky low-fi folk-indie-pop that embraces the end of the world.
Mark: Indie-Pop helmed by Richard Dawson. Social commentary as a sci-fi journey.

 

 

Palo Alto / Monk, Thelonious
Neil: This live recording of jazz legend Thelonious Monk done by the janitor at Palo Alto High school is an unearthed gem.
Mark: Legendary lost Monk concert with amazing sound. Thankfully now released after a dispute with his estate was settled.

 

 

Friend ship / Phoenix Foundation
Neil: Their distinctive vocal and guitar styles are at the front of their latest release. As good as anything else they’ve previously done.
Mark: 1-800 Are you allright? Yes, now that the Phoenix Foundation are back. Collabs with Nada Ried & Hollie Fullbrook add another layer to this intelligent & fun return.

 

 

Sign “O” the times [deluxe]. / Prince
Neil: An extensive box set of Prince at his creative and innovative peak. Much of the additional material is as good as the original album. A must listen for any prince fan
Mark: Is an 8CD box set for one album too much? Not when it’s Price at his peak. From the 63 previously unreleased tracks you could easily compile another album as good as anything he ever released.

Fear Factor: DVDs for Halloween

Test your Fear Level (Low, Moderate or High) with this selection of classic & lesser known Horror films & TV shows from our DVD collection at Te Awe & our offsite Storage Branch Te Pataka.

Halloween (1978)
Fear Factor: Moderate
Mark: Moody. Tense. Created its own cult & changed modern Horror forever.
Neil: John Carpenter‘s low budget masterpiece spawned a million imitators, but none as good as the original.

 

 

Gremlins (1984)
Fear Factor: Low
Mark: Great family fun that never dates.
Neil: One of the Halloween at Christmas movies. Hugely entertaining fun in a twisted & dark way.

 

 

Near dark (1988)
Fear Factor: High
Mark: Grimy & violent with Vampires as soulless spree killers. The anti-Twilight.
Neil: Kathryn Bigelow‘s genre redefining Vampire movie set in the American Midwest is a joy to watch for Horror film fans.

 

The hole (2009)
Fear Factor: Low
Mark: Intelligent YA film has 3 teens discover a mysterious bottomless pit, unleashing something that forces them to confront their own deepest fears.
Neil: No idea. Joe Dante usually makes a great film.

 

 

The cabin in the woods (2011)
Fear Factor: Moderate
Mark: A meta tribute to Horror films. Great fun. Helped to launch the career of Chris Hemsworth.
Neil: Joss Whedon reverses every horror trope in this twisty film. Super clever.

 

 

The birds (1963)
Fear Factor: Moderate
Mark: Hitchcock works out more issues.
Neil: Daphne du Maurier’s short story is given the Hitchcock treatment in this dated but truly disturbing movie which utilises Tippi Hedren‘s real life fear of Birds.

 

The descent (2005)
Fear Factor: High
Mark: The caving is super scary even before the true horror begins. Tips the whole female-bonding trope on its head.
Neil: Do not watch this if you suffer from claustrophobia!

 

 

Eden Lake (2008)
Fear Factor: High
Mark: Brutal ‘Hoddie-Horror’ sees Kelly Reilly on the run from local nasties.
Neil: A frightening version of Deliverance set in the British countryside.

 

 

The evil dead (1981)
Fear Factor: High
Mark: Sequels. A TV Show. Bruce Campbell. Enough said.
Neil: Classic schlock horror. If you’ve seen it, go back and watch it again. If you haven’t, watch to to understand the DNA of horror films.

 

 

Fright night (1985)
Fear Factor: Low
Mark: Another inspiration for Stranger Things. Teens fight monsters that adults don’t believe are real.
Neil: If you want to see mainstream American Horror was like in the 80s this is a great place to start.

 

The haunting of Hill House. (TV Series, 2018)
Fear Factor: High
Mark: Gripping. Atmospheric. Psychological. One of the best Horror TV shows ever.
Neil: Shirley Jackson‘s reputation as a master writer of Horror makes this a TV show worth watching.

 

The wicker man : the final cut (1973)
Fear Factor: Moderate
Mark: A classic inspiration for the recent Midsommar.
Neil: This was Christopher Lee‘s favourite performance. The detailed pagan ritual & rural Scottish setting give it a truly unsettling atmosphere.

