People & Places Newsletter

Welcome to our first People & Places eNewsletter. Here you’ll find the latest books we have available for borrowing on this topic. Our selection includes biographies, History books, Travel stories & guides books, as well as books about New Zealand and other popular non-fiction. Remember you can reserve these items and even suggest we buy something that’s not on the shelf!

Library News

Biography

Have a read below of our most recent biography books for the month of June 2011. Which one will you pick?

Syndetics book coverThe Churchills : in love and war / Mary S. Lovell.
“Portrays the ambitious, brave, and arrogant English family that gave the world Winston Churchill, describing generations of ancestors who were reckless womanizers but also triumphant military leaders all saddled with the upkeep of the family palace, Blenheim” (Summary from Syndetics).

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Travel stories & guides

Describe adventures overseas in Paris, Russia, Mexico and more!

Syndetics book coverRoad of bones: a journey to the dark heart of Russia
The Road of Bones is the story of Russia’s greatest road. For over 200 years, the route of the Vladimirka Road has been at the centre of the nation’s history, having witnessed everything from the first human footsteps to the rise of Putin and his oil-rich oligarchy. Tsars, wars, famine and wealth: all have crossed and travelled this road, but no-one has ever told its story. In pursuit of the sights, sounds and voices both past and present, Jeremy Poolman travels the Vladimirka. Both epic and intimate, The Road of Bones is a record of his travels – but much more.” (Amazon)

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History

New Zealand material added to our collection this month includes, “In search of ancient New Zealand” where geology meets detective work. Plus, David Cohen researches the lives of those who lived in children homes in his new book “Little criminals: the story of a New Zealand boy’s home”, and Ian Dougherty introduces us to a New Zealand folk hero in “Arawata Bill”. In “Only the Houses Remain” Simon Boyce looks into the history and development of New Zealand State Housing. Have a browse!

Syndetics book coverIn search of ancient New Zealand / Hamish Campbell & Gerard Hutching. In this wonderful book palaeontologist Hamish Campbell and natural history writer Gerard Hutching present an exciting new account of New Zealand’s evolution aimed at the general reader. For the first time the story of the 8th continent – Zealandia – is revealed. From 3-billion-year-old grains of sand found in present-day rocks, through the momentous breakaway from Gondwanaland to the drowning and uplift of New Zealand giving rise to today’s landscapes, this new book traces our absorbing geological story. The book is brilliantly illustrated. Photographs of fossils, rocks and the current landscape are linked to outstanding state-of-the-art digital imagery from the files of the New Zealand Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences. (Library Catalogue)

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New Zealand

New Zealand material added to our collection this month includes, “In search of ancient New Zealand” where geology meets detective work. Plus, David Cohen researches the lives of those who lived in children homes in his new book “Little criminals: the story of a New Zealand boy’s home”, and Ian Dougherty introduces us to a New Zealand folk hero in “Arawata Bill”. In “Only the Houses Remain” Simon Boyce looks into the history and development of New Zealand State Housing. Have a browse!

Syndetics book coverLittle criminals : the story of a New Zealand boy’s home / David Cohen. From the late 1950s to the mid 1980s, when most of them were closed down, the New Zealand government maintained 26 residences for children and teenagers. Some of those children had the bad fortune to come from families with large numbers of children and who couldn’t cope financially. Plucking a child out and putting him in a home to ease the burden was seen as a solution. Other children in came from profoundly dysfunctional backgrounds or were profoundly dysfunctional themselves. Could putting them all together in close quarters, supervised by staff with mostly inadequate training, ever deliver a positive outcome? In this powerfully written book David Cohen, who himself spent time at Epuni Boy’s Home in the 1970s, argues not. He tracks down former residents and staff members, many of whom argue that boys’-home stints led boys to, rather than away from, lives of crime. It also led some into abuse. Evocatively and originally written, Cohen’s research takes him back to the era of moral panic about juvenile delinquency that drove the creation of the homes and traces the sea change in ideas about the care of troubled adolescents, especially Maori, who were hugely over-represented in the muster, that spelled their eventual demise. Totally gripping, it is a unique insider account of a failed experiment. (Library Catalogue)

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