He kōanga tangata tahi

Exploration, heritage and kōrero nehe – these are topics amongst the new books for He Kohikohinga Māori, Mahuru, 2017.

Syndetics book coverLaunching Marsden’s mission : the beginnings of the Church Missionary Society in New Zealand, viewed from New South Wales / eds. Peter G. Bolt & David B. Pettett.
“In 1794 the Rev Samuel Marsden became the second Chaplain to the Colony of New South Wales. Both Marsden and the first Chaplain, the Rev Richard Johnson, came to the Colony under the sponsorship of the Church of England Evangelicals. They had high hopes that New South Wales would be the base from which the ‘everlasting gospel’ would sound forth to achieve the salvation of the ‘poor benighted heathens’ of the South Seas. To this end Marsden began the mission to New Zealand on Christmas Day, 1814… This book is a celebration of that mission and Marsden’s preparations for it.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTears of Rangi : experiments across worlds / Anne Salmond.
“Six centuries ago Polynesian explorers, who inhabited a cosmos in which islands sailed across the sea and stars across the sky, arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand where they rapidly adapted to new plants, animals, landscapes and climatic conditions. In this, her most ambitious book to date, Dame Anne Salmond looks at New Zealand as a site of cosmo-diversity, a place where multiple worlds engage and collide. Like our ancestors, Anne Salmond suggests, we too may have a chance to experiment across worlds.” (Syndetics summary)

Tuai : a traveller in two worlds / Alison Jones & Kuni Kaa Jenkins.
“A thrilling biographical narrative of a young Bay of Islands leader who grew up in the Māori world of the early nineteenth century – and crossed the globe to encounter England in the midst of the industrial revolution. This is a story about the Māori discovery of England. These voyages between worlds represented risk and opportunity: Tuai chose opportunity, and the rest is history.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverTruth and beauty : verse biography in Canada, Australia and New Zealand / edited by Anna Jackson, Helen Rickerby, and Angelina Sbroma.
Truth and Beauty turns critical attention to an exciting genre that lies at the intersection of biography and poetry, narrative and lyric, history and the confessional. With essays on influential verse biographers Margaret Atwood, Dorothy Porter, Michael Ondaatje, Jennifer Maiden and Anne Carson along with newer practitioners including Chris Orsman, Jordie Albiston, Robert Sullivan, Tusiata Avia and Amy Brown, this collection looks at the inevitable tensions that arise between historical fact and the work of imagination – and the competing and complementary claims of truth and beauty.” (Syndetics summary)

Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki / edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker.

Syndetics book coverHistory, heritage, and colonialism : historical consciousness, Britishness, and cultural identity in New Zealand, 1870-1940 / Kynan Gentry.
History, heritage and colonialism offers an internationally relevant examination of the nexus between empire and colonial identity, by exploring the politics of history-making and interest in preserving the material remnants of the past in late nineteenth and early twentieth century colonial society… Offering important insights for societies negotiating the legacy of a colonial past in a global present, this book will be of particular value to all those concerned with museum, heritage, and tourism studies, and imperial history, at undergraduate and postgraduate level, as well as among scholars in these fields. It will also be of interest to a wider public interested in heritage and the history of museums.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHe reo wāhine : Māori women’s voices from the nineteenth century / Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla.
“During the nineteenth century, Maori women produced letters and memoirs, wrote off to newspapers and commissioners, appeared before commissions of enquiry, gave evidence in court cases, and went to the Native Land Court to assert their rights. He Reo Wahine is a bold new introduction to the experience of Maori women in colonial New Zealand through Maori women’s own words.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAnimism : respecting the living world / Graham Harvey.
“Animism’ is now an important term for describing ways in which some people understand and engage respectfully with the larger-than-human world. Its central theme is our relationship with our other-than-human neighbours, such as animals, plants, rocks, and kettles, rooted in the understanding that the term ‘person’ includes more than humans. Graham Harvey explores the animist cultures of Native Americans, Maori, Aboriginal Australians and eco-Pagans, introducing their diversity and considering the linguistic, performative, ecological and activist implications of these different animisms.” (Syndetics summary)

Ngā pepeha o te takere nui / Anaha Hiini.
“Here is a collection of pepehā for marae in the rohe of Te Arawa waka.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori at home : an everyday guide to learning the Māori language / Scotty and Stacey Morrison.
“An introduction to the Maori language… covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household- whether you’re practising sport, getting ready for school, celebrating a birthday, preparing a shopping list or relaxing at the beach, Maori at home gives you the words and phrases – and confidence – you need.” (Syndetics summary)

New Zealand geographic; September-October 2017
p. 26. Star struck by Leonie Hayden. The story of aerospace engineer: Mana Vautier (Te Arawa and Ngāti Kahungunu)
p. 46. When worlds collide by Leonie Hayden. The story of Ihumātao, on the shores of Manukau Harbour : Auckland’s oldest settlement now designated special housing area.

Wāhine, whakairo, whakaora reo.

Here are two beautifully illustrated volumes of art – one reveals an all-embracing Polynesian concept of atua with the underpinning spiritual world, the other describes the whakapapa of Ngāti Porou carvings.
On a different note – there’s a huge landscaping of the history of New Zealand women.

Language endangerment in the 21st century : globalisation, technology and new media : proceedings of the Conference FEL XVI, 12-15 September 2012, AUT University, Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand / editors Tania Kaʻai … [et al.]
Presenters include: Tania Kaʻai, Muiris Ó Laoire & Nicholas Ostler — Tīmoti Kāretu — Hinematau McNeill — Rachael Kaʻai-Mahuta — Hana O’Regan — Ruth Lysaght — Michael Walsh — John Moorfield — Peter Keegan, Catherine Watson, Jeanette King, Margaret Maclagan & Ray Harlow — Katerina Naitoro — Tania Kaʻai & Dean Mahuta — Elisa Duder — Paora Mato, Te Taka Keegan, Daniel Cunliffe, Tara Dalley — Lidu Gong — Paora Mato — Kevin Scannell.