New Music at Te Awe

I’m Mark, the Customer Specialist for Music & Film at Wellington City Library. If you spent some time in the Sound & Vision section of the old Central Library you may remember seeing myself and my colleague Shinji, shifting shelves of CDs or DVDs around. We are now in charge of buying the CDs & Vinyl for the Library collection, so we thought we’d start a blog on some of the new and upcoming material we have been buying for the Music collection at our CBD Te Awe branch.
My colleague Neil & I decided to do a quick one line review of these titles to see if we actually know anything about them…

New CDs at Te Awe:
Green. / Yoshimura, Hiroshi
Neil: Regarded as a seminal Japanese 80s ambient album. A great companion piece to Midori Takada’s Through The Looking Glass.
Mark: Pitchfork approved noodling.

 

 

Absolute zero. / Hornsby, Bruce
Neil: After a long wait Hornsby explores some new avenues.
Mark: Jazz meets electronica (if you like that sort of thing). See what AllMusic says.

 

 

Giant steps. / Coltrane, John
Neil: Giant steps is rightly regarded as a masterpiece.
Mark: Deluxe reissue of an iconic album. Strange to think he made Kind of Blue at the same time. Total opposites in style.

 

 

An evening of New York songs and stories. / Vega, Suzanne
Neil: Polished performances of some of her greatest tracks recorded live in an intimate café setting.
Mark: Perhaps too polished.

 

 

 

Sun racket. / Throwing Muses
Neil: First album in 7 years. A welcome return to form of Kristin Hersh’s Alt-Rock icons.
Mark: I always liked her sisters bands better.

 

 

To bring you my love : demos. / Harvey, P. J.
Neil: Unvarnished raw recordings show the grit & sinew behind the more polished final album.
Mark: I prefer the final versions that made it to the album.

 

 

Angelheaded hipster : the songs of Marc Bolan & T. Rex : a Hal Willner production.
Neil: By the nature these are a bit hit & miss, shows how the originals were defined by Tony Viscotti’s T-Rex trademark production. Best track Children Of The Revolution – Kesha.
Mark: She Was Born To Be My Unicorn / Ride A White Swan – Maria McKee.

 

 

Ultra mono. / Idles
Neil: I love this album. #1 in the UK but it could have been released by The Stranglers in 1978.
Mark: Retromania.

 

 

American head / Flaming Lips
Neil: A less experimental album. More like Soft Bulletin than recent outings. Will make lots of Best of the Year lists.
Mark: I always liked Soft Bulletin when it came out.

 

 

 

Blues with friends. / Dion
Neil: A cool coffee shop album.
Mark: New songs (not old covers) played with famous friends.
 

 

 

Wrong way up / Eno, Brian
Neil: This Eno & Cale welcome rerelease has a backstory that is the stuff of legend.
Mark: Filed under Experimental not Popular so it doesn’t confuse the shelvers…

 

 

 

1969 to 1974. / Fleetwood Mac
Neil: When they were a real band. Before the Americans turned them into a stadium filling phenomenon
Mark: I didn’t realize they had made any albums before Stevie & Lindsey…
 

 

The Dusty Springfield anthology. / Springfield, Dusty
Neil: Yet another Dusty Springfield anthology
Mark: But its the best one, with the best sound quality. Out of print also. Allmusic review here.

 

 

Goats head soup / Rolling Stones
Neil: Yet another Rolling Stones re-release for fans. The only great RS album is Exile on Main Street.
Mark: Underrated/unappreciated entry in their catalogue, or another cynical cash in? Listen to it to find out.

 

 

Hard luck stories 1972-1982 / Thompson, Richard
Neil: The underrated Richard & Linda Thompson are given the comprehensive box set treatment.
Mark: 8 discs of all their studio albums with a fantastic hardbound book full of rare photos.

 

 

 

NWOBHM : thunder : new wave of British heavy metal 1978-1986.
Neil: The new wave of British Heavy Metal really shook up the genre that was dominated by Americans. This compilation includes some of its lesser known, but just as worthy, participants.
Mark: Cherry Red has cornered the market on these kind of obscure compilations.

 

Voices. / Richter, Max
Neil: One of my favorite classical albums is the 8 hour version of Sleep. Voices continues his remarkable output.
Mark: Universal Declaration of Human Rights put to music. Sure to aid in your sleep patterns.

 

 

 

Folklore. / Swift, Taylor
Neil: Pop songstress & social media juggernaut returns with another studio album for her fanbase.
Mark: A return to songwriting form, or lockdown musings ruined by the guy from the National? Listen to find out.

