#MatarikiMash – Matariki wordplay for Mondays!

Matariki Mash

On Mondays for four weeks from 26 June, we wish to test your imagination and your skill with language! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge on Twitter for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as one English word. All you need to do is bring your word play skills and include all three words in a tweet-length short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag! See

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Ruakere Hond, Acushla Dee O’Carroll

It’s a long, long trail winding mai i Te Upoko o te Ika ā Māui ki Parihaka, but on Saturday 17 May,  my heart’s right there.

A ‘post-graduate gathering’ began with a powhiri at 12:30, at Te Paepae o Te Raukura, as friends, fellow students and devoted whānau came together to celebrate the achievements of Mr Taranaki Reo, aka, Ruakere Hond, and Acushla Dee O’Carroll, Gen SMS, who received their PhDs at Massey, Palmerston North on Friday 16 May.

Parihaka Pa, South Taranaki Region
Parihaka Pa, South Taranaki Region. Collis, William Andrews, 1853-1920 :Negatives of Taranaki. Ref: 1/1-012046-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23187188

Research findings were presented at Te Niho o Te Ati Awa – and we were fittingly welcomed by Ngapera and her rōpū, with the twirling poi and chant of E rere rā, into this historic house.

A the short profile of the busy life of Dee is available on the Massey site:

“Dee, who grew up in Te Hawera, Taranaki (her iwi affiliations are Ngaruahine Rangi, Ngāti Ruanui and Te Āti Awa), is a member of the College of Health’s Whariki Research Centre at the School of Public Health. She is investigating how Māori and other indigenous cultures use social media.”

News of Dee’s Fulbright-Harkness award and plans for studying in Hawaii and USA, last year, was delivered on Te Karere:

Saturday’s citation of Dee O’Carroll’s research paper was “Kanohi ki te kanohi : a thing of the past? An examination of social networking sites and the implications for Māori culture and society.”

The thesis is available at here.

Through mainly qualitative exploration of [these] data, the domains of rangatahi (Māori) usage, whanaungatanga, tuakiritanga [identity] and tikanga were traversed, to interrogate the contemporary ideas and trajectory of kanohi ki te kanohi values. The study highlights the range of issues that Māoridom must grapple with to guide SNS usage in cultural contexts that considers kanohi ki te kanohi values and the future of marae.” – pānui for gathering of 17/5/2014

This fascinating research scratches the surface of SNS. There are implications for young Māori (initially) but then for all of us, as social networking sweeps across our traditional ways of interaction.

Relevant to the kōrero, is the realisation that Ngāti Porou have already streamed live the tangi of three beloved mātua: Dr Pat Ngata, and his father, and Parekura Horomia. What changes will this type of ‘interaction’ bring to protocols and the sustaining of our marae in the future?
Articles by Dee available at Wellington Central Library and through online access are:
O’Carroll, A. (2013). Maori identity construction in Social Networking Sites. International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies., 6(2), 2-16.
O’Carroll, A.D. (2013). Virtual whanaungatanga – Māori utilising social networking sites to attain and maintain relationships. AlterNative 9(3), 230-245. A326
O’Carroll, A.D. (2013). An analysis of how Rangatahi Maori use social networking sites. Mai Journal, 2(1), 46-59. A327

RUAKERE HOND

Tenā koutou taku nui, taku rahi kei te kūreitanga o Taranaki nei puta atu ki ōna pāranga huhua noa.
“My whānau connections are Taranaki. I firmly believe the distinctive form of our local language, culture and history is a critical factor for Taranaki Māori communities to be fully engaged in education. I have been keenly involved with adult education in the community and institutions since the 1980’s, especially in reo Māori immersion teaching and community development. It is inspiring to see the progress of Māori studies in WITT, which continues to be innovative and forward thinking. This supports WITT in being a pivotal facilitator of significant social, cultural and economic achievement in Taranaki by working alongside community initiatives and playing a major part in responding to local aspirations for growth and development.
Heoti anō rā e ōku karangamaha, rarau mai ki tēnei puna mātauranga. Mā wai kē te puna nei e hurahura? Māu, māku, mā tātou!”

But for many years now, Ruakere Hond’s name has been synonymous with Taranaki revitalisation of Te Reo. The man stands as a colossus in his chosen field of endeavour, and at last he has found the missing link between public health, communities and society.
In his thesis, entitled Matua te Reo, Matua te Tangata : Speaker community : visions, approaches, outcomes, Ruakere shows how he was at a loss to understand why his apparently sound understanding and development of revitalisation processes were not having the success he had anticipated.

It was not until he began to define community as opposed to society and to understand the implications of sustainable health outcomes and the need to establish secure cultural identity that Ruakere began to move more positively towards achieving his goals of reo revitalisation.