He W’akaputanga Mai o te Rangatiratanga : a proclamation.
“This publication represents a culmination of material made available, or created for the Hokianga Maori artists group exhibition ; He Wakaputanga Mai o te Rangatiranga – A proclamation. The exhibition was organised and first presented by black space gallery in Kohukohu, February 1-28, 2014… [Includes] “educational information alongside works and thoughts of Hokianga Maori artists: Maureen Lander ; Toi Te Rito Maihi, Heiwari Johnson, claire Kaahu White, Michelle Morunga, Bev Wilson, Urikore Ngakuru, Heather Randerson, Henare Rawiri, Emere Te Paea Robson, John Morunga, Stacey Noel, Maki Herbert.”

Syndetics book coverA history of New Zealand women / Barbara Brookes.
“This major new history of New Zealand ¿ written from the perspective of the women who have lived here ¿ will be released on Monday 15 February, launching at a conference held in honour of the author (leading New Zealand historian Barbara Brookes) at Otago University.” (Syndetics summary)
Incomplete contents: Origins, traditions and ‘civilisation’ before, 1814 — A civilising mission, 1814-1856 — Settling pākehā families unsettling whānau, 1850s-1860s — War, gold and dispossession, 1860s-1880s — The quest for citizenship, 1885-1890s — New expectations for a new century, 1900-1919 — Motherhood, mortality and a voice for women in the interwar years, 1919-1940 — The ‘modern woman’ of the interwar years, 1919-1940 — On the home front, 1939-1951 — Suburbia, 1950s-1960s — Decade of discovery, 1967-1977 — Into the corridors of power, 1977-1986 — Reckoning with women, 1984-1990s — Shaping the new millennium, 2000-2015.

Syndetics book coverAtua : sacred gods from Polynesia / Michael Gunn.The Polynesian concept of atua — of gods, figurative objects and associated beliefs — developed over thousands of years and spread throughout the region… Across central and eastern Polynesia, from the Cook, Austral, Society and Marquesas islands, the Tuamotu Archipelago, Tahiti, Rapa Nui, the Hawaiian Islands and Aotearoa New Zealand, unique, yet coherent, societies developed. With that a complex and sustaining spiritual world came into being… Among the atua were the deified spirits of human ancestors, particularly those famous for their invincibility, political strength or navigation skill. Polynesians created, revered and communicated with their atua in a relationship of profound intimacy. This way of life suffered a violent rupture with the arrival of Christianity in the 18th century…. ” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverA whakapapa of tradition : 100 years of Ngāti Porou carving, 1830-1930 / Ngarino Ellis ; with new photography by Natalie Robertson.
“From the emergence of the chapel and the wharenui in the nineteenth century to the rejuvenation of carving by Apirana Ngata in the 1920s, Maori carving went through a rapid evolution from 1830 to 1930. Focusing on thirty meeting houses, Ngarino Ellis tells the story of Ngati Porou carving and a profound transformation in Maori art. Beginning around 1830, three previously dominant art traditions – waka taua (war canoes), pataka (decorated storehouses) and whare rangatira (chief’s houses) – declined and were replaced by whare karakia (churches), whare whakairo (decorated meeting houses) and wharekai (dining halls)… Iwirakau is credited for reinvigorating the art of carving in the Waiapu region. The six major carvers of his school went on to create more than thirty important meeting houses and other structures. During this transformational period, carvers and patrons re-negotiated key concepts such as tikanga (tradition), tapu (sacredness) and mana (power, authority) – embedding them within the new architectural forms whilst preserving rituals surrounding the creation and use of buildings… This book is both a major study of Ngati Porou carving and an attempt to make sense of Maori art history. ” (Syndetics summary)

Te matau a Māui : fishhooks, fishing and fisheries in New Zealand / Chris Paulin with Mark Fenwick.
“”Te Matau a Maui discusses the form and function of the traditional Maori fishhook, customary fishing, and development of commercial fishing in New Zealand since European settlement (including the adoption of the rotating hook design as a re-discovery of the innovative and highly effective Maori hook design by present day commercial long-line fisheries), and changes in Maori lifestyle associated with the increasing availability of European agricultural cultivars and domestic animals in the nineteenth century, and urbanisation in the twentieth century that led to a decline in Maori fishing activity and the loss of indigenous knowledge”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Kōrero Nehe: Kete Taniko

Kia ora and welcome to our first kōrero nehe blog post here on he kōrero o te wā – a fortnightly feature where you can learn all about the history of objects and places around the Wellington region. This month our focus is on items which are part of the Taonga Māori collection at Te Papa.

I would like to introduce you to an item which is attributed to my own iwi, Ngati Porou. The item below is known as a kete taniko (a bag with fine embroidery or weaving in a geometric pattern). It is a rare example as it has a variety of geometric designs. It is made of dyed muka (flax fibre) and is dated at 1800–1900. The weaver is unknown.

ketetaniko
Image and information used with permission from Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

This kete taniko was acquired in 1907 from the high-ranking East Cape chief Matutaera (Tuta) Nihoniho (Ngäti Porou), along with a collection of other Māori taonga.

If you’re interested in checking out other items from Te Papa’s Taonga Māori collection, I suggest you check out this book from our catalogue:

Syndetics book coverIcons nga taonga : from the collections of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.