 

 

Chalk dogs / Johnstone, Neil
Neil: Willfully arty and experimental. Obviously a work of genius.
Mark: I listened to the first song & it made be feel anxious. Even the cover is scary. Listen to an exclusive video on our Wgtn Music YT channel if you dare.

 

 

On Order material:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and more….

New DVDs at Te Awe

Here are some new movies & TV Shows recently added to our collection and available at our CBD Te Awe Library and selected Branch locations.

New Movies:
Photograph
“A struggling street photographer in Mumbai, pressured to marry by his grandmother, convinces a shy stranger to pose as his fiancée. The pair develop a connection that transforms them in ways they could not expect.” (Catalogue)

 

 

Why didn’t they ask Evans?
“During a round of golf on a cliff-top course in Wales, Bobby Jones discovers a man lying gravely injured on the rocks below. His last words, “Why didn’t they ask Evans?,” leads Bobby and his friend on a quest to find out what happened to the man.” (Catalogue)

 

 

A White, White Day
“The powerful new film by Hlynur Plmason centres on a grieving police officer in rural Iceland (Ingvar E. Sigursson) who turns his vengeful sights on a neighbour he suspects may have had an affair with his now-deceased wife.” (Catalogue)

 

 

New TV Shows:
Shakespeare & Hathaway : private investigators. Season one.
“Private inspector Frank Hathaway has always worked alone. But Frank isn’t doing so well. He’s out of shape and low on cash. Frank needs a partner. Frank needs ex-hairdresser and people-person Lu. He just doesn’t know it yet. The two eventually join forces and form a highly unlikely and hugely entertaining detecting duo. Frank and Lu quickly discover that all is not as peaceful as it seems in their pretty theatre town. The mayor is murdered, vengeful lovers stalk the streets and a magician’s trick fatally misfires. Welcome to Stratford-upon-Avon, where low life criminals get caught up in deliciously high drama.” (Catalogue)

Ray Donovan. Season seven.
“While Ray makes progress in therapy, there are dangers from the past that require the Ray Donovan of old. Between NYC mayor Ed Feratti, an unrelenting NYPD officer hunting for the truth and clients old and new, Ray struggles to find the balance between fixing for clients and fixing himself. And when Feratti’s corruption brings a piece of Mickey’s past back to New York, Ray is forced to seek answers to long-buried questions.” (Catalogue)

 

Occupied. Series 3.
“A new parliamentary election is due, and the campaign reignites old conflicts between the Norwegians. Seeing himself as the liberator of Norway, interim Prime Minister Jesper Berg is confident of winning the election. But the public is divided. Who are the real liberation heroes? How should traitors be treated? How will relations with Russia develop? And has Russia actually withdrawn from Norway? To complicate matters, Jesper is confronted by a group of young eco-scientists desperate to remind him of his original reason for entering into politics: His deep commitment to clean energy. Ambassador to Norway, Sidorova is torn between her wish to start a new life in Norway and her loyalty to Russia. Security Services Director Hans Martin Djupvik investigates the assassination of former Prime Minister Anita Rygh. And Bente takes her daughter to Moscow to escape the prosecution of traitors.” (Catalogue)

Homecoming. Season one.
“Good intentions. Erratic bosses. Mounting paranoia. Unforeseen consequences spiralling out of control. Heidi (Julia Roberts) works at Homecoming, a facility helping soldiers transition to civilian life. Years later she has started a new life, when the Department of Defense questions why she left Homecoming. Heidi soon realises there’s a whole other story behind the one she’s been telling herself.” (Catalogue)

 

Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan. Season two.
“In the second season after tracking a potentially suspicious shipment of illegal arms in the Venezuelan jungle, CIA Officer Jack Ryan heads down to South America to investigate. As Jack’s investigation threatens to uncover a far-reaching conspiracy, the President of Venezuela launches a counter-attack that hits home for Jack, leading him and his fellow operatives on a global mission spanning the United States, UK, Russia, and Venezuela to unravel the President’s nefarious plot.” (Catalogue)

His dark materials. The complete first season.
“A young girl is destined to liberate her world from the grip of the Magisterium, which represses people’s ties to magic and their animal spirits known as daemons.” (Catalogue)

 

 

The boys. Season 1.
“The Boys is an irreverent take on what happens when superheroes – as popular as celebrities, as influential as politicians and as revered as gods – abuse their superpowers rather than use them for good. It is the powerless against the superpowerful as The Boys embark on a heroic quest to expose the truth about “The Seven” and their formidable Vought backing.” (Catalogue)

 

Belgravia. Season one.
“On the eve of the Battle of Waterloo, two young lovers forge a legacy that will create scandal for generations to come. Years later, when the humble Trenchards (Tamsin Greig and Philip Gleinster) move to Belgravia, they find themselves mixing with the venerated Brockenhursts (Harriet Walter and Tom Wilkinson). The families share a history that threatens inheritances and reputations and there are those who would do anything to ensure secrets remain buried. Pride and loyalty will be tested as forbidden love blossoms amongst the rivalry and lives hang in the balance.” (Catalogue)

Good girls. Season two.
“Good Girls Season 2 opens with Beth (Christina Hendricks) dealing with her failed plan to get Rio (Manny Montana) arrested, while evidence about their crimes end up on Agent Turner’s (James Lesure) desk. Throughout the season, Ruby (Retta) and Beth deal with the new status of their relationships with their husbands Stan (Reno Wilson) and Dean (Matthew Lillard), now aware of their secret criminal life; meanwhile, Annie (Mae Whitman) and her daughter have a hard time getting along. However, with the threat of a conviction looming over them, they can’t afford to make any mistakes with any of their activities.” (Catalogue)

Striking out. Complete series one & two.
“Tara Rafferty is a high-flying solicitor living an apparently charmed existence with her good-looking law-partner fiancé Eric. But when she discovers Eric is cheating on her with a colleague, she decides to go it alone and start her own law firm.” (Catalogue)

 

 

New Amsterdam. Season two
“Inspired by the oldest public hospital in America, this unique medical drama follows the brilliant and charming Dr. Max Goodwin, the institution’s newest medical director, who sets out to tear up the bureaucracy and provide exceptional care. How can he help? Not taking “no” for an answer. Dr. Goodwin must disrupt the status quo and prove he will stop at nothing to breathe new life into this understaffed, underfunded, and underappreciated hospital.” (Catalogue)

Elementary. The final season
“Having lied and confessed to a murder he did not commit in order to protect Watson, Holmes moves back home to London in order to avoid jail time, so Watson follows.” (Catalogue)

The full Central Library DVD collection is now available to borrow!

It has been a huge job to relocate all our Central Library collections to a new home at Te Pātaka, our new collection and Distribution Centre located in Johnsonville. However we are very happy to announce that the Central Library DVD collection is available to be borrowed again in its entirety. Items can be reserved via our online catalogues from Te Pātaka to be collected from any of our other Branch Libraries.
We have decided to remove any fees for reserving items from Te Pātaka. However we have introduced a $2 charge per item if people do not pick up their reserved items within 10 working days of being notified they are available for pick up. This is to help keep the items in the collection circulating for everyone to access.

We have also curated a core collection of ‘Essential Viewing’ titles from our large Central AV collection, many of which are unavailable on streaming services in New Zealand. All our ‘Essential Viewing’ titles are taken from 1001 movies you must see before you die. They are also tagged on our catalogue. Just type in Essential Film Viewing & Essential Television Viewing as a search and you can check them out from home, your device, or on our online catalogues in the library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some pictures of just some of the DVD shelves out at Te Pātaka to give you an idea of the scope of what’s available. We will be posting some videos of us amongst the collection soon, as we start to highlight some genres and titles for you!




Music & Film is back in the CBD at our new Te Awe Library!

Exciting news for Film & Music lovers with large sections of the Wellington Central Library Audio Visual collection now available once again at our newest CBD library, Te Awe, on Panama and Brandon streets.

Some of our DVD collection, as well as a very small CD collection, were previously located in the Arapaki Branch on Manners Street following the closure of the Central Library building. We have added lots of core film titles to the DVDs, greatly expanded the CD collection, and brought them all together in a fresh new location, a cosy corner upstairs at the spacious new Te Awe library.

We have also curated a core collection of ‘Essential Listening’ & ‘Essential Viewing’ titles from our large Central AV collection, many of which are unavailable on streaming services in New Zealand. Watch out for our new blue stickers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

All our ‘Essential Viewing’ & Essential Listening’ titles are taken from titles such as 1001 movies you must see before you die, ‘1001 albums you must hear before you die’ & Nick Bollinger’s 100 essential New Zealand albums. They are also tagged on our catalogue. Just type in ‘Essential Film Viewing’, ‘Essential Television Viewing’ & ‘Essential Listening’ as a search and you can check them out from home, your device, or on our online catalogues in the library.

Details on the library’s location and hours are on the Te Awe branch page. See you there!